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Australian and New Zealand Gardening: Flowering in June

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Seachanger

Seachanger
Clifton Springs
Australia

May 31, 2011
5:25 PM

Post #8600040

Introducing Dahlia "Timothy Hammet"
An evergreen with cascading branches..
The result of cross hybridising D tenucaulis, D apiculata and D coccinea...
It looks just like a small version of the tree dahlia..
Which I can't fit into my garden.
This little beauty grows to a metre and a half high...just perfect.
I just might buy another.

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 31, 2011
10:23 PM

Post #8600639

The tree dahlias can be kept at a reasonable height by lopping them early in the season Dianne. This one is a beauty indeed.

Pam
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

May 31, 2011
11:19 PM

Post #8600652

That is a lovely little Dahlia Dianne. I have not seen it come to bloom, having foolishly left it behind at another garden. Did you get yours from Lambley Nursery? Dahlias are fun. We have a few here including 'Bishop of Llandaff'. The Bishop is quite promiscuous! There are numerous bronze leafed seedlings that come up each year here of various shapes and forms. We have kept a couple and grow them on each year without bothering to give them a name.

Pam's tip is a good one. We have kept D. imperialis to about 2 m high by cutting it early at the first node and repeating that treatment a couple of times in the growing season. Each "Y" gives two lovely, if somewhat smaller panicles of bloom.

Away from Dahlias; here is Kniphofia 'Winter Cheer' growing quite happily in the jungle.

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

May 31, 2011
11:31 PM

Post #8600654

[quote="WayneCarter"] We have kept D. imperialis to about 2 m high by cutting it early at the first node and repeating that treatment a couple of times in the growing season. Each "Y"
[/quote]

And any tips removed (particularly in the first few weeks of the growing season) will strike very easily as cuttings too.

That's a gorgeous scene, Wayne.



This message was edited Jun 1, 2011 4:32 PM

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

May 31, 2011
11:31 PM

Post #8600655

Dianne that is beautiful ...it really does look similar.

Wayne you still have Autumn leaves? mine are gone ...even the Ginko which is usually last to leave.
Don't you love the colours in the new Crepe Myrtle leaves ...really pretty.

Wayne are you going to go into the garden contest at BGI it's opened today and goes until the 10th of this month, just 2 pics a day ...they can be from last couple of seasons because it's Winter and it's any blooms, not just Brugs. If you get in by midnight you can still enter. :) Great way to meet people who love their gardens.
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:22 AM

Post #8600674

This past autumn in Sydney has been the best I have seen for colour in years. Yes Chrissy, I love the Crepe Myrtles very much too. We have the old pink Lagerstroemia indica that was here when we moved in 14 years ago. This tree had been brutalised by pruning. We have selectively pruned, and now a lovely canopy about 5 m in diameter has formed. This is presently festooned with Old Man's Beard (Tillandsia). Added to this lovely old tree are 3 trees from the "Indian Summer" range. Here is 'Natchez'. I particularly like this one for its bark which reminds me of cinnamon sticks! This one has white flowers and was planted in memory of a dear friend. Some of you might remember the red painted bench we use to have under this tree. Unfortunately it rotted away earlier this year. There are also 2 Indian Summer 'Tuscarora' and one seedling tree that a student grew on several years ago for me. It is a single white with spectacular "red" autumn leaves and bark that peels away in great twisted rolls. Love it!

No Chrissy, won't be subbing to that comp. Hope you win those seeds though, the parents are real stunners!

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:24 AM

Post #8600675

Not a flower in sight, but that one is absolutely stunning Wayne.

Pam

Seachanger

Seachanger
Clifton Springs
Australia

June 1, 2011
12:36 AM

Post #8600679

I love the full size tree Dahlia, they are in flower every where here, but any space in my garden is reserved for Brugs, that's why I was so pleased to find this one.

It came from a very large local nursery, Wayne. Wombat Nursery...first time that they have sold them..I think that they are great...they have very woody stems so I think they should be ok for cuttings too...beautiful pic of your garden, great for the competition...

