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Self-contained Box Gardens: New Ebucket thread (we continue) PART III

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 9, 2011
1:45 PM

Post #8620560

This thread is a continuation of PART II. We're interested in hearing about disappointing experiences with the system and/or ideas for improvements or modifications, so we can attempt to do better. Let's build a better eBucket!

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1139703/#new PART I
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1056426/ PART II
is getting so long we need to start over again.

Let's post new comments here.


Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 9, 2011
7:01 PM

Post #8621111

I continue to watch and learn. :)
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2011
9:11 AM

Post #8625541

Well I took some updated shots of mine today, so I'll be happy to post. Some are re-used buckets from last year of the same design, and some are new. It is worth nothing that in the old ones, I did not provide protection during the winter months because I was trying in vain to do some fall gardening, and so I have revamped the potting mixture inside each of them. Dumping out large root masses, and mixing in 50/50 compost and miracle grow potting mix (WITHOUT moisture control). First up, this is what they look like in spring after being out all winter, and why I remixed everything. All colanders and pipes came out in one dried up bundle.

Thumbnail by Kindlekat
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Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2011
9:14 AM

Post #8625552

And here are those re-vamped containers with peppers, summer squash, and cukes going strong.

Thumbnail by Kindlekat
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2011
9:26 AM

Post #8625564

Here are tomatoes in new buckets looking great so far this year. I started the seeds for these in March, so I'm understandably super excited that these are doing so great! A side note though, because of the nature of tomatoes, I did extra fertilizing when I planted these. I used an old "recipe" told to me by my gardening friend who says she got it out of the Washington Post years ago. 4 tbsp garden lime, 2 tbsp epsom salt and 2 tbsp Osmocote slow-release fertilizer per plant. I thought I would try it because her tomatoes are always the biggest, and it seems to be working for her. Also because I can just reuse the same buckets for tomatoes next year and I don't have to worry about planting the wrong thing in the wrong spot.

Thumbnail by Kindlekat
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Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2011
9:29 AM

Post #8625568

Here's a shot of the whole thing, veggie table and all. I love my ebuckets!

Thumbnail by Kindlekat
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 12, 2011
10:21 AM

Post #8625646

Kindle-tell me about how you've worked the larger plastic tubs that look like rubbermaid containers.

I am gathering materials for my first container/vegetable/vertical garden in the sunny concrete driveway.

I also have to take a look at your previous post regarding the vegetable table.

Thanks. :)

A.
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 12, 2011
4:03 PM

Post #8626208

Amanda - My rubbermaids are also self-watering like the ebuckets, but use those square storage baskets that have holes on the sides instead of colanders. I got most of the instructions here: http://www.josho.com/gardening.htm but modified them slightly. I don't use two bins, I use the storage baskets instead.

I've found that I like the ones I have, but they are heavy when full and hard to move to refill, etc. So I won't be building any more. Instead, the 5 gallon ebuckets are not too heavy for me even when full of water and plants, and they are MUCH quicker to make. I estimate it only takes me about 10 minutes to make 1 or 2 now. That includes drilling the overflow hole, cutting the pipe, and trimming the colander if needed.

My post on the veggie table is also at http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1175894/

VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 14, 2011
8:45 AM

Post #8629672

Lookin' good Kindlekat! I'm curious, where did you got the green 5-gallon buckets from?

Also, what varieties of tomatoes have you planted in the eBuckets this year? I planted mostly determinates in mine (Mega Bite, Patio Princess), but I did plant one indeterminate (Black Prince) and it's already grown taller than the tomato cage. I'm going to have to attach another cage (upside down) on top, but it will be quite tippy being that tall and narrow. That's one reason I like the Rubbermaid type containers (especially EarthTainers) for large indeterminate tomatoes. Since they are so heavy, they can handle a tall cage without tipping over. Plus, with extra soil capacity, the roots have more room, and the tomatoes seem to grow larger than they would in a 5-gallon bucket.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2011
11:05 AM

Post #8629988

I've read the ebox .pdf file about how many plants they recommend for each box, but what about 5 gal buckets?

I assume only 1 tomato from experience, but what about -

eggplants
acorn squash
slicing cucumbers
peppers
bush beans
Waltham butternut
sweet baby watermelon

I'm going vertical with everything this year because of the varmints in the yard. Someone gave me some extra plants and i was wondering if I could consolidate some of the vining things...

A.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2011
11:12 AM

Post #8630004

From my experience with eBuckets, I have had success planting the following per
5-gallon eBucket:

eggplants (1)
acorn squash (1)
slicing cucumbers
peppers (2)
bush beans
Waltham butternut
sweet baby watermelon

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 14, 2011
11:19 AM

Post #8630016

Linda - lost me - stuff without the number after (i.e. below peppers (2)) you planted 2 in each (i.e. beans, butternut, watermelon?)?

Sorry - don't mean to be dense. :D

A.

ps. does that mean you don't have experience with them?

This message was edited Jun 14, 2011 1:20 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 14, 2011
1:07 PM

Post #8630215

Yes, the ones without numbers means I have no experience growing them...
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 16, 2011
7:12 AM

Post #8633865

VitaVeggieMan - I actually was in Walmart where I used to get my plain white 5 gallons since they had the cheapest prices. Now it seems Home Depot, Lowes, and Walmart all have them at $2.50 . They didn't have any white ones when I went, only colors, so out of desperation I grabbed green. I would have gotten red if they had had them, but I'm not a fan of pink or purple buckets for my garden, I think my neighbors REALLY wouldn't understand then!

I'm growing both indeterminate and determinate tomatoes this year. I got most of my seeds from a swap back before I thought to pick only determinate, only bought the one kind of determinate - Better Bush. The others are Ozark Pink, Good Neighbor, and Best Boy. So far the bush variety (I have two buckets of them) are looking great. Dense and compact growth habit, just like the package says! I'm glad I'm growing both this year, to see which is more successful in my area, and for fun. It was also easy to put basil and chives in the bucket next to the bushier ones, for some companion planting. I'll be interested to see whether or not mine can get as big as yours and risk toppling over! I'm also interested to see whether the bush variety will produce as much fruit as the others. If so, I can see myself switching to just determinates for next year.
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2011
7:42 AM

Post #8636094

Kindlekat, I like the green buckets. My local Walmart has buckets in weird colors, like turquoise, pink, and yellow, but I've never seen the green ones.

So, if you put basil and chives in the bucket with the tomatoes, that probably means you're not using a cover (like the Earthbox), right? Did you mix your fertilizer into the planting mix? I've got "shower caps" (literally) on all my eBuckets, and used a ring of fertilizer around the top edge of the bucket. It seems to be working well so far (for the tomatoes), but I wish I had planted some the other way for a comparison test. For some reason, most of my peppers in eBuckets are NOT doing very well this year. I think I may have overdone the fertilizer - I mixed a 1/2 cup of Super Triple Phosphate into each bucket, and later found it should have been more like a tablespoon! (oops)

Yesterday, I added another tomato cage on top of the first one (on right in picture, yellow cages) in my 6-gallon eBucket with an indeterminate tomato (Black Prince). It's very tall and probably top heavy, but it held up to a big rainstorm that came through last night. I'll probably tie the cages to the bucket with some rope or bungee cords, and lash the whole thing to the deck.

Thumbnail by VitaVeggieMan
Click the image for an enlarged view.

VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2011
7:52 AM

Post #8636120

Amanda,

I'm with you on growing more things vertically! I haven't grown most of the things you listed in eBuckets (yet), but I think you should stick to one plant per bucket for most of them, except for peppers and bush beans. I have one bucket with three sweet peppers this year as a trial, and so far it's doing well (see picture). I haven't done bush beans in a bucket yet, but based on my experience growing them in an Earthbox, I would say you could fit 4 bean plants per bucket. If you plant pole beans in an eBucket, I think you can go up to 6 or 8, using a Maypole-type trellis. I planted six, and they're doing well so far.

Thumbnail by VitaVeggieMan
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 17, 2011
7:56 AM

Post #8636128

[quote] I mixed a 1/2 cup of Super Triple Phosphate into each bucket, and later found it should have been more like a tablespoon![/quote]

This reminded me of the time I put three tablespoons of super triple phosphate into my African Violet soil recipe instead of 3 teaspoons! Needless to say, the plants died!
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2011
7:57 AM

Post #8636132

VitaVeggieMan - You're right, I don't use a cover. I thought about it last year (my first year with ebuckets) but never got around to it. Same this year. I can see the benefits, but never really found I needed them. I do mix some of the Espoma regular fertilizer in with the potting soil and compost when I'm making my mix. Then, I fertilize as needed in different ways for my different plants. I don't do the ring of fertilizer.

Your tomatoes look AWESOME! I love the variety you have, looks like you'll be getting a great harvest soon. We had a storm blow through last night and filled my rain barrels, so everything is happy with water, but a little droopy.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 17, 2011
8:36 AM

Post #8636220

Thanks VeggiMan. Still putting together materials. And starting stuff from seed. :D

I have some old garden hose we cut off this spring to make a repair where it had sprung a leak. What do you all think about using that instead of PVC? I do have a lot of bamboo, but it would be great to find something useful to do with this length of hose.

Have a great day!

A.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2011
9:09 AM

Post #8636287

VVM,
Glad to see you went with the "shower cap" tip, and, more imporantly, that it works!
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 17, 2011
10:41 AM

Post #8636440

[quote="Kindlekat"]Your tomatoes look AWESOME! I love the variety you have, looks like you'll be getting a great harvest soon. We had a storm blow through last night and filled my rain barrels, so everything is happy with water, but a little droopy. [/quote]

Thanks Kindlekat! They look healthy so far, and I haven't had to spray them with anything yet. They are starting to put on fruit, so I've got my fingers crossed that I'll get a lot of tomatoes this year.

We had the same storm as you last night and it made a mess in all of my planters without covers, but at least I didn't lose any more plants!

I just built a rain barrel, but I haven't hooked it up yet. I'm planning to rig up an automated watering system to the rain barrel using the siphon method described over on the Global Bucket website. Unfortunately, I won't get that done before our vacation in a few weeks, so I'm counting on my teenage daughter for daily watering while I'm gone. Anybody want to take bets on how many plants are dead when I come home?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 17, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8636569

Line your eBuckets up (if possible) and run a drip hose across them. Turn it on to real sloooooooooow drip.

The plants should be healthier than when you left them, withOUT the DD's help...
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 19, 2011
10:29 AM

Post #8640245

I found this thread and am glad to read that folks are still interested and using ebuckets to grow plants in! I love mine!

I want to make a suggestion ... for those of you looking for buckets ... you might very well be able to get them for FREE from any local fast food restaurants. Pickles come in the 5 gallon buckets that McD, Wendy's, BK, etc. use. And often the buckets are white which is perfect for me as I live in the south and needed something to reflect the heat away from the roots. If you need darker buckets, you could wrap a black trash bag around the outside of the bucket with a hole for the drain hole. Re-using them would help keep these large buckets out of the landfills. They will deteriorate in time, but for free, who cares?!!!

