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Hoyas: May Hoya Blooms

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atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 1, 2011
5:58 PM

Post #8533185

It's been a while since there has been regular monthly hoya blooms posted. I'll try to kick things off for a new start this month. Just took this photo of my Hoya multiflora.

Please join in.

Allan

Thumbnail by atisch
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atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 1, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8533225

Hoya lacunosa var. pallidiflora, has proven to be a particularly good variety. Started from a cutting less about 9 months ago, it is now blooming regularly. The fragrance is truly heavenly--sort of a sweet and spicy gardenia.

My biggest personal Hoya blooming event is just a day or two away from it's peak. My Hoya australis var. tenuipes is approaching about 400 to 500 blooms open at the same time. There are about 250 to 300 open as I write this. I fear I'll have to move it out of the bedroom at night as the fragrance may just be too much of a good thing. Hope to post a few pictures in a couple of days.

Allan

Thumbnail by atisch
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GAgirl1066
Blackshear, GA

May 2, 2011
3:33 AM

Post #8533784

Vert nice Allen. I would love to see a picture of the australis.
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2011
2:03 PM

Post #8539719

Here's a first shot showing most (~2/3) of the flowers on my Hoya australis, ssp. tenuipes. The whole plant is less than 2 years old.

Thumbnail by atisch
Click the image for an enlarged view.

atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 4, 2011
2:04 PM

Post #8539722

Here's a closup:

Allan

Thumbnail by atisch
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GAgirl1066
Blackshear, GA

May 4, 2011
2:39 PM

Post #8539802

Gorgegous!!!
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2011
2:04 PM

Post #8546124

Here's (I think) a better photo of the main portion of my Hoya australis ssp. tenuipes that shows as many blooms as I could get in one shot. There's a few hundred flowers that can be seen. Perhaps it's worth noting that this is the rear side of the plant. Th great majority of the flowers face away from the light. Is this usual?

Allan

Thumbnail by atisch
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atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2011
2:08 PM

Post #8546133

Here is a partial zoom-in of the picture directly above that shows more flower detail.

Allan

This message was edited May 7, 2011 2:03 PM

Thumbnail by atisch
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atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2011
4:06 PM

Post #8546341

Lastly is an overview of the whole plant for perspective.

I've learned the hard way, that this plant needs more water as soon as the peduncles start forming buds. For almost a year peduncles would start forming buds but they would drop off almost every time. I tend to grow the plant in as much sunlight as possible at a southern exposed window, which may be contributing to it's need for even moisture while buds are forming. You can see, particularly on the partial close-up (one above), that there is evidence that the peduncles exposed had started to form buds many times before. This floral explosion started--and continued--as soon as I increased the watering to alway keep the soils moist. I had been erring on the dry side, but this Hoya wants more.

Allan

Thumbnail by atisch
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tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 7, 2011
4:35 PM

Post #8546375

In its native state H. australis ssp tenuipes has a hot very rainy summer and a dry very sunny winter.
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 7, 2011
6:55 PM

Post #8546647

Hello, Thanks for responding. I recall your posts on ssp. rupicola. Your information seems to be consistent with what I've observed about increased moisture for blooming. Your posts had convinced me to increase the light level, but I wasn't aware that the summers were that wet. Live and learn.

Allan
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 8, 2011
3:46 AM

Post #8547173

I also posted photos of H. australis ssp tenuipes on this thread:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1043919/

In the summer you can get hot sunny days too, but the humidity is always very high. A lot of tropical plants take very strong direct sunlight, provided humidity is very high. But if the humidity were to drop they'd burn to a crisp.

atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 8, 2011
12:22 PM

Post #8547859

Yes I remember that thread as well, including the relevant statements about natural summer conditions. I just initially misinterpreted how much more water is enough. I did increase the water this spring, but when the first buds started to dry up and drop I increased the water a second time to constantly moist, but careful to not allow any sitting water. The results now speaks for itself. I suspect, that in a way, it may bloom even better this year than it would if I had been proving proper moisture last year, as the plant seems to have a better store of nutrients to drive more flowering now. By the way the plant looks now, it may produce some flowers constantly through the next few months. We'll see.

