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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 12)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 23, 2011
7:26 AM

Post #8581594

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1171840/

Tonight we're probably going to shoot for a pork loin with some asparagus and salad.

Over the weekend, we grilled out some burgers with a side of vegetable pasta salad, and then enjoyed homemade pizza piled with pepperoni and fresh vegetables.

What's everybody else enjoying now that the days are getting longer, and a little warmer for most of us?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 23, 2011
7:44 AM

Post #8581643

Tonight we'll have whole wheat pasta with a simple tomato sauce, broccoli, and some spring greens.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 23, 2011
9:53 AM

Post #8581927

Lettuces were thinned this morning along with endive, chard, beet greens and arugula. The French breakfast radishes look beautiful. Salad is on the menu for tonight. It's too hot for baked potatoes. I'll slice and skillet fry them, top with leftover beans, meat and cheese leftover from last night and crack a few eggs on top to make a hash. Pass the homemade Tabasco sauce please.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

May 23, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8582514

Had a great lunch - BLT - 12 grain toast, thick sliced jalapeno bacon, romaine, and black krum tomatoes. A deseeded jalapeno, a Mexican Onion, and 1/2 a huge dill pickle.

Thanks for the new thread.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 23, 2011
3:17 PM

Post #8582625

Okay, this is a test. Name those twelve grains. BTW, I think you mean Black Krim. What is a Mexican onion? A white?

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 23, 2011
4:38 PM

Post #8582738

The loin is finishing up. Asparagus coming up, plus I'll wash the Romaine and whip up a salad. In between, installed the dryer vent (two trips to town for slim-line extenders - new dryer, tight space, not fun.) All in a day's work.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 23, 2011
4:46 PM

Post #8582759

You should be sending us food. We'll remodel and install your appliances.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 23, 2011
7:11 PM

Post #8583132

I don't even want to talk about it. Let's just say that I grumbled all the way to and from town on the second trip. But it is now hooked up and my door has a whopping 1/4-inch of room to spare when I close it. Sheesh.

When my husband got home, he decided he we should try to put a few more sections of fence in place. I haven't looked in the mirror since I walked back in, but I'm pretty sure I've got blood dotted all over me where I slapped at the skeeters and hit a few. Dinner didn't happen until 8:20, so instead of asparagus and salad, we had an improv meal of pork loin sliced thin on some whole wheat tortillas with bbq sauce and some spicy chili beans; swimmer girl fixed and ate mac 'n cheese on the side. (Summer league practice starts next week..guess her body is wanting to start storing up the carbs.)

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 23, 2011
7:37 PM

Post #8583213

You're doing great for a new homeowner/swimmermom/remodelingwife. Keep up the good work! We've been eating like that for weeks. Got the hash done but the salad never happened here.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

May 24, 2011
5:42 AM

Post #8583847

OK, here goes on the 12-grain bread:
wheat, barley, oats, triticale, rye, amaranth, flaxseed, sunflower seed, corn, spels, &quinoa.

The Mexican onions are white green onions but with fairly large heads - 1 2" in diameter, and VERY mild.

And you are correct on the Tomato - of course.

Survived so far without an insect attack - until this week. Found and destroyed a colony of leaf-footed bugs, then went back and found an actual grey stink bug. - Tried to catch and crush it, but it flew off. Just read about the Asian variety that is wrecking havic on the east cost apple trees. Sure looked like the picture in the paper.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 24, 2011
9:14 AM

Post #8584262

Bubba, the bread sounds wonderful, especially with a fresh tomato. We were plagued with stink bugs last year and heard it was the same for the entire east coast. They would swarm from squash, okra, beans and more when the plants were watered. I've got all the susceptible plants under row covers and still have killed several strolling across the top of the covers. We were just agreeing to leave the row covers on until the squash starts showing female flowers.

Terry, I can empathize having discovered last evening my body had become a housing project for chiggers. On the DIY front, SO replaced my 25 y.o. KitchenAid dishwasher at Maypop with a two year old Whirlpool donated by friends undergoing a designer kitchen remodel. The KitchenAid was a basic model and the Whirlpool has all the bells and whistles. Well it's hardly every worked, has had four service calls and two new main boards replaced. The remaining extended warranty ran out. He took the KitchenAid to the dump.

This message was edited May 24, 2011 11:14 AM

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 24, 2011
5:05 PM

Post #8585088

Howdy! Thanks for the new thread Terry.

I am cooking for my Dad. I took him for eye surgery (out of town specialist) and got better insights into his eating situation. Wife isn't cooking much anymore and Dad has been eating cold cut sandwiches or canned chicken noodle soup mixed with canned mushroom soup. (And not a high end brand of soup either). Soooo... I got two whole chickens at the farmers Market Sun. One stewer & one roaster. I made a huge batch of real chicken noodle soup (with added mushrooms 'cause he loves 'em) and thick with veggies & meat. Tomorrow I'll make a big batch of coq au vin with extra veggies. If I have time I'm planning to make him some "goulash" (basically hamburger, tomato sauce & elbow macaroni w/a little cheese).

For me - finished up the beef & broccoli tonight.

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 24, 2011
6:11 PM

Post #8585246

My favorite sandwich ever--a fancy grilled cheese with multi-grain bread, cream cheese, alfalfa sprouts, red onion, sliced tomato, smoked mozzarella, thinly sliced cucumber and watercress. Mmmmmmmm. A nice big warm fat-fest, and so worth it.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 24, 2011
6:34 PM

Post #8585294

Oh yum, y'all.

We had a decided carb-filled dinner. Swimmer girl has a friend spending the night so I made spaghetti with garlic bread and salad. While the sauce was simering, I whipped up a batch of homemade chocolate chip cookie dough, which the girls pounced on after dinner. They baked up most of it and ate the rest of the dough straight out of the bowl. (Don't tell anyone...the eggs weren't pasteurized.)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 24, 2011
6:44 PM

Post #8585311

Celene, that sandwich does sound decadent. I want one.

The garden greens salad and radishes were made tonight along with feta, artichokes and olives. We had pasta carbonara for a carb fix. Off to the international market tomorrow.

Terry, don't know where you get the energy to bake with what you've got going on. I won't tell about the eggs but just paid a goodly sum for pasteurized when making a catered tirimisu. I used the leftovers for Passover and we joked about the eggs having pink "P" stamps for the holiday.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 25, 2011
3:57 AM

Post #8585863

What are pasteurized eggs, pray tell?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 25, 2011
4:52 AM

Post #8585911

Eggs that have been pasteurized so you don't have to worry about salmonella or other pathogens.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 25, 2011
5:36 AM

Post #8585964

So how do they pasteurize them without cooking the eggs?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 25, 2011
5:43 AM

Post #8585970

I know it's done with water baths, but the actual method is patented. It's not radiation or anything like that, well, heat is technically radiation, but you know what I mean. I've had them before, they look and taste like a regular egg.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 25, 2011
10:01 AM

Post #8586489

The temp needed to kill salmonella is relatively low and does not cook the egg. There is also a time factor involved. You can home pasteurize your eggs for three minutes at 145-160 degrees. The eggs are added after the temp is reached. You can verify my info with university food science info on line. In commercial production eggs are usually sent through tanks where they are immersed in a hot water bath. The rate of speed the conveyer belt moves is timed to correlate with the time needed to pasteurize. Water bath canned foods (like pickles, jams and tomatoes) are done the same way.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 25, 2011
10:02 AM

Post #8586493

That's interesting. Thanks for the info!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 25, 2011
10:17 AM

Post #8586522

Wecome, Mary.

We got home a short time ago with fresh mussels and shrimp. There's an asiago bread defrosting. Dinner will be cozze (mussels) en brodo, a salad topped with chilled shrimp and pan toasted asiago croutons. We been climbing into the nineties for days.
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

May 25, 2011
1:43 PM

Post #8586882

We have a bunch of leftovers, so tonight, we're having "Whatchagot Stew", and a green salad! :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 25, 2011
5:25 PM

Post #8587224

I had a veggie omlette. Still cooking food for my dad - made coq au vin tonight.
Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 25, 2011
6:43 PM

Post #8587399

You're a wonderful daughter, Tammy.

Our dinner plans keep getting waylaid. Youngest son dropped by unexpectedly. I whipped up an impromptu meal of leftovers. He left at 7 p.m.. We had not yet eaten. Like Nanu we had "watchagotstew" too with shrimp, tofu and mung bean thrown in.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 26, 2011
9:48 AM

Post #8588442

Tammy, if you need to cook for them very long, a food sealer will be your best friend. You can make meals like meatloaf, roasted chicken breast, lasagna, tuna casserole, baked salmon, etc. and seal them up and freeze them, so they're ready to eat. My mother can't cook anything, so I cooked for her and drove food out twice a week after my father passed away.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 26, 2011
10:28 AM

Post #8588520

Thanks Celene. I actually do have a food sealer. :-) I'm going to use a combination of ziplock containers and vacuum packed foods. He can make a few things himself. I showed him how to make zucchini pie last year and he had that every day for five months! So I'm hoping to find a few more recipes he will learn. (I've tried a few w/o such success).

Tonight I'll make goulash - or what we always called goulash. Ground beef w/homemade tomato sauce & whole wheat elbow macaroni. I'll add a little cheese too. I think this would work vacuum packed - I'll put it in the bags (open) & freeze before sealing. I see him Sat. (He lives 3hrs away so I can't drop them off too often. Maybe once a month.)

