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blending kitchen scraps to puree and pouring into garden bed

Bozeman, MT

I have a compost pile. But I'm a newbie, and I built it in an inconvenient location and I'm having real trouble turning it. Eventually, I will sort it all out and get good at it. In the meantime, the kitchen scraps keep piling up.

Today I got tired of them, so I put them all in a blender with some coffee grounds, coffee drippings and water and blended to a puree.

Then I went out to one of my beds, dug a hole in a spot that was away from any plants, poured in the puree and covered it back up with soil.

Then, since I had more scraps, I did the same thing three more times.

Any thoughts? Have you heard of this before? Is this done?

Saint Paul, MN(Zone 4a)

I'd pour the slurry on the compost piles. I bet it accelerates the process.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

seran72 - I've done this with kichen scraps, when the weather is hot, without putting them in the blender! They break down very quickly. I wouldn't do this in the winter, or when the soil is cold because it might attract vermin.

North Ridgeville, OH(Zone 5b)

I have an old blender set aside for kitchen scraps. I save the slurry in a coffee can in the freezer. When it's full, I set it on my garage floor to thaw w/o any risk from hungry critters.

I use it to kickstart compost, but burying it works too.

Saylorsburg, PA(Zone 6a)

I have heard that rhubarb especially likes a good kitchen scraps slurry! I have also dug holes in the veggie garden and poured unblended scraps into the hole. It is amazing how fast they disappear.

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

I have an old blender I'm holding in reserve to do the very same thing. I read somewhere about blending the scraps and pouring the slush into the garden. Also, about hole composting. Just dig a deep enough hole and put in the unfinished scraps. If the hole is deep enough, the animals and rodents will not forage in your pile.

North Ridgeville, OH(Zone 5b)

Quote from Gymgirl :
I read somewhere about blending the scraps and pouring the slush into the garden. Also, about hole composting. Just dig a deep enough hole and put in the unfinished scraps. If the hole is deep enough, the animals and rodents will not forage in your pile.


Bingo. http://davesgarden.com/tools/tags/tag.php?tag=composting+in+place

Helena, MT

seran72, next time your in town come see my compost pile and I will give you some red wigglers to put into yours. I am located just across the York Road from Farm-in-the Del (3 mile marker). D-mail me when your comming and we can put on some deer burgers (Kansas Whitetail...not mules). Would enjoy taling with you about your garden experiences here in MT.

Bozeman, MT

Thanks, mraider! I would love that. I've been thinking I should get some worms to throw on my pile.

And thanks to PuddlePirate for the link, and to everyone for their encouraging comments.

Everett, WA(Zone 8a)

I like chinese cleavers or French chefs' knives, plus a sturdy chopping board.

"Whack whack whack" and things are diced.

No question that a slurry is the fastest way to turn scraps into humus, but 1/4" or 1/8" chunks ought to disapear pretty fast, too.

But I agree: only if the weather is warm, or the core of your pile is hot and damp.

Corey

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