The main thing I took away from your posts is that H. australis ssp. tenuipes (and others) can take much more light than the usual written conditions suggest. Higher light often results in more compact plants which I often find more attractive and require less space. You may recall I posted to that thread about my surprise that H. australis ssp. tenuipes could grow so compactly as to approach a bush habit. I used the only photo I had at that time to point out that I had just learned something similar with Hoya pachyclada. I now have one and I grow it even closer to the southern-exposed window that I'm growing tenuipes. It's now producing good peduncles and I hope to see it flower this season as well.

Thank you for you extremely interesting and informative posts on Hoyas--and a few other plants that I've seen you post on other forums. Please bring the Hoya forum up to date with what your doing now. For example how is your prepared outdoor area for H. australis ripicola working out. Do the plants you found with alternating leaves still grow this way? Perhaps you have posted this and I've just missed it.

Allan
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 13, 2011
8:26 PM

Post #8561649

Allan, I've had mixed results with the H. australis ssp rupicola. The plants have sent runners out which I anchored down. But there were no flowers this season. One peduncle formed but then we had a very heavy wet season. There was a lot of heavy rain and temperatures were down. Also had a cyclone, not severe though. The peduncle fell off before getting to flowering.

At present I'm wondering about the rock pile the Hoyas are in. There's a lot of spaces between the rocks so I'm not sure what that's doing to the roots of the plants. Also, these Hoya are from sandstone country but the rock pile is mostly other rock of unknown composition. Some is sandstone but I think some might be dolerite. So pH might be a little high. They are still settling in though so maybe I just need to wait. The wet season has ended now so they'll dry out a bit more.

The H. australis sp tenuipes had a set back last year when there was a problem with the automatic irrigation. They lost a lot of leaves. Although they've recovered they still seem a bit set back. Haven't checked the alternate leaves lately, a lot of them also fell off. But it was happening on only one of the branches of the plant, definitely strange.
Zig
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 14, 2011
2:44 PM

Post #8562742

Zig,

Sorry to hear that your "domestication" experiment hasn't yet succeeded. At least the plants seem to be surviving. It may be a good idea to get some of the rock tested for pH. If it's that alkaline, you might just test some powdered chips in distilled vinegar to see if any bubbles of CO2 are formed. I've found that many of my Hoyas, including my tenuipes, do better with some pulverized egg shell is added to the soil as our water is very soft and slightly acidic.

Hope the next year brings success as you have a great experiment going,

Allan

mjsponies

mjsponies
DeLand/Deleon Spring, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 18, 2011
6:17 AM

Post #8571137

Allan,
That's an interesting support you have around your Hoya. It looks like it is made from green garden fencing ?? Or is it something you purchased. All my Hoya's are in hanging baskets. But I've been toying with the idea of setting some up with something to climb on.

Here you can see some of them...also in the background to the right are more.

Thumbnail by mjsponies
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 19, 2011
5:59 PM

Post #8574632

I might finally be going to have a Hoya flower, possibly just within May. My H. pubicalyx which had been a regular flowerer but for some reason slackened off. A new cutting of H. lacunosa has been growing like crazy just lately and is starting to put out a peduncle. Most likely a June flower.

No sign of flowering from any of the others. But I did discover that a ficus root hung itself down and into the H. walliniana pot. So now the pot is totally choked out with ficus roots. I've just cut the root above the pot and what's left in it will become part of the growing mix. No wonder the walliniana was looking a bit stressed out.
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 23, 2011
11:58 PM

Post #8583578

mjsponies, Your Hoyas look like they're thriving! Love the variegated H. kerii in the foreground.