Tonight I am having salmon & roasted cauliflower for dinner.
Tam
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2011
1:06 PM

Post #8588872

Tammy, what's zucchini pie?

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 26, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8589362

The recipe is as follows:

4c diced or grated zucchini (summer squash - yellow is great too)
1c bisquick (I know - a mix but I just can't figure out how to make it taste as good with flour)
1/2c oil (I use less or none + 1 extra egg)
1/2c diced onions
1c cheese (cheddar e.g.)
3 lg eggs
Salt & pepper

Mix it all together and put in a 9" pie pan. Bake at 350degF til golden on top & cooked through.

Everyone I know who has tried this loves it.
Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 26, 2011
5:44 PM

Post #8589390

Tonight was tilapia filets with a breading of cajun spices and pecans, pan sauteed. Another saute pan of zucchini chunks, Vidalia onion and mushrooms sauteed, with a dash of white balsamic vinegar at the very end. My tastebuds still want carbs, but my intestinal tract is much better off without the wheat (or so I've found) and it was a good flavor combination.

Tomorrow morning starts with a 4-mile run which means we can have guilt-free pizza for dinner.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 26, 2011
8:22 PM

Post #8589801

I'll try it tomorrow. A friend gifted me two nice zucc's that I've been wondering what to do with. Perfect.

I'm going to go a little OT here with Terry's comment re: 'better off without wheat'. Recently saw a friend who has lost a bit of weight *after having a baby* and asked her what gives. She said baby girl was so fussy, crying all the time and just unhappy. Her regular doc said,...that's just the way it is, don't worry about it.

Steff went in one time and her regular dr was not available so she had to see another doc who told her to try getting off all yeast (she was breast feeding). Steff said it took about two weeks to reach nivana although gradually baby girl was getting happier and happier each day. And mom said she started feeling great too. Gets up at 4am, full of energy and runs all day like the energizer bunny.

Hubby's not so happy but can't really complain about the happy females in the house. Anyway, that's the story.

Signed:
Mc_I_Love_Pasta_and_Bread!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2011
3:17 AM

Post #8590139

MaryMcP, I wonder how the new doctor was able to pinpoint it so quickly, and what the old doctor said when he heard. I'll bet his excuse was that the baby had to grow out of it and would have gotten better anyway. So many doctors don't think about foods as potential problems!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 27, 2011
3:47 AM

Post #8590150

Tammy, if you want to try this with flour, I'd use 7/8 cup White Lily self-rising flour with 3 T. shortening (like crisco) cut in, or butter if you're using it immediately. I make fake "Bisquick" by using 6c. White Lily SR flour with 1 cup Smart Balance shortening. No other flour will work as well. I found that out in my experimentation with trying to make biscuits like I had in Georgia. Northern flour just makes lousy biscuits, pancakes, etc.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 27, 2011
4:06 AM

Post #8590162

gg, I think you nailed it with the statement that so many *traditional* health care practitioners simply don't make the connection between dietary causes for many of our ills. I don't think Steff bothered to try and educate the offending dr but I do believe she now goes to the 'new' dr. :-) And yes, I expect the former dr probably has the attitude that baby would have outgrown the issue. Sure. When she stopped breast feeding. But Steff just knew her baby should be happy, not cranky. Funny.

Sorry Terry. Back to what's for dinner. Last night was carry out Mexican food. Muy bueno!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 27, 2011
10:04 AM

Post #8590738

Thanks Celene. Quite coincidentally I found a recipe for "substitute" bisquick last night and it was similar to yours (though it didn't specify flour type) but it recommended lard. I added baking soda but it didn't occur to me that there was oil in it! I'll definitely try the butter when I try it w/flour. I've been cooking with whole grain flours - so don't even have a white flour to try! I did pick up something similar to bisquick in whole grain organic.

Not sure what I'm doing for dinner tonight. Perhaps pull something already made from the freezer...

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 27, 2011
10:42 AM

Post #8590810

I wonder if the zucchini/squash pie could be made without bisquik or a crust - kind of like a crustless quiche? That would make a nice side dish this summer when I'm at a loss for what to do with all those zukes...

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

May 27, 2011
12:06 PM

Post #8590951

A friend in France was trying to adapt a pastry recipe that called for Crisco, which isn't available there. She tried coconut oil and found that it worked just beautifully. Something to try...

Last night we had Italian sausages with garlic and asparagus over bowtie pasta. I added a little flour to thicken the sauce and dumped the pasta into the pale green Le Creuset braising pan that I used to sauté the sausage and asparagus. Nice presentation and really delicious.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 27, 2011
2:34 PM

Post #8591187

Terry, I have a recipe for low carb zucchini pizza crust, I'm sure that'd be similar and it is very tasty. I almost never use it as pizza crust, just as kind of a zucchini crostata, cut into wedges.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 27, 2011
3:26 PM

Post #8591288

Celene that sounds great - thanks!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 27, 2011
4:40 PM

Post #8591428

That zucchini pie sounds terrific. I think I'd like a Bisquick-less version too.

My attempt at mussels en brodo has been ill-fated. Due to extreme weather in Atlanta last evening we were without power until 4 a.m.. It was a poor nights sleep with lights flickering, the alarm periodically resetting and the electronics crying for help. The mussels are hanging in there like champs.

In response to the OT topic...I am a healthcare professional (R.N.) and see no rational science to the complaint vs. diagnosis vs. treatment plan. My specialty is high risk maternal/child care. I consider my training and philosophy wholistic and integrative. I have experience with mostly severely premature neonates and two of my three children were premature with the youngest weighing one pound. Infants are born with sensitive and immature systems. Premature infants have even less developed systems. They do usually outgrow symptoms of colic without special treatment or diets.

Yeast does not pass through breast milk let alone yeast in baked products, which is dead. There might be gluten sensitivities that are passed on (debatable). More commonly there are incidences where there is a lactose, casein, casienate, whey issue. It's usually simply a lactose problem but could be more complex and involve milk proteins. Lactose intolerance would be a more probable cause. Most commercial bread is baked with some form of dairy additives. The test would be if the mother can eat breads that are artisinal and baked without dairy, such as French baguettes, flour tortillas or some flat bread pita. I am privy to this information from personal as well as professional experience.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 27, 2011
6:10 PM

Post #8591621

BTW- the zucchini squash recipe I shared above has no crust. You mix it all together and just put it in the pie dish. Last summerI made every imaginable recipe with squash including the squash pizza crust. Was good! And squash pancakes. Nothing beat the squash pie though. I use coconut oil quite a bit these days.

Laurel - I assumed you were a professional chef!

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 27, 2011
8:53 PM

Post #8591947

Somewhere in the recesses of my mind I have a recipe for zucchini and cornbread cakes. They are thin and you stack them with a dollop of a sour cream mixture on top. I need to dig that one out again before zucchini season reaches its peak.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2011
6:23 AM

Post #8592389

Laurel, thanks for the correction, I don't like to pass on erroneous information. I've sent your comments to Steff, it may be that I got something wrong in the translation.

Terry, I'd like to see the zucc/cornbread cakes. Please post if you find it. I have Feta Zucc pancake recipe that is good with eithr sour cream or applesauce.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 28, 2011
7:49 AM

Post #8592485

I'm always on the hunt for good zucchini/summer squash recipes! Pls do find that one Terry. :-)

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 28, 2011
5:25 PM

Post #8593350

Hope you all are having a memorable Memorial Day.

I've done those cakes, Terry. They are great. I make zucchini fritters with green onions in season. Sour cream or yogurt on the side.

Tammy, I'm a professional cook in that people pay to eat food that I prepare. I'm not a professionally trained chef. Both my parents were food professionals. That is the basis of my training. The rest is from professionals in their circle and my experience. I maintain a current nursing license which requires that I both work and participate in continuing education. Cooking is what I love to do but being a nurse is who I am. I don't want to, or intend to, offer up online advice.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 30, 2011
5:31 AM

Post #8596206

Tammy, the zucc pie was really good. Made it last night. Will it freeze well?

I did not have any Bisquick but found some buttermilk biscuit mix and used that, omitted the oil but one more egg was not enough, it looked dry. I ended up adding 6 eggs. Didn't measure the zucc, just chopped up all I had so it may have been more than 4 cups. [other additions were garlic and jalapeno peppers]. Used the cast iron skillet with sloping sides, heated first.

Very yummy. Will be good cold with salsa.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 30, 2011
5:33 AM

Post #8596210

Ah ha! I dredged it up out of the murky recesses of my memory. Here you go: http://www.bhg.com/recipe/breads/bumper-crop-zucchini-pancakes/

I also wan/t need to tweak savory zucchini bread recipes until I hit the right balance of flavor and texture. There's gotta be a way to get it moist and light (mine comes out dry and light or moist and very heavy and dense.)

