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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 14)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 6, 2011
5:27 AM

Post #8675479

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1189103/

Time to start a new one. Not sure what we're having for dinner tonight, but I've got some Cubanelle peppers that are quickly getting ripe, so sausage and peppers is on the menu sometime in the next few days
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 6, 2011
5:37 AM

Post #8675503

Thanks Terry
That IPAD was smoking with all that scrolling.
I didn't know if poor etiquette for anyone to start the thread that was not the originator of it.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 6, 2011
5:47 AM

Post #8675517

Anyone is welcome to do so but I've tried to stay on the ball enough to get the new 'uns going in this series :-)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 6, 2011
5:49 AM

Post #8675525

Grass-fed beef with a garlic-herb rub, grilled. Steamed corn with chimichurri, grilled romaine.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 6, 2011
6:22 AM

Post #8675612

how do you grill the romain? do you buy it in one head and brush it? On the grill or on foil? Will you tell me how Celene?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 6, 2011
7:06 AM

Post #8675710

So easy. You do need to buy whole heads, I quarter them, brush them with oil, and grill them quickly over a very hot flame until they have a char on both of the cut sides. I serve them cut side up, with some blue cheese (pr shavings of parmesan, or not), walnuts (or almonds, or not) and a drizzle of balsamic or caesar. My friend's children enjoy smaller heads of lettuce cut in half and grilled, with a squirt of ranch dressing, which kinda makes them finger food, and they ate it enthusiastically. Go figure!

One of my friends grilled individual leaves this weekend, and she said it was good. I suspect that might be too wilted for me, but she said it wasn't.

I have also been known to grill thick tomato slices or halves, onion slices, and fresh mozzarella slices to serve with the romaine. This makes a more substantial salad, okay for a light dinner or lunch.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 6, 2011
7:13 AM

Post #8675730

I am going to try today.

Also going to babysit for 2.5 year old granddaughter and she loves fresh lettuce and I will try that for her too. Thank syou so much. I am looking foward to it.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 6, 2011
7:17 AM

Post #8675737

My friend's three year said it made her want to take her shoes off and "pick leck-tuss". I'm not sure how those two things are related, but it was funny.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 6, 2011
10:55 AM

Post #8676221

My granddaughter (not to hijack the thread Terry please excuse just a quick story) she was at a downtown area in Durham, NC. There is a huge water feature running through this downtown gathering/restaurant/ballpark area. Very fast flowing water... she stood next to the rail looking into the water and began to holler "Whoooa Whoooa water...slow down slow down or you will trip!"

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 6, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8676841

LOL cute story!

Thanks for the new thread Terry!

The garden is finally kicking out lots of produce! Today we had kale from the garden in our kale, mushroom & onion omelet. I had a terrific green salad from the garden - even had lots of tomatoes in there. Oh I love summer!

Tam
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 6, 2011
6:45 PM

Post #8677056

I got the romaine after work, but it poured at dinnertime and after a pretty exhausting workday, I will look forward to what sounds like a great meal tomorrow.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 6, 2011
7:43 PM

Post #8677202

I picked up a head of Romaine tonight to try tomorrow night, along with some "tuscan" style pork chops. We'll see how it goes :-)
Lulabelle1
East Peoria, IL
(Zone 5a)

July 7, 2011
4:46 PM

Post #8678998

I cooked "beet greens" from the Simply Recipes site.
from the recipe below. I thinned my beets and added the cut up the little baby beets and stems. I thought it was yummy.

Beet Greens
While this recipe calls for discarding the stems, if you want you can use them too if they aren't too woody. Just cut them into 1-inch segments and add them to the onions after the onions have been cooking for a minute.

Ingredients
•1 pound beet greens
•1 strip of thick cut bacon, chopped (or a tablespoon of bacon fat)
•1/4 cup chopped onion
•1 large garlic clove, minced
•3/4 cup of water
•1 Tbsp granulated sugar
•1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
•1/6 cup of cider vinegar
Method
1 Wash the greens in a sink filled with cold water. Drain greens and wash a second time. Drain greens and cut away any heavy stems. Cut leaves into bite-sized pieces. Set aside.

2 In a large skillet or 3-qt saucepan, cook bacon until lightly browned on medium heat (or heat 1 Tbsp of bacon fat). Add onions, cook over medium heat 5 to 7 minutes, stirring occassionally, until onions soften and start to brown. Stir in garlic. Add water to the hot pan, stirring to loosen any particles from bottom of pan. Stir in sugar and red pepper. Bring mixture to a boil.

3 Add the beet greens, gently toss in the onion mixture so the greens are well coated. Reduce heat to low, cover and simmer for 5-15 minutes until the greens are tender. Stir in vinegar. (For kale or collard greens continue cooking additional 20 to 25 minutes or until desired tenderness.)


Serves 4.















http://simplyrecipes.com/recipes/beet_greens/





meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 7, 2011
5:27 PM

Post #8679122

Hmm, that sounds really yummy. Too bad I didn't plant any beets this year!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 7, 2011
6:11 PM

Post #8679196

We halve the Romaine, olive oil the interior and then grill it. Then sprinkle with Parmesan and cracked pepper. It is great the next day if you like wilted salad.

We had a kitchen sink of grilled garden veggies added into a fresh tomato sauce and served over pasta with fresh basil and Parmesan.
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 7, 2011
6:41 PM

Post #8679253

Tonight was wild caught Alaska salmon w/Trader Joes Soyaki Sauce/marinade, herbed new potatoes, sweet corn and a salad. Tomorrow should be first picking of green beans and whatever..probably beer can chicken on the grill. Garden is beginning to add to the Farmer's Market veggies and the herbs are producing except for the cilantro which grew about 3 inches tall and then proceeded to bolt. Basil, rosemary, sage, parsley are all doing well. It's been a strange spring/summer in the garden here.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 7, 2011
6:58 PM

Post #8679282

Pork chops Tuscan-style (balsamic vinegar, chicken broth, capers and some diced plum tomatoes.) Side of charred Romaine, but didn't add enough cheese and nuts and stuff. We'll take another run at it soon.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 7, 2011
7:17 PM

Post #8679335

Oh you all are making me hungry. These steroids make me crazy and hungry and reading this at 10 pm + is not such a hot idea. Again rain foiled the romaine --- but tomorrow I am home all day!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 7, 2011
7:44 PM

Post #8679389

[quote] Pork chops Tuscan-style (balsamic vinegar, chicken broth, capers and some diced plum tomatoes.) [/quote]

So how does all that come together? Is it a baked in the oven kinda thing? Any recipe with balsamic vinegar gets my attention.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 7, 2011
7:54 PM

Post #8679400

Mary, the pork chops were easy - you dredge them in flour, pan sear them in a little olive oil (couple minutes on each side.) move them to a plate, throw some balsamic vinegar in the pan to deglaze. Add a tablespoon or more of capers, a 1/4 cup of chicken broth and a can of diced plum tomatoes (I used Italian style, so it added a little garlic and basil, but plain would have worked fine too.) Heat back up, re-add the chops and let them cook covered for another 4-5 minutes and serve. It would go great with mashed potatoes or rice, but since we're low-carbing, I did the charred Romaine as the side.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 8, 2011
5:28 AM

Post #8679824

Thanks Terry, I'll try that tonight. I have a lot of already roasted garden tomatoes to use up. I'll bet I could sub chicken breasts for the pork chops too. A few nights ago I made a slow cooker batch of chicken thighs with sweet potatoes and black beans, which made a ton so the SP and beans have been making a yummy side dish warmed in the toaster oven in a small cast iron skillet - that will go nicely with the tuscan chops.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2011
5:50 AM

Post #8679864

I picked a few leaves of yellow cabbage collards this morning and plan to coat them with something tasty and dehydrate into snack chips. Any suggestions?
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 8, 2011
5:56 AM

Post #8679871

Mary if you like balsamic...with your bean, chicken and sweet potatoes.. ...a side of fried plantains drizzles with a wee balsamic go great.