I am still doing the double-bucket method instead of 1 bucket with a colander. Because it is so hot here, I like the 1 gallon reserve in the exterior bucket. I don't have to water as often. But I also really want to try a drip system. Many of my plants are grown in them because I have horrible soil here that is infested with knot-root nematodes which kill any new plants in the ground.

Here are 3 eggplants (only grow 1 per bucket as they get quite large and mine are pretty crowded - live and learn!). It's hard to see in the photo but it has quite a few black beauty eggplant veggies growing on it! The fence is 6' tall. So the plants get quite large! I have 3 stakes tied at the top to form a tee-pee shape shoved down inside the bucket soil to stabilize the plants from heavy winds. I am very happy with my buckets. This is my second year of using them! :-) All my buckets are free, so I'm helping the environment and growing happy plants at the same time!
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 19, 2011
10:31 AM

Post #8640249

Oops! Forgot to attached the photo. LOL!

Thumbnail by beckygardener
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beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 19, 2011
11:29 AM

Post #8640334

The biggest issue for me is how to make all these white buckets aesthetically pleasing. What I have been doing is actually placing them in my garden area. I have been trying to hide the buckets behind more appealing containers of plants or behind in-ground plants. At one point I thought of painting the buckets, but have decided against that idea because I prefer the white color. Trying to hide them behind plants or other containers seems my best option currently. I just need more attractive containers to place in front of them. Would love to hear other's ideas!

Thumbnail by beckygardener
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beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 19, 2011
11:34 AM

Post #8640342

Here is a line of them growing in my west garden bed along the fence. There are various veggies, fruits, and flowering plants in all these buckets. I grow bearded and non-bearded irises, plumeria, brugs, various vining plants (which include clematis, morning glories, and passiflora), and all kinds of other flowering plants.

Thumbnail by beckygardener
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 19, 2011
6:07 PM

Post #8641079

Because your fence is white, the buckets actually look quite nice with the greenery in them.

Although, I can see bands of color wrapped around them in stripes, maybe, or geometric blocks of color, perhaps. Tape would do for the stripes - painting them?

Or, do the stripes in only one color?
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 19, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8641236

Nice suggestion about the stripes. A lot of buckets to paint though if I did that. LOL! I am not motivated to get out in this heat and do that this year. I do like the solid white. I just think the buckets look like ... well ... BUCKETS!!! LOL! Not planters or containers, but buckets! LOL! If they looked more like white plant pots, I don't think the look would bother me at all.

In all honesty, if my yard soil was good soil, I'd be growing everything in the ground instead of containers. I'd much rather have a natural looking cottage garden appearance. But at least I can grow plants in my yard using the buckets and other containers. Otherwise my yard would be barren of plants.

The main thing I like about the buckets is that I can move them. I can move the plants around and I often do. Change the grouping of plants by color or foliage or sun or shade needs. I love that advantage. Probably why my plants do so well in the e-buckets. And the buckets are lighter and easier to pick up. My back thanks me for that! lol

So ... there are some things I like about the buckets and some things I don't. The end result is what really counts though ... and my plants win hands down! :-) Lots of happy and healthy plants are growing in all my buckets! What more could a gardener ask for! ♥
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 19, 2011
7:24 PM

Post #8641254

You know an idea that just popped in my head that might look cute ...

The wide wired ribbon that you can get at Christmas time would look really cute wrapped around each bucket and then make big bows at the front of the buckets to look like gifts! Maybe use different colored ribbon to match the plant blooms? Wouldn't that look rather whimsical? I think that would look really nice! I know the ribbon would fade, but probably last during the growing season. I'm going to have to try to locate some of that ribbon at Wally world. I used to see it go on sale after Christmas. May have to grab a bunch after the holidays this year. :-)

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 19, 2011
9:44 PM

Post #8641540

So about the tee-pees...

I have collected all my stuff, and I am going gung-ho tomorrow (even with the brace on my wrist).

I am thinking if I do the tee-pees that they weight of the plant will eventualy pull it down and make it sturdy against the ground as it grows larger. I do not intend to put the stakes into the buckets for this to occur. I will not have earth to secure them to as my container jungle is going in the sunny concrete driveway.

Any thoughts on how to make the tee-pee sturdier? I was thinking about an arbor, but wondering if that would block too much sun for the plants?

Thanks for any ideas.

A.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 19, 2011
10:07 PM

Post #8641570

Uh, I think you need to be about that wrist healing before you start tackling teepees!

Just when you're least expecting it, something will cause you to bump the booboo, and you'll suffer a setback.

Just my penny's worth.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 20, 2011
8:08 AM

Post #8642229

There is an able-bodied middle aged man in my home (his birthday Wednesday, 45 years old) and he is bringing me a truckload of mulch from the municipality and picking up the soil-less medium I need for the buckets. He's a vegetable gardener so he's glad I'm growing vegetables. See how far I can push him.

We were walking to an event for solstice at our arboretum last evening and saw a plastic colander on a small pile set out for trash day where a yard sale had been this weekend. We picked it up on the way back. See? gathering materials a little at a time. They turn up where you least expect them. :D

Thanks for the reminder about my hand. Nothing worth giving up my hand, ya know.

Have a great day.

A.
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 20, 2011
12:17 PM

Post #8642694

Amanda, I'm not clear on your plan for the tee-pees. You say you don't want to put the stakes in the buckets, but they are on the concrete driveway, so what will hold the stakes together at the bottom? What type of plants will you be growing in the buckets with tee-pees, and how tall are the stakes? An arbor could replace the stakes/teepee completely, but I'm not sure how you would attach it to the concrete driveway. A bit more information please...?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 20, 2011
2:11 PM

Post #8642972

Veggie man - I need to sit down and make some drawings, probably. If I lash 3 lengths of bamboo together to form a teepee, I would think that instead of inserting them into the pot that they would be self-sustaining as sort of a tripod. As the plant grows and becomes heavier it would weigh the teepee down with less risk of tipping which sounds like a concern. The teepee could be reinforced like an upside down tomato cage with wire or twine horizontally at intervals. Maybe it could be tied around the rim of the bucket somehow. OR the legs could be secured to one another around the bucket with twine or wire.

The point is to avoid tipping. I have access to dried bamboo 6'-10' lengths and plenty shorter than that too. With a wider base i would think there would be greater balance and lower center of gravity.

I have toyed with the idea of building an arbor also but wondered if that would allow enough light. Our driveway runs from the street down the length of the house - at least 100' or more. There is some soil on one side of the driveway but not on the house side. Like the idea with the teepee - I would think that the downward force of the plant's weight would offer structural integrity/equilibrium as well. It wouldn't be anything too fancy - we rent the house. Maybe some posts for legs, 2"x4"s to make cross braces on either side, a facing board on the outside at the top for sort of cosmetics. I have access to a friend's wood heap and the arbor is something I will visualize and plan depending on the amount/type of wood available. I'm in a pinch right now and can't go out to purchase supplies.

My BF has generously offered to purchase my soiless media for me.
With this bum hand I have had trouble getting to work with the power tools and setting up the buckets, but the materials are coming together and I'm pleased with that.


Sorry I can't give you specs on teepees or possible arbor. It's in my head and I will know it when I see it.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 20, 2011
7:56 PM

Post #8643642

Amanda - If you are going to attached the bamboo to the container one way or another, I can see it tipping over if the plants get top-heavy, but when you place a bunch of the ebuckets together, that's less likely to happen. If you don't add the bamboo teepees to the inside of the buckets, then what happens when you have to move them? You're likely to break the branches or stems to untangle them from the bamboo.

Here is an example of the bamboo inside the container. This is not a self-watering container, but does become top heavy when the vines get thicker at the top of the teepee.
http://davesgarden.com/community/blogs/i/50129/

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 22, 2011
9:08 AM

Post #8646731

Thanks. I am way behind you all as you can see. The wrist brace has really slowed everything down. I'm thankful for the long growing season, though. Just about have everything together to fill those buckets EXCEPT:

My BF offered to go get me my soil-less soil components for me and I was very happy with that.
He called me from the big box store to tell me they didn't have what I wanted.

When he got home he was very pleased with himself because he bought the best he could buy - MG Organic Garden Soil 1.5 cf. :/

It's forest product, PBF, sphagnum peat. There is also the chicken poop fertilizer and I have always told people not to use garden soil/mix in containers because the nutrient content might be too much for containerized plantings.

What do you think? Do I have to take these 6 bags of soil back?!

I'm afraid I know the answer...

A.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 23, 2011
10:53 AM

Post #8649150

AmandaEsq - my experience with using MS Garden Soil in pots was not a happy one :(

I think it packed-down too much and deprived the plants of oxygen.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 23, 2011
11:15 AM

Post #8649188

You can add some pine fines and/or perlite to that potting mix to lighten it. That's what I do when I get heavy potting mix.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 23, 2011
11:20 AM

Post #8649197

Uh, no good way to say this. Soil goes in the ground. Potting MIX goes in containers...

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 24, 2011
10:33 AM

Post #8651579

Yeah, I already knew the answer. I hate that. Wonder, if the MG Organic potting mix is the same price I could trade 'em out. He's away on vacation - was trying to do a nice for me - hate that - he rarely goes out of his way like that - and spent a lot on it too.

Will head out today to discuss with customer service at the big box store.

hugs!
A.
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

June 24, 2011
10:43 AM

Post #8651616

Hi beckygardener and other friends.
Go here and you will find a whole bunch of people doing just this technique.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1029953/
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

June 24, 2011
3:08 PM

Post #8652212

lonejack,

No good way to say this, but I'm pretty sure eBuckets are not standard hydroponic systems and require a very different set of tools and containers.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 24, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8652745

It is an interesting thread, though, and just a variation on a theme of watering from the bottom. I do appreciate the link. Thanks.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2011
8:55 AM

Post #8663964

Geez it's almost embarrassing to say I'm just starting my vegetables, but well . . .. :D

The plants are ready - grown from seed. I have finally put together a number of buckets. I went with Linda's hardware and took that MG soil back to where it came from.

Here's a pic. I had a length of watering hose from where we cut it to repair a leak.

I'll keep at it!!!

Thanks for your help.

A.

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2011
9:51 AM

Post #8664102

WOW! That is a VERY, VERY, VERY nice setup!

How tall are the reservoir containers? Just keep in mind that the height of your reservoir determines the depth of your available soilbed for planting.

I usually go with something that'll leave me a bit more than half a bucket of soil depth for planting. I probably could raise my reservoir a bit, though, and plant in as little as 12" of soil.

EXCELLENT JOB!

You know, only gardeners can get soooooooooooo excited about a basket, a bucket, a tube, and a straw...^^_^^
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 30, 2011
11:04 AM

Post #8664259

I used the colander in a slightly larger container than the buckets, this year, and my tomatoes look terrible. I used the dolomite per instructions, and the fert. ring, with coir and about 25% perlite. I'm wondering if they're staying too wet, since the wicking material is packed all around the colander, or if that is limiting the air space. I ate the first tomato yesterday, and it was dry and tasteless. The grape tomato next to this is somewhat better, but still has very few leaves. Any thoughts before I yank them and start over?