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 30, 2011
5:35 AM

Post #8596214

Oh, and today's menu will hopefully include ribs and barbequed chicken breasts. That assumes we don't cram so much into today that we leave time to fix dinner :-)
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 30, 2011
5:36 AM

Post #8596215

um Terry? There's no cornbread in that thar recipe. ;-)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

May 30, 2011
5:39 AM

Post #8596221

Garlic knockwurst (I'm having Boca), grilled cabbage slaw, and warm potato salad. Fruit for dessert.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


May 30, 2011
11:26 AM

Post #8597075

MaryMcP wrote:um Terry? There's no cornbreadin that thar recipe. ;-)


I know...I think when I made 'em a second or third time, I used cornmeal (maybe half and half with the flour); hence the recollection of cornbread in them :-)

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 30, 2011
11:30 AM

Post #8597081

I'll try it and report back! I did find some interesting zucc corn cakes though...using fresh shucked corn. I need more zucc's, none of my seeds germinated this year so I'm zucc-less in the garden.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 30, 2011
11:47 AM

Post #8597112

Mary - that sounds terrific! I have frozen it - not quite as good as fresh but better than not having it! I like all the additional ingredients - I've added red peppers. I love it with fresh tomatoes in the summer! (on the side, not mixed it)

Tam
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 30, 2011
12:26 PM

Post #8597187

Just had some for lunch. Cold with sour cream and salsa. Very good.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 30, 2011
4:07 PM

Post #8597662

We've been here at Maypop waiting to learn about my standby status for jury duty tomorrow at 8 a.m.. This would have entailed a mad dash back to the city. I'm off the hook. Eating late as usual, we will grill burgers and spicy sausages and enjoy relish and pickles canned last year. Made a pasta salad and have greens from the garden. We are regretting not doing a BBQ blow out yesterday.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

May 30, 2011
5:51 PM

Post #8597865

I just came home from a BBQ at friends. Knockwurst, big green salad & strawberries w/ice cream & whipped cream. Ahhh the tastes of summer.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2011
7:30 PM

Post #8600347

We had gumbo. Waay too hot for that though. I'm thinking tuna salad or something chilled for tomorrow. It's ridiculously frying for May/June.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2011
8:00 PM

Post #8600424

How odd - it's been unusually cool-ish here for May.

We had a cold soba noodle salad with bbq turkey breast and cranberry sauce, some good bread, red wine, choc chip cookie for dessert.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 1, 2011
3:29 AM

Post #8600733

It's hot here, too. We've had the a/c on for a couple of weeks because something in the air is making us both cough terribly! DH has had bronchitis AND pneumonia as a secondary infection! He asked for a cold salad the other night, too. I did fresh romaine from the garden with a hard-boiled egg and tuna, olives, leeks and tomatoes.

Last night we had some leftover pork roast and the last picking of asparagus from the garden.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2011
9:03 AM

Post #8601352

Cheewawa it's hot! We'll be brushing mid-nineties shortly. Maybe a pitcher of frozen margaritas and a pint each of Ben and Jerry's for dinner. We could make it dulce de leche to keep with the Mexican theme.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2011
1:21 PM

Post #8601906

On my way Laurel. Here's a new margarita recipe that someone gave me and we really like it, especailly so simple.

6 oz can frozen limeaid
1 bottle/can of beer
1 can (or more - I do one and a half) of tequila

Stir, drink, repeat.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 1, 2011
3:24 PM

Post #8602194

Ooo I like Laurel's dinner!

We hit a record high of 94degF today! Finally gave up and turned on the AC last night.

I made a curried shrimp w/pasta last night. Was very good. Tonight, probably left overs of some sort.

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 1, 2011
3:31 PM

Post #8602203

It's way too early to be this hot. I have no idea if or what I'm cooking tonight, but I'm sure not heating up the kitchen...whew!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8602274

It was 101 on the bank marquee in downtown Cleveland today. If it's that hot up here I can't imagine Atlanta. The dishwasher repair guy came calling to our woods. A really big and tall kind of guy, he came in the house red in the face and gasping for air. I thought I'd be doing CPR shortly. He survived the call but pronounced the dishwasher terminal and handed SO a bill for $65. SO then became a bit short of breath and grey. I ordered a new dishwasher. Perhaps this sounds impulsive but that dishwasher has not worked since last summer.

We are having a cold salad with multiple cheeses, eggs, leftover pasta salad and pickled things. There are two leftover burgers to eat cold on thin sliced rosemary bread.

Yes it is way to early for this kind of heat. Tomatoes cannot set fruit at these temperatures. We don't usually need to turn on AC here in the mountains until the end of June. Maybe a random day here and there but I caved in this afternoon. I was in the garden at 6:15. It was too hot to work by 9.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 1, 2011
4:13 PM

Post #8602294

I opened the backdoor at 5:15 to let the dog out and it was already warm. Went up to the bonus room a few minutes later (had to wait on coffee) and it was 84 in there. I usually don't crank on the A/C up here until noontime.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2011
4:40 PM

Post #8602390

I wait on coffee too. For forty years and a bit now SO brings me coffee in bed every morning. Two cups. :) It was a barter based on a promise to tone down the early morning energy. No more singing "Good Morning Sunshine", no more discussing the dinner menu and guests at 5 a.m., no more explanations of sketches for remodeling, gardens or art projects. It's not been easy but I've learned the meaning of compromise.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 1, 2011
5:21 PM

Post #8602531

Taco salad with tvp, beans, cilantro, queso fresco, and lots of fresh veggies, homemade chipotle ranch dressing.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 1, 2011
5:22 PM

Post #8602537

That's so funny, Laurel! Sounds like you're a lark married to an owl.

It's been very hot here, too. We are supposed to get a little relief tomorrow, but it's still hard to spend a lot of time outdoors much past about 9:30 in the morning.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8602555

Jeez, you guys sound like us! Just heard a tornado has mangled part of Massachusetts. Wild weather.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 1, 2011
8:51 PM

Post #8603062

Well, as this post suggests, I obviously burn the candle at both ends. But I tend to be quiet both lying down and rising. However, once I get a sufficient volume of caffeine coursing through my veins, all bets are off.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 2, 2011
12:21 AM

Post #8603245

Well, caffeine *is* a food group for me.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 2, 2011
6:03 AM

Post #8603530

Coffee is a health food now! All those antioxidants. :-)

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 2, 2011
6:10 AM

Post #8603544

Celene wrote:Well, caffeine *is* a food group for me.


IMHO, chocolate (and caffeine) should be at the bottom of the food pyramid with a recommended 7 servings daily :-)

NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2011
6:43 AM

Post #8603605

I'm with you, Terry!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2011
9:10 AM

Post #8603855

The new dishwasher came this morning. I wonder what kind of dirty dishes it would like in it tonight? SO is busy installing and I'm having a pretty lazy day.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 2, 2011
9:52 AM

Post #8603929

Just finished grilled eggplant, peppers, onions, mushrooms and zucchini with garlic, lemon, and thyme, kibbee, quinoa pilaf with saffron, and some yogurt sauce and whole grain pita.
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

June 2, 2011
1:25 PM

Post #8604316

Greek Festival is this weekend, it started today. Very little cooking will be going on at our house, since they're doing spit-roasted lamb, Grecian chicken, fassoulakia yahni (braised green beans), tiropita, spanakopita, pork and chicken souvlaki, moussaka, pastitsio, not to mention the desserts! Four days of heaven, plus the entertainment! BOO-YAH! That's usually enough time to try everything that I like. :-) It's nice to have that stuff twice a year and not have to cook it myself!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 2, 2011
5:56 PM

Post #8604965

Be Still My Heart!

Too bad it's across the state from me...
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2011
6:24 PM

Post #8605009

I must wait until September for our festival due to gas prices. Otherwise I'd be on my way to VA. Share photos if you can. I need to let DD know about this. She is in D.C..

Celene, I am not off feed but am definitely off stove. You're killin' me.

The new dishwasher got installed and, as all the plastic packing was being peeled off, a damaged door edge was noticed. Couldn't tell until we started to peel away the packing tape. DRAT! There's no problem with replacement but it will probably be next week.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 2, 2011
6:42 PM

Post #8605054

What a BITE, Laurel! I hate to do something twice, unless it's pleasurable!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2011
7:32 PM

Post #8605186

Thanks for the sympathy, Darius. I'm feeling so guilty. SO spent several hours installing it and now he has to pull it for the pick up. He even added new lines and cut offs that were not previously there. He crawled around in the dank crawl space to pull lines. He went out to buy parts. The kitchen was so askew I didn't organize anything for dinner. I owe, I know. He made himself a sandwich and I had leftover salad. That is rare here.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 2, 2011
7:45 PM

Post #8605234

Taco salad, pulled together at the last minute before swim practice. Lasagna tomorrow night.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 3, 2011
3:58 AM

Post #8605586

Laurel, what a mess about your dishwasher! All that work to be done over again. Your poor SO!

I made red beans and rice with kielbasa last night. It was from a Zatarain package but I added kidney beans, rice, chopped green peppers and celery along with the kielbasa. It's been too hot and I haven't felt like cooking much! Last night it went down to 48, though; it felt great!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 3, 2011
7:28 AM

Post #8605976

Back to Hotlanta today where the dishwasher works but the ice machine died last week. Reminds me of that saying, "If it wasn't for my bad luck...".We'll be toting ice from here to there. Can someone explain why an ice maker installed in a miniature freezer costs as much as a large refrigerator/freezer with a fancy ice maker on the door? New dishwasher better get here fast. We're weeks away from hosting a RU.

Tonight will be taco salad with white bean chili from the freezer. Or maybe takeout. I'm suffering from post traumatic kitchen stress syndrome and start to seize up just walking through the space.:>)
Laurel
NanuBunny
Poquoson, VA
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2011
6:47 AM

Post #8607965

Here's some info on the Greek Festival, complete with menus! http://www.newportnewsgreekfestival.org/ We didn't go yesterday, because DH was not feeling well. We'll see about today. The weather is much cooler, so it'll be crowded, but it'll also be much more pleasant to stand in line. If we do, I'll take some photos!