Yes, Chrissy...I think that the newer varieties of Crepe myrtle have been exceptional in their colouring this year...best year ever for mine...especially L ''Miami'' and ''Sioux''...I have "Tuscarora and Zuni" too but they are only about 120 cm tall.
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 1, 2011
1:44 PM

Post #8601956

Sounds like you have a well stocked local nursery Dianne.

Best thing with the "Indian Summer" Crepe Myrtles is their resistance to powdery mildew. Our humidity in summer can cause great outbreaks on the old indica varieties. Here is the old one I mentioned above. It is not particularly pron to disease, just gets the odd branch here and there.
That is Tagetes lemmonii in the foreground.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 1, 2011
6:20 PM

Post #8602695

You're very lucky if you have a good nursery nearby. In Melbourne I used to make treks to Poynton's nursery and Essendon Plant Farm. There's nothing comparable within reasonable commuting distance here.

Here's my small Tulbaghia Fragrans Alba (one I bought), still in its pot. Scented, but nothing to write home about.

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 1, 2011
7:54 PM

Post #8602971

Yes I agree the crepe myrtles do get the powdery mildew sometimes but I haven't had it in the new ones ...love them!
Your pretty yellows are so happy in that pic Wayne.

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 1, 2011
9:40 PM

Post #8603123

Not a great pic as the sun is out. My little pinwheel daisy is finally getting room to grow .

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 1, 2011
9:42 PM

Post #8603125

Cestrum, I finally managed to get into the jungle and snap a pic of one of the different abutilons. I also have another with a more yellow skirt under a red top. all my others are the usual larger open flowers in various colors.

This message was edited Jun 2, 2011 3:43 PM

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 1, 2011
9:46 PM

Post #8603128

A bit hard to see as again the sun is shining on the plant. This correa was a tiny cutting about 7 years ago. It grew like a weed and is at present hanging over a 5' fence. It is never without flowers , no matter what the weather.
I have several others out the front , all cutting grown which seem to thrive here.

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 1, 2011
9:47 PM

Post #8603129

My salvia path. It will look even better when they all grow a bit more.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 1, 2011
9:59 PM

Post #8603154

Very pretty abutilon, Jean. I think one of my baby plants might have a flower like that (will have to wait until it flowers to know). Does it also have variegated leaves?
77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 1, 2011
10:02 PM

Post #8603160

Not this one Cestrum. It looks just as the openr flowered ones and grows as big too.
My variegated small one hasnt flowered as yet. It has been hidden behind all the large ones and the huge Ribes. I will move it later in the spring.
Jean.
cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 1, 2011
10:05 PM

Post #8603162

Will be interesting to see the flower on your variegated one, Jean. Hopefully we'll be able to compare photos of abutilon flowers over the next growing season. (Well, I know many of yours will be in flower but am hoping mine will too!)

I sowed some seeds of A. x suntense 6 weeks ago and the first tiny seedling has just sprouted. Such a long way to go, and it still has the dreaded wilt to avoid. I wonder if anyone else is growing it? I believe it prefers a cooler climate.
77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 1, 2011
11:04 PM

Post #8603199

Cestrum, my abutilons seem to have flowers all year. A lot more in spring of course, but still flowers hanging about even now in the cold. Most are sheltered as when I first started the garden where they are, it was going to be big at the back and small in front. Hmmm, we all know what happens to great plans in the garden dont we ?
The abutilons reach up between the bougainvillea, large correa, plumbago and numerous other things in there.
some of the abutilon branches are like snakes, climbing in and out where they can. All look healthy though.
Jean.
cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 1, 2011
11:20 PM

Post #8603212

Yes, I remember those sort of plans, Jean LOL
Hopefully mine will flower as well as yours eventually. They're all only very young plants and so need to get established first.

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 3, 2011
5:52 PM

Post #8606964

My lanterns are trying to eat the garden, but I won't chop until Spring because one Autumn I chopped a huge one and it died.