Terry did the chops suck up the juice in the time in the pan or do they remain untouched inside? I have a pork loin that I can slice into cutlets...but I am wondering if the "bone in" helped your dish to stay moist and maybe I should wait for a chop before I try.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 8, 2011
5:58 AM

Post #8679878

Would you be wanting a dry sprinkle or a wet something? I found a great garlicky marinade that I used for bbq chicken last night. Not sure if you can marinate the collards, then dehydrate.

10 cloves of garlic, rough chop
1/4 cup Worchestershire sauce
2 TBL low-sodium soy sauce
1 med onion, rough chop
1/4 cup water
chopped hot peppers to taste (I used 2 fresh habeneros)

In a blender pure all ingredients. Store in fridge for up to a week.

Very yummy for the chicken.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 8, 2011
6:05 AM

Post #8679890

[quote="missingrosie"]Mary if you like balsamic...with your bean, chicken and sweet potatoes.. ...a side of fried plantains drizzles with a wee balsamic go great.


Terry did the chops suck up the juice in the time in the pan or do they remain untouched inside? I have a pork loin that I can slice into cutlets...but I am wondering if the "bone in" helped your dish to stay moist and maybe I should wait for a chop before I try. [/quote]

The sauce was only on the outside of the chops - it didn't permeate them. (I used cutlets, not bone-in.)

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 8, 2011
6:45 AM

Post #8679965

Have never eaten plantains, I may try that. Thanks missingrosie.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 8, 2011
6:49 AM

Post #8679973

I like plantains but I'm about the only one in my family that does.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 8, 2011
9:23 AM

Post #8680227

Be sue ripened or won't peel...very dry. Black is good as marker. Super sweet ...fast and hot fry both sides in maybe 1/4 inch slices. Stay with the fry pan because the sugar can burn very very fast. I use peanut oil because can take high heat. Drain and serve. It's a veggie dessert! Not sure of nutritional value but oh so good. When not sweet more of a starch/ potato yucca- like addition.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2011
11:55 AM

Post #8680490

Thanks Mary... I may try that. I don't keep soy sauce but do have tamari. A dry coating probably wouldn't stick to the collards.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 8, 2011
12:24 PM

Post #8680516

I don't use much soy sauce either, sub with Bragg's Liquid Aminos.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2011
1:39 PM

Post #8680604

I have that, too. :)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 8, 2011
3:40 PM

Post #8680838

There are so many ways to prepare plantains. They are eaten green in the islands and all over Latin America as a starch as in tostones in Cuba or mofungo (mashed with garlic and cracklins') in Puerto Rico or eaten ripe as platanos fritos or maduros. The green ones should never be refrigerated or they will be impossible to peel. They can be cooked at any stage. I have made great plantain bread with over-ripes so no need to feel guilty if you are timid and never get around to cooking them. When cooking green plantains, place them in hot tap water for five minutes or so and slit the three ridges down to the fruit, then cur both ends and remove the peel. We cut them in two inch chunks and fry them, remove them from the oil and place them on newspaper (the ink is soy based) and smash them. Then we refry them, salt and serve hot. It's a bit of work but we do it for a rustic company dinner, Cuban picadillo with black beans and rice.

We are having a salad with garden veggies, locally grown and grilled corn, eggs, cheese, ham and fresh garlic croutons. It covers every food group.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 8, 2011
4:14 PM

Post #8680890

When cooking green plantains, place them in hot tap water for five minutes or so and slit the three ridges down to the fruit, then cur both ends and remove the peel. We cut them in two inch chunks and fry them, remove them from the oil and place them on newspaper (the ink is soy based) and smash them. Then we refry them, salt and serve hot.

And is this more of a potato or starchy replacement (like for rice) (meaning no sweet).

THANK you for the hints on the peeling

Hopefully, with your info Laurel, I have cussed my last cuss over these plantains. I had no idea NOT to refridgerate. I did it to stop the sweetening when I wanted more of the starch. I did not know about the hot water soak either, but I will tell you the peeling is horrid the way I have been doing...got so aggravating that I just use fried as a dessert or a sweet side to a meal like pork or shrimp.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 8, 2011
5:23 PM

Post #8681043

No matter how much I try, I can't like plantain. I really dislike few things, but this is one of them.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 8, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8681063

Tch, tch...
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 9, 2011
1:04 PM

Post #8682338

Last night was the Tuscan pork chops from Terry, very tasty - thanks for posting that one. Corn on the cob and that good old 5-minute bread that we just love (Potato/Garlic/Rosemary/Thyme). This time I put in 2 cups of whole wheat flour instead of all white. Very happy with the results.

Tonight, bbq chicken with that garlicky/worchestire sauce marinade I posted above. We REALLY liked it. And I'm making a potato salad based on the light, fresh thread here. Fresh lemon juice, small purple and red potatoes, lemon zest...probably garlic - 'ya think? More corn and bread.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 9, 2011
2:34 PM

Post #8682468

Romaine was GREAT. I think I am even going to love it cold left over. Thanks again.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 9, 2011
2:50 PM

Post #8682480

Ooooouch! $ 5 bucks for a quart of 3 inch long tiny sweet peppers...red, orange, yellow at farmers market. Well they sure looked pretty and taste oh so good... But 5 bucks!

Potatoes were nice and cheap. Celebrity tomato $ 3.00 a pound. I HAVE a sunny spot to grow but the critters under and over ground are wicked hard to manage.

Tonight : sweet Italian sausage, potatoes, peppers, and onions in oven. Season, toss in a wee bit olive oil, fresh garlic, and tomato sauce (canned is fine) and the last few min baking sprinkle fresh shaved parm. Easy clean up. Great leftover.

Now just got to fix a salad and heat the bread.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 9, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8682766

We had garden fresh broccoli & green beans cooked w/crisp bacon bits & garlic, tossed w/a little wine, cream & Parmesan cheese over whole wheat pasta.

Tam
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 9, 2011
6:22 PM

Post #8682813

My hubby's dream meal!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 9, 2011
6:49 PM

Post #8682859

There are leftovers. Send him on over! :-)

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 10, 2011
5:40 AM

Post #8683336

My cubanelles are yellow...as soon as they turn red we will have our tastebuds all set for peppers and sausage ;-)

Last night was pulled pork for a crowd (it's a miracle we don't have gout from all the pork we seem to eat!) with sides of potato salad, a black-bean/tomato/avocado salad, my "famous" baked beans with ground beef, ice cold watermelon balls, and two desserts: red velvet cake squares and cheesecake bars. with fresh fruit topping.

Urp.

I'm pretty sure we'll be eating a few more pork sandwiches before I re-open the kitchen and cook anything else. But this week's menu will lighten up considerably - I'm thinking salad, fish and chicken with a lot of fresh veggies.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 10, 2011
6:27 AM

Post #8683496

It sounds like a feast Terry!