Laurel, I sure hope you soon win the "Appliance Wars"!

Love to all,

Bonnie
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 4, 2011
5:22 PM

Post #8609020

Bonnie, hope DH is feeling better and you've made your way to the festival. Send a report. I'm looking forward to ours later this year. "Appliance Wars" is a good term. I don't want to end up being that person with the door to the dishwasher bungie corded or one working burner on the range. I intentionally have post modern double ovens, an old but very loved JennAir stove top and an Amana Radarange that I loved so much I customized a build in when we re-did our kitchen. I made up for the cost of appliance modernization with a 48" Subzero, a KitchenAid Architect series dishwasher and a Viking outdoor kitchen.

We are getting around to the taco salad tonight. We were so bad last night. Popeye's fried chicken and the works. It was a weak moment. Woke up in the middle of the night wondering what killer party I'd been to. Read for several hours after. Dang, the fun is out of fast food.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 4, 2011
8:28 PM

Post #8609505

We call those meals "gut busters" - I had two Sonic burgers in one day this week due to extremely tight scheduling. Hopefully I will never cause my GI tract to endure that again...some things you just get too old for.

I second the wish for a happy outcome to the appliance wars.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2011
6:49 AM

Post #8610123

LOL on the gut busters! I actually succumbed and had not one, but two chili dogs earlier in the week. I paid dearly for it later. I hadn't eaten a hot dog in years, and hopefully won't again unless I make my own.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2011
4:01 PM

Post #8611196

I have only had one Sonic burger in my life. Need I say more? When Five Guys burgers opened in the neighborhood, a few years ago, I tested a single, wimpy (by their standards) burger and fries. I loved it and thought we'd be back, albeit infrequently. We haven't. "Gut busters" is so apropos.

SO smoked an eleven pound, near date, Smithfield "Manager's Special" ham today. Incredible $9 find. It had been hanging out in our freezer for several months. I have some cream to use up and am planning a sauce with fresh tomatoes, cream and basil from the garden. SO has offered to make a salad. Our salads are half arugula at this point because the harvest is huge.

I had a creative day of sorts. We are growing a larger than life, living scarecrow at Maypop. We had a giant satellite dish at one time and now have the big steel post in the rear of the garden that used to hold the dish. We made a skirt of green garden wire around the post. It is being quickly engulfed with Grandpa Ott's morning glories. Now that the live part of the experiment is shaping up I needed to figure out a head. A beach ball, some left over fabric scraps and lips created from two '80's shoulder pads have been recycled. I found some leftover yellow dye from an old costuming project so she will have blonde braids. The ties in her "hair" are temporary. They'll be replaced by big ribbon bows. I'm going to name her Clytemnestra because...well, I'm not sure why but maybe because Clytemnestra was such a supposed beauty and my dad loved history and referred to her often. I'll call her Cly.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2011
4:07 PM

Post #8611208

Fun!

I'm cooking, but not supper. I'm finally making some Trotter Gear to use in other recipes. Also thawing 5-6 pounds of chicken backs to make some stock tomorrow. I figure if I have to can in this heat, might as well do a whole bunch. (We capitulated and turned on the AC, finally.)
http://blog.belm.com/2010/02/12/trotter-gear/
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 5, 2011
4:13 PM

Post #8611221

Love the lips Laurel! Darius, I'd have trouble getting past the part where they look like feet...cannot believe we ate chicken feet when I was a kid and I loved them!

I've just put together some potato/rosemary/garlic bread dough, it's rising. I need to finish off leftover bbq turkey breast from last week, not sure what I'll do with it. When I'm hungry, I'll get inspired.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2011
4:29 PM

Post #8611260

I too grew up eating chicken feet. Chinese versions. I've never prepared them though.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 5, 2011
4:30 PM

Post #8611264

I've made stock with them. Makes a really gelatinous stock, but they are sticky to handle after cooking.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2011
4:43 PM

Post #8611286

Stock is great but the feet are over the moon if you've got a method. I always have them at dim sum. It grosses out friends when I am gnawing on chicken feet. No one eats gizzards, livers, necks, combs, etc anymore.
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

June 5, 2011
6:49 PM

Post #8611595

My dearly departed DH used to speak of his chicken feet diet days, along with a whole host of other life requirements that had him feeling they were trailer trash. There wasn't much money for food, as his Dad kept pulling the plug out of the jug and that is where the money went. I have never tried them, but did SEE them in an Asian buffet in Indiana a few years ago.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2011
7:13 PM

Post #8611668

I'm so sorry for your loss, Wannadanc. As for the status of chicken feet, I was brought up thinking they were a gourmet food. Any drunk can through a steak on the grill but how many of us, drunk or sober, know how to prepare chicken feet? I last had them several years ago in San Fransisco though they are always available at our international market.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 6, 2011
3:51 AM

Post #8612081

I know you're supposed to leave them in, especially when you're making stock or poule au pot, but dang, I know where those things have been and how they usually look and it's just not very appetizing for me!
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 6, 2011
4:43 AM

Post #8612139

103 here yesterday! we had ice cold watermelon for supper!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 6, 2011
4:47 AM

Post #8612144

I worked a hot artisan market all day yesterday, so we ate out. Ale-washed onion strings, and a veggie pita with fries.

Today, making oven fried chicken, five bean salad, and scalloped potatoes and cauliflower. I have green salad with lemon-basil dressing already made, and I cut up a watermelon.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 6, 2011
5:33 AM

Post #8612209

yesterday was a quick lunch of leftovers before tackling the house; a quick dinner at a Mimi's Cafe - I had a cup of tomato and basil soup. I really need to get a menu and shopping list pulled together today.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 6, 2011
7:09 AM

Post #8612422

Finally discovered why I have had so many tomatoes on the plants this year - even in this heat.

There is a colony of honey bees in an electric box.

I have notified the local beekeepers and someone will be out to rescue them.

Sure did not want the power company destroying them.

Houston officially hit 105 yesterday - Galveston broke an 1887 record with 99.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 6, 2011
7:21 AM

Post #8612440

Wowsa...that's hot. We'll stay in the mid-90s all week from the looks of things. I think my menu will be biased towards cold salads and grilled meat and veggies :-)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 6, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8613594

We are having Yankee fish cakes with salsa fresca, a variety of pickles, cheeses and salads.

Bubba, we had bees in the side our chimney at Maypop for years. The colony was so large they would swarm many times a year. Sometimes they would swarm down the chimney and we'd come to Maypop and find the living room coated in thousands of dead bees. Lots of vacuuming. Other times they would swarm when we were there and we'd stand outside and watch the sky turn black over the garden (the chimney faces in that direction). We could hear when a swarm was beginning. The whole house start to hum. Once there was a swarm and we were in the house. They started coming down the chimney by the thousands so we went to the bedroom and closed the door. Then they started coming out the light sockets. It was like an Alfred Hitchcock movie! BTW, you do know tomatoes are generally self-pollinating?

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 6, 2011
4:50 PM

Post #8613762

Okay, I got ambitious before I left to get swimmer girl across town.

Baked chicken, spinach and strawberry salad with a poppy seed dressing; fresh corn on the cob await my menfolk.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 6, 2011
4:52 PM

Post #8613768

Every work day, I leave my husband's dinner in the refrigerator for him. Today, after 18 years, he couldn't find it. lol The refrigerator isn't messy, it was obvious. lol Okaaaay
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 6, 2011
4:56 PM

Post #8613791

I worked evenings for years and cooked for the family before leaving for work. Think I'd pout if the family couldn't find the food. Are you sure he wasn't off at Sonic or Five Guys? Don't think you have Popeye's in Ohio.

Terry, we need an online party when she starts driving herself to practices. Isn't she there yet?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 6, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8613796

He ate snack food that was at the house. We do have a Popeye's about a mile from here, but he's not a big fan. Rally's, and whoever has the Baconator, he likes.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 6, 2011
5:06 PM

Post #8613814

I heart 5Guys. They are da bomb. I let myself have one about 2-3 times a year.

She will be eligible to get her license in September. Whether we feel she's ready to shuttle herself up and down busy I-24 after school and then home after dark...we'll cross that bridge when we come to it.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 6, 2011
5:09 PM

Post #8613825

He too knows how to live on the edge. I've momentarily given it up. Bet you left something delicious and healthy.

On the Appliance War front, it's a truce. Don't ever get a Subzero for its ice making capabilities. The 48" super model makes eight cubes every two hours. We thought there was a technical problem when he hooked up this never used ice maker. There were hardly any cubes the next morning. Then SO went on line and found it makes eight cubes and then takes a two hour nap! This will not do at all. He then bought materials to hook up the ice maker in the new fridge downstairs. I'm not in favor of spending $1,000 replacing the ice machine right now though I miss it a lot.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 6, 2011
5:12 PM

Post #8613832

Terry, I'm seriously overdue for the Guys. As for DD, you will probably balk at the bridge and then make a dash over it. Not to fret.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 6, 2011
7:29 PM

Post #8614141

I prefer Sonic with double meat and all the fixings and a heap of jalapenos , mayo and catsup. I would kill for an old fashioned chocolate soda .
I've been using my air conditioner for a good month . If it gets over 82°, it's hot .I even put a swamp cooler on the front porch for my beasties .
We had veggie plate with cornbread tonight .The oven doesn't heat up the kitchen.This time of year most meals are one dish , because I'm lazy . Tuna and whole wheat pasta salad tomorrow .Coffee will start at 6:30 am and end when I set my glass up to go to bed in the pm .
I'll be trying that frozen margarita recipe .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 6, 2011
7:38 PM

Post #8614168

I think it's hard for a vegetarian to appreciate Sonic. I tried it twice, because I have a soft spot in my heart for deep fried junk food, but their fries, cheese sticks, and onion rings were pretty ho-hum. Maybe burgers would be better.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 6, 2011
7:45 PM

Post #8614185

Their burgers are typical fast-food fare - but occasionally they provide sustenance when I can't get home and eat.