I haven't lost any since then because I put up with the Winter blah looks to ensure they don't freeze.
Good luck with the V. ones I think they suffer more from the cold than the others.

Well I finally found something to post ...in the wild parts of the garden I have these everywhere but the grass ruins the pictures, I have to get some more weeding done, when the drizzle stops. They don't bloom every year like this, they must have enjoyed the cooler days I guess

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 3, 2011
5:53 PM

Post #8606966

ha ha ha ok that was clever ...forgot the pic

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 3, 2011
7:54 PM

Post #8607251

Lucky you, Chrissy. They're very pretty. I don't think it gets cold enough here for Nerines to do well.

Pam

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 3, 2011
8:01 PM

Post #8607280

I grow them out the front of the home facing the chilly Blue Mountain winds ...they grow like weeds. We don't get them in full flight unless there has been a coolish Summer compared to the violent heat we are used to.
the Norfolk Island Pine is now so tall it is way above the home. It's out fron too and withstand the dreadful winds.

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WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 8, 2011
12:18 AM

Post #8617036

Love the Nerines. Had those Clivea caterpillars in them! Never happened before, so shall be watchful next year - no pics this year.
Here is Cymbidium tracyanum. Last year this plant was totally frosted - looked terrible! However, back again this year. My fav Cymbidium! :)

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WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 8, 2011
12:23 AM

Post #8617037

The tree Begonias are doing OK despite two mild frosty mornings. Last year ther froze to the ground!

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WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 8, 2011
12:25 AM

Post #8617038

Kniphofia 'Winter Cheer' - can't do without it!

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gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 8, 2011
3:02 PM

Post #8618494

[quote="WayneCarter"]
Here is Cymbidium tracyanum. Last year this plant was totally frosted - looked terrible! However, back again this year. My fav Cymbidium! :)[/quote]

So THAT's it's name! It's one that has a scent, right Wayne? I was given one a number of years ago by a lovely older chap in the orchid society when we lived in NSW. In spite of all the flash modern hybrids, it was one of my favorites too - flowered reliably year after year.

A little local native groundcover, one of the Goodenia family ... except it doesn't seem that when I do a quote, I can also attach a pic, so will do a separate post for it.

Pam

gardengal
se qld
Australia

June 8, 2011
3:03 PM

Post #8618498

Here 'tis!

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Marleneann

Marleneann
Sunshine Coast
Australia

June 8, 2011
4:02 PM

Post #8618615

White Cattleya...name has been lost.

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WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 9, 2011
12:45 AM

Post #8619360

Lovely Marleneann. Too cold for me to grow Cattleya here without some help I think.

Pam, yes that is the one. There is a great variety within the species regarding colour, size, and scent - however all fall into tracyanum. A bit like our native rock orchid Dendrobium speciosum - much variety. Must read up on your Goodenia, looks a treat!
cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 9, 2011
4:33 PM

Post #8620788

Yesterday it was 7-14 degrees, the same as Melbourne. Except that it felt a lot colder here, as the houses just aren't built for cold (e.g. louvre windows; no inbuilt heating, etc). Anyway, as I was walking around in the cold, I saw this. Ripe and ready to pick on the coldest day of the year. But I didn't pick it because I wasn't in the mood for eating it in that weather LOL Today, I think, as even though it fell to zero last night, the sun is out. This is when you know you're no longer in Melbourne--even in winter here, the sun is warm!

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Seachanger

Seachanger
Clifton Springs
Australia

June 9, 2011
10:21 PM

Post #8621457

cestrum, you lucky duck...what a little beauty...hope it is really sweet for you.
cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 9, 2011
10:30 PM

Post #8621467

Oh, I forgot to pick it ...

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 13, 2011
10:45 PM

Post #8628974

It's the same here ...when you can find any sun that is ...it's been missing most of the Summer and it's terrible weather here,
I scrounged around just outside the back door because there are inches of water everywhere I walk and freezing heavy rain on and off, ok I found this poor shivering little lantern ...up high ...I grew a double from this one but no blooms yet, lots of leaves.