I've made something of a hobby out of home-grown trellises for potted vines. If space weren't such a problem, I'd grow many of my Hoyas in hanging pots. The trellis that my H. australis is growing on is nothing more than plant support hoop that I purchased from Home Depot a few years ago. These are comprised of a circular wire grid (~18") with three detachable supports that usually holds the ring parallel and a few feet off the ground. One support was used elsewhere, and the other two were affixed to make a very sturdy and inexpensive trellis for this Hoya as can still, sorta be seen on the last of the 3 pictures above. The tops of the vertical supports are anchored at about 2 O-clock and 10 O-clock on the hoop and angled inward to roughly 4:30 and 7:30 respectively, where they are secured with baling wire. This makes the trellis rigid and the bottom of the supports are be bent slightly to fit the sides of the pot.

Zig, I'd like to compare notes with you about H.pubicalyx. I think I recall your having posted pictures of your blooming pubicalyx before. Mine is my most mature Hoya, but it has yet to even make a single peduncle, let alone bloom. I can't quite figure out why under rather similar conditions (i.e cool and some sunlight) my H. australis is blooming like crazy.

Allan

mjsponies

mjsponies
DeLand/Deleon Spring, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 24, 2011
4:23 AM

Post #8583732

Allan,
Ahhhhh I see now ! ( little light bulb came on.) Once I read where the supports were typically used parallel to the ground.
I actually have one out in the storage shed, but I think it's too big to use this way. But ! it's given me some ideas, and I will be on the lookout for some smaller ones.
I've got 4 new hoya's that I got in a swap, and also purchased a H.imperialis var.Rauchii which I am think will do better if I let it climb.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2011
4:59 AM

Post #8583779

Glad to see posts on this and always enjoy the photos and experience shared.

I rarely have a Hoya bloom that I have an ID for but finally!

First bloom on the H. cumingiana. (hope that was spelled correctly) LOL

Thumbnail by podster
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 24, 2011
5:42 PM

Post #8585178

Allan, my father had a Hoya when I was a kid. Don't know what species (don't think he did either). From memory it looked more like one of the australis. Always thought they were intriguing, very artificial looking flowers.

A few years back saw one in a nursery, unlabelled other than "Hoya".so bought it and hung the pot in a dead tree and forgot about it. It began to climb over the tree. What was in the sun most of the day was always a bit yellowish, parts in the shade were greener. Year before last it started to flower and that's when I got it identified (on this forum) as H. pubicalyx.

It's getting quite high up the tree now and the leaves are now much bigger than they were for the first couple of years. But the flowering seems to have slowed down again. It seems as though it might have not liked our very heavy wet season. There were old peduncles from earlier flowering, which had flowered on multiple occasions, but these have mostly withered away during the wet season. The only one now is up really high and full of buds. It's going to be close, whether it's going to be a May or June bloom.

Posdter, I have a cumingiana which almost died. The roots rotted. I put it into gravel and it's come good again but still no flowerrs.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 24, 2011
5:52 PM

Post #8585193

As much wet as you had to endure, I am not surprised that your plants have suffered.

I don't consider this a pretty foliage plant so was glad to see it blooming.
It is a bit awkward and not at all what I think of when thinking of Hoyas.
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 24, 2011
9:30 PM

Post #8585631

mjsponies, I'm glad to hear my wandering description made sense. Congratulations on your new Hoya acquisitions! H. imperialis is a climber, and a big one. I've got one that's growing around a 4 ft. bamboo hoop. Training this plant takes quite a bit of effort but I really like the way the plant looks. H. imperialis is one Hoya that I think would do well on the kind of trellis like my H. australis is one, but probably a bigger one.

podster, Thanks for posting your H. cumingiana. Very nice photo! I had forgotten how nice the flowers are. Does it have any fragrance? I have one that's been growing slowly in a southern exposure, but hasn't bloomed yet. You're right though, H.cumingiana isn't a great-looking plant--out of bloom--kind of can't seem to make up it's mind about whether is a vine or a bush.

Zig, Thanks for describing the growing conditions of your H. pubicalyx. I'm getting the impression that it's not a bad idea to grow Hoyas in general in as much light they will tolerate. Now if I could only turn my house 90 degrees I'd be able to increase the light for many of my plants...lol.