Thumbnail by OCCAROL
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OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 30, 2011
11:05 AM

Post #8664261

A close up of the leaves

Thumbnail by OCCAROL
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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2011
12:41 PM

Post #8664466

OCCAROL,
Did your plant ever grow more leaves than in the pictures? I think there's something wrong with the plant, not the bucket...
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 30, 2011
2:14 PM

Post #8664648

No. They just never developed many leaves. They obviously aren't going to make it through the summer, so I will be replacing them soon, but I'm wondering what else I need to change. The grape tomato is almost as bad, but at least they're edible, if a little tough skinned. Both are "Bonnie" plants.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 30, 2011
2:47 PM

Post #8664706

We might need a review before you plant the next tomatoes. I'll stay in touch with you on this one.

Tell me exactly what you used in the eBucket(s): for potting medium. Dolomite (how much?), fertilizer (how much and what did you use?)
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 30, 2011
4:04 PM

Post #8664866

Dolomite- about 1 1/2 cups, Fert.- Kelloggs organic Tomato & Veg. 4-6-3, 2 1/2 to 3 cups. Mixed the lime in the medium, made a ring with the fert.
Medium is coir+ 25% perlite. Took off a couple of bottom leaves and planted deep, slowly filling to top of pot. Reservoir holds about 1 1/2 Ga. of water (same as buckets did). Weather here has been exceptionally cool (70s), so I've only needed to top off every other day. I tried a dose of MG Tomato food in the reservoir last week. No results, so far.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8664943

I think I read also that water soluble fert is not recommended.

Also - maybe too cool? I have 2 plants other people gave to me. Both developed branches that were yellowish while waiting (and still waiting) for me to plant them. I wonder - does the coir wick the water well enough?

Best let Gymgirl handle this. I am quite admittedly a novice not only with tomatoes but eBuckets too!

Good luck.

A.
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 30, 2011
6:21 PM

Post #8665086

Amanda, We are all novices with e-buckets! I did them last year with no problems . Mine show to the street, and the buckets are...what can I say, tacky looking? I'm not on a tight budget, so I decided to do the same thing with more decorative pots. Something went wrong though, and I'm looking for ideas. The coir wicks water very well...maybe too well? I just don't know. I thought it might be the typical May gray, June gloom here, but I have a volunteer from one of last years buckets that is looking really good, in spite of being in too much shade, and getting no water. I'm open to any and all suggestions! This whole e-bucket thread is about learning from feedback.
I'll be the first to tell you "tomatoes grow best in the ground", however if you don't have the ground available, or have seriously bad soil problems, this is a way to have "real" tomatoes, as opposed to those ones you buy at the store. Ha! And these don't come from Mexico! Buy American!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 30, 2011
6:40 PM

Post #8665133

@Gymgirl - the baskets I used for the reservoir were somewhere about 7" or 8" high. The store where I bought them only had 3 (they were at Rite Aid near NCSU and were starting to sell dollar priced items to attract students and compete (?) with the dollar type stores?). They are the perfect size in the 5 gallon bucket. I found a brand new plastic colander on a neighbor's refuse pile after their yard sale. So that's 4 completed buckets.

I really was thrilled/stupefied when the water started coming out of the overflow/straw. Yes - absurd. I'm like "it works, it works!!!" Heh.

Today I planted 2 large maters that a friend gave me - don't know what they are but they took off like rockets together. She had them in peat pots and then again in an 11" hanging basket pot with only about 3" of mulch! And they both were about 2' tall by the time I planted them today. I tell ya there's something to planting in soil-less mix!

I used the scott's topsoil which I had mentioned before. I didn't dress it up at all. I'm adding pelletized fert tomorrow.

I also planted an eggplant a friend gave me called "fingers"? I think they are long-ish and skinny.

I planted 1 bucket with 2 of my butternut squash. One on either side. I think I will make 2 trellis/tee-pee contraptions, one on either side so each plant can grow away from the other. Everyone's comments about the support structures are as concern what happens when I have to move it. Why would I have to move it?!

I sorted my collection of dried bamboo today. I have some that are up to 15' tall. I have a concept for my pole beans so I think I will need the tall poles for them.

I have a good number of pretty thick stalks about 6' tall. They will probably be for my jelly bean tomatoes which are indeterminate. I think the tomatoes I planted today and one other that I have won't get tall tall.

I have zucchini and yellow squash someone gave me and slicing cucumbers which I'm really excited about. I hope by going vertical I can keep the critters from eating my stuff. They have eaten more than their share of bird seed to the point where I have stopped feeding altogether. It's an okay time to do that now - birds have other food sources. Mammals will have to figure it out.

Um, Peppers!!! I am THRILLED because I did find seeds finally for large cherry peppers. My seedlings are only about 3" high, but they look very healthy. Want to pickle some. Yum! Someone also gave me some Thai peppers which I understand are very hot - I eat a lot of Tai food, so I'm not sure how they will go. I wanted to grow some bell peppers and have seeds for some hungarian wax. What would Shoe say about me starting peppers now?!

Beans are sprouted. Bush beans and the purple italian trionfono pole beans.

I guess they will all go in buckets!

Many miles to go before I . . .stop planting buckets. Best get it done ASAP though. Will keep you posted. I might have to do what OCCAROL did and settle for Bonnie plants.

Hope you get that riddle solved.

Going back out there to push stuff around in the dark. :D

A.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

June 30, 2011
6:45 PM

Post #8665146

I've been reading the posts of recent and I'm wondering a few things, OCCAROL...

The containers that you are growing your sickly tomatoes in ... are they the same containers as was used for last year's tomatoes? Is the soil new soil or left over from last year? Mine have done well this year. I use compost mixed in with my potting mix. The tomatoes seem to love it. I also fertilize with MG liquid veggie fertilizer. We've had a lot of rain lately, but it hasn't seemed to bother my tomato plants, surprisingly. One of my plants produced a lot of tomatoes and then started rotting, so I ripped it out and planted a new tomato plant which is currently doing well.

I am wondering how long most tomato plants last? What temps do they grow best in? And how much sun is enough or too much during the summer heat?
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

June 30, 2011
8:33 PM

Post #8665368

Beckygardner, I did regular buckets last year. These pots are a little larger. I used the old mix for the wicking, and put fresh mix on top.. My tomatoes have bloomed and set plenty of fruit in the 70 degree range, just no leaves. They tend to stop producing when temps get in the 90s, then come back when it cools down in the fall. We're talking indeterminates. Back in the days when I had more sun, and garden space, I planted them in the ground and have harvested on New Years day, but trees have grown and ground has turned to Flowers. We are in the same zone, but I'm a couple of months behind you on summer.We're just coming out of JUNE GLOOM, so sun hasn't appeared before noon. Two days of 80s has fried all the flowers because they haven't had time to adjust to that much sun. This week we're supposed to be in the 80s, but we have been 10 degrees below normal all spring. All that blazing heat in the south stopped at the Ca. border. That is another possible issue with my plants this year, but as I said above, I've got a volunteer from last year, in the ground, that's doing very well.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 1, 2011
9:26 PM

Post #8667293

Hey, OCCarol,
Looking at your planting formula, I might be a little off, but in the last season I was cautioned about using more than 1 cup of fertilizer in the 5-gallon buckets. I had always used 2 cups like the EB instructions recommended, and I never associated overfertilizing with any of the "maladies" I experienced in my tomato plants.

This past season, I almost wiped out 208 perfectly healthy tomato seedlings because I got zealous with the fertilizer. I managed to save 2/3 of the crop.

I think I'd try cutting back on the fertilizer and see what happens.

Linda
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 1, 2011
10:13 PM

Post #8667343

Linda - Being in a self-contained bucket or pot, doesn't the fertilizer recycle within the container? It doesn't have the ability to leech out in the soil like it would if it was in the ground. I think that may be why it is best to go easy on the fertilizer and to adjust as your plants appear to need it. That's just my thoughts on the fertilizing part of growing plants this way. I, too, have done a lot of trial and error containers and plants. Still learning ...
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 2, 2011
12:33 PM

Post #8668203

Hmm, that's a possibility. I was going on the EB recommendations for "organic" fertilizers, since these pots are a bit larger than the buckets.

Becky, when you put the fert. in a ring, as apposed to mixing it in, you are supposed to remove it before reusing the medium. It's pretty easy to just scrape it up.
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 2, 2011
1:25 PM

Post #8668272

OCCAROL - I don't cover most of my buckets with a lid. Only a few of them. I've found that the ones that weren't covered did better. Go figure! I use MiracleGro Organic liquid mixed with Fish Emulsion. I water the fertilizer mix directly into the soil with a watering can. I don't fertilize that often. I still have two tomato plants that look great and are producing tomatoes. As well as all the other veggies and herbs. Everything is doing quite well even in this heat. Everything is producing fruit/veggies continually. So I'm going to stick with my method. I also use the double buckets instead of one just using the colander method. I can't find cheap colanders here as I looked. So the double bucket method is my containers.

I also have a few plants I am just growing in a single bucket with holes drilled in the bottom. I think I might try drilling holes an inch or 2 up the sides if I make more. Water can collect in the inside bottom of the buckets. I keep thinking of a small kiddie pool idea, to sit nursery pots in and just have shallow water in the pool at all times to keep the plants hydrated. That would be good for starter plants like daylilies, canna, etc.
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 2, 2011
4:26 PM

Post #8668555

That's something to think about. I keep thinking that I put my drain tubes too high in the reservoir, not allowing enough air space. I'll check that when I change the plants out.
luvcats
Raleigh, NC
(Zone 8a)

July 6, 2011
7:00 AM

Post #8675698

so when my tomatoes are done, what can i plant in my EBucket for the fall or winter?
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 6, 2011
2:20 PM

Post #8676603

Here's what I'm going to plant as fall crops in eBuckets:

- Cabbage
- Collard greens
- Kale
- Broccoli
- Cauliflower
- Sugar Snap Peas
- Carrots
- Parsnips
mllinden
Sioux City, IA

July 10, 2011
2:04 PM

Post #8684438

Here is my garden in ebuckets.

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mllinden
Sioux City, IA

July 10, 2011
2:17 PM

Post #8684464

I have 14 tomato plants, 6 different peeppers, and 5 cucumbers all in buckets with an automated watering system. Here are the cukes.

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beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 10, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8684481

That is a really awesome set-up you have! I'd love to see a close-up of your automated watering system. :-)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 10, 2011
3:29 PM

Post #8684557

Millenden,
That is a fantastic setup you have there! I'd like some pics of the trellis system you're using.

Linda
mllinden
Sioux City, IA

July 10, 2011
3:30 PM

Post #8684561

The watering system is not my original idea. I got it from this thread :

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/917064/?hl=self+watering

It was SOOOOOOO easy to set up and I am not mechanical at all. I am trying to upload a video of my garden, but youtube is being SLOW. I will see if I can find a photo close-up of the watering system in the meantime!
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 10, 2011
3:32 PM

Post #8684563

Do post the link for the YouTube link when you get it uploaded, too! :-)
mllinden
Sioux City, IA

July 10, 2011
3:34 PM

Post #8684567

Ok, Linda. I will go snap a picture of the trellis as well. None of these ideas are my own. I got the trellis from the internet also. Here is the link:

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=conduit+trellis&view=detail&id=037213CC9A6CF49A5C93E6208BCD75AFC584FDB0&first=0&FORM=IDFRIR

I'll be back in a bit!

