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Gardening by the Moon: Moon Gardening Calendar, June 2011

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Forum: Gardening by the MoonReplies: 22, Views: 144
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cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

May 28, 2011
6:28 PM

Post #8593480

Oops! I am just in time.

1st-2nd Seeds Planted Now Tend To Rot In The Ground.

3rd-4th Plant Tomatoes, Beans, Peppers, Corn, Cotton, And Other Aboveground Crops On These Most Fruitful Days. Plant Seedbeds And Flower Gardens.

5th-8th Poor Period For Planting. Kill Plant Pests, Clear Fencerows, Clear Land.

9th-11th Favorable For Planting Peas, Beans, Tomatoes, And Other Fall Crops Bearing Yield Aboveground. Sow Grains And Forage Crops. Plant Flowers.

12th-13th Extra Good For Planting Fall Lettuce, Cabbage, Cauliflower, Collards, And Other Leafy Vegetables. All Aboveground Crops Planted Now Will Do Well. Plant Seedbeds.

14th-16th Poor Planting Days. Cut Hay Or Do General Farm Work.

17th-18th Plant Late Beets, Potatoes, Onions, Carrots, And Other Root Crops.

19th-21st Poor Days For Planting. Kill Plant Pests, Spray, Fertilize, Do General Farm Work.

22nd-23rd Favorable Time For Planting Late Root Crops. Also Good For Vine Crops. Set Strawberry Plants. Good Days For Transplanting.

24th-25th Cut Hay Or Do Plowing On These Barren Days.

26th-27th Good Days For Planting Root Crops. Good Days For Transplanting.

28th-29th Seeds Planted Now Tend To Rot In The Ground.

30th Best Day For Planting Root Crops. Excellent For Sowing Seedbeds And Flower Gardens. Good Day For Transplanting.

Wishing a big crop for all of you, over here the cold weather is starting to be notice and I am heading for a cold winter.

Your friend, well down south
cristina
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 28, 2011
7:10 PM

Post #8593596

Thanks, Cristina! You're fine! It's not quite June yet. I keep a copy by my calendar. Do you ever plant something on a day that is not recommended? It is hard to work around this schedule, but I do need all the help I can get.
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 29, 2011
3:57 PM

Post #8595138

We have just started getting the really HOT weather this last week. Most days had a high temperature of over 100 degrees F. We have to keep watering everything since it hasn't rained much this year.
How cold does it get where you live Cristina?
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

May 29, 2011
5:49 PM

Post #8595387

evelyn_inthegarden, Many years ago I tried planting the same vegetable seed in goods days and also the same seeds in barren days, the difference was quite noticeable , so I continue planting following the productive days. I did find that in days when you could plant vegetables and flowers above ground did not make much difference to plant root vegies, and if I planted potatoes only in those days marked as good for under the ground crop, they grew just the same way.

Some time when I cannot plant outside due to rain I plant the seeds in pots and then I transplant them outside on a sunny gardening day / date.

Ladypearl, the coldest has been -7C that is 19F. The biggest problem is the top temperature in summer 24C to 26C that is 75F to 79F, but it is changing a bit.
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 30, 2011
11:30 PM

Post #8598489

Wow, Cristina, it sounds like you have a nice mild climate there! In winter we sometimes get down to 4 degrees F and in summer frequently get over 100 degrees F here. It is a problem for many plants because they can't take that kind of extremes. You are very fortunate (blessed.)
But I guess you need it to be a little hotter so you could grow watermelons and okra, eh? Do tomatoes do well there?
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

May 31, 2011
5:07 PM

Post #8600011

Ladypearl, It is as you say! I need more heat in summer.

If I start my tomatoes inside, I can get a good harvest , but I need to plant them mid winter in a heated sun room that I have, I would prefer a green house but I do not have the room for one and I've never really thought of building one because I do no know how long I'll be around here.
There is always something, reason or excuse!