I mostly like their fountain drinks, and I like their free wi-fi. It tends to come in handy when I'm waiting on the girl to finish up a swim practice. Like tonight. When I posted earlier, I was chugging a diet cherry limemade and taking advantage of their internet access :-)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 6, 2011
8:04 PM

Post #8614229

I don't usually have anything except the burger. I carry my coffee 24/7 . A juicy burger is one of my favorite sandwiches , unhealthy as it is . I do love the flavor and got hooked on them when I was a little kid . I eat a burger maybe once a month but could have one every day and not get tired of them .I tried Five guys , but for my taste , they are too dry ,and the bun wasn't grilled .
You can look at me and see I could improve my eating habits , and healthier food .
Laurel is my hero for cooking but Darius and so many more of you could come and live at my house anytime . Lol

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 6, 2011
11:19 PM

Post #8614524

Eating healthier kinda ruined my favorite greasy junk foods for me. I adjusted to lower fat, and now my favorite pizza and Chef Keith's cheese fries with fresh cut fries topped with fresh diced jalapenos, tomatoes, diced green onions, and homemade buttermilk dressing, they're all too greasy. Not as good as they used to be.

I could have many of the cooks here visit me, too.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2011
4:53 AM

Post #8614806

Y'all need to home-render some lard from pastured pigs (or tallow from grass-fed beef) and make fries with it. No comparisons!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
5:30 AM

Post #8614885

Oh , Darius , if we could still get Brooks spicy catsup , I'd be in hog heaven.
Celene , I've copied several recipes you've posted . I love to eat , just don't care for cooking any longer . It burns me up to put out a really great meal , give everyone a ten minute notice ,and everyone just sit there and keep talking when I say it's ready . Then it's over in ten minutes .Three hours work , ten minutes to eat , and an hour for cleanup . I also don't like dishwashers, and wash up dishes as I cook , so four hours work . For what ? No thanks , I'd rather pay and be served . Anymore , food is something to satisfy a hunger and except for some favorite dishes , anything is ok . Like I said , you can look at me and see I like to eat . Lol
I would like to make some of my own cheeses , but I love cheese and would eat it . I have always had a sweet tooth . Don't make the pies and treats much because I can set a pecan pie on the counter , leave a fork near and get a bite each time I pass it . Doesn't take long for it to disappear . I do stay away from some things . Makes me think I'm doing good .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 7, 2011
5:37 AM

Post #8614898

Darius, it's oven fries for us now ;)

I don't generally put that many hours into a meal, unless it's a special occasion. I'm a lazy cook, lol. Planned leftovers and fairly simple dishes save my life.

I wouldn't put up with making a nice dinner and being ignored, either. When I first got married, I had a few moments where DH would be watching TV or playing video games with my niece, and they'd let dinner get cold fooling around with finishing a level or watching the end of a show. I told them if they did it again, I'd give their dinner away, and it took exactly once of carrying a lasagna next door to cure that problem. Butbutbutbut...what will WE eat? Beats the heck out of me, I had lasagna with the neighbors. When it was ready. When I called you. Glad you finished your level, though. Zero recidivism after 15 years.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
5:41 AM

Post #8614906

I love it , you are definitely my kind of people . I just cut out the cooking of big long meals .I like your solution better , wish I'd done that .

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 7, 2011
5:49 AM

Post #8614920

Fortunately I have a family that loves to eat my cooking, whether plain or fancy. The only time I have to beg them to come eat is if they are busy outside working.

And they will help clean up if I ask. (Otherwise they bolt from the table like horses out of the gate as soon as mealtime is over.)

I have no idea how I'll cook once it's an empty nest (IF it's ever an empty nest...) since I tend to cook for 4 or 5, and assume a few of them will be hearty eaters.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2011
5:51 AM

Post #8614925

Celene, I love that! Amazing that the lesson was learned so thoroughly!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2011
5:52 AM

Post #8614929

Terry, when my kids left home I ended up with lots of two-mealers, which was just fine with me. Worse comes to worse some gets frozen for another time.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2011
6:15 AM

Post #8614970

"Zero recidivism"... Love it!!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
7:04 AM

Post #8615077

I had rather clean and cook without anyone in the kitchen . They just get in my way . Just sit at the bar and keep me company if you insist .
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 7, 2011
7:12 AM

Post #8615088

Digger,
Next time you're passing through we will fix you a GREAT juicy burger - lol. All the jalapenos you want - regular, special, smoked or fresh.

I knew with a little wind that the toms would self pollinate.

As for Five Guys - they just opened a place a mile from the house, so DW and I thought we would try the competition - signs all ofer the inside touting their magnificent Angus beef - asked if we could get ours rare - - reply was "Only well done." - we left. If they are so proud of their product why are they so afraid of it??? Maybe their cooks, or how they store it?

Finally - rain!! not much but after so many weeks with nothing, even the small hail was welcomed.

Desktop computer sorta died - trying to rebuild it - !@#$%^&. Did I say frustrating? Only wants to run in safe mode and not well at that. Fortunately I have some friends that are near experts helping, so we will get it back together soon.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 7, 2011
7:25 AM

Post #8615110

Bubba, I've been buying ground grass-fed Red Devon beef; makes decent burgers, but I'm thinking to grind my own maybe this fall if I can swing a beef quarter (and IF I have freezer space). I love a good rare burger!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
7:51 AM

Post #8615181

Bubba, you Know I like mine rare . See ya sometime in middle Aug . Keep the buffalo cool because that's what I want .
And anyone else passing through Houston , if you like burgers , stop and have a real treat . Beef is delish , buffalo is top of the line Don't think he serves beef .
Here is our chef, doing his Sunday thing . You have to come on Sun to get his cooking . We were there three hours and the line was out the door. He finally took a break and visited us on the porch for three minutes .
When we travel back and forth to Tex , we have to go through on Sunday to get our Buffalo Bubba fix .The only thing I ask for is rare , the rest , I leave up to him cuz you don't tell a chef how or what to serve .

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
7:58 AM

Post #8615205

Here is another devotee of the best burger in the whole state . Gym Girl ,
If you want atmosphere , come fight for a table .

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
8:10 AM

Post #8615241

And another, Gilraen , you find her on container garden forum . She enjoyed her meal with us on the porch .
One of the sweetest people I've met at Bubbas . I have pictures of more but not on my digital camera .
Get a bunch of us Texakans together and we know how to eat buffalo burgers . Last spring , one adventuresome young man had Six , yes , Six patties on his, and ate every bite .

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 7, 2011
9:25 AM

Post #8615401

Bubba, you and I may have had this conversation before..but you did a stint in Tulsa, too yes? If that memory is correct, do you remember a greasy joint somewhere around 11th St. that served a burger that was half-sausage and half beef? Oh my goodness, the grease literally hung in the air in that place, and I was NOT surprised when it burned down, but their plate-size burgers were to die for. Literally and figuratively - they were probably the unhealthiest burger I've ever enjoyed.

I saw on the news that some states (maybe NC?) have passed laws regarding burgers: must be well-done. Crazy but true.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
9:31 AM

Post #8615409

To show I do eat healthy once in awhile , I'm enjoying cold , out of the fridg , green beans for brunch , lightly seasoned with a piece of bacon cooked in last night .Nothing else . Ha , so there .
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 7, 2011
9:42 AM

Post #8615420

Digger, You are the best - thanks for sharing the pix.

Terry, there was a Lotta Burger near that location. You really needed a bath or shower after eating one of their's, and you NEVER would dare to eat one IN THE CAR - all door handles would be well lubed as well as steering wheel and gear shift..

My uncle's place Hap Parker's Coney Corner was on Admiral. Helped there beginning when I was 14 - used to get up VERY early to make a several hundred coneys while he made nearly as many hamburgers for church groups on Sunday mornings - not every Sunday, but often in the summer.

He had another (Coney Corner #2) just 1/2 block east of Central High that was open ONLY for lunch - 10:30 - 2. I used to help keep the tables, etc. bussed during my lunch break when I attended Central.

Houston wants all beef burgers to be 140 degrees, but we will do whatever the customer wants. I learned a trick years ago - how to tell it was ready - when the juices suddenly change form red to clear - grab it! Cooked, but very juicy. For Digger, DW and me, we dont go that far - ours are even jucier - LOL.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 7, 2011
9:46 AM

Post #8615432

That Lotta Burger was more of a loose meat burger, now that I remember it - made it even messier than any other, and the bun must have been 6" across with at least half a pound of meat alone - fully dressed it was HUGE.