Michelle
mllinden
Sioux City, IA

July 10, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8684575

Linda and Becky,

I started a new thread for the video. As soon as YouTube finishes, I will post a link to the video and pics of the trellis and watering system. My teenagers are begging for food, and YouTube claims says that my video has 176 minutes remaining (my boys claim it will be faster), so it will probably be a couple of hours before I get it all done. Sorry!

Michelle

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
5:02 PM

Post #8684684

That's nice work Michelle - also thanks for posting all your links and videos. It's so helpful for us newbees to see others' projects too.

While browsing the link to the conduit trellis I did another search for working with bamboo, and I found mine too!

I appreciate the inspiration and motivation to look just one more time. I'm going vertical with buckets on th concrete drive that runs the length of the house and sits between the house (where it meets the concrete) and the neighbor's retaining wall. :D

Not a lot of space.

I'm psyched! Still dealing with injured hand and now kidney infection/dehydration "issue" so I'm a little farther behind. Keep you posted. One day soon (I hope) I will be posting my pictures too. :)

A.
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

July 10, 2011
7:20 PM

Post #8684953

Amand, watch that dehydration. It can also cause low blood count. My DH was in hospital for 4 days because of kidney failure and dehydration. He had suffered from anemia for years. Soon as kidney were hydrated, the anemia went away along with the kidney failure. Sharon.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
8:00 PM

Post #8685013

Thanks Sharon. I have to remind myself how serious it is/could be/have been.

I will certainly do a lot less tomorrow. Like someone else on a different thread said today-sometimes you get so behind you just HAVE to do something. She was able to get her handyman come and do them for her. I AM the maid, the gardener, the garden staff, the critter keeper . . .. You know what I mean. Been flat on my back since last Tuesday. BF said I did more today than I have in the last 6 days put together.

Anywho. I am sitting here with my 32 oz. Nalgene bottle of water which has been filled and drained at least 3 times since my last post. ;)

Have a good night.

A.

WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

July 10, 2011
9:12 PM

Post #8685103

Amanda, I have always been the head of the house. My DH is a very smart, high IQ, but does not believe in manual labor. I finally came to terms with myself that we did not march to them same drummer. He could not even hear the drummer. But that was after 20 years of marriage.

And I made all the income. I guess GOD sent him to the right person. And I think he knows that. But if I could not feed myself, he would feed me every day and visa versa. Going on 38 years of marriage. But gardening and helping in the repairs was never his thing. I finally realized I could hire it done and that ended a lot of evil thoughts in my mind. Now we joke about it. I introduce him to the handy man, always the same one, and tell him the handyman is doing his honey do list so he should thank him when he is done. Keep strong young lady. And take care of yourself.
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2011
7:31 AM

Post #8685625

Well, it's July, and the garden is in full swing now in zone 7a! We're getting ripe cherry tomatoes, cucumbers, squash, snap beans, hot peppers, and lots of lettuce and other leafy greens. Here are a few pictures of my eBucket garden from above. This is the left side of my rear deck. In the eBuckets, from the left, are (1) Red Malabar Spinach (with tripod trellis), (2) Swiss chard, (3) carrots, (4) more Swiss chard, (5) Orach Magenta Magic, (6) New Zealand Spinach, (7) Violet podded stringless pole beans (with maypole trellis), and (8) Teddy Bear Sunflowers.

This message was edited Jul 11, 2011 1:20 PM

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VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2011
7:42 AM

Post #8685648

Here's the right side of the garden deck. From the right, the eBuckets contain: (1) a Black Prince tomato (white 6-gallon bucket with yellow cage), (2) the cluster of 6 red buckets hold a few peppers and determinate tomatoes, (3) a Serrano hot pepper, (4) a cluster of three more peppers. The four indeterminate tomatoes in the two EarthTainers have grown way past the tops of their cages, and are at least eight feet tall, with lots of large green tomatoes (Big Beef, Black Crimson, Juliet, and Early Goliath). Most of my veggies are a bit slower to grow and ripen this year because I don't get as much sunlight on this deck as I used to. Still, I'm hoping for a good tomato and pepper harvest a little later than usual!

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VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2011
7:49 AM

Post #8685662

Here's one of my determinate tomatoes, a Patio Princess, and it's got at least 25 good sized fruits on it. This is a great size plant for eBuckets and is doing fine with a single bamboo stake. Next year, I'll start these on a staggered basis about 3 weeks apart for a more continuous harvest. However, I do like that the determinates give up after a big burst of ripe fruit because that will allow me to plant my fall crops earlier in the same buckets. With the indeterminate tomatoes, I just can't bear to cut them down if they still have tomatoes on them. I'll probably have to build a few more eBuckets for the fall garden!

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2011
7:52 AM

Post #8685667

Sharon - you're a strong lady, self-made. What's not to love? :)

When I quit my law practice I used to joke about my BF who doesn't like to be called a social worker, but works with the mentally ill. He works for a private corporation now and has made middle management. Still can't move up any higher without a master's degree. But I tell people that he thought he had himself a cash cow until I quit my job.

His daddy built custom kitchen cabinets and special order furniture for a living. He inherited his daddy's tools, but he's not very handy. He knows it. I know it. I joke about it. He doesn't appreciate the joking. It took me some years and some quiet disappointment in the results of some of our "projects" to figure that out. :)

I joke about the maid coming (when's the maid going to get here?!) which is usually an acknowledgement that I'm behind in my chores. So it is frustrating to be sidelined and watch tumbleweeds of critter hair pile up on the hardwoods. But I will mind my doctor's orders today and get lots of rest and lots of fluids.

Thanks for sharing. Your guy sounds like a good sport. :)

Have a great day.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2011
7:54 AM

Post #8685671

VeggieMan - when I looked at your first picture all I could say was "WOW."

You have a nice setup. :)

OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

July 11, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8685689

Great looking garden!
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 11, 2011
11:25 AM

Post #8686106

Thanks! It's so nice to get some positive feedback on the garden here. :>)

I've learned a lot from all of you!
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 11, 2011
8:06 PM

Post #8687225

I love your patio set-up, too, VitaVeggieMan!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 12, 2011
6:23 AM

Post #8687663

That patio is "Duh Bomb!" You've got so much growing on!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:44 PM

Post #8753033

Hey everybody - bumping this thread. Finally got my stuff growing. I'm sort of ashamed that my spring crop has become my fall crop. Heh.

I wonder if it's the heat, not enough water, not enough food, too much of any of the above . . .

The fingerling eggplant is doing the best of anything. When do they turn purple?

Tomatoes just starting to bear ripe fruit.

Butternut - the first 2 plants planted in 1 bucket together. Each plant has one squash - one is about 5" long, the other only about 2". The flowers bust open very prettily, but I am having blossom rot, methinks. So many flowers - only 1 fruit on each plant. I read other threads - have not planted in buckets before, but I assume same holds true - not enough water and/or not enough nutrients? They did suffer a little when they were set out in the sun initially. I am watering from the top in this heat till water runs from the drain hole to make sure there's enough water. Have added additional granule food. Have "mulched" with dead grass/weed clippings (hey! on a poverty budget here!). Wonder if that will improve things? Have also seen the yellowish/orangey beetlebugs with black stripes. Have stink bugs also hanging out on these plants.

Watermelon had a tiny fruit which fell off. :/
Have kept it watered and added more granules to combat this. Having a bloom every other day-ish now. See tiny fruits, will see what happens.

Cucumbers - too soon to tell. :)

Trionfono purple pole beans - just getting 'em trained onto the teepee.

Pretty lame, eh?

Any help with these issues above which may or may not have Ebucket remedies will be appreciated!

A.

p.s. I will not use insecticide. Please only natural remedies if you have any to suggest. Thanks!

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:44 PM

Post #8753035

Beans.

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8753037

Eggplant.

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:46 PM

Post #8753038

The first squash.

These photos were all taken last week.

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:49 PM

Post #8753041

Almost forgot the watermelon!

(it's gone now but have at least 2 that have taken it's place).

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:50 PM

Post #8753044

O well. While I'm at it here's the trellis I made for the mandevilla. This pic is for Gym_girl. I learned how to tie the Japanese ibo knot for this project. May be a future in there for me?! ;)

A.

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
8:52 PM

Post #8753049


The ibo knot.

The teepee and teepee trellis were fairly haphazard. No fancy knots there, but I am going to put up some more cross posts on each side of the "pyramid" to hold the weight of what I expect to be a giant harvest of butternut and sugar baby watermelon. ;)

A.

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joy112854
Crestview, FL

August 13, 2011
7:18 AM

Post #8753546

Amanda: Those plants look so healthy and I love your trellis.
joy
beckygardener
(Becky) in Sebastian, FL
(Zone 10a)

August 13, 2011
7:37 AM

Post #8753564

Great job on the trellis! I like it!

Your plants are looking wonderful and may do better now as the season starts cooling down. Some of my veggies got fried by the heat this year! I look forward to seeing and hearing about your progress as they mature and produce edibles!
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

August 13, 2011
1:55 PM

Post #8754122

Great job. Sharon

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 30, 2011
3:16 PM

Post #8785483

This BUMP is for Amanda!

Girl, I need a knot tying tutorial I can follow!!!! You're a professional now. I went back and reviewed your pics, and you tied a LOT of knots, so I know you have mastered it!

How's your eBucket garden faring? Post some updated pics, please.

I FINALLY scheduled this weekend for my Hurricane IKE (2008) replacement fence to go up, and, my weatherman has predicted 60%%% chance of rain Friday. First day of more than 1" of rain in 218 days!!!! And, I was gonna have the fence guy build my first raised bed while he was here.

Who'd a thought I'd be praying for it NOT to rain in Houston???!!!

Oh, well, looks like I'll be doing that eBucket garden after all. Good thing I held on to the buckets!

P.S. eBucket news flash!!!!

I'm about to embark on a gardening project at two different schools. Each 4th grader will build and monitor their own eBucket, and grow one veggie! The selection will include: cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower, or Brussels Sprouts. I'm providing the seedlings! There will be 30 eBuckets going on the school garden site! And, my co-worker parent who's coordinating between me and the school, came up with the idea of letting each child decorate his/her eBucket! How cool is that???

They'll also start several community flats of spinach and lettuce (since these will produce a faster harvest for the kids). They can have a living salad garden and harvest microgreens, and learn to thin them out toharvest mature plants, too. Making them wait 60-90 days for a cabbage or broccoli to mature might prove a bit much to ask of them, so we'll give them some nice greens in the meanwhile.