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 13, 2011
10:47 PM

Post #8628976

Then this pathetic show ...usually covered in blooms.

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 13, 2011
10:48 PM

Post #8628977

Black wet bamboo

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WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 14, 2011
1:33 PM

Post #8630265

Misty morning...
More rain today hopefully clearing by the weekend. A few autumn leaves hanging in. This pic reminds me that my dry stone wall project is yet to begin!

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 14, 2011
2:49 PM

Post #8630404

Beautiful Winter shot there Wayne.
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 14, 2011
9:31 PM

Post #8631207

Thanks Chrissy. A bit wet underfoot at present... Lawns will need some renovation work before spring.

Datura metel pods.

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 14, 2011
9:42 PM

Post #8631226

Oh what a cool pic Wayne they look like little aliens.
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 14, 2011
9:55 PM

Post #8631246

Remind me of those sea mines you see in old war movies.

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lucas13

lucas13
Victoria
Australia

June 14, 2011
10:13 PM

Post #8631260

Which type of Datura metel is that one, Wayne?
Lots of seeds there... well done, looks like the cold has bitten it.

I am especially looking for seed of the wild form metel with the single flower for Spring sowing...

WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 14, 2011
11:26 PM

Post #8631290

Lucas, it is Datura metel var. chlorantha. We grow this as an annual. Usually it is v.prone to leaf miners - yes, and probably a bit of cold damage there that you can see. Once the pods are ripe I will harvest and get rid of the old plant.
Original plan was to grow these under a Brug trained as a standard - Angel's Trumpets blasting down and Devil's Horns retaliating from the depths below. Idea a little more poetic than realistic - the Daturas are rather ugly little blighters (apart from the blooms and perfume).
Why do you want to grow the weedy form?

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lucas13

lucas13
Victoria
Australia

June 15, 2011
12:25 AM

Post #8631325

Ah, so it's one of those overbred commercialised monstrosities. LOL
A triple flower?!! That's well a bit over the top for me. Do all the seedlings come true?
Is it fragrant?

Why grow the weedy one? well I can't say I'm huge on Daturas but
IMHO I think the original species looks better actually, much more natural.
Figure you can't improve on Mother Nature...
I heard it has a better scent too.
I always liked single flowers in general. Don't really go for the extravagant doubles etc.
They are alright as a novelty but not when they replace the original species

WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 15, 2011
12:36 AM

Post #8631329

Don't know about the "overbred commercialised" bit Lucas...
It has been around a long time. Yes, 100% true to type.

The name of the book that this hand tinted engraving comes from escapes me at present. Odd in that the illustration was printed upside-down at the time. Perhaps the novelty of the bloom overwhelmed the print setter o'the day.

Curtis's Botanical Magazine
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curtis's_Botanical_Magazine

This message was edited Jun 15, 2011 7:04 PM

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Marleneann

Marleneann
Sunshine Coast
Australia

June 15, 2011
12:56 AM

Post #8631334

This is a pretty Camellia with a lost name.
In flower now.

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lucas13

lucas13
Victoria
Australia

June 15, 2011
1:22 AM

Post #8631338

Perhaps they assumed it to be a pendulous bloom like those of the arborescent species with which they were familiar?

What do you think of this Brugmansia x candida 'Purple' ?
http://www.tytyga.com/product/Brugmansia+x+candida+%27Purple%27+Angel+Trumpet

Do you grow other varieties of Daturas, Wayne?

Seachanger

Seachanger
Clifton Springs
Australia

June 15, 2011
1:58 AM

Post #8631358

That looks very much like one of those Chocolate box Daturas...in fact I'd bet on it...that particular nursery comes up with some ripper exaggerations...

This message was edited Jun 16, 2011 9:09 AM

Marleneann

Marleneann
Sunshine Coast
Australia

June 15, 2011
3:39 AM

Post #8631387

This is mine that came with the name of Datura "Purple Angel"

I have seeds if anyone wants them.

