Photo by Melody
Are you ready? It's time for our 14th annual photo contest! Enter your best pictures of the year, for a chance to win a calendar and annual subscription here. Hurry! Deadline for entries is October 21.

Tomatoes: Is it too hot for my tomatoes?

Communities > Forums > Tomatoes
bookmark
Forum: TomatoesReplies: 287, Views: 1,983
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 28, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8660847

I live in a NE Washington State with a very short growing season. Like July and thru Sept. if we are lucky. I have my tomatoes in a hoophouse with visquine covering it. It gets up to 100 degrees in there some days. Is this good for the tomatoes, or too hot?

I have the ends open for bees etc. but hardly any bees. Is it too hot? There are a lot of blossoms on the tomatoes but only one fruit. Should I take the plastic off? It does reflect the light which we have very little due to the mountains and trees. It's kind of a toss up in my mind.

However, even tho I plant a lot of flowers, and I do not use sprays, I have few bees. I live in an area where there is no spraying. so, what is the problem? I do not have enough nectar to raise honey bees (hives) myself. Please help me, I really want some good tomatoes this year.

The average temperature outside the hoophouse, is around 80 maybe. A few days in the mid 90s.
jeffinyorktown
Yorktown, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2011
6:36 PM

Post #8660952

Jnette,

I am far from an expert, but I am curious why you have the tomatoes in a hoop house. The outside 80 degree range is just about perfect for tomatoes. 100 degrees is definitely too hot! Anything above 90 and mine seem to slow way down.

Also, I am somewhat curious how much pollination you will get in there since it is covered. Even though the ends are open, I am not sure how effective the bees will be at finding the flowers. :)

As for the light, in my opinion, if the plants have got this far in the hoop house while covered, I would imagine there is plenty of light for them without it.

Hope this helps!

Jeff
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 28, 2011
7:20 PM

Post #8661103

Tomatoes are self pollinating so you don't need bees they pollinate by wind. Wondering why you have them in the hoop house also? They can set fruit when it's that hot but I'm sure the hoop house increases the humidity which greatly decreases fruit set. If it was 80 * here I would have my tomato plants outside, like Jeff said that's the perfect temp.
jeffinyorktown
Yorktown, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2011
7:52 PM

Post #8661182

1lisac,

I stand partially corrected. I feel a bit silly as I shake my tomatoes whenever I walk past to help them out so I am not sure why I got bees in my head for them.

I am sure the hoop house is blocking the wind, so that could definitely affect pollination and fruit set.

I have not had much luck with fruit set over 90 degrees, probably the humidity here in Virginia as you said.

Jeff
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2011
9:50 PM

Post #8661366

Howdy Jnette. (Long time, no see! Hope you are doing well.)

As others have mentioned, no bees/insects required to pollinate your plants. However, 100 is too high for pollen viability so you really should remove the plastic to cool it off in there. Is it possible to raise the plastic on both sides (not just the ends) so it allows more air to flow thru, not trapping it as well as removing the overall greenhouse affect?

I'm also wondering why kind of tomatoes you're growing. Only the variety that are bred for pollinizing in high heat would give you an ounce of a chance in those conditions. And yes, as Lisa mentioned, excess humidity in the g-house would contribute to a lack of pollination also.

If your blossoms are falling off, high heat/humidity (in your situation) would be the culprit. Your one fruit is probably the result of when your summer was much cooler and you had a better chance. I wouldn't give up though, you still have plenty of time to get a crop; you'll need to cool them off though.

Hope this helps.
Shoe
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 28, 2011
9:53 PM

Post #8661370

I have them in the hh because so much of the time it is way below 80. Like tomorrow is suppose to be 59. Never know from one day to the other. Night temps are in the 40s.

That is why the hh. There is no way I can keep taking it off and putting it on at night. It is 20 feet long, 8 ft high and wide.

When I first plant the first ones in late May, I lost them to frost. Had to buy new plants.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 28, 2011
9:57 PM

Post #8661374

Hi Shoe!! No, my blossoms are not falling off. Just not getting any fruit. Ok, even tho the night time temps are in the 40s I guess that will be best to take the plastic off. Sure hope I don't get frost.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 28, 2011
10:02 PM

Post #8661380

Hmmm...you may want to rig your hh so the sides roll up and down. Many folks do that here with grow tunnels and such. Rolling the sides up on hot days allows a convection air flow, really helping to drop the temps. That way in the evening you can easily roll them back down, keeping them warmer at night.

Wow...your days really fluctuate with temperature! I had no idea. I'd hate for you to slow down the growth by exposing them to 40 and 50 degree nights.

Shoe
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 29, 2011
8:25 AM

Post #8661909

Well, I can tell you right now, that's not going to happen. I can open the ends and turn a big fan on during the day. That is the best I can do.

Either that or decide which would be better, the plastic on or off?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

June 29, 2011
12:08 PM

Post #8662302

Well, that fan would sure help, both in moving air as well as helping to pollinize those flowers. A shadecloth might be nice, too, eh?

Next year we'll figure out how to put your tomato plants on wheels so you can wheel them out and back in as needed. :>)

Shoe
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 29, 2011
12:17 PM

Post #8662316

LOL Shoe that would be nice. I raised one side of the plastic up (rolled it up) about 4 feet and got the temp down to 77 with the fan too, but now the sun is out and on it so it is up to 87 again. 88 now. I sure like this remote thermometer but I do go crazy trying to grow tomatoes.

I have the tomatoes planted in alfalfa bales. They really are looking good if they would just get some red balls on them.

When you figure out how to put them on a farm wagon and move them in and out, let me know. : 0)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2011
12:11 PM

Post #8664414

Jeff your not corrected. Tomatoes don't need insects to pollinate but they can help.

Jnette-you said the blossoms aren't dropping, but they aren't setting fruit. Are the plants not blooming? That could be a whole other issue. I didn't realize you were growing in alfalfa bales, I'm wondering if the nitrogen may be too high, causing the plants not to bloom. Alfalfa is high in N.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 30, 2011
6:23 PM

Post #8665092

1lisac my tomatoes are loaded with blossoms. We have such a short season is why I have them in the hh. If I didn't, and they grew nice tomatoes, they would not have any flavor with no sun or heat. Therefor, the hh. Our season is not only short, we don't have a very warm one. We just might get a week of over 90 degrees, but not all at once. A day here and there. An unusual summer might be over 90 in a row of a week.

I think the fruit needs sun and heat to have any flavor. You can have ripe tomatoes with no flavor.

Anyone have any answer to how to get some tomatoes on my plants?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2011
9:07 PM

Post #8665419

Ok I'm confused. If the blossoms aren't dropping but they're not setting fruit then where are they going? Once they bloom if they don't set fruit they drop off at least that's my understanding.

I get why you have a hh but now that you mentioned that you are growing in alfalfa Bales I think you may have to much N. Whenever I hear great looking plants but no fruit that's my first thought, after heat and humidity are taken into consideration, but these two factors don't seem to be constant for you. High N can cause plants not to bloom or drop their blooms.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

June 30, 2011
9:51 PM

Post #8665465

The blossoms seem to be staying on the plant as long as they would if they were setting fruit. I thought whoever said it meant that the blossoms were dropping without opening etc. Not so. Therefore, I don't think it is too much nitrogen. No, the blossoms are big beautiful things.


podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 1, 2011
4:42 AM

Post #8665673

Wouldn't that indicate insufficient pollination? Which would be likely with no breeze to stir the blossoms. Like Jeff said earlier, I tend to walk by the maters and shake them as a greeting. I like them growing up a cattle panel so I can shake the panel and do a row of them.

I learned something here... didn't know the ill effect of humidity on the blossoms. Thanks.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 1, 2011
9:26 AM

Post #8666098

Pod, my hoophouse is made of cattle panels. Don't you love them? I have had it up about 5 years now. Only had one problem with it and that was when we left the cover on one winter and the snow piled up and then turned to ice. Then it snowed again and that turned to ice. About 4 layers of that and it was so heavy they caved in.

Bob had to take each one down, 5 of them, individually and lay them flat in the driveway and walk on them to flatten them out again and put them back up. No trouble since.

We don't have a lot of humidity here but I suppose it might be more in the hh. With both ends open and the fan on tho, I don't see how it could be.

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 2, 2011
5:28 PM

Post #8668658

I am fond of cattle panels for all kinds of things. Thankful too that I am not blessed with that kind of snow!

I suspect if you bought plants locally, they are not a variety that is suited to the hot type of climate that you have created.

Can you shake your plants daily and see if that improves pollination?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 2, 2011
5:56 PM

Post #8668704

I will try. I counted 4 tomatoes today, all on the same plant. Didn't see any on others.

Did find one tomato with a lot of aphids. They had spread to a few leaves on the plants on either side of it. I took the leaves with the most on them off and some on the other plants also. Then I blasted them with the hose. Hope I didn't scatter them to all of the plants. I might try Al's alcohol treatment on the aphids for a few days if I have to. Saw one lady bug on them but she won't be able to eat all of them.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2011
10:46 AM

Post #8669766

If someone posted this already pardon, but indoors over the winter I took a brand new very soft sable paintbrush and "painted" the flowers on my citrus/navel orange tree. There were dozens of flowers and they kept falling off/not setting fruit.

After I did this, the flowers stopped falling, and fruits, dozens of them, began to develop. The plant itself knows how many fruits it can handle, methinks. I only have 4 that stayed on the plant and they are the size of golf balls. Last year I moved it outdoors, but the birds knocked the fruit off so it's staying where it is this year.

If you have the time/patience to do this with your 'maters you may have some success too.

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 3, 2011
10:57 AM

Post #8669782

LOL, then my tomatoes must be telling me they can't handle ANY fruit. Guess I will go yank them all out and throw them on the compost pile.

I have enough green around here with trees etc. than water and tend something that isn't going to give me a salad once in a while. Just a lot of little yellow flowers.

Sorry Amanda, don't think that's my problem.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 3, 2011
11:55 AM

Post #8669880

"Sorry Amanda, don't think that's my problem."

Ditto here. Amanda, tomato flowers are self-pollinizing and don't require moving pollen from one flower to another. Air/wind, vibration is enough to pollinate them and they'll oftentimes become pollinated before they even fully open.

Jnette, I'm getting curiouser and curiouser...what variety of tomatoes do you have?

I'm still of the mindset that you'll get tomatoes when the temps allow. And with your cool nights I bet that could be happening at some point. The high temps and no humidity (or low humidity) shouldn't have too much effect on the newer flowers which could pollinize before the hot daytime temp kicks in. Best time to go jiggle your plants would be in the morning before it gets to warm in there.

As for aphids, spray your plants with some fish emulsion and/or kelp spray. They hate that stuff but your plants will love it!

Shoe (feeling like Jnettes tomato plants, too hot here today!)

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2011
12:30 PM

Post #8669930

Shoe - then this driveway concrete ebucket garden thing is not going to work for me. The driveway runs the length of the house to the back yard bounded by the house on one side and the neighbor's cinderblock retaining wall. I could move the plants out towards the road more - but we would both have to park on the street then! I'm willing to do it if improving air circulation to perhaps reduce some of the ambient heat will result in more successful tomato plants.

Whaddya think?

A.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2011
1:07 PM

Post #8669980

This all seems more complicated that it should be. A gentle breeze will pollinate tomatoes- and unless the humidity stays so thick it prevents movement of pollen, they should do just fine without your interference-

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2011
1:32 PM

Post #8670009

Well I don't know much about maters - I'm the first to admit, but in the hoop house with no air moving about . . . anyway.

Best leave this up to the experts. :D

A.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 3, 2011
1:38 PM

Post #8670018

Last summer when we had a prolonged heat wave my tomatoes wouldn't set fruit. Only when the heat wave broke did I start getting little tomatoes. Although they are a warm-climate plant, even tomatoes have their limits!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 3, 2011
1:39 PM

Post #8670020

I don't believe in "experts", Amanda. :>)

But yes, as Jo mentioned, it doesn't take much breeze to pollinate a tomato flower and I'm sure under your conditions you'll get that. No need to move anything. And if you get nervous just go out there and wiggle the plants a bit in the mornings. I sometimes do that for my g-house tomatoes (but then again I also tell them tall tales, dance a jig, and speak in gibberish to them to help with the entertainment factor in their lives). *grin

Shoe
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

July 3, 2011
2:28 PM

Post #8670090

shoe- you have waaay too much free time!!!
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 3, 2011
3:48 PM

Post #8670224

Heheheh...you got me grinnin', Jo! :>)

But, but, but...isn't it important to entertain and make things (people/plants/rocks and dirt) feel welcome? *grin

Shoe (off to pick some cowpeas)
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 3, 2011
9:00 PM

Post #8670798

LOL, maybe that's my problem. I yell at them instead of singing and dancing.

Well, before I read all this about shaking them in the morning, I did it this afternoon so knocked all the pollen off.

Oh gosh Shoe, I have a dozen plants and only a couple of them are duplicates. Early Girl, Early Bush Beef Steak, Yellow Pear, Mortgage Lifter, German Johnson, Parks Whopper, Jelly Bean, Oregon Spring, Celebrity

can't remember the others. JB and GJ and possibly ML were dups. Can't see anything in those that are werid.

I think they will get tomatoes on them but the season won't be long enough to ripen any. Just like last year. Because of the cold June they didn't grow. Didn't ripen any. The little ones yes. That was all.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 5, 2011
8:19 PM

Post #8675001

Ok, I have decided I am giving them too much water. Killing them with kindness. They have no reason to put fruit on. Don't know it is getting late in the season. So, I am going to hold back on the water and see if that doesn't help.

Here is a picture of them and sorry about the weeds. Oh, since I took this picture I took the plastic all the way off of the hh.

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 5, 2011
8:26 PM

Post #8675010

Ok, here is a picture of my first garlic I dug. Sorry, it is on my lap. Not very big, but smells soooo good.

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 5, 2011
8:30 PM

Post #8675014

See these cute little ends? I think they call them scapes. They look like they have had hair rollers in them.

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 6, 2011
7:20 AM

Post #8675746

[quote="Horseshoe"]"Sorry Amanda, don't think that's my problem."