I can't send him over, he is on a no parm or any cheese or cream sauce pasta diet. He can't control himself and will eat it when I am not around lunches. He can stick to tomato and whole wheat. It won't kill him. He is a nut about creamy cheese sauces... Well at least it ain"t women, drugs, or drink...but let a woman walk by with au d cheese ('scuse the spellin') perfume and who the heck can predict the outcome!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 10, 2011
7:22 AM

Post #8683569

I really shouldn't have the creamy cheesy sauces either, but I love them as well. I feel your husband's pain :)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2011
8:44 AM

Post #8683714

Missing - there wasn't that much cream or parm. DH added mayonnaise to his bowl. :-( I guess I'm used to it. If I make anything that isn't dripping in cream, butter & cheese, he puts mayonnaise on it. And sometimes even if it is dripping in cream, butter & cheese he adds the mayo.

We're having waldorf salad, green beans & tomato tossed in a balsamic vinegrette w/a little basil. And a peach/blueberry buckle for dessert. Our guests are bringing green salad. Should be a nice cool lunch!

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 10, 2011
9:34 AM

Post #8683884

I really cannot agree on reducing the natural fats available in meats, butter and cheese. However, I do avoid those fats IF they are adulterated by any processing. There is too much evidence available... and besides, our brains function on saturated fats.

I know that last year when I upped my pasture-raised meat, eggs and butter (and dropped lots of carbs), my cholesterol dropped, my weight dropped, and my energy and outlook improved immensely. Unfortunately my limited budget cannot sustain that food expense, and I have backslid in all areas. The fresh produce from my garden is helping now, of course!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 10, 2011
10:49 AM

Post #8684067

I'm with you on needing a certain amount of healthy fats but I say all things in moderation!

Tam
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 10, 2011
12:02 PM

Post #8684190

I agree Tam. I even much on salt and pepper potato chips from time to time!

Tonight is some pulled pork from the freezer. It was a very yummy roast from maccionoadha. Anyone have a favorite pulled pork sauce recipe they can share? Looking for new ideas.
.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
12:04 PM

Post #8684191

We are getting buried in produce. It calls for extemporaneous menus. Here is a saute, using olive oil, garlic and fresh herbs, of garden veggies topped with grated cheese. Grilled corn on the side.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
12:08 PM

Post #8684197

Yesterday I made several dishes including potato croquettes and cauliflower, peas and tomatoes in a creamy curry. Here's the curry.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
12:10 PM

Post #8684201

Keeping up with the yard long beans is challenging. we are picking this many at least two times a week. Thank goodness they are only about two feet long. lol

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
12:11 PM

Post #8684204

I fried up a bit of our smoked ham, sauteed the beans and then added a little liquid to steam them.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 10, 2011
1:49 PM

Post #8684412

Oh, I had some of those beans last year,and they were lovely! Didn't plant them this year due to some kind of brain fart. My sugar snaps I think are done already, too hot for them. One meal for us. Waste of space. Not doing them next year, I'll just buy some and plant something with a bigger harvest.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 10, 2011
4:03 PM

Post #8684607

Food all looks yummy.

Darius may I suggest that it was the reduction in carbs that gave you such positive outcomes. Not so much increases in the other. Weight loss contributes to those positive outcomes in labs and mood/ energy is really impacted by carbs.

Many cardiologists are no longer slamming the Atkins and the studies are bearing many of the earlier claims to benefits out. That issue about the high protein and kidney issues also has not been proven by legit studies.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 10, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8684682

missingrosie, I agree... mostly. There's the fact that some food nutrients (vitamins) are only fat-soluble, and they all work together only if given enough saturated fat... which I was not doing before that protocol. I was doing the typical American 'low/no fat' food program, and eliminating good fats based on media hype.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 10, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8684694

I'm somewhere in the middle on the carbs and the fat. I try to get more unsaturated fats and omega 3's. I don't necessarily limit carbohydrates, just highly refined carbohydrates. They're very calorie-dense and not very nutritious, so it's easy to overeat with the processed foods.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 10, 2011
5:26 PM

Post #8684717

Celene, it's hard to get enough Omega-3 to balance the Omega-6 in our typical diets. I struggle with that all the time, especially since I love olive oil. I do eat lots of carbs, but try to limit them to the greens and low glycemic loads most of the time.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 10, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8684720

You are correct - the low fat if eliminating the healthy saturated fats is just as lacking as a diet in unhealthy fats. I just try to avoid any excessive in on area or super restrictive diets. After the initial phase in a diet like Atkins...it really does fall to a common sense moderation diet and the cardiac patients that I have seen that follow similar do well, aren't hungry, have great lab changes and say have more energy. I followed a gluten free diet and the catkins. Both for me tended to be low carb and I for. Sure noted the energy perks. I am 130 pounds give or take 3 or 4 in any direction and so not looking for real pounds just better health.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 10, 2011
5:39 PM

Post #8684725

Ha ha - Catkins...this IPAD thinks it is smarter than me. It ends sentences and changes spelling al the time.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2011
6:05 PM

Post #8684774

Missingrosie, the autocorrect on iPads drives me nuts, too.

Darius, how do youmanage to get Omega-3 into your diet to balance the Omega-6? We tend to rely on supplements.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 10, 2011
6:12 PM

Post #8684787

Darius, I use a lot of flax seed oil and flax seed, chia, walnuts, and vegetables high in Omega 3's. Fortunately, I like those things and it's easy. I will *not* eat fish or any animal, so that does make it a little more challenging. I also take flax seed oil supplements. I eat whole foods with carbohydrates, like sweet potatoes, cooked dried beans, nuts, farro, etc--but fewer white flour and sugar kinda meals. A couple of years without them, and they start to taste bad. I used to LOVE Pizza Hut pan pizza, and I had a slice over the weekend and it was so greasy and fakey flavored, that I threw most of it away.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 10, 2011
6:27 PM

Post #8684813

Celene a not Cod Liver Oil either?

Anyway, good legit studies saying supplements not giving same benefits as food for Omega 3 ( antiflammatory, blood platelet, etc.) has something to do with food being in the form of triglycerides as opposed to supplements being in an esther or something. So you are on right track Celene. I eat a lot of salmon. - I think that my largest source.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 10, 2011
6:38 PM

Post #8684832

Umm, I'll need to remember not let my brain do that, Meezers. Sounds super embarrassing. I get upset when I plain 'ol forget. :>)

We eat lots of carbs and fats. Our primary fat source outside of what is contained in the veggies and small amount of meat we eat is olive or peanut oil, then butter. Most of our carbs come in this order; 1) beans, 2)rice 3) potatoes 4) grains (bread and pasta). I think much nutrition information comes from online sources and is rather selectively geared to educated folks without backgrounds in nutrition. There's enough information out there to sound logical. Still, we have never thought about recentering our diets. Folks, in our opinion, seem chronically obsessed with finding some sort of food Taiji. A primary aspect of what I do in nursing consult work is nutrition guidance. My patients are those requiring special and drastic diet changes due to diagnoses of chronic conditions, obstetrical complications (such as gestational diabetes), surgeries or cancers that require tube feedings. I ask people I meet along the way to explore Steven Bratmen's coined term "orthorexia". I've not seen this term pertain to any other country than this one but think it's so apropos to our current situation. We are obsessed with finding solutions to our national obesity epidemic by breaking down every molecule of what we put in our mouths and attaching some negative effect and alternative solution.

We split a grilled rib eye, had leftover curried veggies in cream (chilled) and zucchini with green onion fritters.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 10, 2011
6:45 PM

Post #8684850

I think that's a good analysis, Laurel. I add omega-3's because of my cholesterol, which is primarily a hereditary issue, it's not otherwise dietary.