Ya'll pray for me, hear?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 30, 2011
3:42 PM

Post #8785548

Linda:

Ha Ha Ha - yes it's a super cool project, but you will need the prayers for sure. :)

If you need to see any of the knot tying sources I looked at let me know. I ended up having to go nautical to get the basics in order to go back to the traditional Japanese knot tying. Once you get the hang of it it's fairly easy, depending on what you are building. Since I was building a trellis I wanted it to look a little more tidy than the teepee trellis which was very haphazard. :D

I let my squash plants go - they were for sure the only plants infected. I put the sugar snap peas in there last week and will wait for them to show themselves.

I was so thrilled this morning - literally - to see tiny beans on my damned bean pole. They are only an inch long, but you know - I have to take the joys of gardening where I can get them.

Thanks for asking. The stuff is sort of slow growing, but it's progress and I will post a pic or two this week since you asked. :)

A.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
7:49 AM

Post #8786704

Gymgirl - what a wonderful school project. I hope more schools across the country start these types of projects, it's so important that children learn how to grow their own food. I wish I could live long enough to see the day when growing vegetables in your own backyard was as common as it was when I was a child growing up in England.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 31, 2011
8:00 AM

Post #8786726

AmandaEsq,

[quote]I ended up having to "go nautical to get the basics" in order to go back to the traditional Japanese knot tying[/quote]

So, you had to buy a yacht and sail around the world for a year, serving as a deckhand on your own ship, doing all the rigging, knot tying, yarring, cooking, and swabbing the decks?

SUH-WEET!!! ^^_^^^^_^^ (me and Amanda, tying Japanese knots on the Island of Mali...)

This message was edited Aug 31, 2011 10:00 AM

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
8:17 AM

Post #8786763

Gymgirl - or you could check with a local craft store for a book on knots, and photograph the page with your cell 'phone!

(I've never done this, and it's probably not legal)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 31, 2011
8:42 AM

Post #8786795

A book on tying knots. Thanks, Bee!

BTW, My sister sends everyone in the family drugstore b'day cards that she's photographed on her cellphone. Some of them even play music! I was shocked and appalled, and told her I'd come visit her in jail, but I wouldn't be sending her a card!

Actually, the camera phone trick comes in handy, just when you least expect it. I was in the supermarket shopping for ingredients to make Rice Krispie treats and I couldn't remember something. I looked on the back of the box I was buying, and it WASN'T there!!!! But, the Rice Krispie treats recipe is ALWAYS on the box!!! Not!

It was the Christmas Holidays and, of course, they knew everyone would be making those desserts. So, they shifted the recipe to the LARGE box of Rice Krispies (which I didn't need). But, I needed the recipe. So, I whipped out my trusty cellphone camera, and, Snap! Crackle! and Popped! that recipe right off that large box...

I don't pirate videotaped movies, either. I detest that practice with all my heart...

Linda

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
11:28 AM

Post #8787084

O my goodness. Glad my cell phone does not have a camera.

Ready for the islands, Linda. Just say the word - the yacht washed ashore during the hurricane. Will have to stow away. ;)

A.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 31, 2011
12:00 PM

Post #8787147

LOL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 1, 2011
7:02 AM

Post #8788300

Actually, I don't have a cell phone that takes photos (it's a Jitterbug) - but my daughter does. It comes in handy when we are on our walks and see an insect we can't identify.
luvcats
Raleigh, NC
(Zone 8a)

September 10, 2011
8:17 AM

Post #8802115

[quote="VitaVeggieMan"]Here's what I'm going to plant as fall crops in eBuckets:

- Cabbage
- Collard greens
- Kale
- Broccoli
- Cauliflower
- Sugar Snap Peas
- Carrots
- Parsnips[/quote]

Hiya! I was wanting to know, how many plants of cabbage or collards to you put in each bucket? I have two buckets but want to plant some cabbage and collards so i need to know how many seedlings to buy.
Thanks!!!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 10, 2011
8:19 AM

Post #8802118

My watermelon collapsed this week. I harvested a cute melon about the size of a large cantaloupe. We are going to open it today. Poor thing . . .. :/

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 10, 2011
10:10 AM

Post #8802222

Luvcats,
I've grown the following of each in my eBuckets:

- Cabbage (1)
- Collard greens
- Kale (never grown before)
- Broccoli (1)
- Cauliflower (1)
- Sugar Snap Peas (never grown before)

- Carrots. Have only grown them in a small raised bed. This time, I'm using a free draining (no reservoir), clear plastic Rubbermaid tub to grow my carrots in. You can also grow them in the green rubbermaid tubs, too. Just drill plenty drain holes in the bottom and some on the sides about 1/4" up. Here's a pic of the tubs.

- Parsnips probably grow the same as carrots, in tubs.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 12, 2011
2:33 PM

Post #8805485

Hey Guys,
I can't find Al, and need to know how many cubic feet of potting mix a standard 5-gallon bucket holds. The 4th grader teacher is waiting to purchase the potting medium. They'll most likely be using Tapla's 5:1:1 container mix for the project.

Thanks!

Linda
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

September 12, 2011
7:51 PM

Post #8806013

There are 0.6684 cubic feet in five gallons. I looked it up on Google.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 13, 2011
3:04 AM

Post #8806260

Yer so smart. :D

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2011
7:50 AM

Post #8806580

So,
TWENTY-FIVE, five-gallon eBuckets x 0.6684 cf = 16.71 cf divided by 2.0 cf per large bag of MG potting mix = 8.355 bags to fill the 25 eBuckets, right?

And, a patented Earthbox takes 2 cups Dolomite lime, 2 cups of fertilizer, and 2.0 cf of potting mix.

A 5-gallon eBucket holds roughly 1/3 the total of the Earthbox.

So, each eBucket would take approximately
5.3 ounces Dolomite lime
5.3 ounces 10-10-10 fertilizer

Yes?





This message was edited Sep 13, 2011 10:04 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2011
8:10 AM

Post #8806602

My brain hurts...

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 13, 2011
8:20 AM

Post #8806615

Ow. Now my eyes hurt.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 13, 2011
8:24 AM

Post #8806619

My brain hurts, too - do they have an APP for that? LOL

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 13, 2011
8:29 AM

Post #8806624

:D

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2011
8:42 AM

Post #8806646

Come on, ya'll. I need help, please...?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 13, 2011
9:27 AM

Post #8806703

O hon, I'm sorry I sort of thought that was a rhetorical question up there. Not only am I math challenged, I couldn't find my calculator if it was tied to my neck.


Where the hell is Sharon when you need her magnificent brain?!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2011
10:43 AM

Post #8806788

I thought ya'll were math wizards! Numbers elude me -- but WORDS? AHA!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 13, 2011
12:04 PM

Post #8806869

Just found this thread and looks like I'll have another project with those e-buckets . Linda , now I know why Bubba was saving all those buckets for you .HA ! I hope he has some for me when we see him in early Nov . I'm gonna try that .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2011
1:55 PM

Post #8807005

Digger,
He's got PLENTY buckets!!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 13, 2011
3:54 PM

Post #8807134

Good , good , good ! I can use a bunch . My places , my sons place and left overs to shovel oyster shell in for my walks and drive .I can't carry but 10 buckets at the time .
Do you find the e-bucket gives superior planting and harvest than the conventional ?And how about ease of care ?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

September 13, 2011
4:20 PM

Post #8807170

Digger,
I'm about to set up 40+ ebuckets. Still tweaking my mix, but last season was the 1st time I used Tapla's 5:1:1 container mix, and had the healthiest tomato plants and best harvest (modest) ever, since I've been veggie gardening!

I definitely came out ahead $$$ by using the pine bark as the base of the mix.

Linda
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 13, 2011
4:48 PM

Post #8807206

I'll go back and read up some more on it . Sounds like the best way to beat that drought , and my boy worked so hard on his first garden ever this last summer . I sure don't want him discouraged .He watered every evening , and kept things going , but want him to enjoy more and work less . So glad I found this thread .
VitaVeggieMan
Clifton, VA
(Zone 7a)

October 1, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8831548

[quote="luvcats"]

Hiya! I was wanting to know, how many plants of cabbage or collards to you put in each bucket? I have two buckets but want to plant some cabbage and collards so i need to know how many seedlings to buy.
Thanks!!![/quote]

Luvcats,

Sorry, I've been busy building my greenhouse, so I haven't had time to log on lately.

I would go with one cabbage plant per bucket (same for broccoli and cauliflower), and three collards per bucket.

Good luck!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 11, 2011
9:36 AM

Post #8844991

OK , I bought the last five collanders at Dollar Tree yesterday that were strong . They had a bunch more that seemed a little flimsy and had narrow slits for drainage . Has anyone seen them , and are they strong enough ? Will be looking for more in other D T 's in the area . I want to get all my stuff together .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 11, 2011
10:01 AM

Post #8845010

Long as you lean on them and they don't collapse easily, you're good to go! How many eBuckets are you putting together?
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 11, 2011
12:15 PM

Post #8845150

Total of twenty . I want to leave ten with my kid for next spring , maybe three for him to plant now for cold weather stuff .I'll keep them at the coast , spinach , something that grows fast , to get him hooked .(Mothers are so devious )

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 11, 2011
8:23 PM

Post #8845756

Ok. That IS devious!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 15, 2011
1:10 PM

Post #8850014

Where do you get Tapla ? Don't think I've heard of it . And does H D sell the small pine bark ?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 15, 2011
9:12 PM

Post #8850523

Digger!
Tapla (Al) is the soil and composting guru over on that thread. The container recipe is his.

I'll semd you my cellphone number so you can call me tomorrow and I can explain further. Ezier to talk than type.

Linda

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2011
12:22 AM

Post #8850590

WAH!!! I want Gym Girl's cell phone number.
Just kidding.

I happened upon a thread and ultimately his profile page on GardenWeb too. I'm still getting some jellybean tomatoes and the others are growing slowly. Nights here dipping into mid to upper 40s and 50s. Next week looks like we'll be dropping more steadily.

Linda - I have a Omar's Lebanese which a friend gave me and I planted VERY LATE. It has the most glorious foliage I've ever seen - beautiful green and the fuzzy tomato hairs are GOLD! It has had flowers but too late to expect any fruit. I saw someone post somewhere asking about taking cuttings of tomatoes. Whaddya think of me bringing some of this inside as a foliage plant so it can go gangbusters in the spring?

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 16, 2011
7:01 AM

Post #8850770

Tapla , DUH ! Sent dmail . I agree , typing takes too long .If you get there , (hopefully ) I'll see you Sun . pm on the 30Th .
Amanda I have several Beef master volunteers and plan to take suckers , re pot and transport to south Texas . They grow 15' , so plan on pruning back as they grow . If I have any success , I'll post it .They will be outside mostly , but have brought inside for short periods in the past . Heat , sun, is the key .

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2011
7:05 AM

Post #8850772

Digger - I've been meaning to mention that I've been to Dahlonega. My BF and I started the AT in N. Georgia and enjoyed the scenery! ;)

When are you moving to TX? Do keep me posted. I looked at the tomato plant again this morning and said hello to the gold glinting off of it's leaves.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 16, 2011
7:37 AM

Post #8850800

What is the AT? I'm not "moving " to Tex , but it seems like it every year . I sold a house in Arkansas and turned the money into a mobile home N. of Rockport , with two lots , bought previously , across from my sons weekend place .We used to take over his place in the winter , then got this good deal, so I see him often when he comes down to fish the coast .He lives in central Tex .
Just dawned on me what A T is .That would be one of my wanna do's . Hips and knees won't allow it. If I took a coupla days , I might do a five mile section . How far did y'all go ?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2011
8:30 AM

Post #8850875

We did it in sections - not the whole thing - we stopped road tripping when we got this green iguana. Cats and dogs are sort of easy to find people to come in and watch, but with exotics it's like having kids. When I had my mom's parrot it was even more so. They are like little people and need constant interaction.