Ditto here. Amanda, tomato flowers are self-pollinizing and don't require moving pollen from one flower to another. Air/wind, vibration is enough to pollinate them and they'll oftentimes become pollinated before they even fully open.

Shoe [/quote]

At one time (not sure it's still done) in some hydroponic operations they would actually use vibrators to briefly touch the flowering clusters to pollinate the plants. I heard it was pretty much standard practice among some professional growers.

-Rich

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2011
9:02 AM

Post #8681962

Thanks Rich - I'd forgotten about the hydroponic issue. When Shoe was asking about the air circulation in the hoop house, I thought that's where he was going. My navel orange, kept inside this year, was not doing it's own thing so well.

Maybe with the plastic off and less water, she will start to see some blooms.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2011
9:10 AM

Post #8681987

Shoe - can't wait to stop by unannounced one of these days and catch you unawares doing a jig among your tomatoes. :D
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 9, 2011
10:37 AM

Post #8682125

Wait a minute guys, I don't understand.

If the vibrations and shaking were not moving the pollen from one flower to the other, what were they doing? Isn't that what they sometimes refer to as pollinating?

Amanda, don't you know that is dangerous in some areas: Showing up unannounced and spying on people? LOL, who knows what Shoe will be doing, and what state of dress/undress he may be in? LOL, what about it Shoe?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8682182

Jnette! Shhh...don't give away my secret garden attire! :>) As folks know I despise shoes so my feet are always naked. As for the rest of me, in the summer I prefer fig leafs, in the winter a hat.

As for tomato pollination, the wind/vibration doesn't tend to move pollen from one flower to another but rather from the male part of the flower to the female part of the same flower. This is why vibration also works. And by the way it is not just hydroponics but also greenhouse grown tomatoes where vibration methods come into play. Some years ago electric/battery powered toothbrushes were used; those would still be useful if you want to try that.

Shoe...home from the mkt with just enough tomatoes left to send to Jnette!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 9, 2011
12:10 PM

Post #8682271

Gee Amanda, maybe you did have a good idea.

My tomatoes Shoe, are you going to throw them? OR???

LOL, does each tomato plant want it's own toothbrush?

Oh, so the pollen has a shorter distance to go? Or did you mean the whole male part to the female part, and that then the pollen results in little baby tomatoes?

Who said this forum was not a lesson of the birds and the bees?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2011
1:24 PM

Post #8682375

I did think about what I might be sneaking up on, but this is a family forum (?) so I kept my mouth shut.

Jnette - one of my brothers went through a phase where he found these battery operated toothbrushes and I have a drawer full of them if you need. :D



Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
1:29 PM

Post #8682387

Hmmmm...Jnette, I guess I'll have to eat your tomatoes and tell you how good they were! *grin

As for tomato flowers/pollination, etc... Each flower has both male and female parts. Within one flower pollen just has to go from the stamen (male) to the stigma (female), then down the pistil to the ovaries which would get fertilized and a baby tomato is born! Ta-dah ♫ The wind/vibration will do that job.

Sometimes insects/bees will visit one flower, pick up pollen, visit another flower and deposit the pollen and the same is true (ovaries are fertilized and a baby tomato is born, or can be.)

Often times a tomato flower is pollinized before it is fully open. See, it makes it easy to begat tomatoes, eh? Factors that may inhibit tomato flowers from being pollinated would be too-cool temps, too hot temps, high humidity causing pollen to clump and not be transferred easily. I've even heard too low humidity will come into play, not allowing the pollen to stick to the stigma.

There ya have it in a nutshell...er, uh, rather in a tomato shell, I mean flower.

Shoe

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2011
1:34 PM

Post #8682398


Thanks for the lesson. We got that in about 3rd grade when they separated the girls and the boys. :P
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 9, 2011
1:58 PM

Post #8682427

Hah! I remember that separation day...always wondered what it was about cus the girls went off and the boys stayed in class just doing "busy work". No fair!

Shoe (off to hang new speakers so my gardens have music to listen to)

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8682431

We got to watch a movie. And we took home pretty pink pamphlets.

ppphlllepppp. :P
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 9, 2011
4:46 PM

Post #8682669

Must be something in that NC air. LOL, we didn't have that. No wonder I didn't know. I didn't get a pamphlet.

Gosh tho, got me so excited, makes me want to go out and see if I got any baby tomatoes. I went thru yesterday and shook all my tomato plants. It could be the low humidity here tho. We have almost NO humidity. Even when it rains hard. Can you believe that? Can only tell by the mosquitoes that are out. LOL, we don't sweat either.

Well Shoe, I thought you were in Oregon. How did you get to NC? Don't know why I thought that. I was wondering how you had tomatoes when I didn't. I thought you were talking about MY tomatoes as being supermarket tomatoes and that is why I didn't get all excited about them.

Bet I could get my good friend Kent to send me some. Maybe if I tell him about what the girls in the 3rd grade were doing when they left the room he would.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 9, 2011
7:10 PM

Post #8682893

Hmmm.

I don't know what the girls were doing when they left Shoe's class.

MY class was in Pennsylvania. I think the boys got a talk too (?!). May have to poll my grade school chums on FB to find out. :D

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 9, 2011
9:47 PM

Post #8683098

Must have been something new since I was in the 3rd grade. Maybe they thought we, as country kids, knew everything already. : P)

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
9:03 AM

Post #8683785

Jnette - maybe shake 'em again, real hard! "Grow, dammit, or I'll pop your heads off!!!"

Just another suggestion.

Have a blessed day. heh. :D

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 10, 2011
9:43 AM

Post #8683902

LOL, I love it Amanda. I'm going to try it!! Thanks.




edited to add: I have heard from several people in this area, including my sister a hundred miles away, that they have the exact same thing. One tomato with fruit on it out of many plants. Weird? Yeah, but now, my daughter in Seattle, where I must tell you Shoe, is more humid than here, says she has many tomatoes on hers and she has her tomato plants in 8 inch pots!! AND, she didn't start hers until last month!! She has them in a small greenhouse where it gets up to 120 degrees even with a fan on, and doors open. Go figure.

This message was edited Jul 10, 2011 9:50 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 19, 2011
10:00 AM

Post #8701706

Ok, it has been 9 days since our last post. In that time I cut back the water, shook them hard like Amanda said and threatened them also, then I broke down and gave them some fish fertilizer. Whether it was any of the above, or all, or just the time they decided to do it, they are getting tomatoes on now. However, I will be surprised if I get any ripe before the end of our season which is sometime after Labor Day. Any time after that we can get a hard freeze that kills everything, and then it will be nice again until almost November.

I am thinking I might just put the plastic back on the hoophouse around Labor Day. That might extend my season. If it could get me past that one freeze then I might be able to get a decent crop of tomatoes. Don't know.

You would think after 16 years here I would have it figured out, but the last 2 years I am not the only one that has had this trouble. They have just been very strange years for weather.

Last year even the wholesale growers didn't get theirs out until late and then a few weeks later a hard rain split them all and that was the end of their crops. That is more of a kind of desert area vs mine that is more of a valley with a lot of trees and much cooler. Only 60 miles apart.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 19, 2011
8:17 PM

Post #8702839

Well that oughtta teach those tomatoes!! You show 'em who's boss, Jen!!!

I'm still planting seedlings! I wonder which one of us will have a tomato first. :D

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 20, 2011
4:05 AM

Post #8703069

Jnette, plastic over the hoophouse might not be a bad idea, although here we are still getting high temps through some of September so you'd have to be careful not to fry the little dears.

Amanda, I wonder whether you'll get much at this point, but it's always worth a try. If it doesn't work there's next year. My tomato plants, grown from seed and set out in the beginning of May, are loaded with tomatoes but only two are starting to color up - always with the exception of my Petit Moineau, a currant variety, which has been giving me tiny nuggets of sweetness for several weeks now.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 20, 2011
5:02 AM

Post #8703111

Yeah, injury and illness have conspired against me this season. Not like me, typically very healthy.

I am especially excited about my indeterminate jelly bean tomatoes. 2 years ago I planted seeds and only got one spindly plant. It was determined not to die and not to thrive. I eventually put it in a bucket and it grew and grew and grew until the frost killed it. It gave me delicious tomatoes right up to that point. What a great experience for someone who doesn't really like tomatoes. It's what inspired me to do buckets in the driveway this year. My "seedlings" are about 12" right now. I think I'll get some 'maters before Jen.

Will keep you posted.

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 20, 2011
11:40 AM

Post #8704013

LOL, Amanda, EVERYBODY will have 'maters before Jen. :0)

GH Gal, look where she lives. They have a long season.

It was barely 60 degrees here yesterday and in the 40s and low 50s at night so they really do not have much of a chance to grow. It has to get to at least 55 nights for them to do anything.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

July 23, 2011
7:57 AM

Post #8710508

The plastic alone will not be enough. I see about 1 degree difference between the outside and inside temp of my single layer hoop house at night. Were it me I would be for laying the plants on the ground as well as covering them with a couple of bankets and taking them off again in the morning.

Here they come

Thumbnail by eweed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8710524

Lookin' good eweed. Isn't it pretty sad when even your weather over there is warmer than here!! No, if I have to do that with the blankets etc. then they won't have any flavor anyway so might as well buy them. I just thought that even the one layer of plastic would keep the frost off if/when it hits. It usually only does it one night and then it is good for another month or so. But just that one night is enough normally to get anything that is fragile.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 23, 2011
12:23 PM

Post #8710887

Lookin' good, Ernie! You gotta love that g-house, eh?

Jnette, yep, your plastic will be fine for frost protection, and I'd sure put it back on. For freeze protection that's another thing, eh? I imagine for weeks though you will just have cold temps when the weather changes, not necessarily freezing temps. (I'm determined to see a pic of you EATING a home grown tomato...I'm not giving up on ya!)

Shoe :>)
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 23, 2011
5:55 PM

Post #8711329

LOL, Ok Shoe, you might have it. I went out this morning and I could not believe all the tomatoes on all of the plants. It was almost like someone decorated Christmas Trees overnight. Now WHY??? Did the tomatoes figure with the cold weather coming right after those couple of warm days that the end was near so they better get to work? I was shocked 'cause some of them that I had never seen before were the size of ping pong balls. Now how could that happen so fast?

It is turning warm now this week. By warm I mean in the low to mid 80s. And, I am not sure for how long, at least a few days I think. Maybe that is the answer. After a few hot days, the nights went down into the 40s (one lady said she had frost kill her beans) so the tomatoes decided they better get their butts in gear and make some tomatoes before they died.

Ok, so now my question is, should I give them another dose of fertilizer to get some size to those tomatoes so they maybe will ripen? I have the rest of this month, a week?, and August, and from then it is iffy.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 23, 2011
9:25 PM

Post #8711727

I'm guessing your threat to pop their heads off really did the trick!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 24, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8712431

LOL, Ya think?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

July 24, 2011
12:03 PM

Post #8712583

Congrats on those tomatoes! You must be elated!

"Ok, so now my question is, should I give them another dose of fertilizer to get some size to those tomatoes so they maybe will ripen?"

It wouldn't hurt to top dress them. I can't remember what you've fed them (and I'm too lazy to go back up and re-read the thread to find out). I think it is a good idea to give the plants a treat when they have produced the babies though; it'll do 'em justice and help you get a bit larger fruit. (If they are larger fruit bearing types, that is.) Even watering with fish emulsion or the like every week or so will work.

Shoe...waiting for pictures of you with tomato juice running down your chin!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 24, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8712916

Hi Shoe,

Very elated and SHOCKED. LOL, I really was. Those babies popped out just like someone decorated them with Christmas ornaments. Couldn't believe it. Yes, I have some of all sizes. From Jelly Beans to Mortgage Lifters and Park's Whoppers. And everything in between.

I have them planted in alfalfa bales. and have only fertilized them twice. Once with the blend of kelp, humic acid, Mychorrizae; and then Miracle Grow Tomato food. And then the fish emulsion last week I think it was. The plants are beautiful, and when those Christmas ornaments turn red they are going to be even more beautiful.

I have found that with the alfalfa bales I only have to water a couple times a week. But then it hasn't been hot either. I have to say that my remote thermometer says it is 99 degrees out there now tho. Not sure how close that is 'cause the other one in the shade and on the north side of the house says 83. But that 99 is probably in the direct sun.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 24, 2011
7:17 PM

Post #8713256

Wow - I love the image of your plants lighting up like Christmas trees. Please do take pictures. :)
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 25, 2011
9:33 AM

Post #8714166

LOL, me too Amanda. I have a very vivid imagination. I am sure the pictures will not ever happen since I will probably be lucky to get a few ripe tomatoes before frost. But, it is a nice dream. I forgot, I also have a couple of yellow ones to go with those red lights.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 4, 2011
8:42 PM

Post #8737781

Pictures, Jeanette!!! We NEED pictures!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 4, 2011
10:37 PM

Post #8737929

LOL, Amanda, you and Shoe are not going to believe this. I was out watering the tomatoes today and went to check the one very small near-ripe one and decided it needed a couple more days. Well, the darned thing came off in my hand. Soooooooo, guess you all know, Bob was going to cut it up for our salad tonight. I said no, it is too small. Just cut it in half and we will each try it.

So, he did. Had to put a few grains of salt on it and believe me, it was heaven. So much better, just that little bite, than any tomato we have had since last year. Probably 2 years. It was just a bit larger than a cherry tomato. 2 more of these mid 80s weather days and it would have been a bit sweeter. However, I would bet that squirrel that was giving me heck out there the other day would have gotten it first. So, I am glad we got it. Sorry it didn't last long enough for a picture.

LOL, Amanda, I am going to take a picture of my tomato patch just for you. But please remember I have been stripping these poor plants for a week now. You are not going to believe it. And Shoe, when I get a tomato I can be proud of I will take a picture of it for you.

I have been cutting leaves off for a few hours each day. Probably have about 2 more days of cutting leaves and tops off. Can't believe not even the Jelly Beans are ripe yet. They are actually smaller than grapes I would bet. And they have not ripened yet. None of them.

Now that I am getting a lot of this stuff off, maybe they will have more strength going into growing and ripening the fruit that is already on there.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2011
5:47 AM

Post #8738222

That is so funny. :)

I mean, how much delight and enjoyment we can get from one tomato.