Tulsa is the only city I know of where "grilled in onions" is the norm. There were plenty in the Lotta Burger.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 7, 2011
10:03 AM

Post #8615460

My husband likes the occasional rare burger, so I buy a nice grass-fed piece and grind it myself. I figure if he's going to splurge, might as well do it right. If I grind it, I'm less worried about E. coli and other ugly bugs.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
10:10 AM

Post #8615471

I just think that if our government inspects it and they know what's best for not only for us but what is taught to our kids in school ,( tongue in cheek ) , then if it makes it to the kitchen , it's ready to eat and as long as it is warm , it's safe .I f someone in our government wants the meat at 140°, they are either communist or like their meat cooked dry and burned or both . But I forget , they want what's best for me and my kids .
Actually , my keen switch was the best teacher my son ever had . And Mother will tell you the same thing about her switch .LOL
Any time we had a steak , the first bites my son and I took was before the meat ever got to the stove . Now that's tender .
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
10:15 AM

Post #8615480

Right on Celene . I process all my wild game and don't let anyone else do anything but get the hair off .It's kept in ice and processed five to ten # at a time after ageing twenty days at 34°.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 7, 2011
11:05 AM

Post #8615594

I'm on the fence about having meat safety be a government regulation. Given the choice between FDA veterinarians or the kid at Rally, I'd pick a veterinarian. I've traveled places where regulations of this nature were nonexistent, and people become ill and even die, with a regularity that would be unacceptable to us. It's not as simple as we'd like to think, I have experience on both sides of the coin.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
12:23 PM

Post #8615763

Celene , did I turn a page and miss something ? Who is the kid at Rally ?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 7, 2011
12:54 PM

Post #8615825

Sorry, I wasn't very clear. *blush* Someone preparing hamburgers at a fast food restaurant. Microbiology and food animal courses, as well as some travel, changed my perspective on some things.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
1:20 PM

Post #8615864

We are having country style ribs (shoulder ribs). Found a package at Costco that was cut from a much leaner than usual section. The ribs are hanging out with a homemade chili rub. Going to recycle leftover potatoes into croquettes with green onions and pop a jar of green beans canned last summer. We need to use those beans up because we still have lots and beans should be coming in shortly.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 7, 2011
1:49 PM

Post #8615928

Grilled chicken that has been marinating in a chipotle chili pepper marinade all day, grilled sweet corn, deviled eggs, cantaloupe and watermelon.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 7, 2011
2:26 PM

Post #8615995

Oooh, that sounds good. (I'm a sucker for deviled eggs and the rest sounds delish too.

Since we had a swim meet today, no practice tonight. I'm grilling pork chops with a dijon glaze of some sort, and whipping up some homemade creamed corn and a broccoli and brown rice casserole. I made monster cookies early this morning, so they are for dessert for anyone who can handle the carbs. (I *might* have had one or two already...)

lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 7, 2011
2:39 PM

Post #8616017

that sounds yummy too. i love corn any way it is cooked. the casserole sounds good too. and homemade cookies are something that are hard for me to resist. I can pass cakes, pies and other desserts by...but not a good cookie,lol.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
2:51 PM

Post #8616034

Are you saying there are monsters within, Terry?

I'd like to order a few burgers from Bubba (extra rare), some venison from Digger, anything vegetarian from Celene, and Lizzie's deviled eggs. Might break down for a taste of Terry's baked goods. BTW, Lizzie, do you ever mix chipotle, lime and mayo and then brush the corn? Very good.

Sally, there's not much I'd prefer to do than cook with my soul guy. The photo Elaine took of us at the RU last summer pretty much sums up the way we always are in the kitchen. http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=8010017 I'd rather not clean at all but he's willing to share chores so I'd rather do it with him than without. The worst thing about empty nest is not the loss of the children but the loss of the house help. lol

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 7, 2011
3:06 PM

Post #8616065

I don't mind my husband in the kitchen, but he is banned from cooking. Not only does he choose the very largest cooking vessel for any given task, he makes an otherwise enormous mess. He hangs out in a chair and chats, lots of our friends do while I cook (or whatever), but they learn to stay out of my immediate work area, as do the dogs and cats. My big dog, Tessie, lays on the edge of the work area and polices it for me, keeping stray humans and unwise cats out.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
3:36 PM

Post #8616123

I've said this before...I'm horrid in the kitchen or, for that matter, around the fire pit. I expect washed hands, sharp knives, clean work spaces and good technique. I love teaching but don't tolerate repeating myself more than several dozen times. :>) There is rarely room for personal expression in my kitchen. Anyone can cook with me and I welcome the help but it has to be done my way. I'm exacting but not apologetic. We have an open kitchen and service bar area. I teach cooking technique but not usually when I'm entertaining.

It's said that we are losing the art of dining in this country. Forget about cooking. What happened to gathering around the table with family and friends? Maybe not everyday but even sometimes. I don't cook for the heck of it. It's not my job or why I went to school or why I have friends. Whether professionally or at home, I cook to share a point and what happens at the table is, like music, counterpoint. My food philosophy is that without meaning when we eat satisfaction regarding what we eat is hard to come by.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
4:13 PM

Post #8616189

The floor space in my kitchen is 11' by 14 ' I have a large island in the middle with oven on one side , fridge around the corner and stove top on wall opposite oven and cater corner sink with bartop on down that wall . I made it that way to keep everyone out .
What I probably didn't make clear is FDA inspects meat so it should be safe to eat as long as it's fresh . I don't agree with all uncles policies tho .We have two inspectors in the family , one a vet doing beef and the other doing chicken .Sorry if I wasn't more clear .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
4:38 PM

Post #8616223

The FDA does not inspect all meat that flies down the processing line. Meat inspections on most of America's food processing lines is random and sporadic at best. The FDA arbitrarily visits processing facilities. Kosher food is the exception in that inspections are done on every animal and in every step of processing by trained inspectors albeit with a religious set of criteria.

I'm a huge fan of tartare (raw meat with raw eggs). I only eat it if the beef is grown by people I know and I Pasteurize the eggs. I'd take greater risks, and enjoy it more often, but no one ever wants to join me. It's like the chicken feet thing.

Now that I'm off topic I'll need to think about the next meal.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 7, 2011
5:17 PM

Post #8616319

Had speckled trout deep fried, homemade hush puppies with corn , onions , jalapeno peppers ,horseradish cooked in and sharp cheese ,garlic bits , seasoned french fries . and called it quits for the night .Made red sauce and tarter sauce.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 7, 2011
5:19 PM

Post #8616323

maypop...I have never fixed corn that way...but I will try it next time we grill...lime and chipotle are 2 of my favorite flavors! yumm! and who can go wrong with mayo??????
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
5:38 PM

Post #8616371

I'd love to hear what you think of the corn, Lizzie. Please try it soon. You can also give the ears a light rub with your favorite chili seasoning and, if you sprinkle the hot ears with butter and grated cotija cheese, you will be over the moon..

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 7, 2011
5:52 PM

Post #8616400

Dinnertime has always been part of our family life. We sometimes eat out, we even sometimes eat take-out, but until our children started having their own driver's licenses, it was a given that everyone would eat dinner at the same time, barring something unusual in someone's schedule. For over 20 years, we've managed to weave it in around work, ball games, practices, church and social stuff - 5 or 6 nights out of 7 you'll find us breaking bread together.

I encourage all my friends with children at home to make family dinner a priority. It doesn't have to be fancy but IMHO dinner with your kids is a big ingredient in the glue that sticks everybody together :-)

I could probably use tutoring on technique. But I am highly skilled at KP duties and decent at whipping up family favorites and sliding new stuff under their noses on a regular basis.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 7, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8616443

We have had a sit-down breakfast, to say nothing of lunch when we're home and dinner, all the years of our marriage (going on 43...). It was always extremely important to us. In fact, one of the reasons why we didn't get the kids involved in sports before they entered high school was that it would have made meals too difficult to plan and schedule and would have added too much hassle to our lives. Of course, the fact that sports totally bore both of us may have had some influence...

Most of our kids' friends, while they were growing up, came from households in which, even if the parents were professionals, they didn't have family meals together. One frequent visitor used our dinner table conversations as material for an essay he was supposed to write for school about family dinners, since he had no other exposure to that experience.

We went out for dinner and had Dungeness crabs at a tiny creekside restaurant. The beautiful sunset over the docked work boats at the marina was an extra...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 7, 2011
6:37 PM

Post #8616480

I completely agree about sit-down family dinners. In my house, that means at a table like a human and not in front of the TV like you're a couple of retractors short of "A Clockwork Orange". My niece and my husband weren't always in love with the idea, but if I cook, you eat when I tell you to eat, where I place the food, or it goes away. LOL Works wonders.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8616509

Our youngest child has been out of the house for six years. He is here locally and still comes to eat with us every few weeks. Most would say that is especially unusual for a twenty four year old male. Granted he sometimes does a little shopping from the fridge and pantry, but he also often comes with gifts. Weird but well intended, like the time he brought holy basil because he thought I could cook with it or the incense burner that looks like a squashed Aztec idol. Our daughter, next oldest at twenty five, visits several times a year from D.C.. To this day we enjoy her many friends, who show up at every meal when she's in town. They grew up around our table as children. We'd not trade anything for time shared hearing about their lives today. All those kids from swim team to youth group and drama provide special moments for us in these years.