I suspect the bioavailability of omega-3's in products where they can oxidize would be less, I'd expect the triglycerides to be used as an additive in more processed foods like cereals, baked goods, etc. That's the down side of Omega-3's and polyunsaturated oils, is that they oxidize easily, so handling and storage is important.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2011
6:47 PM

Post #8684860

We had merguez lamb patties with couscous. It's an easy meal because I make up the patties beforehand and then just cook them in a frying pan while the couscous/raisin mixture is absorbing the chicken broth.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2011
6:50 PM

Post #8684866

By the way, my dermatologist uses curcumin for cholesterol. I had never heard of that application of it, but we take it for other reasons and my DH's cholesterol is now excellent even though he cut back on his statins because of muscle aches. Something to think about, although it's also an anticoagulant so that has to be considered if someone is also on anticoagulant meds.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 10, 2011
6:54 PM

Post #8684878

Celene, it isn't easy. There is a chart at http://www.texasgrassfedbeef.com/gi_and_omega_3_nutritional_food_data.htm that shows Omega3-Omega6 in common vegetables, nuts, seeds, etc. It's rather interesting.

I am a firm believer that our bodies do better getting vitamins and essential fatty acids from foods rather than supplements. However, having said that... I do take a morning tsp. of fermented cod liver oil (along with my coffee and heavy cream, no sugar) that also has K2 butter oil in it (a Weston A Price recommendation), plus several D3 tabs over the course of my day. Vitamin D is one of the nutrients I do not believe we get adequately from sun and food any longer. Not sure why that is...

I would eat a lot of salmon too if I could afford wild salmon. I won't eat farm-raised salmon.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 10, 2011
7:04 PM

Post #8684920

I also think it's better if you can to get nutrition from food, but I also know that I don't always, and it'd be different if I had a diet devoid of nutrients and expected a Flintstone vitamin to fix it, lol. Knew some people like that, it's funny but sad.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 10, 2011
7:10 PM

Post #8684932

I got some canned salmon at the supermarket that was wild-caught from Washington State. I wasn't even looking for that, but the least expensive variety was from China so I picked up the next one in terms of cost and saw that it was domestic wild salmon. I make a pasta salad with it, adding asparagus, olives, anchovies and aioli to my tri-colored rotini. That's an inexpensive way of getting salmon.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 10, 2011
7:55 PM

Post #8685007

I used to go to Whole Foods for the wild salmon and it made my checkbook go wild. Now I go to Costco. 1 trip out of maybe 5 yields a wild caught beautiful salmon filet and it is no more expensive than the farmed. Not so lucky with shrimp there but local grocer Harris Teeter (way overpriced on most items) will lure with the NC shrimp wild) and hope you stay to shop. Ditto Fresh Market - wee shopping Karts and Stepford Wives kind of music and shopping experiences..the money can fly out of the pocket there while the soft classical music plays...5 bucks for a bag of pasta? Sure ... Where do I pay? Gimme two...

Tonight we had a crisp romaine salad ( I bought a lot! ;o )

I cubed mango ( had a few of those too) tossed in dried cherries, chilean raisins, gala apples, fresh baby bell pepper, a few dry roasted peanuts and fixed a balsamic dressing with a little pepper oil Then I opened a foil pouch of yellowfin
tuna in oil (I bring those to work for lunch) and microwaved the tuna it till heated and tossed it with the salad. IT WAS GREAT!



meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 10, 2011
8:05 PM

Post #8685019

LOL we went out for chinese at our old favorite 40 miles up the road. Enough for another meal in little boxes. And then, oh sinful secret addiction, stopped at Popeye's chicken and got some grease...for later in the week. Shameful, I know.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 11, 2011
4:48 AM

Post #8685358

Oh, don't feel bad. The pizza place in my neighborhood makes cheese fries with big hand-cut fresh fries, smoked salt, real cheese that they grate right over the hot fries, diced tomatoes, jalapenos and green onions, and homemade ranch dressing. Because deep-fried potatoes covered in melted cheese don't have enough fat already, lol. I have them rarely and enjoy them tremendously.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
5:24 AM

Post #8685415

How far is Columbus?????? LOL

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 11, 2011
5:32 AM

Post #8685439

I'll get the ranch dressing on the side and next day air you an order. Chef Jeff is worth it. I'll throw in a cookie pizza, too. It's sugar cookie dough pressed into a personal pizza pan, topped with chocolate chips, nuts, and caramel. That should come with a roll of Tums.

I'm trying to convince them to have a whole grain crust pizza, lol.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8685513

No, they'd be cold by the time they got here!! The best french fries I ever had were done at a tiny chinese takeout place, they did them in peanut oil!!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 11, 2011
6:41 AM

Post #8685534

Growing up in Colorado, there was a Mexican restaurant next door to my parent's business that made their own beef patties (dinner plate size) and their own matchstick fries. An open-faced chili burger with your choice of green (hot) or red (hotter) chili, topped with sizzling hot fresh fries and grated cheese was enough to make you cry tears of joy and pain all at once. While the sweat beaded up on your forehead and chin. It wasn't something you'd want to eat every day unless you can burn calories like Michael Phelps but decades later I can still remember how good it tasted.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 11, 2011
6:42 AM

Post #8685535

If you're ever in Columbus, give me a call. We can have fries. :) I'm allergic to peanuts, so Chinese food is dicey for me for that reason alone.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 11, 2011
7:17 AM

Post #8685595

greenhouse_gal, I don't much like canned fish or meats, even my own home-canned, but I'll look for the canned wild salmon next time I get to a big city. I do get some tasty Morrocan sardines at an international foods store in Blacksburg, but since it's a hundred miles each way, I don't go very often.

missingrosie, I drive over to visit a friend in Boone about twice a year. (It's about 2 hours across the mountain. I used to go a lot before my mother and all my aunts and uncles died.) They have a small EarthFare, which is kinda like Whole Foods. There is also a huge newly expanded Harris-Teeter in Boone. I like the H-T store brand whole bean dark roast coffee and usually buy enough for 6 months when I go. The closest Costco to me is in Winston-Salem, or even farther away in northern Virginia. There is a Sam's Club about 40 miles south of me near the Tennessee line, but I have never seen wild salmon there.

Last night I made a pasta dish, first pasta in more than 6 months. Just angel hair, dressed with fresh basils (spicy globe and ruby) from the yard, olive oil/butter and 2 cups of my homemade cheese (a herbed Lancashire) grated in.

With all this talk of fries I may make some sweet potato fries tonight.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 11, 2011
10:07 AM

Post #8685965

Isn't plain and simple served pasta great?

You know coming from an italian family...we had 'Sunday Gravy' style pasta dishes..most of the time.

And of course every single holiday along with the meat and traditional desserts, we had to have lasagna, or some kind of cheese stuffed tube or puff covered with sauce ... the sauce was always the long-cooking meat sauce on top of the stove that went on for hours and hours.. But, every now and again my dad would fix us what I thought of as 'instant sauce' ... quick cooking tomatoes (out of a can) hitting a hot fry pan with some fresh basil and cheese added. It was light and delicious..no meat no fish no nothing in it. If he made pasta with just oil and garlic..(no tomato sauce) he'd brown italian bread crumbs to sprinkle on top and if we had any in the house ...he'd top with roasted pine nuts.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 11, 2011
11:10 AM

Post #8686071

OK... garden is kicking out green beans like crazy! what are your favorite ways to eat them?