I can see that it is true, Texas is blooming hot! Do you have enough rain,, water supply?
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2011
10:10 PM

Post #8600632

Some years we get enough rain; we even had floods in 2007. That year the tomato plants were HUGE and loaded with tomatoes that I gave to everybody I know around here. It was wonderful! Last year was an okay year for rain and we had a good peach crop. Home grown peaches are the best!
But this year is VERY dry. We have had wild fires and many people have had houses and barns burn down. But in May we got a little rain so there aren't as many fires right now, thankfully. We still need lots more rain though.
Yes, Texas has brutally hot summers, only the okra really do well in the middle of the hot summer and everything else just survives till September when the weather cools off a little. Then we get more peppers and tomatoes.
Do you grow lettuce in your garden in the winter?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2011
4:45 PM

Post #8602406

We have had plenty of rain in the past couple of years compared to our usual California drought, but much cold weather late in the season has not really been well for the tomatoes. However the cool-weather crops have been outstanding - peas, lettuce, broccoli, potatoes, carrots, radishes, beets and parsley. The tomatoes - not so good, but later on the basil did extremely well with several cuts and lots of pesto and giveaways! Some tomatoes, barely enough to get by without buying any from the market for a couple of months anyway.
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 1, 2011
5:20 PM

Post #8602528

The weather is a BIG problem worldwide, I feel it is because the axis are changing and the authorities had not say a word to avoid panic, The north pole is drifting to Siberia.
This NASA articles dated 2003 and already the shift was quite noticeable:

http://www.nasa.gov/vision/earth/lookingatearth/29dec_magneticfield.html

Every time that there is a big earthquake, 7 and over the pole will accelerate the movement, in Chile we have one, 8.8 degrees in the Richter scale classified as a Great earthquake that shift the pole further and then the one in Japan did it again, another Great earthquake, Mother Earth is changing and the weather is changing with Her.

We used to have lots more rain than what we have now and our summers are starting to be slightly hotter and in some areas there is drought, Chile never had drought before...
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2011
9:34 PM

Post #8603119

Evelyn, glad to hear you are getting rain and able to grow some good produce. Maybe the tomatoes will do better as the summer months progress. The spring months here in north Texas fluctuate from COLD (cold fronts blowing through) to chilly to HOT (when the wind is from the south. We don't get many mild days.
YUM, pesto ! We have had some years that were good for basil so I made up a bunch of pesto and froze it in small containers so could pull it out and use it when we wanted some. It was so good on hot spaghetti noodles and topped with dehydrated tomatoes (the ones that are just a little smaller than cherry tomatoes.)
Yep, we've been hearing about the magnetic pole moving. It's very strange and a little frightening - especially for people living along the coasts and in places where there are fault lines (earthquake zones.) Earthquakes are so destructive!
Hope we both get some more rain soon, Cristina!
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 2, 2011
5:10 PM

Post #8604816

Lady pearl can you grow watermelon? Do you have "city water" or better do you live in town or country area?
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 2, 2011
8:51 PM

Post #8605390

In years when we have rain watermelon grows very well here. I like the watermelon variety called "moon and stars" with the yellow spots on them. They are so sweet and get pretty big here. Unfortunately we do not have a well but would like to someday. We live in a neighborhood where the houses are on 2 1/2 acre lots in between two towns. Wichita Falls is to our east and Iowa Park is to our west. It is a pretty nice place really (except that the weather is so extreme.) It would be nice to have some big trees for shade like we had in Alabama but I guess there is not enough rain here to support those big trees. This year even the weeds are struggling to survive.
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 3, 2011
5:11 PM

Post #8606861

Wow, ladypearl you are experience some dry weather, let's hope that it is temporary , sometimes the climate goes in cycles. Texas is such a big state but for gardening we need water.

Today I put some garlic on the ground, perhaps is a bit early but they wanted to sprout, the cold days are getting colder so, for sure their growth will be retarded pretty soon until the weather warms up, that would be mid September. I am cleaning the garden and pruning some shrubs, there is a bit of work in late autumn.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

June 4, 2011
9:53 PM

Post #8609643

In one way we are lucky to have a well. But when and if, electricity is out for a long time, we do not have a hand crank to get the water. Even though I save water in containers all over the basement, I know it will not be enough. So, we have water for now, and a little for later.
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 5, 2011
4:43 PM

Post #8611287

Well water is a good thing, have you thought of building a "thingi" using solar power?, in your area for sure you've got plenty sun hours to use it, I do not know how expensive they may be.
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 5, 2011
9:04 PM

Post #8611878

Yep, plants do so much better with well water or rain. But the tap water is better than nothing, of course and right now that is what we have. A solar powered pump for the well would be excellent.