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lucas13

lucas13
Victoria
Australia

June 15, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8632874

[quote="Seachanger"]That looks very much like one of those Chocolate box Daturas...in fact I'd bet on it...that particular nursery comes up with some ripper exaggerations...

This message was edited Jun 16, 2011 9:09 AM[/quote]

LOL! You'd think someone would correct them.

Well, I guess that is one way to sell a Datura, pass it off as a "Purple Brugmansia"... how Rare!

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 15, 2011
6:49 PM

Post #8633088

I think it may be to do with customs Lucas (thanks for the seeds :)
I doubt that Datura would get through them- hence the wrong name because that might.
It is easy to see why there is so much confusion with all of these things. Brugmansia having once been called Datura too of course.
Guess it's also to catch the unaware gardeners who are just starting out, thinking they have finally found that elusive purple Brug everyone talks about, or the triple yellow.

I see you prefer the species, however we also love the pretty prettys, it's a girl thing perhaps.
I like the common names best ...for these plants ...Angel's Trumpets (The Brugmansia) and the Devil's Trumpets (Datura).
Yes I know it's naughty but very descriptive.

This one ...I grew from seed but the seeds it set never did anything, I think they prefer different conditions to the Brugs (not sure)

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lucas13

lucas13
Victoria
Australia

June 15, 2011
7:10 PM

Post #8633129

That one is a Datura stramonium var. tatula I believe, with the purple throat.
The seeds could germinate in years-decades following soil disturbance, they are weeds and can last a very long time dormant in the soil or so I am told.

lucas13

lucas13
Victoria
Australia

June 15, 2011
9:15 PM

Post #8633331

Yeah, the Daturas are not allowed entry into Aust.,
Here is an interesting range anyway for interest's sake:

http://www.seedman.com/datura.htm

WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 15, 2011
9:45 PM

Post #8633359

Regarding the illustration of Datura metel var.chlorantha from Curtis's Botanical Magazine, the reference is:-

Curtisís Botanical Magazine, vol. 85 [S. 3 vol. 15], t. 5128 (1859)
W.H. Fitch

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MyaC
Magnetic Island
Australia
(Zone 11)

June 16, 2011
12:15 AM

Post #8633479

The name eludes me but this shrub is never without flowers...

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MyaC
Magnetic Island
Australia
(Zone 11)

June 16, 2011
12:16 AM

Post #8633481

My desert roses are never without flowers ...here are a few

This message was edited Jun 16, 2011 3:17 AM

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MyaC
Magnetic Island
Australia
(Zone 11)

June 16, 2011
12:18 AM

Post #8633486

Spot the desert roses here...

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MyaC
Magnetic Island
Australia
(Zone 11)

June 16, 2011
12:20 AM

Post #8633487

Chrissy sent me a bit of this succulent and it has gone in overdrive,it's growing everywhere,it helps that the possums and wallabies don't like it...

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MyaC
Magnetic Island
Australia
(Zone 11)

June 16, 2011
12:22 AM

Post #8633488

just a bit of everything...desert roses,duranta and bougs...

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 16, 2011
12:47 AM

Post #8633505

Holy Smoke that Succulent has gone nuts Mya ...the plant you can't remember the name of is (common name) Fire Spike , everything is growing beautifully http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/62195/ they come in red and purple.
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 16, 2011
1:28 PM

Post #8634441

Thanks Chrissy - Fire Spike...
Odontonema callistachyum, syn. Justicia callistachyum.

Cestrum, this is the "Lipstick Plant" I was yacking to you about some time back. Grows well here in the semi-shade.
cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 16, 2011
6:52 PM

Post #8635023

[quote="WayneCarter"]Thanks Chrissy - Fire Spike...
Odontonema callistachyum, syn. Justicia callistachyum.

Cestrum, this is the "Lipstick Plant" I was yacking to you about some time back. Grows well here in the semi-shade.[/quote]

I don't think I've heard of it, Wayne. So this is the plant you're trying to find?