I found a tiny eggplant forming on the "fingerling" plant that a friend gave me and I practically did a jig in the driveway this morning.

I do not like the way the flowers are looking on my butternut squash, however. I think the first flowers are just going thru growing pains (remember the whole ebucket thing in the driveway is still in its nascent stages) but today's flower is speckled with brown and flower is becoming soft and mushy.

I have 2 ripe red tomatoes from an unknown variety which was also given to me this spring. I guess I'd better get to liking tomatoes!

Still haven't planted my pole beans on the pole, though they are looking like they would probably appreciate it. So you see how far behind I am? My spring crop is my fall crop.

I am interested in your 'maters Jeanette - hope that giving them all a haircut will produce the intended effect.

Loveya.
A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
11:27 AM

Post #8738791

Hold her there Amanda. I just remembered YOU were the one that was going to have a ripe tomato before me!! Remember that? Well, can't tell how ripe that little bugger was, but it was much better flavored than the ones you get in the store.

LOL, beatcha

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2011
11:44 AM

Post #8738817

I have 2 LARGE ripe red tomatoes in the driveway just waiting to be plucked. Like yours, I don't think they're ready yet, but I could probably take them down tonight. :)
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
5:17 PM

Post #8739171

This is one side of the hoophouse tomatoes that have not been trimmed. Jeanette

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8739188

This is the same side and has been trimmed on both ends but hadn't gotten t the middle or any of the tops or the other side yet.

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
5:39 PM

Post #8739211

This is the opposite side that has been trimmed on the inside of the hh but not the tops. This side is only half of the hh in tomatoes. The rest is planted in a raised bed with horseradish and garlic.

Jeanette

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
5:44 PM

Post #8739227

Those are the plants. Even with all the foliage I have cut off, in some cases half the plants from the ground (bale) up, it is difficult to see any tomatoes. They are there but not as many as should be. I know, with our current temps, in the mid to high 80s that they will ripen if the heat continues.

I am thinking I am going to try Ebuckets next year. How do you like yours? Don't you have them on your driveway?

Jeanette
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
5:57 PM

Post #8739253

LOL, it's a good thing I don't have neighbors. This is to keep the deer and hopefully the squirrels out. Some of them have marbles in them.

Jeanette

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2011
6:45 PM

Post #8739327

Jeanette - looks like if you had water in those bottles they might make some beautiful music! :)

The maters look lush! So glad you will have them before your cold snap hits.

I did start buckets in my driveway, but as you know with my limitations this season I am way behind. Therefore I can't opine about whether they are the cat's meow or not. ;)

I have been challenged to keep them watered. The heat has really been taking it out on them. I have the bamboo teepee trellis and put my pole beans on poles today. HA!

Will send pictures of my 2 ripe tomatoes. :D

Loveya.
A.

p.s. I have heard good things about the straw bale gardening, but it sounded like too much work for me.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2011
9:43 PM

Post #8739544

Amanda, I think the bale gardening is too much work if you are physically challenged. You never did say what your problem was. But, if you don't want to tell me that is ok too. If you do,want to, put it on D-mail. I love to hear about peoples problems. Makes me feel better with mine. LOL, being my typical smart a-- self.

I have my 2 tomato plants in the Earthbox on the deck and I nave to give them almost 5 gallons of water every day. Amazing. They do have tomatoes on them tho. I have about 4 beans on my teepee out there in a big clay pot. Doubt if I will get any beans. I was going to put the climbing spinach on them with the beans but couldn't find my seeds for the spinach. Oh well.

Would love to see pictures of your tomatoes. REALLY!! Jeanette

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
7:46 AM

Post #8739919

HA! This makes me laugh - I am able bodied. Nothing to hide - you all know that I am a crazy, retired lawyer, but the meds help so enough about that. ;)

Physically - the hand injury this spring is all, but in terms of the effort with the hay bales, pour this much of this on it and wait for x days, then pour this much of that on it and wait for y days, etc., etc. Maybe I can't plan that far ahead? And it would probably get to be a soggy mess and we don't have that much space and, and, and . . ..

I will take a picture of my nitrogen deprived tomato with the 2 beautiful red ripe maters. The other bucket next to it has beautiful foliage. Not sure what I did, but when I was putting the fertilizer in the buckets I remember doing both of them differently and wondering if it would have an effect. Apparently it did, though my experiment was not controlled. I have no idea which bucket was which except to see that one plant is yellow and the other is green.

Have a grrrrreat day! Haven't heard from Shoe in a while. I wonder how HIS garden grows.

He's not far from me, but as you know I am mortified at how it is here, August, and I am just now trying to train pole beans to my teepee trellis.

Can't keep up with the Joneses neither.

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 6, 2011
10:42 AM

Post #8740233

Somehow you don't strike me as the kind to ever even try to keep up with the Jones boys, and really couldn't care less if they get by you and leave you waaaaaay behind. LOL

I do want to see those tomatoes before you eat them. How do you stand leaving them on the bushes and how come you do not have to worry about some darned deer or squirrel eating them????
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 6, 2011
3:46 PM

Post #8740699

OK blt time again

Thumbnail by eweed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
3:48 PM

Post #8740702

Jeanette:

Court encouraged me to take these off the plant today to let it put energy into fruiting. I am going to post a series here - hope no body minds. :)

A.

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
3:51 PM

Post #8740709

Oh my goodness!!! E. Weed Jones just showed up!!! What beautiful tomatoes!!! Really. :)

Here's the picture of my entire tomato plant crop so far.

A.

p.s. Note the yeller tomato plant in the foreground. It has been fed!

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
3:53 PM

Post #8740711

My bean crop and new teepee trellis!

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
3:55 PM

Post #8740714

Butternut, cucumbers, even a sugar baby watermelon! In AUGUST!

Full sun right there at the head of the drive. Will post photos as soon as the crop pulls down the bamboo teepee trellis.

A.

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
3:59 PM

Post #8740723

My first butternut (I'm growing them for Rita, my iguana)(yeah, yeah - I know)!

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 6, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8740724

Last one, I promise:

My first eggplant (a finger variety a friend gave to me and I couldn't say "no" to).

A.

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 6, 2011
8:28 PM

Post #8741086

Well Amanda, I've never seen a garden quite like yours. It certainly is different. I know, you haven't seen one like mine either. LOL We would do well together working together I believe.

But, Amanda, that one yellow tomato plant looks diseased. Maybe Shoe can tell you what is wrong with it. Rather sad really. Amazing tho, it has very nice tomatoes. Poor thing. Maybe that is what is wrong with it. It has too many tomatoes on it. Taking all the strength.
:0)
Jeanette

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
5:38 AM

Post #8741444

Jeanette - if you go looking into some other threads (which I know you don't tend to do) like the container gardening and vertical gardening and ebuckets and such, you'll find a lot of odd looking gardens. :)

But this is my driveway, not my garden. I have some mammals in the garden that I think would do damage to the fruits and vegetables so I thought I'd try to take advantage of the sunny space in the drive.

Days are getting shorter. :/
Hope they like my parking space.

A.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
5:44 AM

Post #8741454

Here are some pictures of the garden from this year and last:

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.10150203111931434.318742.716796433&l=4072b8ddbd&type=1

https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.413198046433.199237.716796433&l=abb597ef16&type=1

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2011
7:58 AM

Post #8741692

Amanda, gorgeous photos! Your place is both lovely and intriguing!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 7, 2011
10:02 AM

Post #8741919

Amanda, what makes you think I don't look at all of those other sites??? No idea how you can tell what I am doing.

As a matter of fact I have tried almost all of what you named and next year am going on to ebuckets. I have used cattle panels upright to grow cucumbers. I have grown corn in 5 gallon buckets. I have more containers with everything from okra to flowers.

I understand your garden on your cement driveway. Very smart taking advantage of the heat.

Your issues with your hand are very debilitating inasmuch as how do you manage without them? I understand that. I think it is wonderful that dealing with that you still have tomatoes on your plants, squash on your plants, egg plants, etc.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
11:44 AM

Post #8742116

Jeanette - maybe I'm confusing you with JB who doesn't have time to look at other threads. :)

Not saying you don't go to other sites, just that there are a gazillion threads! I guess when I was sidelined with the hand I read those threads for weeks! I started things late to begin with because of school. I figured I'd go at it gang-busters when school was out. Then when school was out the first week back to work full-time is when the injury occurred.

The hand has been frustrating! Totally debilitated for at least 2 months. Now only partially so. I have been doing a little at a time, and I am still wearing the brace but notice less discomfort in my wrist. Follow up with the specialist is in September. Did I tell you the MRI showed partial tear in xyz ligament and "full thickness perforation" in TFCC? Whatever that means.

I would really like to have seen corn grow in 5 gallon buckets! I love being exposed to all these different ideas. I told my BF that he could sit on the back porch today because I am almost finished with my seedlings and transplants going where they need to, and there is more and more room back there. He said the plants were doing a dance around the porch as each one moves a little every day. :D

The heat has come up again today. We are hiding inside and listening to the race in Pocono on the internet/streaming radio.

A.


AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
11:45 AM

Post #8742118

Thanks, Leslie - how are your beans doing? I haven't been paying attention. :)

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 7, 2011
12:09 PM

Post #8742165

Wow Amanda, that is a terrible time to have an injury. But then there is never a good time. Even when I need to have my ankle operated on with screws etc. 6 weeks off, when do you do it? Not in the summer when there is so much work. Not in the winter when you would be housebound and get cabin fever. So?????

What in the world does all that mean from the MRI? Sounds real bad.

One would think in the winter you could read books for 6 weeks right? Well, the house looks sooo dirty then because you can't do anything about it. So you can't even concentrate on a good book. Or a couple a week.

Probably meant JB. She manages to keep real busy.

Sure laughed about the BF's comment about the plants dancing around the porch. I can really imagine that and see it too. Must be a name for it.

Well, better get busy before it gets too hot. In the mid 80s now and it is noon.

JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
12:24 PM

Post #8742212

Speaking of disabilities- I just had surgery for my severely damaged right rotator cuff-2 months ago tomorrow. Doc said 8-12 months recovery, which made me very depressed-but as of Friday the sling is gone and I am doing very painful isopmetrics and resistance exercises. I am ahead of the average on recovery, and at least I can do small simple things- no lifting or pushing! He said if I mess it up he can't fix it again, ao my gardening future is at stake.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
3:34 PM

Post #8742741

Jo - best listen to the doctor.

Jen - the place is always a mess. :D

Have a good night! Spent my afternoon building a bamboo trellis for my mandevilla which has not bloomed yet because I'm a mean momma.

Later!

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 7, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8743021

Wow, what is going on Jo? You are about the 4th person lately that I have heard of that has had that surgery. Dawn had hers about 2 months ago too. Wonder how she is doing. Haven't heard from her lately about it.

What did the dr. mean he couldn't redo it?

Amanda, I have had about 3 of those plants and killed every one of them. They are so pretty. Mandevilles

I went back in my computer to see if I could find pictures of the corn growing in the buckets but guess I didn't take pictures, or don't have them in this computer. I planted 3 to a bucket and each plant had 2 or 3 ears on them. Just as good as any other corn. But, they weren't ebuckets. Don't know the difference between ebuckets and just plain old buckets with holes drilled in them for drainage. Why mess with the calendars etc. See, the problem with the earthbuckets and boxes is that with that space down there, if you let that go dry the roots are exposed to the air. Whereas if you just plant them in the buckets with drainholes, they aren't. The whole thing is, you just don't let them dry out.

I read somewhere that someone wanted to know where to get the green buckets. Well, they sell a beautiful green Krylon spray paint now just for plastic. I have used it on these buckets and it works just fine.


I should go on that forum and ask them why bother with all that. But they probably wouldn't appreciate that huh?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8743098

I think people paint them for aesthetic purposes to keep the Joneses. ;)

I am watering the buckets every other day to keep them from going dry. I used little plastic rectangular storage basket thingees in the bottom for my "aeration chamber." I thought it was a neat concept, even though I grew giganta tomatoes in regular buckets even without drain holes a couple of summers ago.

There's a learning curve. It's been a long time since mom made us grow vegetables.

Have a good night all. Monday's coming!

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 7, 2011
6:22 PM

Post #8743111

One quick thing Amanda, I meant why bother with the air/water space? With the overflow. Why not just grow them either with or without the drainage holes.

Night, have a good one. Jen

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
8:17 PM

Post #8743406

I understood your question and don't know why not - I was struck by the novelty of it, I guess, and that people reported good results, seemingly superlative results.

I don't have much experience either way, so I thought I'd give it a try. It did make sense, trying to keep roots from rotting and allowing them more air circulation. On the other hand, with temps like we've been having, the concern about drying out is more likely and wasn't something I'd thought about in advance.

Truth is - the whole watering tube to water into the chamber at the bottom is useless. I water the plants on the soil to ensure that the media is moist at the top. Doesn't matter how much your media "wicks," with temps in the mid-90s there isn't much moisture at the surface anywhere!

A.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
8:17 PM

Post #8743408

p.s. i know this isn't about your tomatoes, but I had a flower on my sugar baby watermelon this morning, and before night fall I could see a tiny tiny watermelon. :)
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

August 7, 2011
9:12 PM

Post #8743514

Jnette, he said the damage was so severe that it was a one shot repair- I injured it last fall lifting a heavy pot of flowers- probably 40 pound -into my van. As I lifted out from my body and up, I felt a burn and heard pops. He had to sew and screw many tendons back, and he said I also had some old damage..I waited for it to get better during the winter then found out that rotator cuff injuries do not heal- they must be repaired. He did it arthroscopically with 4 buttonholes, and he is confident it will be a success- maybe not full use, but useable without pain. Since having the surgery I find that it is a pretty common thing- I have a wonderful therapist and we will make it work!!!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2011
8:42 AM

Post #8744074

Jo, I think the arthroscopic surgery is a wonderful thing. I believe in the past a lot of damage was done in the major surgery when they didn't have it. Also, PT is slow, but it works. You just have to take it as it comes. Take care, and you are lucky to have a good therapist.

Amanda, have you read Al Tapla's article in the container thread? I think besides the type of mix he uses, the wicking idea is very interesting. i.e. using the wick to get the moisture to the roots where they need it really makes sense. I sure would like to hear Al's take on this water reservoir is concerned.

