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Forum: Article: Peaches: homegrown without the hazmat suit?Replies: 2, Views: 29
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Landstander
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8560405

University of Florida has developed a root stock that is resistant to many of the fungal issues in florida...I can not remember what the name of it is but I believe it starts with an "s" found it watching some of the videos on IFAS but have not had a chance to look back for the name. I do not believe it has been released yet but the one drawback is that it is less productive then the more commonly used nemaguard. The other thing is try planting flowers that attract beneficial bugs such as Tansy, Cosmos, Sunflowers, Coneflowers etc...Many of the bugs can be controlled by nature itself.
Landstander
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2011
11:44 AM

Post #8560476

The name of the rootstock is "Sharp"
http://vfd.ifas.ufl.edu/stonefruit/stonefruit_disease.shtml

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2011
12:10 PM

Post #8560533

Thank you for going further with the topic, and for the link.
Good video there- I especially liked the view of mature open center peaches as I have never seen one. They are really impressive. I did note that although they talked about brown rot, he specifically said that Sharpe is resistant to armillaria rot. You may be interested in this paper on Sharpe
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/horticulture/fruit_vegetable/peach/diseases/pdf/sharpe_hs.pdf
We may hear more about Sharpe. The paper says that its less vigorous growth might make it a candidate for 'dwarfing' peaches which sounds good for us backyarders.

And you have a good point about beneficials. Maybe I should have given that a mention as I specifically talked about backyard peach tree or two, which an owner could conceivably be interested in watching closely and handpicking for bad bugs. Garlic Chives, catnip, and the Umbellifers draw lots of wasps and tiny insects in my garden. Sometimes those other plants can attract the bad bugs as well and give you a chance to handpick further.

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Other Article: Peaches: homegrown without the hazmat suit? Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Am I missing something? catmad 2 May 13, 2011 7:39 AM
Great info, thanks! catmad 5 May 17, 2011 4:51 AM
SoCal Peaches quiltygirl 1 May 17, 2011 3:27 AM


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