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 16, 2011
8:19 PM

Post #8635249

Wayne has it growing in his garden cestrum, I have it if you like it, I took it cuttings from an old Church down the South Coast (Funeral) and it strikes as easily as a succulent though perhaps not in Winter. The old Church had these plants growing wild and they were over my head in height and in full bloom ...spectacular sight (about a quarter of an acre covered in lovely leaves and hot red firecracker blooms ) this was all under old trees that gave them dappled shade. I know it was naughty but I figured a couple of tiny pieces would not be missed. Had them for years now but they only bloom towards the end of Summer here due to the cold nights I suppose.
I have shared them around with some people here :)
Found the link to the red one
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/1854/
cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 16, 2011
8:33 PM

Post #8635275

Not for me, thanks Chrissy. I thought that Wayne was looking for it ...
Given how quickly old gardens disappear as housing lots are subdivided for units, it's almost an obligation to 'rescue' some plants (via cuttings) when you come across them LOL

chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

June 16, 2011
8:36 PM

Post #8635281

We agree on that for sure ...I have many grannie plants :) funny how some of the common old ones are now considered rare.
WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 16, 2011
9:13 PM

Post #8635374

No, not after that one thank you Cestrum. The purple flowering one if anyone has it to swap for something else please. :)

Blowing a gale here! Lovely blue sky, but so windy! 'Clementine' in full bloom is swaying the hula! :)

BTW - not my pic.

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77sunset
Merino
Australia

June 16, 2011
9:25 PM

Post #8635387

Chrissy, the cuttings of Firespike from you have grown well here. They sometimes get a hit from the cold but seem to come back. One is under GHA and I am hoping it stays unaffected by the cold so it will flower. It did flower when small and in the shadehouse.
I may put one back in there.
You also gave me a piece of a yellow flowered succulent type creeper. It grew slowly for the first years but has decided to turn feral .
It is also flowering for the first time. Luckily I planted it down the back where it can roam .So far it has eaten half the succulent bed, the bottom of a gum tree and is slowly but surely trying to invade the rest of the world. Too wet for pics as the rain has returned.
Jean.

Seachanger

Seachanger
Clifton Springs
Australia

June 21, 2011
8:51 PM

Post #8645994

These little Anemones come up every year, if my husband doesn't get to dig in that area...sometimes I think that he is as blind as a bat...he did some weeding this morning and I found a median Iris among his weeds...LOL

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:23 PM

Post #8650443

Anemones are pretty--like silk flowers.

Took the camera with me today. Here is an unscented snail creeper growing up a tree.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:24 PM

Post #8650450

I've never seen a single seedpod on this plant.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:24 PM

Post #8650451

Extreme closeup.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:26 PM

Post #8650461

Growing like a weed in one of the paddocks. Maybe it is a weed?

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:30 PM

Post #8650477

Saw this in the middle of a patch of unmowed grass. Looked like lantana from this distance.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:32 PM

Post #8650482

Closer inspection showed it wasn't lantana.

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cestrum_SEQ
West of Brisbane
Australia

June 23, 2011
8:36 PM

Post #8650493

It is in fact Asclepias curassavica, one of the milkweeds. Very weedy indeed, when it sets balloon-head seeds that burst open when ripe, dispersing the seeds in all directions.

This message was edited Jun 24, 2011 1:36 PM

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WayneCarter
NW Sydney NSW
Australia

June 23, 2011
11:14 PM

Post #8650728

Good for butterflies though Cestrum, caterpillars love it. If you want the plain yellow just give me a yell! :)

Marleneann

Marleneann
Sunshine Coast
Australia

June 28, 2011
5:48 PM

Post #8660852

An unnamed Camellia.
Anyone know the name? Thanks

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Seachanger

Seachanger
Clifton Springs
Australia

June 28, 2011
8:58 PM

Post #8661307

This is just a guess, Marlene...it looks like one of the Nuccios, but I don't know of such a soft pink one.

Maybe Betty Ridley? that's my guess anyway.

It's very pretty whatever it is...you just have to like Camellias...

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