Truthfully, I never recall having to summon family for dinner. They were all here at some point, even if it was a few minutes beforehand, making it happen.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 8, 2011
3:26 AM

Post #8617100

My kids were always here setting the table and helping to put things out. Main problem was, and still is, DH. He is usually outside doing things until the last possible minute, or else he comes in belatedly and needs to shower before he sits down. Because he's so productive out there I can't get too irritated, but it's definitely a family joke. If I'm making something really time-sensitive, like grilling deer steaks, I pace myself so that I'm just finishing as he's there and ready. He is very appreciative of my cooking, though, which helps a lot!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 8, 2011
4:16 AM

Post #8617145

I miss sitting at the table with family and/or friends over a meal. For years, my fondest wish as I grew older was still having my table be a gathering place for friends and conversation, hence my love of this quote, a favorite of many people:

MFK Fisher, On Dining Companions
"Dining partners, regardless of gender, social standing, or the years they have lived, should be chosen for their ability to eat -- and drink! -- with the right mixture of abandon and restraint.

They should be able, no, eager, to sit for hours over a meal of soup and wine and cheese, as well as one of 20 fabulous courses.

Then, with good friends of such attributes, and good food on the board. and good wine in the pitcher, we may well ask, "When shall we live, if not now?"


Laurel, the USDA Inspector has an office in the abattoir that processes most of the beef and pork for several counties around here. Nothing gets cut and packaged if he isn't on hand to inspect it.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 8, 2011
4:23 AM

Post #8617152

Darius, I adore MFK Fisher, although the recent biography about her didn't do her or the material justice.

Good to hear that there's a USDA inspector who's conscientious...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 8, 2011
4:33 AM

Post #8617169

LOL, Leslie... I only said the inspector was there!

I'd love to know what testing he does... what criteria.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 8, 2011
4:43 AM

Post #8617181

I wish meat were produced differently, I think it'd make more difference than all the inspectors in the world, good, bad or otherwise. It'd cost more, and that'd make people mad, so it's unlikely.

Corn with chili and lime is fantastic. I was never a big lover of corn as a vegetable, Italians just don't eat it that way, so I didn't grow up eating it, but grilled with chili, cumin, and lime...I'll eat that.

I am so happy to see that other people are proponents of sit-down meals. Not necessarily dinner parties, just sit down and talk to each other and eat. I fix breakfast every Sunday, and some of our friends usually show up, a tradition I started in college, because we were starving and I could get free eggs from home, and someone could come up with potatoes. Now we have a more variable menu, but it's the social aspect that is meaningful. Now their kids and partners come along, so I feel like we're passing it down. The kids can watch me make waffles or pancakes and pick whatever stuff they like to add in, they can choose fruit to eat or juice or whatever, and learn to interact socially and enjoy it, rather than drooling in front of a video game all day. Not that those games are always bad, but that a little variety is a good thing. Watching a four year old pick peas, with no one to tell her that fresh, raw peas are not necessarily breakfast food is fun ;)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 8, 2011
5:42 AM

Post #8617287

Just google in FDA and you'll get enough websites to keep you reading all day .They have a finger in everything .
Setting down at a meal is satisfying for sure but we get our family time early in the morning on the porch over coffee making plans for the day, and in the late afternoon on the porch going through all the days activity , latest family gossip , just interacting about everything .That is an everyday routine , Dinner has been started and something is probably in the oven , or ready to go in . we actually spend more time together that way than we could at the table . We talk very little at the table . We eat out several times a month and it's small talk at that time . When you're together 24/7 , it's nice to have some away time . All outdoor stuff , we work together on , except I dig all the holes and he's a pretty decent gopher .We take lots of breaks in the lawn chairs that follow us around the yard, and sometimes our breaks are way too long to get back to work .
I think where ever you spend your time with family isn't so important as just spending time . To me , when we do finish eating , I want that mess out of site . Can't wait to get it put up and get comfortable again out on the porch . Just me .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 8, 2011
5:57 AM

Post #8617330

Still trying to cook out of my freezer. Made grilled shrimp w/brown rice and fresh picked sugar peas.

Tam
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 8, 2011
6:24 AM

Post #8617394

Simple dinner last night - a couple of Angus sirloins, small boiled red potatoes, sliced tomatoes and a couple of "fooled you" jalapenos. had a friend over to help with the "sick" desktop computer.

Computer is better, but still has a few problems. - meal was great.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 8, 2011
11:12 AM

Post #8618098

Must be going around. I had to fix malware on my friend's computer today, too.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2011
2:59 PM

Post #8618487

What's a "fooled you" jalapeno, Bubba?

It's agreed that spending time with family and friends is most important, no matter where, Sally. Lets make that "quality" time though. We've been flabbergasted in recent years with current restaurant etiquette. Kids spend entire meals on gaming devices. Not surprising though 'cause the parents are often on their cell phones. We observed a double date next to us. One couple was engaged and making wedding plans. The other was a blind date set up by the first couple. All four spent the bulk of the evening on their phones. They even managed to cut meat and eat. We were amazed at this new level of multitasking.

Dinner is griddled three cheese and garlic ciabatta, with caramelized apple cider onions. Also a salad with extensive garden additions.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 8, 2011
3:05 PM

Post #8618504

My husband and I both have jobs where we must take urgent work phone calls. This is different from sending/receiving 30 text messages or junk emails. Phone etiquette is a rant I don't want to get started, given how many people cannot possibly hang up the phone during the entirety of their pet's physical exam. It makes my teeth itch.

As a young adult, my niece stops by for dinner, because she misses the interaction. That makes me happy, I feel less of a fossil that way.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 8, 2011
3:27 PM

Post #8618542

Tonight - grilled pork chops, that corn Laurel got me thinkin' about, another fresh loaf of the potato-garlic-rosemary bread. Mint ice cream sandwiches for desert.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 8, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8618558

Tonight is Mexican pizza. It may involve eating and running for half of us and a late night meal for the other half. Wednesdays are just that way.

No cell phones at my table or when we're in a restaurant - our kids don't question it. When it comes to the texting-while-eating thing, we're unapologetic Luddites and we don't care what passes for passable behavior these days :-)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2011
4:08 PM

Post #8618624

Everybody's cooking is sounding more intriguing than mine these days.

Perhaps we should start a new movement and call ourselves Luddicians?

Mary, you've got to have that AC cranking to churn out bread almost daily in this weather.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 8, 2011
4:50 PM

Post #8618728

Laurel, we're still using the 'swamp cooler'...evap cooler. Works great until we get humidity, but that is definately not our problem right now. This morning the humidity was 7%. And it's not that hot. Really. Only mid-90's this week, that's nothin' with such low humidity.
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

June 8, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8618816

Tonight we had 16 spice chicken with mustard sauce, orzo, roasted cauliflower and basalmic brussel sprouts.

Yes it's too bad that people don't take an opportunity like dinner to really be with one another. A couple of months ago my two granddaughters were sitting in the same room texting each other! They do say that children who have dinner with their parents are less likely to get in trouble as teens.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 8, 2011
5:42 PM

Post #8618848

we went easy tonight! grilled hamburgers and chips. watermelon for dessert. can you tell we love watermelon,lol? I think we have had it for dessert every night this week. we found a couple of really good seedless ones at sam's over the weekend.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 8, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8618891

Ever tried juicing a watermelon? Ahhhhhh, wonder-juice...it's grand - really grand. Ice cold, good flavor, not sweet.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 8, 2011
6:38 PM

Post #8618948

the juice is the best part!!!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 8, 2011
6:43 PM

Post #8618966

We are just coming in from the garden. Still have not eaten. The moon is beautiful. Is that a quarter moon? Peepers are peeping. The fireflies are lighting up the night. It feels so Southern to smell the gardenia bush in full bloom. The temperature is dropping rapidly. We'll not need AC tonight.

Mary and Lizzie, we've made watermelon/lime sorbet in our ice cream maker a number of times. If you have leftover watermelon you can throw it in the freezer for this use.

Doss, what can I say about the granddaughters texting but "Ugh". I just keep thinking there must be something valid going on that I'm not getting. Too, I wonder if this is what happens when we age and the world begins to pass us by. Well if ever there was a time when "grassroots" behavior and values were appreciate it is now we hope.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

June 8, 2011
6:44 PM

Post #8618967

Watermelon is the only thing I planted this year .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 8, 2011
7:15 PM

Post #8619040

I plant melons around my bananas--they get plenty of sun and water that way. I love watermelon!
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 9, 2011
5:50 AM

Post #8619607

maypop...do you make it in a full size freezer or one of the smaller ones(like cuisinart). I picked up a brand new cuisinart one still in the box at a yard sale for $5 about 3 years ago. I have only used it for ice cream but would like to make some sorbets this year. we have always used a 6 quart freezer so it took me awhile to get my favorite ice cream recipe cut down to "just right" for the cuisinart.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 9, 2011
7:17 AM

Post #8619759

Lizzie, we make it in a Cuisinart freezer. I might have the recipe we used around somewhere. DD took the idea and made vodka, watermelon and lemon granita infused with lavender for a recent dinner party. She used her regular freezer and stirred the mix every so often so it became slushy. She said it was easy and fabulous.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 9, 2011
7:48 AM

Post #8619808

I love the freezer bowl for my Kitchen Aid mixer, it makes fantastic, fluffy ice cream and sorbets, and granitas if you don't over-mix.

We're having turkey smoked sausage, ww noodles with poppy seeds, steamed broccoli & cauliflower, and fresh greens from the garden with herb vinaigrette. And watermelon, lol.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2011
8:01 AM

Post #8619827

I love sorbets, and should make some now that I have a churn. I'd have to make a bunch for the freezer to make it worth the effort of ice, rock salt and the fruit but it would be so welcome on these hot afternoons.

Funny story: After having a 'slice' of grapefruit sorbet (frozen in a grapefruit shell and sliced like cantaloupe) as a palate cleanser before the main course during a wonderful prix fixe gourmet dinner in Coral Gables, my mother and I decided to make some that summer in their mountain cottage.