I have been experimenting with growing some of the cooler-growing species outside here all year round. We dosn't get any hard freezes, but otherwise our climate is VERY cool. I was able to keep some of my carnosas and a pubicalyx in pots outside all winter. They didn't thrive but they survived in good shape. Our spring so far has also been unusually cool even for us--nights into the 40's even yet. Just the last week or so I've noticed that the plants that over-wintered are starting to wake-up. In general, the indoor plants of the same varieties have fared better, but I've much more room to grow outdoors, so this year I plan to increase my outdoor Hoya experiments.

Allan
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2011
5:09 AM

Post #8585936

Please continue to post your outdoor successes and failures. I had two huge H. carnosas that I had to leave out. They stayed on the porch (sheltered) and I would wrap them in blankets when we had cold temps. They survived well and provided lots of summer blooms.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 26, 2011
5:50 PM

Post #8589408

Atisch ~ I had to go sniff the H. cumingiana after you asked. I am not good at IDing smells but this one has a 'green' citrusy smell to me. I rather like it. Now, the next person will tell you it smells like something else and I'd probably agree with them too.

I have it in a hanging basket but really don't know how to display the plant. It is gangling.
atisch
Alameda, CA
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2011
4:06 PM

Post #8591361

podster,

Thanks for giving H. cumingiana a sniff. You're pretty-much in agreement with the only description of its fragrance I seen so far. Christina of myhoyas.com, who I believe is still a DG member, describes at on her site as:

"a citrus fragrance mixed with coconut."

My favorite of those I have smelled is H. laconosa, which to me smells like a mix of cloves, jasmine and gardenia. I often pick up a haunting whiff of it even in a different room. While I haven't smelled them in quite a while, H carnosa is another old favorite. I've also been enjoying the evening dose of my H australis, though we had to move it out of the bedroom during it's peak bloom as it high concentrations it can get somewhat overwhelming.

Allan

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2011
7:36 PM

Post #8591822

To me H. carnosa can be a bit overwhelming. I keep them on the front porch and in the evening the fragrance is even stronger. It strikes me when I walk out on the porch.

I am going to sniff for the coconut citrus now. lol

I haven't experienced the H. lacunosa. The one I had was an exotic angels plant. It had blooms with no fragrance. I found it was saturated when the yellowing leaves dropped. It seems plants that are overwatered have less fragrance so that should have been a clue.

I had an H. kentiana (or wayetti) bloom that reminded me of butterscotch and made my saliva glands drool when I sniffed that one.
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 31, 2011
4:52 AM

Post #8598648

The sun has finally set on May here but the H. pubicalyx managed to get it's blooms in for the month. There's two peduncles of flowers. One is fully open, the other still has some unopened buds.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 31, 2011
4:56 AM

Post #8598662

This is the fully opened one. They're up high in a tree so I had to perch up on a high ladder to get these photos.. It looks like nothing is going to flower lower down. The H lacunosa is going to be a June flower, probably within a week or two. None of the others are showing any signs of flowering any time soon. Well, tomorrow is the official first day of winter.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click the image for an enlarged view.

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 31, 2011
5:27 AM

Post #8598703

Pink blooms ~ how pretty. First day of winter doesn't sound so bad either at mid 90įs here and getting warmer.

There is another set of buds on the H. cumingiana but they will have to wait for June blooms...

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

May 31, 2011
10:10 PM

Post #8600631

First day of winter has come with a vengeance this morning. Minimum was 11.1C (52.0F). Yesterdays maximum was 30.3C (86.4F). Today is expected to be the same.

Looks like being a much colder winter than last years, or perhaps it's just come earlier. May (last month of Autumn) last year the mean minimum was 23.2C (73.8F). May this year mean minimum was 16.8C (62.2F). Mean maximums were closer, 32.8C (91.0F) and 31.4C (88.5F).