Amanda, remember what I said about after 2 days I looked and had tomatoes the size of golf balls where there had been none before? Same with your watermelon. They just appear so fast. And I think it is the time of year that the plant knows it is running out of time to produce before frost sets in.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 8, 2011
12:26 PM

Post #8744591

So cute! Just about as big as a pencil eraser. :)

Thumbnail by AmandaEsq
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2011
12:47 PM

Post #8744646

Pretty cool. Will be ripe enough for dinner?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 19, 2011
7:47 AM

Post #8764565

Well, it is only 47 degrees out there at 7:30 in the a.m. Not a ripe tomato yet. Plenty of big tomatoes finally, but just getting too cold nights now to ripen!! I am not the only one tho, Other people have said the same thing.

I read an article in the newspaper Wednesday that said to put green tomatoes in a paper bag with apples or banana peels to ripen. Problem there is, they probably wouldn't have much flavor. Anybody know anything bout it?

Well, better get busy. Lots to do today.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

August 19, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8764591

Yes you can wrap the tomatoes on a paper bag with banana pr apple. They will ripen. Their flavor ill not be as god thought. Sorry.
I wish we could share some weather: I will send you some 100 degrees day and you can send us some cooler ones. This summer has been crazy !!
Good luck !
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 19, 2011
9:19 AM

Post #8764700

Jenett cut off the top of the plants to just above the tomatoes that stand a chance.Now take a shovel and cut down close to the stalk and sever the roots half way arounf the plant.

If all else fails just before you get in to heavy frost or a period of cold nights pull your plants up and take them into a warm basement or back porch if you have one. Hang them up by the root end up. your tomatoes will ripen on the vine.It makes a mess with the leaves but this has worked since the settlers times and I think for many years before.

Isn't that a nice mountian can you see it from your side of the mountians? It is mount Baker

Thumbnail by eweed
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 19, 2011
9:55 AM

Post #8764749

Jnette, look at the blossom end of your green tomatoes. If they are showing a lighter green, a pinkish blush, or change of color those are perfect for picking and ripening off the vine.

However, keep in mind, although your nights are turning cool again aren't your days still fairly warm? Those tomatoes may still gain in size and slowly "blush"; just pick the bigger ones showing a slight color change, leave the greener ones on the vine, picking them as they start to change.

Hope you get some!
Shoe
PS. you can store them in a paper bag w/ or w/out a banana, they'll give off their own ethylene gas which is what helps them ripen.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 19, 2011
9:56 AM

Post #8764751

And, ditto what Ernie says, too. (We were posting at the same time.)

Now you have some choices!

Shoe (nice mtn, Ernie!)
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 19, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8764870

I look for a light colored kinda star shaped thing that starts on the bottom and the points run up towards the top. Those will ripen the rest can go for Fried green tomatoes. If you are much more ambitious than I am you can make green katchup or relish.I feed most of mine to the working girls chickens love them.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 19, 2011
12:37 PM

Post #8765001

O my goodness Jeanette. I was wishing for cooler weather but i am not ready for that! I can see the angle of the sun and how my yard gets shaded so much already. I got very sad the other day, but remembered that I still have plenty of tending and flowering yet to go.

I am waiting for a second flush of tomatoes from my new plants. Will keep you posted.

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 19, 2011
2:07 PM

Post #8765139

Shoe, if those blossom ends are changing and I pick them will they still have a good flavor? Now, they are saying we are in for near 90 degree weather for the next week to 10 days. Well, that should mean the night time temps should at a minimum kick into mid 50s. But don't those big swings hurt the tomatoes too?

Beautiful Mt. Baker Ernie. We have another pass between us and the Cascades so I can't see it. I am just a few miles., as the crow flies, from Idaho.

Ok, you guys have given me a lot of options here so I am destined to have some ripe tomatoes with, or without, good flavor. LOL

Thanks all of you.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2011
9:25 PM

Post #8769885

Good gravy, Jeanette - soon you will need to change the subject of this thread to say:

"Is it too cold for my tomatoes?"

Loveya. :)

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 21, 2011
10:23 PM

Post #8769984

LOL, Amanda, not my thread to change the name. I love talking to these people about my dumb tomatoes. I have a lot of big tomatoes, little tomatoes, and everything in between. I try my darnedest to get them to ripen and give me some good ones.

Would you believe we went to a farmers market over the weekend and I paid $6 for 4 tomatoes for our dinner tonight? Yup, I did that. That is how badly we wanted a good BLT. And they said they were Beefsteak tomatoes, and from the size I would say they probably were, but they didn't have a real good flavor. Soooooooo? Whadda ya say Amanda?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2011
10:26 PM

Post #8769987

OUCH is what I say. Something wrong with that program. Sorry. I am so looking forward to my jelly bean tomatoes, I don't know what to make of your beefsteaks.

On the other hand, someone gave me what is supposed to be a giant slicing tomato. It has a very odd exotic name. Not coming to me. I'll post it tomorrow. My butternuts fell today to some creepy bugs. Shoe and Gym_girl helped me narrow it down to SVB or stink bugs. Either way, a bit sad, but not crushed, given the time factor. I am going to plant snap peas in there and see what happens. :)

Loveya.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 21, 2011
10:35 PM

Post #8770004

Girl, you either got a lot of patience or one long growing season. I would have figured this season at a loss by now. But then it is very difficult for me to think beyond 3 months at the most for a season. LOL

BTW, maybe I will go close my windows some and bring the bird in. jen

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2011
10:40 PM

Post #8770010

Look out for cats!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 21, 2011
10:40 PM

Post #8770011

p.s. the garden in season is the only place where I can consider myself an optimist. ;)
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 21, 2011
10:46 PM

Post #8770017

Yeah, the cats cannot get in my room. I am so careful of that. I don't want to sleep with them. I do think the little bird is asleep. I hope. jen

LoveForests

LoveForests
FU
United States
(Zone 9b)

August 22, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8771005

Lots of great info on this thread :]

I have two tomatoe plants in pots. Seems like they've been in the pots forever but are barely growing, not getting new branches and only got two flowers which fell off. They have big 'Leaf Curl' too. I might be growing the wrong type of tomato for this area (huge beefers) and at the wrong time of year. Temps have been about 92 degrees (101 in the sun with 60-100% humidity). I live in south Florida. I find it very hard to get tomatoes growing here and without the Leaf-curl happening.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 31, 2011
7:33 PM

Post #8787794

Ok Shoe, Amanda, and the rest of you, I picked my first large tomatoes today. Think they were Early Girls. Wonderful!! Reason I'm not sure of the name is the labels were mixed up on those on that end. I do have a lot of the Jelly Beans, the red ones are a better flavor. I will use some in salads and try to dehydrate the rest.

Now if the weather holds up for a few more weeks I should get enough to dry some of the larger ones also. Or use them in roasted tomato sauce. Love it.

Oh, BTW, I also took a couple of tomatoes out of the sacks with the banana peels today and they were ripe also. They were green when I put them in there and looked for the star on the bottoms. Neat trick. Jeanette

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 1, 2011
12:23 PM

Post #8788798

Very cool! If I even HAD green tomatoes I think that would be something I would try. As it is, they are still growing plant parts, not flowering mostly.

A friend gave me an "Omar's Lebanon" and said it was a great giant slicing tomato. I planted it in a bucket weeks ago - it was a fairly well developed plant to start with. Once it gets comfy in the driveway I hope it goes gangbusters. Ha ha ha.

Okay kids - going to meditate on a happy mood.

Love to all. :)

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 5, 2011
6:48 PM

Post #8795177

Ok, the tomatoes I put in with the banana peel ripened and they were real good. But, I have some that are real big, the biggest I have ever had here. Can't believe just 1 1/2 months ago was worried I didn't have any at all. Anyway, now I am going to cut the roots on the big ones and see what happens. I had already cut the tops off. So the next try is the roots.

Thanks you guys. Jeanette

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 5, 2011
7:51 PM

Post #8795323

Man - you're a mean momma Jeanette!!!

No wonder they're working OT.

Maybe I should threaten to yank their roots off next time?!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 6, 2011
10:44 AM

Post #8796024

LOL, Amanda, I don't have as long a growing season as you do. One of the fellas about 10 miles from me said he had 36 degrees the other night. I'm not taking any chances. That I know of anyway.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 6, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8796030

Oy. I guess you'll be covering up the ol' hoophouse soon, eh?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 6, 2011
12:52 PM

Post #8796270

Soon. right now it is in the high 90s. But really gets down there at night.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 23, 2011
2:37 PM

Post #8820966

Amanda, I had forgotten covering the hh. It has been so darned nice. But, it is suppose to get down to the high 60s next week and the lows in the 40s so it will be soon.

Remember you all when I was so worried I wasn't going to have any tomatoes this year? Well, I have to tell you this has been the very best year ever for tomatoes for me. I have wonderful tomatoes. I think the place I bought the plants had the labels mixed up, they said they grow over 6,000 plants and when I bought some because mine had frozen, they had only about 300 left. So, I ended up with huge tomatoes, which I never buy because our season is so short. Well, I guess it doesn't matter if it is short as long as you have the right weather for a couple of months.

Anyway, at the rate they are going, it might be that all of my tomatoes ripen by the time summer is over here. Normally after Labor Day anytime is it. Well, it is in the low 80s today. Haven't had rain for 2 1/2 months. Love it.

We are hearing the bad vibes about such a bad winter coming up. Hope not, but I will have nice ripe tomatoes in the freezer to remind me of what a super season I have had.
lizardbreath
Boise City, OK
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2011
5:44 PM

Post #8829800

Since reading this thread I have wondered could you cover the hoop house with blankets or some other insulation as well as the plastic if a freeze threatens? Also wondering if that kind of set-up would work for me because we have horrible high temps all summer(weeks over 100) but it cools down suddenly. Like Jnette we have hard freeze, then beautiful weather three or four more weeks. Each year I try to figure a way to save my tomatoes as long as possible because they don't like to produce in the high temps but can't grow fast enough to beat the freeze.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 29, 2011
6:28 PM

Post #8829868

I did cover my hoop house with blankets and I saved my tomato plants.
It is important that the cover doesn't touch the plants.
Also I think it is going to be really cold I put a bucket of boiling water under the hoop house just before I go to bed, so the heat and the humidity is going to help the plants.
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 29, 2011
7:49 PM

Post #8829974

I would think that the bucket of boiling water would not be effective for very long since it would cool off in a few minutes due to the cold. I cover my three-level herb stand (3' wide x 5' long) stand with a burlap cover on really cold nights, plug in a warm air humidifier to provide heat and humidity, and also hang up a 75 watt shop light underneath, but not touching, the burlap to provide additional heat. Everything is turned off in the morning and the burlap cover is removed. All of my herbs survived last winter. I suppose you could also use a warm air humidifier under a row cover to protect tomatoes or other crops and as long as you used a good outside extention cord, there would be little to no risk of creating a fire.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 30, 2011
7:47 AM

Post #8830353

I use sleeping bags and water in plastic milk jugs (not warmed) the water does retain the heat, however eventually it does get too cold. I only use this method to get through a freeze that is going to be only a night or two.

I cant believe we are discussing how to keep plants warm after the summer we've had! LOL
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 30, 2011
8:48 AM

Post #8830416

I'm keeping up with all this .
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

September 30, 2011
8:55 AM

Post #8830420

Hey, Digger you've actually seen my tent city.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 30, 2011
9:06 AM

Post #8830430

Yes and I had doubts , but not anymore . I thought you was killing them and mashing them flat , but it WORKED ! How ya been ? Hope to see you this fall . Hope the boys are well .
Need to know where you got that ceiling tile that looks like hammered metal , seriously
This thread has been so informative . I'm going to check further into the ebuckets . As I didn't plant anything this last season , I'm chomping to get stuff started again . I know you're talking about toms, but forgive me for planting spinach when I get south , too cold for toms ,
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8830432

I don't think any of these things would work for my hoophouse. It is 20 feet long, 6 feet high and 8 feet wide on the ground. So, I do have the plastic cover made with grommets to hook bungee cords to fasten it to the hh. My hh is made from cattle panels. Then I use bungee cords also to attach the plants to the cattle panels. Attach isn't a very good word, but you know what I mean.

I have about 20 tomatoes planted in the alfalfa bales, then I have a raised bed that I plant horse radish in one end and garlic in the rest. Also one bale with 2 bell pepper plants. So, it is pretty hard to keep the frost off.

I went out yesterday and picked all the ripe and near ripe tomatoes. I made some salsa yesterday for tacos last night, it was real good. Then I want to use the cherry tomatoes for another dish tonight and saving a couple for BLTs and then freezing the rest. Just putting them on cookie sheets and freezing them whole, unpeeled, and vacuum packing them. I don't have enough to can but we can use the frozen ones for sauce, juice, or whatever. I made a Gazpacho that was wonderful and I can make some of that in the winter if I want. However, it is a cold soup, I suppose it can be heated. Have any of you done that? If so, how did it turn out? Was it weird?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2011
9:17 AM

Post #8830437

Digger, we crossposted. I am really curious about the ebuckets. I had decided to make some of those and use them next year instead of bales. BUT, then in my curiosity, I wondered why you need that air space? I have an earthbox on my deck with tomatoes in it, and I cannot for the life of me figure out why you need the airspace? Why not just use drainage holes and fill the buckets with soil mix?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 30, 2011
10:22 AM

Post #8830504

Ha ha - yes this has changed into the "is it too cold for my tomatoes" thread. :)

There is a lot of information here, so it will all be handy, rain or shine, hot or cold...


So glad Jen got tomatoes finally. Mine have not been as abundant. I won't have to cover mine and will let the frost have them sometime in November.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

September 30, 2011
10:23 AM

Post #8830506

After reading every relevant thread, I believe they are supposed to allow more oxygen for the roots, Jen.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2011
11:09 AM

Post #8830564

Amanda, have you ever grown seeds using seed blocks? The roots stop growing when they hit the air. So, roots needing oxygen in that way does not make sense. Hydrogen Peroxide makes more sense. Sure curious. I think I told you several years ago I grew corn in 3 and 5 gallon buckets. No air space, and I got 3 ears of corn to each stalk and had 3 corn plants per bucket.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2011
11:16 AM

Post #8830573

The tomatoes I grew in the earthbox on my deck did well, but I don't think they did any better than the ones in the bales.