She had lots of canned grapefruit juice on hand since my step-father loved a Salty Dog after working in the garden all afternoon. Let me suggest that you never use canned grapefruit juice for sorbet! It froze easily, within about 15 cranks of the handle... but it was so salty we couldn't eat it. I think they had frozen salty dogs (not needing any extra salt added) for weeks. I had no idea canned grapefruit juice had so much salt... not noticeable at all in drinking a glass of it over ice.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 9, 2011
8:28 AM

Post #8619892

darius...that is what is so nice about the cuisinarts...you don't need rock salt or ice. I keep the container it is made in in the freezer so it is ready to go whenever we get the urge for some homemade ice cream...it is enough for just one or two people to eat on for a couple of days...or if you don't eat big bowls it will last more than that.

I love grapefruit and grapefruit juice...can't have it now as it can react with bp meds. I sure do miss it.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 9, 2011
9:16 AM

Post #8620022

I can see the advantage of the Cuisinart freezer, but I cannot justify the expense. Plus, where I can do so, I'm trying to get away from so much dependence on electricity and electrical gadgets.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

June 9, 2011
9:42 AM

Post #8620085

GymGirl gave me some "fooled you" jalapeno plants.

The look and taste like jalapenos, but have VERY little heat.

DW and I both like hot ones, but there are interesting and good, too.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 9, 2011
11:53 AM

Post #8620328

yea...i probably wouldn't have picked one up if I hadn't found that brand new one at a yard sale for $5.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 9, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8620333

bubba...I will have to look for those fool you jalepenos/plants. we love grilled stuffed jalepenos, but hubby can't handle things with much heat anymore...we think it has to do with some of his medicine he takes.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 9, 2011
5:11 PM

Post #8620852

Bubba, we have saved seed from jalapenos for many years. Ours are hot. I've wondered why the canned ones and the prepared "poppers"seems so mild. A few years ago I noticed Bonnie plants had two jalapeno versions on the big box shelves; mild and hot. For stuffing, like rellenos, we use poblanos or Cubanelles. Cubanelles are considered a sweet pepper but are really mildly hot.

Darius, good for you about the low energy kitchen equipment. Also, the grapefruit story was amusing. Remember the name of the restaurant? My favorite in the Gables was The Country Store in the Grove. Don't get much use from that ice cream maker. There are usually desserts if we have guests. Even then there may have been many courses, none sweet.

We are having salmon croquettes (freezer mining) with salsa, potato/mushroom empanadas and salad.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 9, 2011
5:14 PM

Post #8620856

I have some inability to discern when foods are too (spicy) hot for normal people.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 9, 2011
5:24 PM

Post #8620893

I'm careful with that, Celene. I like it hot and SO is a terrible enabler. He likes it hotter. If I ask him to taste he will say there is barely any heat. We process pints and quarts of many varieties of hot peppers each year. They wind up in many of our meals. With several friends who can't even handle black or white pepper some advance planning is necessary.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 9, 2011
5:31 PM

Post #8620914

I don't have anyone who can't handle peppercorns, but my husband called my habanero sauce a "chemical weapon" and put one of those Army bags over the jar, one of the ones with a skull wearing a gas mask, that tell you to stay 10 meters away.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 9, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8620952

That's funny, Celene. We are not growing habaneros this year but we are growing chiltepins (tepins). I've got enough jerk sauce canned for at least another year so we'll wait until next year to grow Scotch bonnets which are similar too, but not the same, as habaneros. We are also growing jalapenos, orange cayenne, red cayenne, cherry bombs (Italian hots), Greek pepperoncini and hot lemon peppers.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 9, 2011
6:18 PM

Post #8621015

I've been slipping in a little extra cayenne in all my meals. DH (from mid-west and unfamiliar with anything hot when I met him) is now eating foods w/some heat w/o comment. I am definitely appreciating hot/spicey more as I cook more! (I was going to say as I get older but that just could not be it!)

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 9, 2011
6:59 PM

Post #8621102

I am growing: Seven Pot, Fish, Ghost, Chocolate Habenero, Lemon, Peter Red and Yellow (yeah, yeah), Chiltepin, Kung Pao, Mushroom, a Viet variety from seed purchased at the Viet market, no English on the packet, Ancho, Corno di Toro, Serrano, Negro de Arbol, unknown Indian variety from seed I picked from Indian food, Thai Hot, Trini Scorpion, Big Sun Habanero, Pequin and purple variegated. Not that I enjoy spicy food or anything, lol. I'm wintering over some of the bigger perennial peppers and putting LED Christmas lights on them in the kitchen.
lizzieshome
Grapeland, TX

June 9, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8621151

Maypop...tried your grilled corn recipe tonight...we still had a couple ears of sweet corn left and needed to use them. I did it a little different...used the mayo, lime juice, chipotle pepper seasoning and then added in some More Spicy Tony Chachere's seasoning...slathered it on the corn and then added some sea salt. YUM YUM! Thank you! We also had grilled flat iron steak, baked potato, cantaloupe and roasted sweet 100 cherry tomatoes from my garden.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 9, 2011
7:36 PM

Post #8621204

I've got Cubanelles, Anaheims and some mini bells ('Yum Yum') growing.

One year a while back, a friend of ours asked me for leftover pepper seedlings for his garden. Mine had gotten a little mixed up between the cat and a plant sale, but I warned him that there were habs in the mess of stuff I gave him.

He planted them, his wife picked one thinking it was a cute little mini bell. Popped it in her mouth while she was weeding the garden. I don't think she's forgiven me yet.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 10, 2011
3:54 AM

Post #8621622

I've got Cubanelles, Pont du Paris, Long des Landes, Long Red Hungarians, and Aconcaguas for sweets; the only hots are Piment d'Espelette and Italian Long Hots, which I grow in another area of the garden.

Last night, with temps at 105°, we had tri-colored rotini tossed with canned salmon, asparagus tips, and olives with creamy balsamic dressing and Bénédicta aioli sauce, chilled. It was really good, and super easy.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2011
4:06 AM

Post #8621631

While I can thoughtfully appreciate many recipes using hot peppers, I have to pass on eating them. My system just cannot handle 'hot'.

Laurel, I don't remember the name of the restaurant in the Gables anymore. It was back in the 1980's; they were located on a side street a block or two north of Miracle Mile in the downtown business district. Monday nights were one-seating only by reservation, a prix fixe 7 course meal, no choices except optional wines. The waiters even brought a pile of pillows for the ladies' feet (and a long-stemmed rose). I should have taken one of the pillows for my butt... the meal was long and leisurely!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 10, 2011
4:30 PM

Post #8622757

I love Cubanelles but have not grown them in years. The last time we did I was making chili rellenos every night. Darius, I can handle the heat but all those fried chilies were doing me in. I don't remember a restaurant like that. It sounds like an evening of indulgent food fantasy.

We spent most of the day in the garden. We are enjoying evenings listening to the Ken Burns documentary series about the history of baseball. Tonight's dinner will be sandwiches with pulled pork BBQ from the freezer, pickled veggies and collard greens.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2011
4:38 PM

Post #8622776

Yellow Cabbage Collards, by chance? I picked a few last night.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

June 10, 2011
4:51 PM

Post #8622813

Absolutomente. I put up a boat load a few weeks ago from the ones that overwintered and have the Spring ones just coming in. GA Southern collards flowered and went to seed in between. I stuck the seed stems in a hollow log on the deck like a dried flower arrangement. Want some?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2011
5:02 PM

Post #8622842

Nope, I have plenty... but Thanks.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

June 11, 2011
4:13 PM

Post #8624481

I had pork & cabbage for dinner. I have a number of different pots going - making another month's worth of dinners for dad. He says he doesn't like cabbage so I'll give him just a couple servings (and keep the rest for later 'cause I bet he will like it!) More chicken noodle soup, a pot of chili and roasted chicken in the works. Will make beef & broccoli & goulash tomorrow.

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

June 11, 2011
4:18 PM

Post #8624485

Salad with grilled asparagus, blue cheese, candied walnuts and balsamic. Fresh five grain bread. Sangria.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

June 11, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8624563

I had my first fresh peach of the year... tasty and aromatic! Not sure where they were grown (I didn't ask at the produce stand because I really didn't want to know if they were imported, but I think not), but almost as good as S.C. peaches. I probably need to see if I can grow a peach tree, Red Haven might fruit here since it blooms late.

And since y'all have been talking watermelon, I bought one of them too! No refrigerator space available so it's sitting on an AC floor vent to cool.

I picked some of my Nanking cherries today, might have enough to juice and make a sorbet if I pick the rest tomorrow. This is their 3rd year, so a fair crop... considering last year I had only 12 cherries from the 3 bushes.

Supper? Fresh fruit and homemade cheese.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

June 11, 2011
5:44 PM

Post #8624630

Red Haven is a good peach and fairly resistant to brown rot and other ills that peaches fall prey to. Carolina Belle does fairly well for us here, too. I ordered Harrow Diamond and Erli Red Fre (I wonder who thinks up these names) because they were supposed to be quite resistant, but they haven't set fruit yet so I don't know for sure.

We attended a dinner for our granddaughter's eighth grade graduation - pasta, meatballs, pulled pork, beans and salad. Not too bad considering.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


June 11, 2011
8:27 PM

Post #8624949

New thread here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1189103/

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