June last year was the coldest month of winter, but only for the first half. Hopefully this cold spell will only last to mid June again like last year

The Hoyas shouldn't have any problems. But 2 that were flowering right through last year aren't currently flowering - H. "Kapit Borneo" and H. densifolia.

The others, apart from pubicalyx, haven't shown any sign of wanting to flower. This will be their 2nd winter now.

H.lacunosa getting ready for the grand opening.

Thumbnail by tropicbreeze
Click the image for an enlarged view.

TXdoodlebug
San Antonio, TX

August 1, 2011
6:42 PM

Post #8730840

Hi all -

I'm fairly new to Hoyas but so far so good. I've bought 6 or 7 in the last couple of years and despite (some) neglect, I"m paying more attention to their needs now and have only lost one. I really want a Hoya Multiflora "Shooting Stars" just like the picture at the beginning of this thread. I've wanted one from the beginning. If someone could tell me where to buy a small one or a starter on Ebay or Amazon or some vendor, I'd appreciate it. I'm bidding on one now on Ebay but I doubt if I'll "win" it. My belief is someone is scamming and placing extremely high bids so you never win, especially if it's something unusual. I called and talked to Customer Support but after almost 30 min. the girl admitted they "hoped" people were basically honest! I had asked her if I bid $20 on something and at the last minute someone bids $100 - they win and only pay $20.50.

Sorry, didn't mean to sound off but I wondered what was happening & think I figured it out. So I'm not hopeful I'll get that plant and the vendors listed here are "sold out" or something. I really love the plant and would like to try my hand at it. Any ideas? Thanks
GAgirl1066
Blackshear, GA

August 1, 2011
8:08 PM

Post #8731077

TX,
Order one from Logees, that's were I got mine. It will be just one 8 in rooted cutting, but if you want it as bad as I did, go there. They are also very good in their customer service. Mine it about 18-20 inches now and has bloomed 3 times. I was amazed.

Thumbnail by GAgirl1066
Click the image for an enlarged view.

begoniacrazii
Northern California, CA
(Zone 9a)

August 1, 2011
8:13 PM

Post #8731087

Nice GAgirl! I bought mine in January from Rob's Violet Barn and it's in bud now! It was a tiny start in a 1.5" pot so they bloom pretty quickly.

Good luck Doodlebug, you should find one pretty easily.
TXdoodlebug
San Antonio, TX

August 2, 2011
9:44 AM

Post #8731979

GAgirl ~ Is that picture your plant? Is that the one you bought from Logees? It's beautiful.
Thanks Begonia~ I'm not familiar with Rob's Violet Barn but will check it out. I'll let you all know if I "won" the one on Ebay, but as I said, I doubt it. Thanks for your help.
GAgirl1066
Blackshear, GA

August 2, 2011
11:55 AM

Post #8732172

TX,
Yes it is. It was probably 8-10 in. when I bought it earlier in the spring. It has since bloomed 3 different times and if you look close enough you can see 3 more emerging. It is so happy where I have it, I am afraid to move it.

Thumbnail by GAgirl1066
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Anniesfollies
Carlsbad, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 19, 2011
6:45 PM

Post #8765538

Just found this thread today and what a great variety of pictures. So far I only have three, a very large Hoya carnosa, a small variegated Hoya kerrii, and a new small H compacta. But after seeing Atischís picture of the H multiflora I got so excited and just now bid and won one on eBay. It was cheaper than Logees, description says its bloom size, sellerís reviews were excellent, so hopefully it will be as nice as it looks. Canít wait to have it bloom and enjoy the flowers.

Have to say Iíve never fertilized my H carnosa and it has always bloomed and grown so well. But I probably should start, especially since the H kerrii is such a slow grower (may have something to do with inconsistent watering) and because Iíd like to see blooms on my new H multiflora and H compacta. And, Iím wondering if Hoyas prefer any specific type of soil. I typically use Miracle Grow or EB Stone Potting Soil. Any suggestions regarding fertilizer or soil would be appreciated.

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