If I remember, next year I am going to grow one of each side by side to see if there is a difference. I have grown tomatoes in buckets on my deck before and they didn't do well because I couldn't figure out anything to support them. But if I put them in the hoophouse I can attach them to the cattle panels like I do with the bales.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 30, 2011
12:40 PM

Post #8830660

I'm seeing the ebuckets different . To me , the bucket only has one drain hole at the top of the strainer and out the side to let out overflow . The pipe down into the air pocket , which is really a water reservoir and is to fill the reservoir The plant waters from below . If you water through the soil , it defeats the whole purpose of growing with hydroponics .I'm going to see GymGirl in a month and she has used this method . She says it's the way to go . I'll check the thread I heard about this on and get back with y'all .



edit: the only drain is about 1" below the bottom of the strainer , creating an air pocket.

This message was edited Oct 1, 2011 9:40 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 30, 2011
4:22 PM

Post #8830896

I read a lot of the thread they discussed them on. When I read it I got all gung ho to do them next year too. But, even tho you are saying they get their water from the bottom, why is that better? There are feeder roots all the way down.

Have you read Al Tapla's discussion on container growing? Take a look at it. He says if you don't use a wick, the water is not going to wick all the way up. It will stop at a certain level. I haven't read it for a couple of years. He is very interesting. You should read it. I have used his theory and it really works, but I forget to do it. He is saying to water from the bottom, but use a wick.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

September 30, 2011
4:54 PM

Post #8830930

Where do I find it Jnette?

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 1, 2011
7:20 AM

Post #8831503

Gymgirl (Linda) does use Al's recommended soil mix which is a "wicking" mix - a lot of pine bark fines with other stuff mixed in. I am sure it's tomatoe, tomatta Jeanette - everyone will have their way. Whichever way works for you is best. I started all mine late as you know. I thought of you as I collected my harvest - about a dozen purple pole beans and same amount of red jelly bean tomatoes. :)

Anyway. I read all those threads this spring, but I wouldn't be able to point you to anything specific.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
8:00 AM

Post #8831553

I'm for sure going to use this method at my son's in Texas . He watered every day to keep his little garden alive and the week I was there, in July , that was my job . With the drought , this should be a better way to keep water on the plants without over or under watering and prevent sun scald to the poor leaves that got wet .His ground is almost solid rock and when you water , it's draining so fast , the plants don't have time to get a decent drink . It takes a lot of water to get the plants to come out of the wilt and stand up . Hauling in top soil isn't an option , it would be cheaper to buy veggies at the store . If you have experianced 110 heat for months , and no rain for almost a year, then you can appreciate what this system might be able to do . Anyway I'm gonna give it a shot. Wish us luck !
This was in the drought last year and he says it's only dirt and rock now .

Thumbnail by digger9083
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8831558

Jnette , that thread is on another web site and I don't think I'm supposed to post it . Sorry

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 1, 2011
8:43 AM

Post #8831606

Oh that's silly.

You mean it's on ALL THINGS PLANTS?!

Jeanette - the ebucket thread started here:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1011889/

There are 4 or 5 continuation threads to it, but in it it evolves and discusses the types of media and soil and containers to be used AND Al Tapla's container mix.

A.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
8:50 AM

Post #8831612

Hey digger, that looks mighty familiar. Hope to see you this Thanksgiving. For any of you that have not heard her say Pecan Pie, trust me your missing out.

Digger-the ceiling tiles are wall paper sprayed with copper stuff, it came in a powder. Those tiles are way too expensive. The textured wall paper was way less expensive. SORRY WAY OFF TOPIC,I KNOW,...
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2011
8:53 AM

Post #8831616

You all lost me. Digger what thread are you talking about? Al Tapla's site is Container growing or something in the forums on here. And the ebuckets are on here also in several "chapters". I think Gymgirl either started them or kept them going.

What did I miss? Now I am totally befuddled. Is that a word? LOL, Confused. Amanda, helpppppppppp me. :0(
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2011
8:56 AM

Post #8831620

I've seen a lot of those tiles lately. Haven't priced them, but didn't realize they were costly. In fact we were in a small restaurant a couple weeks ago that had them in sheets on the ceiling. You could tell they were like 4x4 foot sheets.

I think I would price them around, cause once people start using stuff the prices sometimes come down. OR go up. :0)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
8:58 AM

Post #8831621

Good im glad im not the only one who's confused. The link she posted is to Daves garden? Maybe there is a thread on ATP?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
9:03 AM

Post #8831625

Ok I guess I can go off topic. What she saw on my ceiling looks like copper tiles but it's really wallpaper my house is 15 hrs old so I don't have any idea about the price, now. It's in the billiard room so we wanted it to look like an old saloon. That's how we got that look, I'm sure there are other ways. Just wanted digger to know that my ceiling is wallpaper not tiles.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
9:20 AM

Post #8831642

You told me they were fake but had NO idea it was paper , sprayed . They look as real as the ones in my folks dry cleaning shop . Lordy , all those buildings have been torn down and I could have retired on the salvage price I could have gotten for them
.Don't think I'm being "silly" , just cautious .

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 1, 2011
9:26 AM

Post #8831647

ON TOPIC:

Jen:

1) yes, befuddled is a word.
2) the link I posted is to the original ebucket thread here on DG.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
9:42 AM

Post #8831661

Ouch, that hurt my ears . Explain what's on topic about the last two remarks ? Thought topic was about hot tomatoes .
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
9:49 AM

Post #8831674

Great minds think alike. I was thinking the same thing, I do believe we should throw in the towel. It's been too hot for my tomatoes since the beginning of June anyway.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 1, 2011
10:03 AM

Post #8831696

It's okay. I'm always just ribbing Jen about being off topic.

I hear you about the old salvage stuff! Good thing I don't have enough room to keep stuff like that or I'd be piled up. Bad enough the way it is. :)

A.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
10:11 AM

Post #8831704

Yeah , Lisa , case closed ! Any further discussion would be beneath my dignity.
Has the heat wave let up with any rain yet ? I'm sure all the gardens have dried up by now .
I'd hate to try to garden in an area where it's so iffy on the weather like you Jnette , but you're gutsey to keep after it . Do you eat fried green toms at all . My D H begs for them , but I have to get my tomato sandwiches fix before I start pulling the green ones . I did tell him that he could start a garden and tend it for the things he wanted . LOL. Didn't you say the toms are coming on like gangbusters ? I could grow rhubarb if I lived up there .
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
10:14 AM

Post #8831707

Truce , and Jen can tell you , I'm mouthy , Not a good trait !
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
10:33 AM

Post #8831726

No tomatoes here, it's too hot and dry, my garden looks pitiful. No rain and the temps have just dropped. Then the deer got in my garden and ate the tops off of my tomato plants. If I had any set now I don't know if they would even have time to ripen. SEE we are back on topic. It has been too hot for my tomatoes.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
11:27 AM

Post #8831771

I found out when I get hungry for toms in the winter , I can open a can of whole or chopped , drain good and great on a sandwich . A girlfriend showed me how to dip store toms in hot water to soften and juice them up for better flavor.
That was your post !
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
12:07 PM

Post #8831806

Not my post! I don't even buy canned tomatoes.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
12:37 PM

Post #8831833

Girlfriend , you need a nap .lol
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
12:51 PM

Post #8831848

Where did I post that? It sounds like a good idea I would take credit if it was mine.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2011
4:55 PM

Post #8832063

LOL, you guys better watch out. Off topic very long and Terry will stop this thread and tell us to go put one in the chat room. I thought if the original starter, me, didn't care if it was off topic it was ok. Not So, huh Amanda?



digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 1, 2011
7:30 PM

Post #8832227

Jnette , if you go up through the thread , there are many comments that don't strictly pertain to hot tomatoes . Three off topic posts at the time were all that was posted . I have seen most threads that didn't stay on the straight and narrow , but always got to the subject at hand . We've gone through so many subjects that encompass the problems of heat that we've pretty much covered most everything , from shade to drought . To hi, friend , how are the kids . Actually , I've been visiting on the email , just sometimes easier to ans here than switch back and forth .
BTW , everything is cooling off in this area , are you going to get a good many ripe or will you have to ripen most of them in the house ? How is it looking now ? Do you make green salsa ?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 1, 2011
8:54 PM

Post #8832288

I never been on a thread that admin corrected. I too thought if the thread starter didn't care there wouldn't be a problem. Especially because the discussion is basically over and you aren't fighting to get it back on topic. I think Terry only shows up when somebody complains, if you don't care why should anybody else.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 1, 2011
11:04 PM

Post #8832344

:0) you're right 1lisac. As Digger said, when you either run out of topic, or think of something else you want to discuss, who cares? I have been on some threads tho that the originator really wants you to stick to the topic. And, they do get upset!! Yuck.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 3, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8834542

Guess my tomato season is over. I went out today and chopped up the vines in 4 to 6 inch pieces and pulled them out by the roots. Got a wheelbarrow full so far and only about half done. I can't put them on the compost pile until we get a lot of soil out of there for my hosta bed. Then I will put the tomato shreds on them and some more soil and straw. Water.

Didn't get a lot, but what I did get were very good. Guess can't ask for more than that in our very short season.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 3, 2011
4:24 PM

Post #8834744

Growing season is over here too, Jnette . 40 this morning . D H just walked in and said it was 36 when he went out this morning . That's right , I was awake most of the night and went back to sleep 'til 9:00 am . Glad you at least got some .
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 10, 2011
9:43 PM

Post #8844454

Sally, just read your post again. Did you really mean 36 degrees? In GA? Gosh, it's just barely gotten down to that here.

When are you heading for Texas? Are Russ and Barb going down to visit you this winter? Maybe you could teach him to dredge. LOL, is there any place to do that down there?

Better take some tomato plants with you. This is the best year for tomatoes for us. That is truly amazing isn't it? Here I was crying in July about not a tomato on my plants. All of a sudden they were popping out. We still have some nice ones on the kitchen deck. I told Bob he is really pushing it.

He wants to try some in the basement this winter with a light on them. I just told him that would be his best bet would be to take the Earthbox off the kitchen deck down there and keep them going. Do you think that would work? I know they are annuals. Didn't you say you take cuttings to start a second crop down there? Thought someone said that, maybe it wasn't you.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 10, 2011
10:18 PM

Post #8844478

Jnette, I have not heard of many who have had success with tomatoes inside- but nothing ventured, nothing gained. I would think the light would need to be very strong, and there would have to be excellent air flow to make the plants strong and keep disease down. A big challenge to say the least.Good luck.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 11, 2011
5:54 AM

Post #8844689

Those cold mornings didn't last but a day or two . Still jacket weather early in the morning but much warmer .
No place to dredge where we're going . Doubt if Russ will come that far , but he's welcome . Maybe to Georgia next year when he makes his rounds .
I take off some of the suckers and get new plants . No garden in Texas , had hard freeze the last two winters , even the frost cloth wouldn't save tomatoes . Sure would be nice if I could grow them there .I'll plant spinach tho , love it on everything , and to cook. Toms need HOT weather.
We have a deck (covered porch , screened in )to build , and the posts are up but need to finish our fence around the lot . Lotsa work to do , hope to get in some good fishing .
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2011
9:19 AM

Post #8844972

Jo I have an HPS (think it means high powered sodium) light, they are for blooming and producing, that he can use on them. Got it when I was playing around with hydroponics.

Well Sally the fishing is the most important. ;0)

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 11, 2011
11:58 AM

Post #8845124

That'll be a fun project for Bob, Jeanette:

I have an Omar's Lebanon that I got from a friend and planted late. It has the most beautiful foliage - in the sun it looks like the green has gold leaf, literally! So pretty. It is just now blooming. Knowing that they get to be gi-normous, I guess I won't get any fruit. I hate the idea. I wonder how it would do in the lizard's room? :)

Prolly too humid in there. But 70-90+ degrees in there all year, depending . . ...

Let us know how it goes. My tomatoes did not make a massive showing, but they tried valiantly. :)

A.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2011
3:32 PM

Post #8845362

Now Amanda, you said you were going to have ripe tomatoes before me. What happened?

Is this beautiful plant a tomato? Sounds wonderful. If not a tomato I hope it is not an annual. Bet the lizards would love it. Where did you get the seed? Does Totally Tomatoes have it?

Well, if he takes the planter and all down there now he has a start. I hope he takes the ripe tomatoes off of it first. I cut the tops etc. off of it several weeks ago so the big ones would ripen. Wonder where he is going to get tomatoes.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 11, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8845512

Jeanette - I believe I saw this variety listed on Rick Corey's seed list. It is called Omar's Lebanon or Lebanese. It's supposed to bear giant pinkish fruit and is an excellent slicing tomato. The plant is gorgeous - I'd grow it as a foliage plant. :D

A.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 11, 2011
7:19 PM

Post #8845673

Where would one get some seeds of this Omar's Lebanon? It sounds really interesting.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 11, 2011
7:36 PM

Post #8845699

Hehehe, glad you hear you are nearly swamped in tomatoes, Jnette. All that worrying for nuttin', eh? Then again, maybe all your worrying made those plants feel sorry and made them kick it into high gear just for you! :>)

I have a HPS light but have never set it up, it is so high powered I decided that running it would only be beneficial in my g-house where I could place it over quite a few hundred plants. How big is your light? Just curious. Hate to see you spend so much on power your winter tomatoes cost fifty bucks each.

Amanda, you probably have Omar's Lebanese (not Lebanon, although its origin is Lebanon). Great flavor, huge size, averaging 2 pounds but can reach 3 or 4 pounds under good conditions. I hope you can ripen at least one for your seed saving for next year. If not, Tomato Growers Supply sells it as does Tatiana's Tomato Base. I think Reimer's Seeds may also carry it now.

Again, congrats on your tomato harvest, Jnette! Ya done good!
Shoe
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2011
9:15 PM

Post #8845783

Hi Shoe!! Thanks for the congrats! No, don't think it was for nothin' 'cause all my whining got me a lot of suggestions and I tried them all. So, they must have ALL worked.