When do they recommend planting garlic in Chile, Cristina?

We plant ours in the fall (in October ) so it can develop a good root system. They start getting the tall leaves in the spring. It is one of the easiest things to grow. We chop up some of the leaves for our salads.
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 6, 2011
6:20 PM

Post #8613981

Same happens here, to plant them last month of fall but we can continue through winter, the soil does not freeze but consistent cold temperature inhibit the growth and strong rooting system assure a quick growth when spring arrives.

I also plant all the ends of onions, you cut the roots with about 1/2 to 1 inch of the white of the onion. In winter you will have the green tops growing from these roots and are lovely addition in soups and finely chops in salads

my lettuce are doing well.
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
9:47 AM

Post #8615433

That's a neat way to get new onions, Cristina. I do that will leeks (leave the bottom 1 1/2 to plant in the garden) and it grows a new plant to eat in a couple months.

Glad to hear your lettuce is doing well. I have heard of a group of Americans that became fed up (upset) about what is happening here in America so they moved to Chile. Have you heard of them too? I don't remember where in Chile they live now.
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 7, 2011
6:51 PM

Post #8616505

You would not believe this but Chile is becoming a final stop for many, many people from different countries lately.

It is nothing new about Americans taking residence in Chile, but European is the new trend now.

From the times when Douglas Tomkins in the mid 90's, after he sold his Spree clothing company and bought a big peace of land in the south of Chaiten, he then became more greenie than a green, was the start of the 'American Invasion", even Kirk Douglas got land here and many normal american (not very rich) have come, give it a go and they stayed.

Many others came for holidays, they like it and then they return as residents, it is as I said before, an usual occurrence now.

Chile is receiving a lots of "Gringos" (sounds like this: greengoes)
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 7, 2011
8:41 PM

Post #8616842

I am curious why your government is letting the "Gringos" come there. Is there not many people already?

sonoranpoet
Cave Creek, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 8, 2011
4:44 PM

Post #8618717

new here and new to this concept...though I've heard of it have not practiced it but since I live just a few minutes from the Atlantic Ocean in the summer am very much aware of the moon/tide connection. Looking forward to practicing Moon Gardening.

This message was edited Jun 8, 2011 6:44 PM
cristina
Temuco
Chile
(Zone 9b)

June 8, 2011
5:38 PM

Post #8618840

sonoranpoet, Hello
welcome to moon gardening. Is good for you to try and see.

I find that plants grow better planting them on fertile days. I did try it many years ago and I was converted.


Ladypearl , what happens is that Chile has a good economy and it is growing at good rate, the mines are important for Chile's economic boon and copper and gold are always a winner.
Also workers wages aren't very high, that is a bonus for investors. If you come with a bit of capital you can do very well in Chile. Also US$1,00 is equivalent to 480 Chilean pesos ...
that mean that with american dollars you can do a lot over here, if you are good for business and look after what you spend for a couple of years you get your capital earning a good return very soon.

But for normal people, it is difficult because of the low wages ... same story, I supposed!
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

June 10, 2011
12:34 PM

Post #8622418

Been busy for a few days. Thanks for that information Cristina. Wish I had a lot of "capital" so I could be one of those migrating gringos : ) Your country sounds like a wonderful place (I have heard several people tell about it.)

Sonoranpoet, I have been gardening by the moon for several years and find that it is very helpful. Who has time to waste?! So planting on the fertile days and pulling weeds on the barren days makes the most of time in the garden (and yard.) Glad you joined us : )

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Other Gardening by the Moon Threads you might be interested in:

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Here's what I'd started last year .. Magpye 24 Jul 21, 2007 4:40 AM


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