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 11, 2011
11:16 AM

Post #8686088

Tammy, I'm so lame...but three bean salad, sauteed with butter and dill, or stir fried with soy, ginger, garlic, red pepper paste and tofu.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
12:15 PM

Post #8686194

That was our house, too, missingrosie, always spaghetti with red gravy on Sunday plus another meat dish, roast of some sort or a capon, or a porketta. When my DD worked the late shift at the shipyard in the years just before WWII, he came home and made spaghetti and oil for a late snack. I'd sneak out of bed and pick out the leftover strands after they left the kitchen. Never lost my taste for it. We have it often. And he loved those bitter greens like escarole and such. I should make up a batch of antipasto with our garden crops this year,, I have my DGM's recipe for canning it, but I have to double the sauce because our vegetables are soooo much bigger now...calls for one head of cauliflower, one bunch celery, etc among other things. Makes about 16 pints or more.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 11, 2011
12:51 PM

Post #8686275

meezer - dad cooked escarole with pork ribs floating in the 'scarole soup!
sometimes he add tiny tiny tiny chopmeat and cheese meatballs if no ribs. I think that soup was chicken broth based. I'D FORGOTTEN IT UNTIL YOU MENTIONED. THANKS FOR THE MEMORY!

Tammy - Raw!!

If I am to cook...plain old butter and salt and pepper. Maybe some onion powder.

I love raw green beans dunked into plain old cream cheese - no flavors. dunk ...nip...dunk...nip... takes time and not that fattening --makes me feel like I had a snack.
sonoranpoet
Cave Creek, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 11, 2011
12:55 PM

Post #8686284

Maypop that curry looks divine!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
2:03 PM

Post #8686426

Dad always made the ravioli, too. I still use his noodle recipe. But, as time went by, he got less and less ambitious about cutting and filling bite size ravioli, at the end he was using a saucer for the noodle cutout, folding it over and two were nearly a meal!! He liked to make a ricotta and spinach filling, but sometimes he'd do sausage and cheese, or find some bits of leftover main course and stuff that in there. He did not clean up. We followed after him and wiped and washed and stirred gravy. First born sons in Italian families did NOT do kitchen KP.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 11, 2011
2:09 PM

Post #8686445

You folks and your Sunday pasta meals...we're Irish/Lithuanian but every Sunday night was macaroni soup. Milk, lots of butter, lots of salt and funny shaped pasta. My favorite was wagon wheel. Wonder if my siblings remember? I could get so darn excited about wagaon wheel pasta soup...didn't take much to Make My Day back then. hah hah.

Tonight we will have ww pasta with my roasted tomatoe sauc, made yesterday with garden toms, lots of garlic, garden basil, onion, habaneros. A green salad and some bread.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 11, 2011
2:27 PM

Post #8686491

Thank you Sonoranpoet.

We are on the run tonight. Both of us have meetings. It's leftovers from meals this past week. We have a cottage stay guest at Maypop the next few days so we'll race up tomorrow. The guest is combining a business trip with a mountain respite. She will be gone during the day. I'll be busy making like a B&B maven.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 11, 2011
2:43 PM

Post #8686532

Celene - the stir fry sounds good!

I'm just gonna roast 'em tonight. And blanch & freeze the rest. We'll have lots more tomorrow for another option.

We always had donuts for breakfast Sun, a big meal mid-day (roast beef w/potatoes was a favorite) and then dad made a big batch of popcorn drenched in butter for our "dinner". Oh that was wonderful popcorn! He had an electric frypan and would pop a huge potful and then melt a whole stick of butter on that pot. Then made another batch & put another stick on that! Yum!

Tam
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 11, 2011
3:54 PM

Post #8686686

Tonight is sloppy joes, potato salad, sweet corn. Not sure what kicked off the craving for sloppy joes.

Tammy, about the green beans, if they are young and small I do a batch or two of dilled green beans pickles. They taste really good mid-winter when salad fixins and sides are pretty skimpy.

One of the master gardeners at our local farmer's market had a pan of tomatoes, onions and fresh green beans this past weekend that was really tasty. I need to follow up and get a recipe.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 11, 2011
3:59 PM

Post #8686696

It's Bunco potluck tonight, so I'm taking egg salad stuffed in croissants with some loose head lettuce. There will be other kinds of sandwiches and I hear-tell we'll also have ice cream with brownies and nekkid cupcakes. I don't know what those are but I guess I'll find out!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
5:21 PM

Post #8686842

Leftover chinese from last night. Tomorrow I'll mash up some spuds and we'll eat the Popeye's Chicken. Wednesday I may have to cook.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 11, 2011
5:29 PM

Post #8686859

I sliced a few shallots and tossed 'em in with the green beans, roasted them and shaved a little Parmesan cheese on top. Really good.

Eden - will look into pickling green beans. Hadn't heard of that before!

Tam

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8686865

I have a friend who pickles them with garlic and red chili flakes to spice them up . Saw a recipe on one of the cooking sites but it doesn't have the garlic or the pepper.


http://allrecipes.com/Recipe/pickled-green-beans/detail.aspx

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 11, 2011
5:39 PM

Post #8686881

Oh that's too funny! I was just looking at that same recipe Meezers!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 11, 2011
5:45 PM

Post #8686891

Great minds, and all that...
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 11, 2011
5:52 PM

Post #8686909

Egg salad. I haven't had that in a long while. Would be great with a tomato slice on rye.

I guess dads cooked a lot.

My hubby is part Lithuanian.,,and Irish...and polish...and English..

I swiped some of the money I got for the church basket and bought a jelly donut and a comic book (Archie or Superman) while walking home from church. I prayed all the way home because of the sin ...but I went to confession and then did it again the following Sunday. We all got change for the basket and one of us
(not me obviously) would get the 'pink envelope' with the REAL dollar contribution.
Those strawberry jelly donuts...were so puffy and fluffy and rolled in sugar. I never got
caught. Surely on of the many neighborhood 'spies' saw me. So many things to wonder about now these many years later. Us kids were recognizable because we were the ones with the soles of the shoes flapping! Maybe we ALL had Sunday after church jelly donuts!

Tomorrow for dinner I am going to make a shrimp salad sandwich but just with a little oil and lemon and dill - no mayo based.

Next day I plan a clam sauce - a promise I have not kept to someone with a 'hankering'. I get tired of the same old things but mostly the hubby wants the same old stuff. He's asked for stew or stuffed cabbage but it is so darn hot.

Meezer your dad's ravioli sounds more like a periogi!

This message was edited Jul 11, 2011 8:55 PM
Edens_Gardener
Clay Center, KS
(Zone 5b)

July 11, 2011
6:02 PM

Post #8686928

Tammy & Meezers
Yes it needs red peppers and garlic, I use the Blue Ball canning book recipe/never seem to have fresh dill (too many butterflies) so I use dill seed, dill weed, garlic clove and crushed red peppers. Boiling water bath 10 minutes.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 11, 2011
7:47 PM

Post #8687186

Fish question
In Brooklyn my family used to catch what we called chicken of the sea of of a pier. My bro said the fish were blow fish. Folks here in NC tell me the fish are puffer fish. I know the fish were small and would puff up...but perhaps many fish do (?) when hauled out of water. The underside was real tough. I think the tail end was eaten since not a lot of length. Anyway..the cleaned fish would get dredged in flour and salt and pepper...sautéed in butter and then transferred to a roasting pan. Once in the pan, the browned fish were covered with a layer of tsort of a thinned omato sauce ( of course ) and onions and garlic., basil, etc and then baked...last few minutes grated cheese over the top and then back for a few minutes. It made a delicious fish stew in the oven. The fish was white and 'hefty' and we kids didn't think 'fishy.'. Actually was chicken like. My question...Do you know what the fish may have been? And, it is doubtful that I will ever find those type and given the description of the meat and the method of cooking, do you have an opinion of a fish that would be comparable in flavor type and hold up to the cooking treatment? Would like to try this again.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 12, 2011
10:00 AM

Post #8688052

I don't have any guesses on the fish you are describing but tilapia might work in that recipe.