I will check my HPS light tomorrow and let you know. I am sure mine is not nearly that high powered. It is in a reflector light and I can clamp it or hang it.

Thanks again Shoe. Loved all the help. Will get to you tomorrow.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 11, 2011
9:31 PM

Post #8845788

Oh good...your light will not take as much power as mine, which comes with a separate power supply or ballast or some such thing.

And yes, like someone said above your tomato plant(s) will need some good heat in that basement and plenty of light.

Sure am glad to hear you had such great success with your tomatoes. I love to see you happy!

Shoe
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

October 12, 2011
5:54 AM

Post #8845979




.

This message was edited Oct 12, 2011 7:59 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 12, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8846239

Ok Shoe, good thing my camera zoomed in on it 'cause I couldn't read it. Here are a couple of pictures.

Looks like 65Watts. Not very high. I have a Metal Halide also just like it. I have it on my tropical houseplants. Think the MH is more for foliage isn't it?

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

October 12, 2011
9:18 AM

Post #8846248

Oh, in looking at it now it didn't come out as clear as it showed in the camera. Here is one of the overall light.

Thumbnail by Jnette
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 12, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8846740

I think your light is more for a small house plant, like the kind they use for orchids and such. It's very small for a tomato plant, especially if in a basement. The HPS lights are good for extending daylength or for augmenting light on overcast days. This would be where your plants are already being exposed to natural sunlight and its blue rays. In a basement you would be missing that part of the light spectrum with a HPS light.

Your MH light would be better in your basement, offering your plant a wider light spectrum, including blue rays. But keep in mind you'd have to have the proper lumens, too.

Pretty confusing, eh?

Shoe

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 12, 2011
6:35 PM

Post #8846866

This is the light bulb I use on my green iguana.

http://www.reptileuv.com/megaray-sb-275-watt-self-ballasted-flood-uvb-lamp.php

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 24, 2012
5:43 PM

Post #9217379

I'm back!!! Hey Shoe, you missed me whining because my tomatoes are so late??? Well I just decided this year that I wasn't going to worry about them, and here they are a repeat of last year. Our weather in June was exactly the same. Cold and wet and the plants just sat there doing nothing.

Guess I will have to go back and see when they finally started getting the tomatoes on them last year. They finally started and the plants and tomatoes are growing so much every day, still!! The plants have got to stop growing soon I would hope. I have to keep getting more things to tie them up. I use bungee cords. When I find them. Now have to buy more.

Well Guys, Shoe, Amanda, and all, I am running a few weeks behind last year. Gosh, here I go again. Guess I am going to have to start whining so hold onto your hats and plug your ears!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

July 25, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9217879

Jnette , those little , cheap woven , throw rugs that are strips of cloth held together with string , are my first choice for ties . They cost a dollar or two and the strips last several years . I just cut the string and pull the strips out . The strips are long enough and wide enough not to injure the tomato plants.I grow the toms on a piece of field fencing strung between postsand just throw the ties across the fence and leave in the weather all year round. Always have them handy when needed .
All my toms came out small this year , don't have a single sandwich size out there . One sandwich , one tom .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 25, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9217943

For tying up tomato plants I use those pale green velcro strips that you can buy in rolls in garden supply places. I like them because they are easy to unfasten and refasten higher up as the plant grows, until you need a second or third one to support the plant, and I also re-use them year after year until the velcro loses its adhesive ability. They match the tomato foliage and are more attractive than some other options, too.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

July 25, 2012
8:28 AM

Post #9217985

Those are nice .

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 25, 2012
9:35 AM

Post #9218083

Both nice ideas - I had never thought to cut up one of those rugs, digger, but that takes the work out of it for sure!

They are getting to be that size and that time of year again. Thanks.

A.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

July 25, 2012
10:52 AM

Post #9218165

Is crappy a word ? If yes , that describes my tom patch this year . Always planted Better Boy , Beefmaster ,Whoppers . These Celebrity are not worth the space they take , and little . Hope others do better with them . That's another variety I don't ever have to plant again .

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 25, 2012
11:15 AM

Post #9218178

I agree about "Celebrity" - they grew well, but didn't have much of a flavor. The "Better Boy" I grew that year tasted much better, but when it rained - they split!

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

July 25, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9218234

I just saw this thread. I apologize as try as I might I don't have time to read through everything. I imagine by this time someone has already mentioned this, so please forgive me if I'm repeating things you already know, but just to be sure...I need to tell you that, in reference to your original question about whether 100 degrees would prevent your tomatoes from producing fruit, the basic answer is, "yes". Tomatoes will not set fruit when the temperature exceeds a certain threshold. The exact temp depends on the variety, but is generally in the range of 90-95F.

Here in Charleston, SC, we have a very long growing season, pretty much year round depending on the vegetable. We are usually eating tons of tomatoes (from the garden) by late spring or early summer; however, those same tomato plants which were bearing more than we could eat and give away in June will stop producing altogether in July & August when temps here are in the high 90's. If we keep the plants alive through the very hot weather, they will resume fruit production in late August or early September when drop back down to the 80's - or we can just plant new ones for fall.

That tomatoes routinely stop producing fruit at temps above 90-95F is a recurring problem here and in other semi-tropical areas, hybridizers have developed specific tomato varieties which are capable of setting fruit at higher than normal temps.

Here is a quote from a website specific to the same problem in Arizona: "The pollen of most tomato plants becomes sterile at 90 F and tomato production often ceases during hot periods." (http://gardenoracle.com/tomato.html). This link from Clemson University says much the same thing and includes a list of heat-tolerant varieties for my area: http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/plants/vegetables/crops/hgic1323.html.

I included those 2 links to give credence to what I am saying, not to suggest you buy heat tolerant tomato varieties. For this year, I'm thinking anything you can do to get the temp around the tomatoes below 90F will improve your chances of getting fruit. In subsequent years you should probably reorient your tomatoes so as to take advantage of your natural 80F weather, or at least maintain the plants at a temp below 90F.

I hope this helps, and I apologize if it has already been said. Whatever happens, don't let this year's problems prevent you from continuing to grow tomatoes in subsequent years. You will get the hang of it very soon. (Gorgeous tomato pics from weeds and others.)
Carolyn
Salem, NY
(Zone 4b)

July 25, 2012
12:20 PM

Post #9218272

Sheesh, I read almost to the bottom of this thread without realizing it was a thread from LAST YEAR.

That ought to teach me to be more observant. LOL

Carolyn

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

July 25, 2012
12:25 PM

Post #9218282

Oopsie! I failed to realize that very important bit of info altogether.

Well, now that it IS next year, are you growing tomatoes this year, Jnette? If so, are you having any better luck with fruit production?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 25, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #9218366

LOL, Carolyn, and DOS, that's ok, just think what you would have missed. You have to go back about a dozen posts to see this year's information. BUT, the information from DOS is so interesting. I had heard about the tomatoes stopping producing when it became a certain temp., but I did not know what the temp was.

So, my next question is, if the tomatoes become sterile at 90-95 degrees, do they become fertile again when the temps go down? Like at night? And then re-sterile at noon, etc.??

DOS, I did go back and look to see the different stages of my tomatoes last year and this year mine are about a week behind them!! I think our seasons are rotating around, and if I lived long enough would probably see 90 degree temperatures for Christmas. Maybe trading with Australia. You know that is how they spend Christmas is camping on the beach.

Also, Greenhouse gal, I have used the velcro for houseplants, but it would take too much for my tomatoes. Too expensive.

Sorry you wasted your time folks, but I don't know how to send it directly to just Shoe and a few others. But, I know how you feel, I have done the same time, but usually learn something I missed the first time round anyway.
Carolyn
Salem, NY
(Zone 4b)

July 25, 2012
3:07 PM

Post #9218504

I a variety has pollen that beomes denatured, that is destroyed, at sustained temps above 90 to 95F then that pollen is kaput and is non functional. Period/

If there are sustained levels of high humidity the pollen can beome clumped making it much less effective, and it doesn't become unclumped when the humidity decreases.

But the blossom cycle is about three weeks, and it's random, not synchronized, so if temps and humidity are OK for self pollenization them, OK, then pollenization can occur and if all the ovules in the tomato are fertilized the ovary starts to enlarge ( seeds to be within it) and it's on its way to becoming a mature fruit.

Carolyn

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 25, 2012
5:13 PM

Post #9218680

Jnette - when our children were young we went to the beach on Christmas in South Florida. No need to travel all the way to Australia ^_^

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

July 25, 2012
5:27 PM

Post #9218700

Sorry, no, night time temps don't count in this case. When day time temps reach the 90-95F range (depending on variety), tomatoes stop setting fruit, regardless of night time temps. As mentioned, in July/Aug when our temps zoom up into the mid to high 90's, tomatoes here completely stop producing fruit, this despite the fact that our night time temps drop into the 70's & 80's at that time. Most people here just compost the plants when they stop producing, but if we keep the plants alive (even while they are not baring fruit for a month or more), they will resume fruit production as soon as the day time temps drop back into the 80's in early Sept.

I have difficulty believing that humidity has anything to do with the failure of the tomatoes to produce fruit. Tomato plants produce heavily here, even though summer humidity here on the immediate coast is in the 85-100% range most of the time. (Reiterating, Charleston is right on the ocean & unbearably humid, so much so in summer that I have to remove my glasses for some 10min every time I walk out of the house or car. Glasses fog up so completely I can't see through them. Also have to wait 10min or so before I can use my camera. Same reason. Very annoying. When I wake in the AM, my entire house is like a giant, frosty, beer mug, every window fogged up. Some days, when we are at or approaching 100%, the air actually feels thick and heavy.) In spite of our very high summer humidity, tomatoes produce so heavily here that just a few plants will produce all you can eat, freeze, and give away.

It is often warm here at Christmas. A few years ago we had a pool party for our office Christmas party. Most years I still have the A/C running on New Year's day. I gather my last large bouquet of roses to decorate the table either for Thanksgiving or for Christmas. Camellias & Japanese Flowering Quince bloom Nov through April along with Hellebores, so there are always flowers blooming here. We can and do grow vegetables in winter but not tomatoes.

Our weather has been a bit odd at times, but our seasons, such as they are, still seem to come and go at about the same time as decades before. Winter here is the last 2 weeks of Jan and the 1st 2 weeks of Feb. Daffodils start blooming in early Feb, and by May it is starting to get hot. July & August you basically can't go outdoors w/o bursting into flames. After that, it's 'spring' all over again (but w/o all the green). Oh, and we spend August through October dodging hurricanes lobbed at us by a practice pitcher off the African coast. Come to think of it, this year we did heat up well ahead of schedule. We were already in triple digits in June, whereas we don't usually get there until late July.

I'll have to go back and read to see how your tomatoes have fared. I'm quite curious now.
Carolyn
Salem, NY
(Zone 4b)

July 25, 2012
6:29 PM

Post #9218765

Dream, high sustained humidty does have an effect on the ability of pollen to self pollenize b/c of the clumped pollen I spoke to above.

At one time I knew a hybridizer from Petoseed who was based in FL trying to work on that problem, but that was years ago and nothing new has appeared in terms of varieties whose pollen is less likely to clump, so there you go. ( smile)

Carolyn

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 25, 2012
10:15 PM

Post #9218961

Well, that is about the only thing my tomato plants don't have to deal with is humidity. We have almost zero humidity all the time, even when it rains. heh heh. kidding on that one, but it doesn't last much longer than the storm.

All very interesting. It is really hard for me to imagine what you describe DOS. Your weather, year round. Would love a lot of it if I could pick and choose. I would not like the extreme heat or the hurricane season. Don't need those.

Even tho we have very moderate weather, usually, we have 4 distinct seasons. It just seems like our winters are lasting longer than any of the others. Shortening our spring and summers.

I feel so bad when we see the storms, fires, hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, etc. on TV that so many of you all have to go thru. I know we do not have the ideal situation here, but not too many areas do. Think maybe just a few like San Diego have a constant nice weather. And haven't heard of any real bad issues with that area. Also, Stockton where my sister lives in Northern Ca. is called the agricultural belt of the nation. So, there are some out there, but they have their issues too.

Glad to hear from you guys even if I did start this a year ago. LOL, it is fun. Thanks for sharing Carolyn, DOS, and the rest.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 26, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #9219156

Carolyn,

I'm glad I wasn't the only one that didn't notice that the thread was from last year until I reached nearly to the bottom... It was fun to read anyway.

Jnette,

One thing you can do to improve the heat retention of your hoophouse is to cover the frame with bubble wrap, then cover that with your normal plastic. I bought a roll of 1" bubbles, 48" wide and 100 feet long, on Amazon for $50. It blocks a little more light, but does a good job of holding a few extra degrees. I used it inside my shed-frame greenhouse last winter and was able to keep everything above 50 degrees during our few cold snaps with a small, 1500-watt heater. You wouldn't have the air-gap between the bubble-wrap and the outside plastic that I have, but the extra insulation of the bubbles would make a difference.

http://www.amazon.com/Wide-Medium-Bubble-Wrap-100/dp/B005JZU2DG/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1343308404&sr=8-3&keywords=bubble+wrap+48%22

David

Here are a few photos of the greenhouse:


Edited to add the link to the bubble-wrap. Also, the photo showing the bubbles has small bubbles. The first order mis-shipped the small instead of the size I ordered. It was cheaper to keep than to return.


This message was edited Jul 26, 2012 7:27 AM

Thumbnail by dreaves   Thumbnail by dreaves   Thumbnail by dreaves   Thumbnail by dreaves
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 26, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9219353

Thanks David. Well, with a16 foot span across, and 20 feet long, 100 feet would cover it with some left over, wouldn't it?

Will have to think about that. I would have to cover the ends but might have enough left for those. Thanks. Don't know how I would do it and keep it from touching the plants tho unless I cut them off on the outside of the hh.

