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gloriag
Floyd, VA
(Zone 6b)

May 30, 2011
6:54 PM

Post #8598036

This is the second time I have gone. I have enough milk cartons and big juice bottles to last three years! It
was so much fun getting so many at one time.

My plastic zip lock bags did not work well. Did anyone else have problems with them?
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 6, 2011
2:34 AM

Post #8612011

I have been collecting the bins that you buy the baked chicken in from Costo. The clear top already has vent holes. The top locks on and they have a nice black bottom. The tops are easy to remove.
If you place them out in the weather, and you make sure to place drain holes in them, they will self-water.
Besides, they are small enough so I can give each grand-kid one to plant and label.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

June 10, 2011
9:11 PM

Post #8623311

I wondered about the chicken containers. I worried that they weren't deep enough. So you think they will work? What type of seeds do you plant in them?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 11, 2011
8:54 PM

Post #8624972

I have used all kinds of containers in addition to m. jugs. this year settled on vented plastic berry containers with hinged lids. I find just a couple of inches of soil is necessary to sprout seeds.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2011
8:44 AM

Post #8625496

then when it is time to remove them from the container?? Do you just do the HOS thing or do you try to separate to individual plants. Guess it depends on the plant. Big ones like say sweet peas would be easy to separate, but poppies not very likely.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2011
10:26 AM

Post #8625651

You're right - everything is different and it also depends on how much time/patience I have. :)

Also - with more containers and more space you can be less liberal with seed so you won't have to thin as much.

I haven't done a lot of overwinter type growing, but do set things out in early spring/late winter. The amount of soil will also depend on when I am setting things out. If it's late in the season not so much soil because as the temps warm everything can come out of milk jugs.

I use this method year round because I have squirrels and other critters that like to get to my pots outside and having the jugs gives them that much more protection.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2011
10:31 AM

Post #8625660

I guess I would also WS in say late Feb or March. I still have snow, but if I wait til April, I might as well plant inside under grow lights. I will recommence saving milk jugs that seem to be a planting 'vehicle' of choice, as well as the chicken cartons. Good excuse to buy the store cooked chicken which is soo good and sooo fat. lol. Thanks

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8625708

Holy crow - missed that you were in AK!

I'm terribly spoiled by the long growing season here. I moved here from Boston in 1998 for a job and never left.

The chicken containers ARE good. We have a crow rescue right now and my BF buys some store bought chicken now and then for them to share as a treat.

I don't eat meat, but it still smells really good. Gosh, does it. ;)

A.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

June 12, 2011
1:16 PM

Post #8625933

My daughter is budhist and she rarely eats meat. I can take it or leave it, but sometimes the aroma just sucks me in. :)
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

August 10, 2011
9:31 AM

Post #8748542

Good Morning, Gloria
I have been out cutting back coneflowers where their flowers have faded. It is a very tall coneflower plant, almost 30-36 in. I think I may have snitched the seeds from the public library and some of the seeds are starting to dry up, but It was so heavily laden with blooms that I had to put some wire fencing around it to hold it up. Another one of my phlox that I had transplanted was next to it and it had started blooming and I wasn't having it smothered. I managed to get one phlox cutting but will not be afraid to take more. I cut the coneflower plant to about 4 in. and next month, I will pot it up and take to plant swap on 9/10. I had an azalea that died from the hot weather we've had and I dug that up. Boy, their roots are kind of shallow. Also had told my man that is coming today to do my pruning and edging of the back flower beds, where there is no landscape timbers or scallopped bricks.
I had a Westerplatte clematis that I never liked and it was 4 years old and it was bought the same year the Dr.Ruppel was and it just didn't perform well. I know it takes a few years for them to get established but I hated it. I was going to let Mr. B dig it up today but I got out there and tackled it myself, without any problem. Tomorrow is yard waste day and that's even more reason to get it done. It's suppose to be in 90's and he starts working at 7 am, and leaves at 3..so I thought since it was delightful this morning, I'd do what I could and also save myself some money. His biggest challenge I want him to do is cut down and dig up a forsythia bush that is very mature and crowded out the hydrangea and the previous owners just stuck it in a wrong odd place. He will be pruning two other forsythias and I want to have him to edge. I'm going to watch him and see how he does it, but I think I'll leave that job for him. I've seen how to do it in gardening books and I'm sure I could probably do it, but hey, let a strong man do it. I just made up some lemonade and ice tea to offer him and his helper. Yesterday they were working next door and by the time they finished digging and revamping one flowerbed for the owner, their clothes were both soaking wet.

Working out in this heat is draining on anybody. When it's real hot and high humidity, I can only manage about 3 or 4 hrs. at the most and I've got to come in and rest for the rest of the afternoon. Some days it has wiped me out for an extra day.

I haven't been keeping up with the DG forums that much lately. What have you been up to? Any new plants? I really have to come up with drought tolerant and low maintenance in addition to deer resistant plants. The two flowerbeds in back of house..definately need low maintenace there. My neighbors behind me may only be looking at BES and marigolds next year.! I might add some daylilies in there.

One of the plants I want to get is Irish eyes or Prairie sun rudbeckia. Love those green eyes/centers!

Need to go out there now and clip my dwarf fairy candytuft as it has dried up and gather the seeds. I love that plant and it is so easy to raise plus so showy. Their colors are in shades of purples.

Well, I'm going to try to sow some seeds that I never got around to sowing in the winter.
Talk to you later. I hear the doorbell ringing. Maybe Mr. B. and Cathy are already here.

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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