Tam
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 12, 2011
10:38 AM

Post #8688138

Do you think tilapia would stay intact and not fall apart. It is not a fishy fish and I like that.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 12, 2011
12:02 PM

Post #8688357

Tilapia tends to flake. What about cod? It's firm, white, mild.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 12, 2011
12:05 PM

Post #8688363

I was just thinking cod, it's not fishy and it stays very firm when cooked.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 12, 2011
1:32 PM

Post #8688526

Cod would be my choice for that dish too..
My favorite way to eat fresh green beans is stir-fried. I even collect recipes for all the different ways to spice up simple stir fried green beans. Szechuan-seasoned and Sesame-ginger are favorites. .
Chronic anemia is a problem for me and I’ve always heard stir-frying is the best cooking method to preserve vitamins and minerals.
The recipes I have often call for Chinese long beans, but the classic American string bean, snap bean or haricot verts seem to do just as well. The trick to making them tender is to dry fry them until they start to brown and sort of pucker up.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 12, 2011
1:41 PM

Post #8688540

dry fry as in no oil?

I was just thinking about a great recipe I tried a few years ago for shrimp & green beans. Gonna look that up again!

Tam
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 12, 2011
7:28 PM

Post #8689288

The only thing that has worked for my lifelong mild anemia is b complex vitamins. Doc says "nah...that won't help." "Even tho lab measured iron is ok ...try iron...even tho bothers the gut, let's try it ...can't hurt"...next check...the iron had no impact other than on the gut... I say "Watch this, I will stop the B complex..." Repeat labs. ...HCT goes down...Doc says "coincidence". ... I say "OK watch this..". ...back to the high B Complex...6 months later...anemia is much improved...doc says "Nah, ...a coincidence..., but the anemia is mild and stable all these years, so no concern and if it makes you happy taking the B complex- go ahead.". Grin!


I will try the cod. It is a tough fish. I don't think of it as all that mild but maybe it will work. Actually, haven't had it in a long time-- maybe fishy just in my mind.

Tonight hubby says " don't cook" ( wheeeee). Go to downtown and I got a great salad with orange/peanut dressing and a fried shrimp sandwich with this great slaw. Shrimp fresh lightly floured. He had grouper ( would grouper work in that dish??) and it had a lemon dill sauce. Green beans on side and white rice - I would have asked for brown.

Got home...the new Kitchenaid (don't let me get started on that horrid horrid mistake) freezer drawer got hung up on the sliding tray above (WHY did I get rid of my old fridge it was faithful and perfect ..) and the freezer had 8 inches of snow in it covering everything. IT IS IMPOSSIBLE to access the freezer back/ bottom to clean. The trays are fixed. The drawers are fixed. The bottom freezer drawers are a bad idea. I could not get in there to fix/ clean/ wipe...my one night out turned out to be over an hour in the fridge and then had to clean the floors. You know why the "french style" upper doors have a door alarm...because you have to put some meaningful 'butt' behind closing or the doors don't shut, so they built in an alarm...the freezer has no such alarm. That fridge is nothing more than a pretty face.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 12, 2011
7:41 PM

Post #8689306

Korean here tonight...ground chicken thigh meatballs with black bean sauce, sauteed spinach, sauteed zucchini, sesame mushrooms, and bok choy in vegetarian "fish" sauce. Served with a side of searing hot fresh vegetable pickle--radishes, cucumbers, onions, and zucchini.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 12, 2011
8:10 PM

Post #8689346

I used my last jar of Trader Joe's vodka sauce with some penne pasta and meatballs. (It was me, myself and I for dinner, so I kept it simple.)

Rosie, I feel your pain. I love my Maytag french-door freezer for its access, but the doors are harder to close than my old side-by-side and I'm always afraid of leaving them ajar.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2011
4:31 AM

Post #8689573

Uhoh , doors ajar...I have a nearly new LG and it is the same. If you open both doors, which you have to do to pull out the chill tray at the bottom, you need to give it a good bump to close them. And on occasion I've not tightly closed one of the double doors above and walked away, only to hear my DH "Can't you hear that???" when the little beeper goes on. Otherwise I like it just fine. My old one was still running so I gave it to another DGer who was setting up house and needed one.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 13, 2011
4:33 AM

Post #8689576

Hmmm, I have a KA refrigerator and LOVE it. It replaced a cheap piece of crap off brand annoying junker that came with my house.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 13, 2011
5:21 AM

Post #8689613

how can a fridge/freezer have a bottom loaded freezer drawer with a main bin (a wire slide rack) a top rack that slides over the top with FIXED divider. The main bin cannot be removed. So anything that spills/falls/etc. at the bottom of the freezer through the wire openings cannot be accessed... you can see the stuff but not reach it. No way to reach the back wall of the freezer either. And, it doesn't hold squat and I bought the deeper than counter depth. Well this thread is about happy things like great food and you all do a great job of stimulating the brain to try new things and twists on old.

What is your favorite Trader Joe item?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 13, 2011
5:36 AM

Post #8689636

There's a whole discussion of TJ recommendations, it was fantastic. My personal favorite of the moment is veggie and flaxseed tortilla chips.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 13, 2011
5:52 AM

Post #8689658

Celene, I've been watching that thread and I had my list of must-try's in hand the first trip. It's definitely time for another visit. Maybe I can time it just right and take my oldest son to lunch, as he works just down the road from the one in N'ville.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 13, 2011
9:57 AM

Post #8690106

Missing, I know smelt and sardines are super popular in Italian homes. They are both eaten floured and fried with tails on. I love them, especially smelt. I've never had smelt sauced though. I grew up with Italian families and know how much they cherished smelt night. You'll almost always see them in fritto misto. Cod is another Italian favorite and very mild, as Terry recommended. However, it is a VERY big fish. Scrod is a made up name for small cod. Still bigger than what you are referring to. Cod, hake, haddock and whiting, which is a specific species are in the same family. The confusing thing is the name "whiting" is used sometimes to refer to all of them since they are all mild white fish. I think this came about when some of these species were cheap and some expensive so that they could better market the cheaper fish. Now that cod is more expensive they sometimes call other fish in the same family "cod".

As for puffer or blowfish...they have deadly poisonous glands and are not generally eaten in this country. They are a delicacy in Japan though. Maybe you've seen them served up on a TV travel show? Anthony Bourdain and Andrew Zimmer have done shows where they eat fugu (blowfish). Trained fugu chefs need a special license to prepare the blowfish 'cause they know how to remove the glands...most of the time. Still, a lot of people pay hundreds per meal to eat this delicacy 'cause it makes your lips and mouth tingle and there are many casualties every year as a result.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2011
12:15 PM

Post #8690288

Missed seeing Zimmern eat Blowfish, but had years of watching my family devour smelt after the spring season. Bushels. I can clean a bucket of smelt in half an hour. Zippppp! We can get them in SE Wisconsin but they aren't as fresh as when you seine them yourself.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 13, 2011
3:02 PM

Post #8690584

I will ask the older sibs if they know the fish. Brooklyn pier...small fish...hit the deck and puff up. Very tough underside seems it was lumpy bumpy. I think only tail end eaten and vey small/ few inches. Entire fish prob not more than 7. I am going to try the dish with the cod ( thanks for the great explanation).