I might just figure that out. Thanks for the link too. Jeanette

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

July 26, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #9219377

I forgot that you were using the frame of the panels as trellis for the tomato plants. That would require trimming off all the outside greenery before it would work. Also, it would take more than one roll to do the whole 20 feet, with ends. Just the top 20' x 16', would use 80 feet of the bubble-wrap. You could still make ends with one roll if you covered only 12 feet or so. You could cut the plastic for ends to the shape of the hoop (with extra to fold in on the edges). Tape the edges over strips of bubble wrap (taped together at the edges) then add grommet holes in the edges to hang the ends from the cattle panels. You can put grommets spaced all the way down the sides, to hold the sheet in place. Lay a board on the bottom edge to hold it in place. To get really fancy, drill some holes in the board, then drive some metal tent stakes/spikes through the board and plastic into the ground.

David
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 26, 2012
6:19 PM

Post #9219860

LOL, David, your mind works like mine. You talk when you are thinking. I like that. The 100 foot roll would go over the 16 foot span 6 times. A squeaker. With 4 inches left. Actually, I think the cattle panels are about 50 inches wide and I have 5 of them. Whatever. I might be able to stretch it.

We'll see how many tomatoes I have left that time of year and if it is worth the $50 and work to do it. Good idea tho. Thanks.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

July 27, 2012
9:10 PM

Post #9221045

Jen ~ How many tomato plants do you have? Do you can them?
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

July 27, 2012
11:18 PM

Post #9221085

I have about 18 plants, but no, I don't can them. I don't get enough in our short season to can. I make some salsa some years if I have enough and will bottle that up, but other than that I don't. If I have any left after we are tired of BLTs, LOL, not much chance, I will freeze them and use them in sauces later in the year.

Normally by the time our cold weather hits, the tomatoes seem to know when to stop producing. So they slow down and I still have time to pull them out and cut them up for the compost pile.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 5, 2012
11:12 AM

Post #9230358

I think it's a great thread, and will continue into next season and beyond. Jen will always have questions about her tomatoes. :)
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 5, 2012
1:50 PM

Post #9230544

Jen ~ I am growing some tomatillos this year. I hope to make some salsa out of them. Also lots of tomatoes as well.

Amanda ~ Yes, I am always curious about Jen's tomatoes as she lives in such a cold climate, so it is quite a challenge for her. I suppose we all have our challenges when It comes to gardeneing. I think she should grow lettuce since she has so much cool weather, but she does not, I think.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2012
3:35 PM

Post #9230671

No, I don't have a garden in the ground. I have been using bales. Alfalfa. Ok, I have decided that if I can still plant next year, I am going to put them in buckets. 3 and 5 gallons. I have made a list of the ones that have been doing the best, and will just plant those.

My ground is like cement. Pure sand. When I try to amend it, the next year all of the peat, manures, etc. that I put in are gone. I don't have a clue where they go, maybe I am filling up my aquafur. Hope I don't run out of water.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 5, 2012
4:43 PM

Post #9230747

The tomatoes that I have in containers are doing better than any in other place, including my square foot garden beds. I have put some in the ground as well. The ones that are doing best are in large pots, maybe 5 gallon ones, but I am not sure what size the pots are as I got them on clearance last year - 75% off. I told myself I would find a use for them, since Steve did not like them in front of the house. Not a problem.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 5, 2012
11:26 PM

Post #9231079

Evelyn, have you looked at the Earthbuckets? In the container forum, I think by Gymgirl. Kind of interesting. I might just do those next year in the buckets.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 6, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9231476

They are much cheaper to get the plastic pots from Rite Aid at 75% off. I may get some next year as well. I really do not need any more pots, though. Thanks for the suggestion.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 6, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9231537

Jnette , I used gym girls (linda's) design of the buckets and got great results . The water reserve at the bottom and overflow hole with straw meant I didn't waste water and only watered every other day , even in the brutal heat of Texas . The five gallon buckets are ideal size for toms and used kitty litter buckets same way , for other veggies . Try a few , you'll like it .
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 6, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9231830

Hi Digger, have you ever gotten the 3 gallon buckets? The bakeries get their cake icings in them. So they are food grade too. I have some cucumbers in one of those. Will see.

Regarding the earthbuckets. Did you use wicks? Like Al says in the container forum? I would think with a bucket that deep that you would almost have to. But, the roots probably go to the bottom tho so maybe not.
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

August 6, 2012
2:11 PM

Post #9231963

Hi Jnette,

My tomatoes took quite awhile to get going because of the wet weather we had had in the spring and early summer, and as soon as it got hot and dry, they just took off! We're enjoying tomatoes every day now, and so very many are on the way. I live just south of you, I think, in Spokane.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 6, 2012
4:25 PM

Post #9232142

You guys are about 3 weeks ahead of us up here Karrie. So, hopefully mine will kick in pretty soon. Jeanette
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 6, 2012
7:06 PM

Post #9232384

Hello , GymGirl. that is a great system and I had a gold miner friend bring me 32 five gallon buckets . I'm bringing about 15 with me to fill with crushed oyster shell for my walkway down there . I can fill them and walk about 35' uphill to fill a small trailer. I'll fill , DH can carry and empty . LOL
I need to call W. She's had allergies and could hardly talk .
I love those cat litter buckets .Not too heavy to move .
Jnette , I wouldn't be afraid to use any of the buckets as long as they didn't have some kind of caustic in them and they don't put caustic in that kind of container. Dry wall is the most common thing you run into . Even swimming pool chemicals are safe because you go swimming after it's dumped in .
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 6, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #9232476

OK, Jen ~ How are your tomatoes doing now? It must be warm there by now. Do you have a lot?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 6, 2012
9:14 PM

Post #9232538

Hey, Sally!
Yep, my poor cousin can barely talk. We had a great visit. She helped me tremendously with ideas and manpower!

And, Bubba gave me another tutorial on building another cabinet for yhe garage

While I've got you, tell me again which seedlings you want for October.

Linda
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 6, 2012
10:33 PM

Post #9232570

Don't know yet Evelyn. They weren't getting ripe as of yesterday. Yes, it is running in the high 80s and 90's. So, should see some action soon huh?
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 7, 2012
7:18 AM

Post #9232849

G G , this will only be the second time I've had a winter crop , so I'll let you choose . I have plenty of collards in the freezer, don't need those . I'll try anything , but knowing you , you'll load me down . Anything above 20 , 30 plants ,I'll have to fix a bed for . Don't give me that many, and you decide what . You know more about growing in the winter than I do . I promise I'll do better next year . Do eggplants grow in the winter , if they do , (I don't think so ) and you have two , that would be nice . If not then I'll get plants if I can grow them .
Call me winter growing stupid . lol
Those grape toms are growing GUNG HO! I'll take suckers off those for the winter and build a proper hoop house out of cattle panels .
Can't wait to see you and I'll give W a call tonight . Poor kid . Hugs .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 7, 2012
7:40 AM

Post #9232877

Digger,
Here's some of what you can choose from that'll be ready by the time you swing through. They like LOTS of organic medium, so load up on some compost for your planters. What will the temps be like in Rockport while you're there?

Cabbage (Early Jersey Wakefield is a 2.5 lb. cutie!)
Broccoli
Cauliflowers
Mustards (Florida Broadleaf) You should get a batch every 4-6 weeks once they're in!
Lettuce?
Spinach? Still trying to get a proper crop of spinach, but a girl can pray, right?

Linda

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 7, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #9232899

How about 3 -4 of each and I'll do the spinach when I get down there . It comes up and good crop .You gave me broccoli last year and would love more . The others will be a first time so I'm game for any of them .
I have a load, 6x18 ' trailer load of mulch composting down there , should be ready . I'll be getting another load to compost and be ready for next year .
We had a mild winter , only got down to 29-30 twice for one night each . We had 26 the winter before, lasting three nights, below freezing several times . It's always iffy . A greenhouse would be ideal , but will have to settle for a hoop house with frost cloth .

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 7, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9233112

Good Deal, Sally!
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 7, 2012
5:46 PM

Post #9233544

Hi, I'm new to Dave's Garden. I live in Montreal, where it's been hotter than you know what. I found my toms are taking a long time to ripen and I'm having a lot of cracking. Today I found a small, long creature on one of the leaves.
Most of my tomatoes are in large containers. My problem is with how often to water.
Another question, any one here grow Gold Medal toms?

You guys all sound great! I hope to get good advice and share experiences. We don't have a long growing season here, either. It can turn on a dime.
Thanks, Sharon
.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 7, 2012
9:16 PM

Post #9233753

I keep my toms very damp in containers with good drainage.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 7, 2012
9:40 PM

Post #9233772

Hi Hugo!! Welcome!! Yes, Digger (Sally, for your info) is right. In containers they will take more water than if in the ground. Also, you didn't say what kind of containers. That makes a difference also. i.e. if they are a glazed container, they would not dry out as quickly as a wooden tub for instance.

Need a picture of the creature, and I have never heard of the Gold Medal tomatoes. I am not sure about the cracking. Since you say it is hot, I don't imagine you have had any rain or hail. That can be a problem. But, if they are slow to ripen, I would say to start convincing them summer is soon over and to get on the stick. I would prune the ends (tops) off, anything that you know will not make a viable tomato before winter, cut back some on the water, and if you are really worried about cold weather soon, I would maybe do some root pruning with a shovel.

If you read this thread from the beginning, you should have read all the suggestions I got because I was worried just like you are. Take a look. Some real good suggestions from everyone. Good luck, and keep us posted.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 7, 2012
9:50 PM

Post #9233779

It's 12:45 here and I have to go to town for the day , tomorrow . Go to bed Jnette, and get a good nights sleep .
signing offffff
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 7, 2012
10:01 PM

Post #9233784

9:50 here Digger. :0)
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 8, 2012
6:09 AM

Post #9233987

Thanks Jnette and Sally and everyone. My pots are like a thick foam material, so they do tend to hold moisture well and they are large. We've had very little rain, and when we have, it's been hard. Haven't had hail recently, but we've had wind, which of course dries the soil out even faster. I am starting to top off the toms. Usually I grow mostly cherry toms because they are a breeze. I'm now keeping a vigilant eye on the tomatoes and at the first sign of blush I am removing them.
I'm looking into the grow bags for next year. What's the experience with them?
The Gold Medals are a yellow hierloom with red striping and they apparently prefer a cooler night, so I'm keeping my fingers crossed.
The critter was crushed under my foot, so sorry no photos. Thanks a million. I'm thinking of adding more compost, but not sure if it's worth it at this stage.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 8, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #9234163

Hugobee,

Here's something you might be interested in, for next season.

http://allthingsplants.com/thread/view/3230/Make-an-eBucket/?offset=0

Determine (as practically as you can) the number of growing days you have where your temps are not higher than 85 degrees average daytime, nor lower than 45 degrees nighttime. Then, calculate back to 8 weeks before this period starts. That's when you can start your tomatoes from seeds. 6 weeks to grow your seedlings inside under fluorescent lights, Then, outside to harden off, by moving the seedlings gradually into more and more full sunshine, slowly over a period of one week to 10 days.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/48/ This is the light shelf setup I use at home. Piece of cake to construct. Have the shelf boards cut at HD or Lowes, put two, 2-light kits side-by-side under each shelf for a total of 4 lights per shelf, and keep the seedlings within 1-2" of the light.

Identify tomatoes with a "days to maturity" number that falls within your growing window. The "days to maturity" count begins from the day you set out the tomato plant or transplant to grow.

There are a number of tomato varieties that are actually a bit cold tolerant, so you might want to research those. They have "cold" clues in their names ("Russian" Rose, "Siberian" something-or-other, you get the point...)

Hope these tips are helpful.

Linda

This message was edited Aug 8, 2012 11:30 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9234198

Linda's suggestion is a real good one. Those might just solve all your problems. Good luck.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 8, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #9234207

Thanks, Jnette!

Hugs!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 8, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9234227

I'm ready for this season's seed starting which began Monday!

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #9234499

LOL, I'm sure glad I only do that once a year. Need the rest of the year to rest up. :0)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 8, 2012
1:12 PM

Post #9234530

Jnette,
I had it down to once a year, starting tomatoes --

until last season when I started the brassicas for the first time! I had a bumper crop of cabbages, broccoli (the most gorgeous plants ever!), and cauliflowers.

Now, I'm up to starting brassica seeds every 4 weeks until the Winter Solstice, and starting tomatoes immediately after the Winter Solstice!

Whew!

But, I LOVE it! Just something about those wee babie seedlings I can't resist!
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 8, 2012
1:17 PM

Post #9234534

Gymgirl, I only wish I could have the growing season you have! Jnette, I do agree, once a year is plenty! I have done seeds in the past, but stopped because of space, lighting, etc. I like your set up... In my zone I would probably start seed in March. You just never know what kind of summer we are going to have. At theut rate we are going now, I could have tomatoes until October. That's what happened last year.
But I found another critter - very thin, less than an inch and kind of brown and yellow. It's eating the leaves. So far i have found 2 and am killing them immediately.
Thanks, Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 8, 2012
4:06 PM

Post #9234792

Thanks for your name Sharon. LOL

I love starting the seeds too Linda, but so much work. If I didn't have to pot and repot, maybe I would like it even more. Also of course is just like Sharon said, the guesswork on the weather. I hate it when I just put them out and they get hit by frost. Or, they start ripening and get it.

agree tho, the brassicas would be worth it. What do you do for the potting mix? Do you reuse it, rejuvenate it, or????

Are those worms the horned tomato worms? You can spray with BT. My sister in California told me she had worms on her tomatoes so I told her to get some BT and she found some she could just use a hand spritzer with. That was just recently. I will have to ask her if that took care of them.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 9, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #9235503

Jnette,
I reuse/recycle old seed starting mix for my seeds. Here's my process:

http://allthingsplants.com/blogs/entry/136/

The brassicas are DEFINITELY worth it. I love the fall/wtr garden sooooooooooooo much better than the summer. It is just too hot to be out there tending the garden now.

Regarding the disappointments of the weather and unexpected frosts, I do understand the frustration. I've put some systems in place for next tomato season so that if/when the weather dips below 30 for more than 3-4 days in a row here, my seedlings will be PROTECTED (pvc hoops over the raised beds, covered with perforated plastic that lets the rain and wind through, and won't allow heat build up underneath to fry them on mild/sunny days).

I intend to plant out much earlier than before, and it will still be chilly out. But, the systems are tried and proven, and can get the seedlings through the last of winter and into the warmth where they'll be well established and on their way. I'm truly hoping for a bountiful, EARLY harvest next year!

