Photo by Melody
Guess what time it is? It's time for the DG County Fair! Now in it's sixth year, enter your blue-ribbon photos or mouth-watering recipes for a chance to win a gift subscription! Click here here to get all the details, dates and entry rules.

Mid-Atlantic Gardening: question about Gladiolus

Communities > Forums > Mid-Atlantic Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Mid-Atlantic GardeningReplies: 5, Views: 26
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
rubyw
Crozet, VA

May 17, 2011
8:59 AM

Post #8569144

I asked this on the Glads forum but thought I would also ask any MAGardeners who might love this blooming beauty. How have you corrected Glads tendency to be top heavy and fall over? I haven't really addressed the issue in my gardens but since discussing the topic with someone else here, I thought I would ask.

Are there any inexpensive ways to stake them or does it have anything to do with the depth of how they are planted? Since I claim that Gladiolus/Gladiolas are my favorite flower, I thought I ought to get to know a little about this frustrating tendency they have.

Thanks all for any feedback.

Ruby

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 17, 2011
10:41 AM

Post #8569351

Ruby, the trick is plant them deep. We start with a furrow 8" deep. Lay the corms in the furrow & fill about half way. After they send out leaves, go back & fill level. Then when they are about 12 to 18 tall, hill them up. A lot simpler than staking.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/498789/

I thought this thread was a sticky, not.
Bernie

donnerville

donnerville
Damascus, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 17, 2011
10:51 AM

Post #8569369

Thank you, Bernie, for sharing the info. I too had the problem of Glads falling all over the place, and I finally stopped planting them. I love their pretty flowers. Will try again next year.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

May 17, 2011
11:45 AM

Post #8569467

I have glads that were already here when we bought the house, I'm not going to redig to plant deeper so I found that these willow arches(about 12-18") work great, blends in because garden is packed tight with all types of perennials
Trying to find a picture but I can't find one! Will post when I do
rubyw
Crozet, VA

May 17, 2011
1:44 PM

Post #8569666

Thanks so much Bernie. I will read the link you sent later. I had a suspicion that they were not buried deep enough. We are in the same boat as Jen is and have a chocked full bed of other perennials along side them. Hilling them is a great idea and would work if we can work around the other plants.

Thanks Jen for the willow arch idea too. Looking forward to seeing a picture of your flowers.

Ruby

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

May 17, 2011
5:48 PM

Post #8570217

Other people have mentioned when they are not dug up every fall, they will tend to get closer to the surface by themselves.
We have to dig & store them or they will freeze.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Mid-Atlantic Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Welcome to the Mid-Atlantic Gardening forum Terry 51 Jan 6, 2009 12:54 AM
Happy Hollow trip in MD who's in??? magoobu 48 Apr 26, 2007 12:41 PM
rocks??? nikki_conway 68 Jan 18, 2011 6:26 PM
Liriope - evergreen here? pennefeather 18 Aug 2, 2010 6:18 AM
Pineapple sage recipe to share. ladygardener1 18 Nov 5, 2010 4:03 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America