Anywho, we started at the southern terminous and have gone all the way up to the Shenandoah Nat'l park. That would have been the next 'leg' of our trip. It is quite another world - we would go for a week or ten days at a time. Really really loved it. Not sure about my joints now either. A little out of shape to be carrying a 50 lb pack.

A part time spot in sunny TX is probably just the thing when you need to get away. I wish the iguana could travel. :D
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 16, 2011
8:42 AM

Post #8850908

I'm taking supplies with me to put together the e buckets . Have five so far . Looking for more colanders .
How big is the iguana ?
I have a 50 lb pack wrapped around my body . Don't think I could manage a separate one . lol

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2011
8:58 AM

Post #8850926

:D

I have been thinking about my own pack and wondering why I started to carry it...

The iguana is almost 4' long from nose to tip of tail. She doesn't weigh more than 10 lbs. She's probably 7 or 8 years old. Last year she laid her first clutch of eggs - over 50! That mess will start up again in January. Not looking forward to it. Good thing she's an herbivore. Going to start some greens in my buckets I guess.

Have fun out there. Signing off so I will get more stuff done today. ha ha ah

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 16, 2011
8:20 PM

Post #8851848

Please tell me the AT is the Appalachian Trail...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 17, 2011
5:39 AM

Post #8852172

Yes , Linda , you snapped to it but not much conversation 'bout it round here , so it went right over my head .
Talk to you Sun , after you get home , or when it's convenient , let me know .
These pots have been used but they came out of an inspected nursury , so no boogers , I've had them several years . Too many to wash

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 17, 2011
7:19 AM

Post #8852337

Ok, Digger. I know how to wash nursery pots, and will put that on my "to do" list, too!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 17, 2011
3:59 PM

Post #8853125

Sweetie !
luvcats
Raleigh, NC
(Zone 8a)

November 6, 2011
8:51 AM

Post #8878867

[quote="VitaVeggieMan"]

Luvcats,

Sorry, I've been busy building my greenhouse, so I haven't had time to log on lately.

I would go with one cabbage plant per bucket (same for broccoli and cauliflower), and three collards per bucket.

Good luck![/quote]

woops! Well I had planted two and they are doing great!! Really big! My question is they haven't formed heads yet but can i eat some of the leaves on the outside of the plant? Does anyone eat some of the bigger leaves or just the head of cabbage?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 6, 2011
4:08 PM

Post #8879309

VVMan,
Eat those leaves! In fact, the smaller, more tender outer leaves make great cabbage rolls!

Check with Bubba_MoCity for his wife's recipe!

Yum!!!

Linda
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 8, 2011
5:56 PM

Post #8882197

Hey , we like cabbage rolls too !
donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 20, 2011
6:55 AM

Post #8898380

Can someone tell me where I saw the cheap DIY automatic watering setup for the e-buckets or earthboxes .If I remember correctly it was a timer at the facet and 1/4 inch tubing running to each e-bucket to the fill tube and you could put it together for under $75.00. for up to 10 buckets and just a few bucks more for additional buckets. It showed how to set it up and gave the name of the parts used and also the price of each part. I also think they got all the parts at either Lowes or Home depot. Any help would be great. Don
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 21, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8900261

Hi donlaclair.
I use a garden hose electric water timer, $26 - 40. http://www.nextag.com/Watering-Equipment--zz2700479zB4z5---html
Then I build a manifold with 1/4" tube so I have an outlet at each site. http://www.lowes.com/SearchCatalogDisplay?Ntt=raindrip&storeId=10151&N=0&langId=-1&catalogId=10051&rpp=24
I suggest raindrip becaue you can get replacement fittings. You can get other Raindrip fitings at Lowes, such as; tees. and L fittings and pressure reducers.
DO NOT USE ANY DRIP SYSTEM FROM HARBOR FREIGHT because you will only get maybe one season out of it.
I don't have fill tubes in my buckets so I use 1/4" soaker hose curled around the top of my bucket on the end of 2 or 4 hr end drippers I get from Raindrip.
Hope this helps.

This message was edited Nov 21, 2011 2:07 PM

This message was edited Nov 21, 2011 2:08 PM

This message was edited Nov 21, 2011 2:11 PM
donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

November 24, 2011
7:37 AM

Post #8903843

Thanks Lone,
I'm thinking of the Orbit single dial faucet timer ($29.97) to start. I have so many different e-buckets with different water requirements that I think instead of buying a kit I'll do better by buying piece meal.
I'm creating a compact structure that will hold between 24 and 32 e-buckets. I'm trying to make it 8 feet long and about 4 feet wide and approx 6 to 7 feet tall. It will be able to be covered with a plastic tarp(without touching foliage ) when weather and temps are going to effect tomatoes and peppers. It will be able to be heated with a $25 cermamic heater.It will be able to be cover within minutes and when weather improves back to growing temps ,cover rolled back up in minutes. It will be watered on a timer system so once complete and the e-buckets planted up I'll just have to worry about tying the tomatoes and vineing veggies and watching for a overfill tube being plugged and pest and sick plants. My concern right now is being a tad top heavy and once the foligage is completely fill in it acting as a sail and blowing over. I believe with 16 e-buckets planted up that will give me enough weight at the base to make it pretty stable. I may have to leave the braces on that will keep the cover off the foliage during cold weather. I will take pictures while I construct it and probably post them here. Thanks again Don
PS I guess I'll call it an e-bucket cold frame.

This message was edited Dec 2, 2011 5:13 PM

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 24, 2011
8:22 AM

Post #8903898

That sounds like a great project, Don. Can't wait to see the pictures. :)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 24, 2011
7:35 PM

Post #8904387

Yeah, Don,
Post construction pics, please!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 25, 2011
5:44 AM

Post #8904824

Oh yea , the tomato suckers I brought from Georgia have got blooms now .Have cilentro seeded in a bucket yesterday .
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 27, 2011
7:42 PM

Post #8908435

Hi donlaclair,
If you scroll down the page below the drip kits, you will see individual drip components, as well as timers.
These are raindrip components from Lowes. You can Google raindrip and order online if you don't want to go to Lowes.
Paul.
donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 2, 2011
2:40 PM

Post #8914020

Here's my first day putting together the e-bucket cold frame. All made to this point with 8 foot landscaping timbers,3 inch screws and liquid nail. Don

Thumbnail by donlaclair
Click the image for an enlarged view.

donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 2, 2011
3:20 PM

Post #8914062

another angle

Thumbnail by donlaclair
Click the image for an enlarged view.

luvcats
Raleigh, NC
(Zone 8a)

December 3, 2011
6:24 AM

Post #8914667

just give an update! Look at the cabbage in the buckets!!

Thumbnail by luvcats
Click the image for an enlarged view.

donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 7, 2011
10:12 AM

Post #8920060

last few days on the e-bucket cold frame

Thumbnail by donlaclair
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 7, 2011
10:42 AM

Post #8920083

Luvcats,
Those look great! Congratulations on taking that eBucket plunge!

BTW,
I made a strawberry eBucket, and planted 25 bare root plants over the weekend. I'd totally forgotten they were sent in a sealed plastic bag, and when I opened it, some of the new shoots were getting mushy! Fortunately, most had at least two shoots growing, so I trimmed off the mushy ones. Today, the remaining shoots look like miniature butterflies, and I can see new shoot unfurling within the branches!

I just have one question...

Who invented such a thing as a strawberry pot/bucket? It is #$%(@ to lay those plants down sideways, plug up the holes so the dirt won't fall out, and not break off any sprawling shoots, ALL AT THE SAME TIME!!!!

Lane,
we've got to invent a better strawberry bucket!!! Or, at least, a better planting method!

Hugs!
donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 7, 2011
11:10 AM

Post #8920121

latest add 7 2 X 6 X 4 feet ends cut to your own design. Bamboo poles. 2 - 1X 3 with 3/4 inch holes drill every 6 inches to let ends of bamboo poles to slip into for support. Next will be the 1/2 inch pvc pipe to hold the plastic tarp from touching the foliage.. Right now it looks like the e-buckets may be to close to each other and may hamper the fruit from maturing due lack of light. I had orginally thought about making a shelf 2/3 the way up ,but now i realize that would really block the sun. I could go wider with another row of buckets on each side but would be hard to get to the inside fill tubes.
where we stand right now
7 landscape timber @ 1.99 = 14.00
4 PT 2X6X 8 ft. @ 3.00=12.00
2 PT 1X3X 8ft. @ 2.00=4.00
3inch screws 1 lb @ 4.00
3 tubes of liquid nail @2.99 = 9.00

This message was edited Dec 7, 2011 2:40 PM

Thumbnail by donlaclair
Click the image for an enlarged view.

donlaclair
New Port Richey, FL
(Zone 9b)

December 7, 2011
11:46 AM

Post #8920173

Oh I forgot the bamboo poles and jute twine. I got the bamboo for free so I honestly don't know how much it would cost.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 7, 2011
1:20 PM

Post #8920327

Don,
Your eBucket pergola looks great! Fantastic job there!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

December 7, 2011
9:22 PM

Post #8920995

Hey Linda - you are making me hungry for strawberries. :)

Do you still need the knot tying info? I haven't gotten my info off of that computer yet - still hanging on with my old laptop here. I am the queen of procrastination this year.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 8, 2011
7:25 AM

Post #8921256

Uh, Ms. Barrister,
Yeah, I do! But, not until mid-February when I put out the tomato seedlings. I'll need to know how to tie the knots for the trellises, so, don't procrastinate too much longer. I'd say you can stall until right up until the New Year, when I'll be sowing the tomato seeds...

I understand pro-cras-ti-na-tion!

P.S. Those strawberries are taking off in that eBerry Bucket! I hope I'm not damaging them by keeping them in the house until a few more sprouts pop out. Then, it's "out you go!" We had morning temps of 30 degrees, but that's the last of the freezing dips for awhile. Good thing is the sun is out and it warms up to the mid-50s during the day.

My bucket garden is staging their "Winter Olympics" right now! The broccoli are taking the gold with no competition, and the cabbages have the most silver medals! The Brussels Sprouts are working hard for the bronze, and the cauliflowers showed up to late to enter the games!

^^_^^

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 14, 2011
10:51 PM

Post #8930202

Lookie!

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

December 15, 2011
8:46 AM

Post #8930566

STRAWBERRIES!!! :D

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 15, 2011
10:05 AM

Post #8930664

Wheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

December 15, 2011
11:17 AM

Post #8930730

Silly girl. :)
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 11, 2012
8:19 AM

Post #8963274

Gymgirl:

You drilled a bunch of holes in the traditional ebucket design, right?