I heard about that crazy/deadly fish and the specially trained chefs. Had no idea the name tho.

I lost my dinner partner...nobody to please but me...tonight peanut butter and jelly (confetti sweet pepper) sandwich on toast. Oh joy!
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 13, 2011
3:06 PM

Post #8690592

From th NY times
Blowfish tails are often sold under the names sea squab or chicken of the sea, though the odd-looking delicacies have nothing to do with birds. This has been a good season for blowfish, found off Long Island's south shore and the north New Jersey coast. The tails are delicious morsels, with a single slender bone running their length. But few markets in Manhattan sell them because, the owners say, few people buy them and many do not even know what they are. I cook them like jumbo shrimp, dusting them with flour before sautéing in butter and garlic, or I briefly sear the tails on the grill. Sometimes I add them to paella or bouillabaisse. There are about 20 to a pound, and they cost $6 to $8 a pound. In Manhattan, they are often carried by Pescatore Seafood in the Grand Central Market, Catalano Fish in Eli's Manhattan and the Vinegar Factory; Rosedale; and Pisacane. In Bay Ridge, Brooklyn, look for the tails at Henry's Fish Market. But they are not available every day, so it pays to check.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2011
3:08 PM

Post #8690595

Something with a nice pork tenderloin I picked up the other day. Haven't gotten my brain around sides yet.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 13, 2011
3:11 PM

Post #8690599

1991 article

COLLECTIONS>JERSEY SHORE
Blowfish Are Making a Comeback
By LEO H. CARNEY
Published: June 16, 1991

Seems disappeared in 1970 only to return! forgive the length but maybe some would find interesting. The flesh delicious.

LIKE it or not, fishermen and marine scientists say, the blowfish, a voracious and mysterious predator that people love to eat, has returned to the back bays and rivers of the Jersey Shore after an absence of some 20 years.

Blowfish are "all over the place," said Lee Kruysman, the owner of Kaptain Krunch's Bait and Tackle Shop here, just a few blocks from Barnegat Bay. "They are big, and there are as many as you want."

The blowfish is known officially as the Northern puffer (Sphoeroides maculatus) because it can inflate itself and become almost spherical. The meat of the fish is often called sea squab.

The fish has an erratic history in the state. Researchers said in recent interviews that they did not know why the fish could be seemingly ubiquitous for several years, then disappear altogether for a decade or two.

Also, because of a paucity of local research, a debate over whether blowfish cause a decline in the catches of one of their favorite foods, the blue crab, is continuing. Turning Up in Crab Pot

"The old adage at the Shore is that when blowfish are up, crabs are down," said D. W. Bennett, an environmentalist and avid fisherman from Fair Haven. "I don't know if it's true or not."

Nevertheless, from Sandy Hook to Delaware Bay, blowfish have been turning up since last month in commercial crab pots and on the riggings of weekend anglers, who were perhaps hoping for flounder and other more fanciful catches. The newest run of blowfish is expected to last another month or so and possibly pick up in September for a couple of weeks, Mrs. Kruysman said.

Considered mainly a nuisance fish until its last disappearance, about 1970, the blowfish has been receiving a more enthusiastic welcome at the Shore this year than in the past, fishermen and retailers said. Middle-aged vacationers and Shore residents, perhaps recalling the comical fish from their childhoods, are paying up to $5.50 a pound for blowfish tails at fish markets and about $9 for a prepared blowfish platter at some restaurants, market owners said.

"When I was a kid, we would beat them off the side of the boat as we reeled them in," said Richard Hook, the proprietor of the Double Creek Fishery here. Mr. Hook interrupted the cleaning of a single catch of 130 blowfish to reminisce about the creature's strange comings and goings.

missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 13, 2011
3:17 PM

Post #8690605

Meezer
The redt pepper jelly here is GREAT GREAT on pork. And (sounds bad) roasted pork sliced about 1/2 inch thick - roasted or grilled with nothing but a wee bit of salt and pepper. ..sliced hot and spread with a thin layer of plain cream cheese (cold) and topped with some of the red pepper jelly is to die for.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2011
4:07 PM

Post #8690676

Sounds good, I have some yummy pepper jelly...but the pork has already turned into a stir fry...! Gonna keep that in mind though as I bought two large loins and hardly made a dent for this meal.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2011
4:12 PM

Post #8690683

That sounds very yummy. We're bbq'ing a pork chop tonight but don't have any cream cheese. Durn!! There's a balsamic/raspberry sauce that's pretty good on grilled pork too. Warm the sauce and spoon on just as serving. I could see cream cheese as an option here too. ^_^

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2011
4:16 PM

Post #8690688

I also have some of Penzey's Raspberry Enlightenment which goes well with just about everything.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 13, 2011
5:55 PM

Post #8690873

oui! I Googled your Penzey's, it would be good if I could find it locally, they had several items that looked interesting. Bookmarked it for later.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 13, 2011
6:25 PM

Post #8690912

Making this for tomorrow...Greek pasta salad and grilled lemon-rosemary chicken thighs.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 13, 2011
7:05 PM

Post #8690991

You can mail order from them. I love their stores, been shopping there for years and years. I get their catalog and about every other time there's a coupon for a free 1/2 c. or larger new item. Their ground pepper is fantastic. If you see something you like, check the shipping charges and if they are higher than a flat rate small box, tell me what you want and I'll be glad to pick it up for you.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 14, 2011
4:03 AM

Post #8691387

I'm going to Penzey's this weekend. Out of vanilla AGAIN. Bake sales and husband's work parties and Pelotonia bake sales, etc. I'm also low on a couple of spices, might as well pick them up while I'm there! For those of you who haven't tried Aleppo pepper, its fabulous.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2011
5:27 AM

Post #8691459

Aha! There are three stores in Arizona. I'll check it out. Thanks meezers, that was a nice that you offerred to ship. I found link to Locations and Arizona is listed.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2011
5:45 AM

Post #8691505

NP, I'm in there once a month at least. It's close to a World Market where I get coffee, and a used book store!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2011
7:49 AM

Post #8691735

Sounds like a perfect set up! The one I'll visit is close to Chili's Grill, where I like to lunch with The Girls.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 14, 2011
8:19 AM

Post #8691777

Chilis is dangerous for me. Utterly without nutrition, fat and calorie-bomb jalapenos and onion rings. I love them, for no good reason. They're horrible for me.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 14, 2011
8:26 AM

Post #8691790

I like the No-Guilt Chicken sandwich! ;-) but I may try one of those jalapeno bombs next time.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 14, 2011
9:29 AM

Post #8691908

[quote="meezersfive"]NP, I'm in there once a month at least. It's close to a World Market where I get coffee, and a used book store! [/quote]

Lucky, lucky girl!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2011
10:13 AM

Post #8691983

Except for the fact that by the time I get out of that parking lot, my wallet has been seriously damaged. Although I am learning, take cash in to the shop, leave purse and credit/debit cards behind. Self limiting measures!!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2011
10:14 AM

Post #8691986

Missing, maybe I don't know this kind of blowfish?