Regarding Harry the Hornworm -- he's all fluff and no fire. He'll roll over and play dead. You can pick him off with your hands, actually. He doesn't bite or sting. That red tip on his butt is just to look wicked and make you afraid. If you do pick him up, he might puff himself up, and maybe even click loudly. Again, all tactics to make you afraid enough to drop him, so he can scoot away.

If you study him closely, you'll see just how beautiful his markings are. I love Harry. Especially when he's eating something OTHER than my tomato vines! Oh, and please don't discount the beautiful butterfly he's gonna turn into, if you move him to some other plants far away from your tomatoes, and let him live.

Linda
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 9, 2012
10:45 AM

Post #9235654

Linda ~ Harry turns into the Hummingbird or Sphinx Moth.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 9, 2012
10:52 AM

Post #9235664

Totally gorgeous, humongous, velvety moth.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2012
11:08 AM

Post #9235681

I have seen those moths. But not in my area, around my garden. They really are different.

Well, that doesn't sound like what Sharon has. Can you help her with her worms Linda?
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 9, 2012
11:27 AM

Post #9235715

Grow a coupla pepper plants away from the toms to put the hornworms on . they can munch away in peace .
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 9, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9235763

Hey guys, are they hornworms? I keep looking for them. All that work growing my toms, I am not going to be outdone by a creepy little bug! I'm pretty sure this bugger doesn't turn into anything remotely gorgeous!
We are ow expecting a lot of rain and I suspect some cooler weather! Like I said, I just can't count on how long our growing season is. And of course I'm debating about leaving the toms on the vine, bring them in... I think I'm going for leaving them on as long as possible????
Sharon
Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

August 9, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #9235764

Lots of great advice on here! I'd be too chicken to mess with the root systems of my maters, but I did prune off a bunch of dead leaves and leaves that were burnt and going dead.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 9, 2012
12:10 PM

Post #9235788

Hi Karrie, there's tons of great advice from so many great gardeners. I'm starting to prune off lower leaves too.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #9235818

I took my lower stuff off about a month ago. Last week I cut off the tops, down to the viable tomatoes.

Don't know if your summer lasts longer than ours up here Karrie. I doubt if Sharon's does. Yes, I saw where you were getting the cooler weather and it looked like storms. They went around us, knock on wood. Overcast the last couple days.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 9, 2012
12:48 PM

Post #9235829

Sharon,
Sounds like an army warm or a cutworm. DESTROY them!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 9, 2012
6:06 PM

Post #9236151

No rain here. Last week we had lightning, and it knocked out the modem on the desktop. If you hear thunder, disconnect your computer.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 9, 2012
7:53 PM

Post #9236282

Do you have surge protectors on your electronics? I haven't had any problems since I put them on everything, and they are not expensive.

That's right Sharon. Linda, what would you think she should use. I don't know of anything other than the BT for worms, that you can use on edibles.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 9, 2012
8:56 PM

Post #9236312

I believe you're right, Jnette. I'm not an expert on the pesticides, since I don't spray very often. My bug population isn't unmanageable and I'm more likely to just hand pick any I see.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 10, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9236893

Jen ~ The surge protector was not on the phone line, but yes on the computer. I suppose the current went through the phone line.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 10, 2012
1:17 PM

Post #9236956

Are you saying the modem doesn't have any power, other than the phone line??? It might have power coming from the tower. I don't think the elec. thru the phone line would be enough to blow out the modem. Funny it didn't ruin the tower if it went thru it and got the modem, unless, the modem was weak and maybe about to go anyway?
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 10, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #9237179

Hi guys, I'm hand picking any creatures. We've had rain since yesterday so I haven't checked. I'm worried about all the rain and the toms cracking!
Personally I don't know much about surges, except that lightening can be bad for computers...
Sharon
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 10, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9237207

[quote="Jnette"]Are you saying the modem doesn't have any power, other than the phone line??? It might have power coming from the tower. I don't think the elec. thru the phone line would be enough to blow out the modem. Funny it didn't ruin the tower if it went thru it and got the modem, unless, the modem was weak and maybe about to go anyway?[/quote]

I don't really know except I was using it when lightning struck, the tower did not go dead but the modem did. It was fairly new, but, you are right...weak. They are flimsy things anyway and too pricey, but what choice do I have right now? I just have to find the phone number. I did not thinl I would have to call so soon, but on the other hand, I was considering buying 2, and maybe I will. They do not make new computers with (regular) landline capability any more, just high speed and wireless.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

August 11, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9237615

Oh , yes , I liked my desktop XP much better than this windows 7 laptop. I had to sign up for tech support to get it straightened out all the time . Twice , day before yesterday .If I watch Fox News videos, the screen freezes up and can't get back to nuthing . Call support . They take over the computer by remote . Then they don't put all my stuff back on , like my Google toolbar
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
9:01 AM

Post #9237732

Sally are you serious or being facetious? Seriously. Do you have something new? Are the bugs ironed out, or do I wait until they are to get it?

Evelyn, what do you mean they are high speed and wireless? Even being wireless they would have to be connecting to something. Wouldn't that be your landline? Just like my wireless printer. It may be wireless as far as my little mouse goes, but that mouse is just a couple feet away from the wires it connects to thru MAGIC!!

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2012
11:31 AM

Post #9237872

No, I take my laptop to the library and the connection is completely wireless. Very high speed at that.

When I need to download or upload any large files or videos, I take it to the library as my slow landline cannot handle it.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2012
11:35 AM

Post #9237876

Oh, Jen, BTW, How are your tomatoes doing now? Mine are beginning to ripen.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 11, 2012
12:03 PM

Post #9237911

The laptop industry is leavin us behind again, did you reset your modem? Let it rest a few hrs? Virus protection systems are Goin to the kinds someone else tends each glitch, sigh, and they aren't always as efficient at it as we need. Fighting Op Sys for control. Hornworms don't eat THAT much- and they trim the soft parts and leave the stems. Cutworms eat EVERYTHING!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9238005

[quote="kittriana"]The laptop industry is leavin us behind again, did you reset your modem? Let it rest a few hrs?

[/quote]

Yes, thank you. that was the first thing I did and I will probably try it again before calling them. Thanks for the reminder, though.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 11, 2012
2:03 PM

Post #9238042

Hey everybody - nice long thread Jen. You'll have to start a second page soon!

COMPUTER PROBLEMS? My brother does remote support and also sales. If you need a referral other than me there are DG folks who have purchased machines and peripherals from him. I don't mind you saying that I sent you. He's got new and used/refurbished equipment too. Awesome. Let me know if you need any help.

Otherwise, I've been working on other folks' gardens this year. My backyard is like a powerline easement with my native plants. The backyard is for wildlife. They can eat anything.

GymGirl (Linda) I am looking at fall/winter crops myself now. We'll probably set up some raised beds out in the front yard and then develop some hoops for when the cold stuff finally hits. We have such a nice long growing season we'd like to take advantage. Especially for my iguana who, pound for pound, costs us the most to keep up because we have to buy fresh greens and produce for her every week.

As always, I love your setup. I have not set up the garden in the driveway. I've had some great success and not so much. Another weird season for me. Back to work in the middle of the season (July) right when I should have been digging in the dirt.

I have to go prune the tomatoes I am growing for my neighbors in their raised beds. Just have to get a moment between rain storms!!!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #9238088

Amanda!! Wonderful to hear from you!! Wish you would tell us about your job etc tho. I will start a new thread when I can figure out how to do it this time.

My gosh yours is the second one I have had in a row now talking about rain and here all we hear on the TV is drought. What is going on??

How do we get hold of your brother Amanda? I have a real mess with my main computer. Can't use it at all. What does your brother charge? LOL, probably by the time you look at this message we will be in the middle of another thread.

Well, I have to go mess with Verizon. Another one I hate to deal with. It looks like I need a new cell phone. Mine goes out every time I shut the lid and yet it has all the bars. Oh well, been thinking about a new phone anyway. Any of you have any preferences? I don't text as I have enough typing on this thing. Also I would like to have a louder ring. I can't hear this one on it's loudest. Bad hearing. How are you doing with yours JB?

ttyl, jen
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
3:03 PM

Post #9238090

O boy Amanda, I just looked and we have 266 replies. You are right, except we are turning this into a chat room. Think maybe we should move to the back porch???
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2012
4:23 PM

Post #9238192

Good idea...unless we just talk about how hot your tomatoes are...^_^


OH, BTW, How ARE your tomatoes doing now??? Are they getting ripe yet??

Yup! VERY SLOOOOOWWWW for us landlinders...

This message was edited Aug 11, 2012 4:27 PM
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 11, 2012
4:30 PM

Post #9238200

This has to be one of the most interesting threads! It's been pouring in Montreal and I can here my tomatoes splitting as I write this post. Hope my Internet keeps working. One of my boys is a computer whiz but won't giveme the time of day! Guess he has no patience for my slow mind!
Sharon

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

August 11, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #9238346

The library - by the way - is unfortunately a really great way to get viruses on the systems, be careful.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9238355

Thanks, I put all the safety features on before I go, including secured passwords...etc. Then when finished, I completely log off every website before shutting down. I do not pay any bills or go to the bank at the library. I do that at home on the wired connection, which I think is safer, though there are no guarantees with anything.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 11, 2012
7:09 PM

Post #9238447

Jen - Lee from Montana bought a machine recently from my bro and says she talks to him for tech support. I think she talks to him more than I do lately. :D

If you want his no. send a dmail.

Keep this thread - we can talk about your tomatoes next season again.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
7:15 PM

Post #9238452

LOL Amanda, are you making fun of my thread being from last year? Maybe I will. It certainly got a lot of play. I enjoyed all of it.

I know Lee is very pleased with the helps he got from him. I will send you a dmail, but why don't you just send me one? Or do you want me to send one so you can answer it. Ok

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 11, 2012
8:17 PM

Post #9238506

Lady Barister,
Thanks for the kind words! Glad you've rejoined the threads.

Like to invite ya'll over to the thread "Starting Our 2012 Fall/Winter Veggie Gardens". It's an open zone discussion, so folks from all areas can post what they're doing to get ready. The information is very helpful with keeping on track with your sowing/planting schedules, as well as giving ideas of what you can plant for the fall/Winter season.

So, stop on by and join the conversation.

Linda

This message was edited Aug 11, 2012 10:26 PM

This message was edited Aug 11, 2012 10:32 PM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 11, 2012
11:16 PM

Post #9238589

Thanks for the invite Linda. We mainly just clean up after the summer is over and get ready for the snow to fly. But, will certainly look in to see what you all do? Would be very interesting.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #9238705

No Jen - I'm not making fun - it's true! It's been a great thread! :)

Leave it open, and we'll revisit next year when you can't figure out what to do with your 'maters.

xox

Linda - can you post a link to your new thread? What forum are you in? I will have to start digging thru my seed boxes again to decide what to plant. I'm going to use the neighbor's raised beds. heeee heeee. Court wants to do something in the front yard, but he's not in a hurry. We'll figure it out.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

August 12, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9239000

I have finally pulled up the last of my tomatoes - not that it's too hot, but the onset of regular afternoon rainstorms (almost every day here) have wiped out the plants. I couldn't keep up with the late blight. I'm seeing anthracnose and other fungal problems on my peppers too, and I've had an explosion of small but destructive snails that zero in on everything tender and edible, even sweet potato leaves. Don't get me wrong, rain is great, and after experiencing droughts I have a hard time complaining. But too much (or even a little bit, too often) is definitely not good for the vegetable garden.

-Rich
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2012
2:41 PM

Post #9239156

Jen ~ Will you please make a new thread?

Rich ~ Yes we gardeners want it just right. A nice gentle rain at night, clear and sunny during the day with a gentle breeze and then cool at night. It seems as none of us have perfect weather. I am watering like crazy as there has been almost no rain all summer, with a couple of brief showers months ago. You have been getting too much rain. I wonder if Jen is having perfect weather right now??

The corn farmers are all dried up...I wonder what is next...
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2012
6:06 PM

Post #9239362

Hi, I know what you mean. Too dry too hot, then bam, too much rain! It's hard to keep up. On top of that one plant showing purple on the leaves. Linda, I'll check out your other thread although in my zone, we pretty much just get ready for winter.
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 12, 2012
10:03 PM

Post #9239588

Ok, I will give it a try. Bear with me. I am not sure how to do it. Jen

For those of you who wanted me to keep it going, here is the new thread: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/f/tomatoes/all/

This message was edited Aug 12, 2012 10:10 PM

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 13, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9239862

Here's a link to the continuation of the "Is it too hot for my tomatoes?" thread:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1275252/


Good effort Jen. :D

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 13, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9239898

Here's the link to our current thread:

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1272354/
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

August 13, 2012
10:04 AM

Post #9240042

Oh for heavens sake. I wonder what happened to my thread that had that info on it??? I was so careful to do it right this time. Thanks guys.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 13, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9240578

Follow this tomato thread here:


http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1275252/

Karrie20x
Spokane, WA
(Zone 5b)

September 4, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9264352

my threads have been attacked, and I'm afraid to even share anything, anymore, to be honest. You all have fun. I am not going to renew a membership that involves Carolyn the tomato lady.
hugobee
Montreal, QC
(Zone 5b)

September 4, 2012
5:17 PM

Post #9265019

Hey Karrie, don't quit us!
Sharon
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

September 4, 2012
10:51 PM

Post #9265388

I won't pick sides, but life is too short and this site doesn't need spats. So, hope you two figure it out. Tomatoes etc. are not that important to fight over. Jen
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

September 6, 2012
9:57 PM

Post #9267651

[quote="Jnette"]I won't pick sides, but life is too short and this site doesn't need spats. So, hope you two figure it out. Tomatoes etc. are not that important to fight over. Jen[/quote]
Amen!

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Tomatoes Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Blossom End Rot tiG 34 Mar 17, 2013 10:29 PM
TOMATOES ARE SPLITTING oblambert 31 Sep 11, 2012 7:13 PM
Principe Borghese/Juliet in containers? shane478 7 Feb 19, 2009 4:20 AM
Disease? Any idea what this is? BudZander 31 Apr 21, 2010 6:48 AM
Tree Tomato ?? faronell 10 Aug 3, 2007 1:23 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America