(just asking - not criticizing) - wouldn't it be easier to put a trellis and grow the strawberries up? What about bugs/animals coming along and munching on the berries?

SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 11, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #8963279

I have an aesthetics question:

I have some birthday money from my dad. I want to get some paint to cover up the ugly orange (and also serve as camouflage against nosy neighbors/code enforcement since my back yard fence is chainlink and you can see straight through it), and I know I take sandpaper to roughen up the surface of the bucket, but what about the paint?

What type of paint would I use? Don't know if I have the patience to make a pretty design, but if I could, hubby may be more inclined to support my gardening efforts...

thanks.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 11, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #8963289

SoFlaCommercial,
I've never grown strawberries before. This is my first attempt, and I followed the design Gessieviolet posted on the eBucket thread...

Krylon makes a spray paint specifically for plastics. Only thing is you'll need a LOT of cans to paint multiple buckets...
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 11, 2012
8:30 AM

Post #8963296

oh, okay - thought there was a paint-brush type paint. Was thinking of doing some freehand artsy stuff to it.

I'm kind of backwards - I'm growing many types of plants, but only four or five of each, so I'm only doing two or three e-buckets. I have to wait until it warms up a bit before putting any actual plants in, though - my last attempt at beginning of fall failed miserably.

btw - i see some of you stating that you have 200+ seedlings. WHERE do you put that many seedlings? or do most of you have some awesome plots of land? my back yard is about 60' x 30', but hubby won't let me use entire yard.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 11, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #8963351

I give most of the seedlings away to friends and newbie gardeners...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

January 12, 2012
11:08 AM

Post #8964899

SFC - if my hubby wouldn't let me use enough space to grow vegetables, I'd tell him he could only eat 6 months out of the year! I think that would put it in perspective. Fortunately, my hubby enjoys homegrown veggies as much as I do.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 12, 2012
5:34 PM

Post #8965363

G G, I went to the store today and id'd collards .Got pictures on puter and will send them on tomorrow
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

January 14, 2012
10:03 PM

Post #8968136

my husband is meat and potatoes guy, who eats all processed crap. he will eat a salad but once a week. he's a chickensh*t when it comes to food...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 15, 2012
3:52 PM

Post #8969020

I think these are collards

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 15, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #8969023

No clue

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 15, 2012
3:57 PM

Post #8969027

Again , no clue , but aren't they all pretty ? No bugs but no fruit either .forgot the picture .

This message was edited Jan 15, 2012 6:58 PM
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 15, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #8969031

try again. What do you think G G ?

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 15, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #8969034

Not in e-bucketscuz I didn't have them set up yet , am ready for next year .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 15, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #8969042

Digger9083!

Looks like you've got quite a blend there. My guess is collards, at least one Brussels Sprout, and some cauliflower or Broccoli.

Keep em fed with a little MG Water soluble plant food for veggies, and a little compost and stay tuned. They should head in the next 8-12 weeks!

Don't you just love a good mystery?

Linda

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #8969741

Collards and broccoli look very similar until the broccoli starts to head. The leaves of both taste the same to me.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 17, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #8971169

G G , these are the little plants you gave D H the last time we saw you .
When you pick the veggies , are the leaves good to eat too ? I have never grown a winter garden , so don't know from nuthin .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2012
9:01 AM

Post #8971298

Digger9083,
From what I've been reading, most of the gardeners-in-the-know recommend that the leaves on all of the fall-winter brassicas are completely edible!

I just don't know how to cook them, so I'll be looking for recipes. I have a yard FULL of greenery!!!

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2012
9:04 AM

Post #8971302

Linda your yard looks lovely. I guess I'm enjoying the mild winter, but sort of glad for the respite from worrying about weeds and such. I'm getting ready to go gang-busters with my winter sowing. Yeah, getting ready to get ready. :D

Have a great day!
A.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 17, 2012
9:43 AM

Post #8971357

Hey, Amanda!
Long time no hear from! Thanks for the compliment!

NEVER in my life would I ever imagine praying for rain and COLD at the same time in Houston! The heat is killing my garden. I've lost several huge broccoli heads to blossoming, but not all was lost - the bees swarmed over them, so I figured it was ok to give them over to support my beneficial wildlife. But, I've still got silver dollar sized cauliflowers that are heading, and cabbages in wee stages. I NEED A DEEP FREEZE in the deep South!

Linda

P.S. I hear yah about getting ready to get ready. Went to HD and bought MORE mat'ls to build another grow light shelf stand. I have seventy-five 3" seedlings that need potting up and moving on to the cool room. That's only half of my total. Once they're moved over, I'll sow seeds for the 2nd half of the crops, and then the bell peppers.

I understand about the respite!

Linda

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #8972693

Oh goodness, you're way ahead. :)

I started the New Year with a leak in the plumbing/pipe to the main and couldn't use the water in the house for a week and a half.

Last week I took in another stray (I am the dog lady in the neighborhood and everyone that finds a dog comes to me) and Court decided to keep it. He's a giant puppy, and will be an even bigger dog someday. In the meantime, Court comes home to "help" at lunchtime. ha ha. Some help.

I have some serious organizing to do - I received so many seeds in trade and in the round robin I have to get some kind of system going. I am going to do some winter sowing in milk jugs outside, but I will also start some seeds in my iguana's room where the temp is always above 70 degrees and the humidity is fairly high. She's got an east and a south facing window - it's pretty bright and a friend gave me a small shelving unit that goes almost to the ceiling. If I can keep the lizard (and cats!) off the shelves, it just might work! Until then, I keep getting ready to get ready.

Hope the weather begins to comply with your wishes. I have been wondering if you in TX have been getting any rain to make up the drought?

A.

This is a picture of our cast iron leaky pipe. :D

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

January 18, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #8972696

Here's a picture of the giant puppy's feets.

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 18, 2012
8:12 AM

Post #8972711

I can I D another plant G G . D H found a broccoli yesterday about the size of a golf ball . . Don't know how I missed it two days before . Have two plants of B . Will it only make one head or will there be more than one on each plant ?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 18, 2012
3:53 PM

Post #8973333

One main head per plant. But then you'll get some side shoots to keep harvesting until the plant bolts.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 18, 2012
5:44 PM

Post #8973448

Ok , gotcha!
gessieviolet
Saluda, SC
(Zone 8a)

January 19, 2012
5:50 PM

Post #8974822

Hi Linda and all,

been awhile since I checked in. Have had to abandon all gardening efforts for a year or so. What a thrill to see the eBucket idea seems to be moving ahead pretty successfully.

Got a chuckle out of the strawberry eBucket comments on planting. Got to admit those were exactly my sentiments when I came up with the design, but felt the results justified the frustration.

I wonder: why not buy either sheet of coco planter liner (or even a coco plant basket liner) cut it into about 3 inch squares to fit inside the eBucket over the holes as you filled the buckets to keep mix from spilling out?

I planted by filling mix to bottom of each row of holes, putting the plant in and filling over the roots as I tried to keep mix from coming out. Took a while; I was not using the liner.

Seems to me if you simply cut a slit in the piece of liner first so you could slip the roots through from the outside then put mix against the liner it would hold everything in place, as the plants become established the liner simply expands to let them grow. Maybe some one can try and see what happens.

Good to see all the activity and the improvements to the system that have been made.
Lane

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 19, 2012
9:36 PM

Post #8975000

Lane,
You'll be happy (but not too surprised) to know I used the EXACT same method as you did to plant my strawberries!
jhmjhm11
San Antonio, TX

February 13, 2012
7:13 PM

Post #9005769

can you all tell me where the instructions are to making an ebucket.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 14, 2012
8:48 AM

Post #9006332

Here you go, jhmjhm11

http://allthingsplants.com/thread/view/3230/Make-an-eBucket/

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 14, 2012
10:34 AM

Post #9006456

Right here is where the discussion evolved on DG:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1011889/

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 14, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9006582

Thank you, ladies!

I'm so up to my ears in tomato seedlings, I couldn't even remember where the eBucket threads were!

Hugs!

Linda

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 22, 2012
10:57 AM

Post #9092877

I'm concerned about the type of plastic used in e-buckets. Perhaps it's best to use "Food Grade" containers?

Here's a link that sells them for a reasonable price. Their shipping fees seem reasonable, too.

http://beprepared.com/product.asp_Q_pn_E_MS%20C100_A_name_E_5-Gallon%20Bucket%20(No%20Lid)

http://beprepared.com/article.asp_Q_ai_E_94_A_c2a_E_bn_A_name_E_ShippingRates
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

May 1, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9105697

HoneybeeNC - I get white food-grade 5 gallon buckets for the same price at Home Depot. Their orange, cheaper buckets (with logo) are not food grade. You can also ask around for food grade used buckets at local restaurants or factories.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 1, 2012
10:58 AM

Post #9105706

Kindlekat - thank you. I will check Home Depot for their food-grade buckets.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 1, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9105773

well, guy, it was nice knowin' yah! Looks like I'll be keeling over soon from eating the veggies I've grown in the NON-food grade buckets...

It's been real...

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 1, 2012
7:27 PM

Post #9106438

Thanks, Linda - you've been swell . . ..
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

May 1, 2012
7:33 PM

Post #9106450

Rest in peace girl...
Kindlekat
Washington, DC
(Zone 7a)

May 2, 2012
12:42 PM

Post #9107392

I have definitely grown a lot of things in non-food grade plastic tubs though. Guess I'll eventually be joining you all ;)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 4, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9109997

I'm gonna miss all my D G friends , (until I join you )

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 4, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9110052

Don't worry, Digger!

We're just gonna push up some daisy's for your spring garden!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 4, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #9110272

I like daisys . Dmail fur ya .

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 17, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #9126947

On our walk yesterday I noticed a neighbor (in another street) had 5 gallon buckets growing tomatoes lined up on either side of her front steps.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 17, 2012
3:57 PM

Post #9127609

I'm torn about whether to do it again this year. Linda! Help!!!

I was so discouraged by the wilt and whatever happened to my watermelon and my squash that I didn't much care after that. :(

I AM growing vegetables from seed and most are ready to plant out. A neighbor across the street moved in and there are 3 raised beds behind the house left by prior owners. I have helped her to plant one with some basic things using the Sq FT method. Most of the squares on the perimeter were raided by squirrels methinks, but some luck in the center with peas and beans.

There are 2 more beds. She knows nothing about gardening and her idea of weeding is tearing the greens off at soil level. When she went to "weed" the raised beds with me, I told her "no thanks." It took me 2 days to weed the first bed down to the ground to get most of those running weeds out. The beds are each 4' x 8' and not more than about 8" of soil above ground. Anyway.

The 2nd bed is weeded but I am going to put cardboard down and soil on top of that. The 3rd bed I have to cut down with shears first because weeds have gone to seed. UGH.

Anyway - still have the teepee trellis I made last year and have started the trionfono purple pole beans, but nothing else in buckets. Maybe because they were in front of the retaining wall (although at least 5-10 feet most of them) they didn't get enough airflow? I refuse to use chemicals to control pests/disease, so I'm pretty limited.

Thanks for any thoughts, pep talk, or kick in the pants.

A.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 17, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #9127667

Kick in the pants LOL ! would you consider weed and grass killer ?Eliminator from W M is the same stuff as Roundup except stronger and much cheaper .
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 17, 2012
5:22 PM

Post #9127689

Digger, Same as RoundUp, but stronger and cheaper? Give me a link! Probably not liscensed in Ca. , but worth looking. My new neighbors paved their yard, and now I've got their tree roots comming up in my yard. I'm getting to old for all that shovel work!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 17, 2012
6:18 PM

Post #9127752

OW!

thanks digger - will think about it. ;)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 18, 2012
3:15 PM

Post #9128821

I don't have a clue how to give links , but if you Google Eliminator weed and grass killer , you should be able to bring up a bunch of sites . You could probably order it online if they don't sell it in Ca . If they let you buy Roundup , I don't know why you couldn't find it at WalMart. That's the only place I've found it . I buy the super concentrate , makes up to 42 Gallons and I mix it 2 1/2 oz to a gal of water in a hose end sprayer . My jug has lost the label so can't give you more info . I'll be going to town tomorrow and will report back . Oh , and it was around 25:00

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

May 18, 2012
3:47 PM

Post #9128857

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Eliminator-Weed-and-Grass-Killer-II-Concentrate-32-oz/17126444?adid=bzv_fb_revshr_001#Specifications ^^_^^

guess who?

Digger,
How do you keep this stuff from killing the St. Augustine grass? Sounds pretty potent!

This message was edited May 18, 2012 5:52 PM
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 18, 2012
6:47 PM

Post #9129004

I had access to the good RoundUp for years, but I'm retired now , and the 50% stuff is expensive at Home depot. I'll check out Eliminator. Not all herbecides are licenesed in all states.
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

May 18, 2012
7:16 PM

Post #9129037

Eliminator is still licenesed in Ca. so I'll check out the price. I have to admit I'm not crazy about usuing Diquat though.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 19, 2012
4:25 AM

Post #9129301

Roundup's patent run out , so others got on the bandwagon .
G G , I use a hand sprayer to get a good clean edge around my beds and adjust the nozzle to a tiny straight spray . Hold it close to the ground and just control the spray . Gotcha bedroom ready fur ya at the coast this winter .
We have a LOT of honeysuckle here in Ga to control . It takes over everything , worse than kudzu .
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

May 19, 2012
4:37 AM

Post #9129315

You use this stuff just as you would Roundup . Only difference is strength ( So can mix leaner ) and price .I've used it ever since I first saw it right after Roundup's patent run out and only buy it now .
I compared several of R U 's products, and some say super concentrate , but when compared side by side with each other , very missleading

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2012
2:40 PM

Post #9198017

I've not done any gardening since I was a child helping my parents but I've been wanting to grow tomatoes for about 25 years now and decided to try the Ebuckets. I got two 5 gal buckets at home depot and all they had in the paint department were cloudy white translucent type with large black lettering. I should have looked around for a better color but at the moment I decided to get a can of textured spray paint. This paint did not cover well so I found some old tan, and gold left over spray cans to use as primer. It took 2 more cans of the textured to cover them well and I'd probably start with a better color base or just get a better color bucket - see attached picture. I used grey central vac pipe for the watering pipe since I had some and I think it looks a bit better with the thin wall and less obvious color. The colander that I used had to be cut down a lot and was not very strong in the end, so I put about a 4" leftover plastic pot in upside down with holes drilled in it to provide more support - it was just the right height. The colander I used had holes that I think are too big, but we'll see how it goes.

I purchased 2 Bonnie tomato plants in roughly 6" pots and should have looked at the variety, they are Black Prince variety. I wanted some Basil also and also got 2 Bonnie pots. They look crowded, and I'll probably do cherry tomatoes next year since I use more of them. It is very hot here in the North East but you never know when it will snap back much colder. I have no experience and am open to suggestions about growing them.

Thanks for the great ideas and all the info!
Pete B.

This message was edited Jul 8, 2012 5:47 PM

This message was edited Jul 8, 2012 5:53 PM

Thumbnail by PeteB7
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PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

July 8, 2012
3:04 PM

Post #9198037

There were a few, what I think are Pillbugs (Isopoda?) in the tomato containers when I transplanted them and I'm wondering if I need to worry about them. I read that they like instant mashed potatoes that blow up inside them; should I just sprinkle some on top of the soil or push some down into it? One thing I'm wondering about, I believe that the overflow was intended to be say .5-1" below the top of the colander which should provide some air between the soil and the water; was this the intent to airate the soil? I included a hole in the watering pipe at the air level so that there is a path for more air than just from the overflow tube - a minor detail probably not important, not even sure if this is correct.

I used Fafard potting mix, and the following in each pot:
4 tbsp of garden lime
2 tbsp of Epsom Salt
2 tbsp of Osmocote

I'm not reliable about watering and I have a nice simple faucet timer so I just need a drip kit to set them up.

A few more pictures:

This message was edited Jul 8, 2012 6:10 PM

Thumbnail by PeteB7   Thumbnail by PeteB7
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2012
9:24 AM

Post #9199024

Pete - here's a link you might find helpful about bucket gardening

http://www.globalbuckets.org/

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #9199208

Thanks, so aeration is part of the design.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

July 9, 2012
12:53 PM

Post #9199279

PeteB7 et al,

Here are two, step-by-step pictorials I put together on eBucket construction. They may be helpful:

Make An eBucket: http://allthingsplants.com/thread/view/3230/Make-an-eBucket/?offset=0

24" ePlanter conversion system 101: http://allthingsplants.com/thread/view/3231/24-ePlanter-conversion-system-101/?offset=0

Linda

This message was edited Jul 9, 2012 2:54 PM

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

July 28, 2012
8:14 PM

Post #9221993

Thanks everyone. A squirrel took all of the tomatoes, only had 3. I saw him running away with one in his mouth, lol!

I'm also planting blueberry plants but in our front beds. Dug the hole and it happened to rain. I noticed that even with it being about 18" deep it was not draining, not even by the next morning, the level was about the same, give or take an inch, with 6" in the bottom. Then it rained again and now there is about 12" of water in there that has not lowered much in the past 6 hours. Odd that it seemed to me that there was 5" of top soil, then what I would describe as sandy soil; it does not look like clay to me but I'm new at this. Anyway, I was wondering, before I even dug this hole, if there might be a way to make an e-bucket in the natural ground, or if there would be an advantage. It seems that this soil holds water really well and I could just put a collander in the bottom, but I have no control over how much water it gets when it rains so I suppose this would not work very well.
I've been advised to dig much deeper, another 1-2 ft and loosen up the soil so that it drains. I'll post in a better spot concerning this soil. Just wondering about an in ground Ebucket.

PeteB7

PeteB7
Trumbull, CT
(Zone 7a)

July 29, 2012
9:07 PM

Post #9223174

The tomato plants are growing strong now, we had an intense heat wave right after I transplanted them and they were not looking very good. I watered them a lot, probably too much. It cooled down and they are really growing now, the stems are probably twice the diameter since just 20 days ago when I transplanted them. They were not flowering and I did a lot of reading about this, then yesterday one is showing several flowers starting the other is not showing any signs of flowers and is not growing as strongly. I've stopped watering and am letting the timer system work which is set up to water about twice a week (skips 2 days). The feed hose fell out of one and I decided to fill it manually, then did the other just to see if it was already full. The drain was plugged on that one; this is the one with flowers and about 20% more growth. Perhaps I put the drain tube too low in the bucket so that there is not enough water, or perhaps it is just the intense heat that we've been having that is making it more favorable for more water.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #9230471

I was at my daughter's home this morning and saw a large pile of used kitty litter buckets in her back yard. She thinks my son-in-law might have set them aside for me.

Keeping my fingers crossed!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2012
6:41 AM

Post #9238714

A large pile of kitty litter buckets?! What a good son-in-law. Ha ha ha.. :)

Crossing my fingers for you girlie.

A.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 12, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9238823

I sure like my K L buckets . I can use less soil in them and not so heavy . Good for shallow rooted plants .Still use the e-bucket system .

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #9241011

Daughter has confirmed that the kitty litter buckets are for me. I just need to drive over there and pick them up!

I have an idea for an experiment using them...

Will keep y'all posted.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 14, 2012
10:06 AM

Post #9241286

LIKE THIS?

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 14, 2012
4:26 PM

Post #9241647

I will leave the ones I have here in GA . I'll do ebuckets in Tex .
WormsLovSharon
Las Vegas, NV

August 15, 2012
9:18 PM

Post #9243114

Digger, are you moving to Texas. If so I have many plants I can send you because you were so great sending me the Irises. No cost except a hug. Sharon

PS: Where are moving to in Texas?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2012
6:31 AM

Post #9248705

O linda that's great - a hoop house too!

I wish I had more room here which is funny because it's already like, 10x what we had at the condo. Never enough room for plants. ;)

A.
GrowKing
Apple Valley, MN

January 22, 2013
7:50 PM

Post #9394246

Try using the Aqua Oasis Garden. Its complete and trouble free..Grow tomatoes, peppers, herbs, flowers. It's proven and patented. Has flushout design. I have had over a hundred plants this last year and plann to get 10 plus years out of the buckets.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 22, 2013
10:38 PM

Post #9394361

Growking,
One AquaOasis unit costs $29.95 + shipping. That's a bit cost prohibitive for me.

Our colander eBucket design does the same thing. I can make one for $1.65...

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

January 24, 2013
6:39 PM

Post #9396663

A bucket, a basket, a green and yellow gasket ...

I collected suggestions for finding free large plastic buckets from another thread:

-----------------------------------------------
5-gallon plastic tubs:

I think this captures all the suggestions in one place:

car washes
burger joints (pickle tubs)
school cafeterias
restaurants (especially Asian)
bakeries & doughnut shops
delis
supermarket bakeries
supermarket delis
painters & drywall contractors (if they don't use plastic-lined cardboard tubs)
Home Depot ("Homer's buckets" or "Leaktite" in the paint isle 10/$30)
cat peoples' kitty litter tubs (maybe less UV-resistant)
------------------------------------------------------


fordpickup
Clinton, IN

January 25, 2013
8:25 AM

Post #9397150


Gymgirl or somebody would you please start part IIII . We are at 230+ posts now. It takes awhile to scroll down to the latest posts. Fred

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 25, 2013
8:29 AM

Post #9397158

Ok! Thanks!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 27, 2013
10:49 AM

Post #9399132

Ford , just above the word," content ", is a" skip to new ", and it'll take you to the bottom of the posts
fordpickup
Clinton, IN

January 27, 2013
7:29 PM

Post #9399558

Digger, Thank you, new enough here that I did not know about that feacher. Fred

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 27, 2013
8:07 PM

Post #9399599

Will start a new momentarily ...
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 28, 2013
10:02 AM

Post #9400193

I'm still learning too !
Digger

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 28, 2013
10:23 AM

Post #9400211

THIS THREAD IS CLOSED

New Thread here: New eBucket Thread, PART IV

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1295824/

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