We don't have Penzey's but within two miles of our home we have Whole foods, Fresh Mkt., Trader Joe's and Costco. The Kroger grocery chain put a Murray's cheese shop http://www.murrayscheese.com/ in its store down the street from our house. One of four in Atlanta. Costco has a prime meat selection and we have a prime meat butcher shop within blocks. There are at least a half dozen European-style artisinal bakeries within this radius. All these options and our international market with amazing fish has put a damper on our restaurant forays. Basic restaurant food seems lackluster with so many other choices. After several shopping trips during the early days of Trader Joe's I only go there for some of the wines. Pre-packaged mixes and pre-made foods are handy, as well as tasty, but not our style of cooking or eating.

We'll be eating a salad platter topped with artichokes, cold roasted beets (garden), fresh mozz and griddled chicken breast.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2011
10:16 AM

Post #8691992

I forgot...we also have World Market but it's much more fun to go to San Fransisco and shop the mother store. lol I love their card selection, especially for girlfriend cards.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 14, 2011
10:19 AM

Post #8691998

Bought a ginormous package of brats, and some Italian sausage and I'm throwing them on the grill now, so as to avoid the heat wave later in the day. I love grilled food but I hate standing in the hot sun to make it. What we don't eat tonight will go in the freezer for later consumption. Grilling is one "manly" task that my DH has avoided like the plague. When I was setting up the charcoal, I commented "I hate cooking outside". And he said "me too" and I said, "Whenever did you cook outside?" He grinned and said "Never." Come to think of it, he's never cooked INSIDE either.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 14, 2011
10:51 AM

Post #8692049

Meezer Grin. I like him already. a good sense of humor.


Laurel you are in a great place. My son heading down there for a James Taylor concert this weekend. My neice lives in Dacula.

We have great shops close too (not so much the bakeries however and slim pickings for a 'butcher') but not within as small a radius as you. Costco is 15 - 25 min depending on the direction we head. Trader Joes about 20'. Ditto Whole Foods which bought our beloved WellSpring Grocery. We do have A Southern Season which is a huge specialty food/kitchen/wine store (cooking classes by local chefs, guest chefs, international chefs, ethnic cooking, medical dieticians, etc. -- how to make doggie treat instructions, kids classes, pizza making, care and choice of knife, abcs wine, etc.) and a restaurant and other smaller specialty foods in Raleigh (Simple Pleasures) etc. More and more we are getting award winning restaurants and chefs - lots of Farm to Table offerings. ($$$ whoo wheeee those are expensive) Of course the farmers offer seasonal U PICK YER OWN fruits and Veggies and I am fortunate that I have at a minimum 4 great great active bustling weekend farmers markets and 3 huge formal farmer's markets that offer not just the ususal fare but great meat and baked items.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 14, 2011
4:17 PM

Post #8692586

Missing, he's right down the street from me at Chastain Park. lol But I am at Maypop now. We can actually hear the acoustics with the louder concerts. We try to make a few concerts each year. For years we had a season's ticket dinner table. It's a great venue. Bet he has a great time. As for your location, it's the only area I have always been willing to consider relocating to. Somewhere between Hillsborough and Raleigh/Durham.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 14, 2011
5:52 PM

Post #8692737

I think it will be kind to us in retirement (but we have been here for many many years) which is not real far on the horizon -- not up against it but not too far. Aside from the foodie perks and access, we have a stong arts community with shows and galleries, studio tours/art walks and sales, and the competition keeps it affordable. It's the many universities that bring new neighbors to the community and stong medical presence to and education opportunities for retirees. Welcome Welcome should you decide to relocate!
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 14, 2011
7:34 PM

Post #8692974

Without any inspiration from here, I am stuck at toasted cheese sammie!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 15, 2011
12:34 AM

Post #8693363

I actually really like toasted cheese. I went through a phase of creating the ultimate grilled cheese a couple of years ago, I had them a couple times a week.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 15, 2011
4:26 AM

Post #8693477

Me too! Slip a nice slice or two of tomato in there, and use a couple of different kinds of cheese/bread and that's tops in my book any time!
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 15, 2011
5:10 AM

Post #8693520

Oh, I will have to give those variations a try!!!!!!!!! Thank you!!!!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 15, 2011
6:22 AM

Post #8693624

My personal favorite, in the "fancy" category was whole wheat bread with cream cheese, sliced tomato, thinly sliced red onion and cucumber, alfalfa sprouts and smoky provolone. In the "regular old grilled cheese" it was sourdough with sharp white cheddar, smoked orange cheddar, and tomato. With tomato basil soup, of course.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2011
7:35 AM

Post #8693734

I want that for breakfast!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 15, 2011
7:48 AM

Post #8693757

Oh yum. We had big honkin' steaks last night. (Our younger son's 23rd birthday, and the boy wanted BEEF and potatoes.) And turtle cake. Which turned into a rescue mission (save the turtle!) before all was said and done.

Never trust any of my menfolk to frost your cakes. That's all I'm sayin'

Tonight is probably chicken fajitas because I have the fixings here and they need to be eaten up ASAP.

Tomorrow night is another b'day celebration: my MIL and our oldest son's birthdays are back-to-back. So we're planning a cookout for family here. Not quite sure of the menu yet (the birthday boy and girl haven't told me what their cake preference(s) is/are), but I'm thinking of burgers, brats, maybe some chicken and the typical side salads - potato, pasta, etc. It's a "hearty-eater" crowd with some teenage boys and my two 20-somethings, so I just need to have LOTS of food for them.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2011
8:11 AM

Post #8693786

I'm making a garlicky sautéed swiss chard with shrimp tonight.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2011
8:28 AM

Post #8693825

I'm making garlicy kale w/mushroom & onion omelet. With fresh tomato on the side

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 15, 2011
8:30 AM

Post #8693829

That sounds good. Makes me want piadina and not omelet, though. lol

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2011
8:44 AM

Post #8693855

I'm always learning here! Didn't know what piadina is so I just checked. I have fresh eggs from my girls that I need to use so I have omelets quite often. I find eating what we produce has wonderful benefits but my diet is in large part dictated by what's on hand and coming in fast.

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 15, 2011
8:46 AM

Post #8693860

[quote="Tammy"]I'm always learning here! Didn't know what piadina is so I just checked. I have fresh eggs from my girls that I need to use so I have omelets quite often. I find eating what we produce has wonderful benefits but my diet is in large part dictated by what's on hand and coming in fast.

Tam[/quote]

Me, too on the piadina.

Good on you for eating primarily what you raise and grow. We should all be doing more of that :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2011
9:06 AM

Post #8693897

I'm so glad I bought the freezer last year. I've put up 7 pints of green beans already.
Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2011
12:22 PM

Post #8694205

We bought a freezer for Maypop 's basement years ago. It was filled each year, for two or three years, with garden goodies. Several years later we realized we were running the freezer but not eating the food. Our growing season is sooo long there were not enough meals in the year to eat all the food I could put up. That was with six people in the house. We now can and freeze some, eat tons and give the rest to a community food pantry in Atlanta.

I need to do something with tomatoes. There is a request for tomato pie for dinner. I've got a gelatinous brew of hock "jus" waiting for some collard greens. There's okra to fry or fritter. Might be back with a photo later.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 15, 2011
1:04 PM

Post #8694267

I have a farmer down the road who has free range chickens and I pick up eggs from him for $1.50 a dozen, the sizes are varied but who cares when they are fresh.

I haven't a clue what's for dinner, I brought home ginormous ham and cheese subs after golf, so doubt either one of us are up for a big meal. And besides it's hot. Not A/C hot, doors are open but too hot to eat or prepare hot food. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

July 15, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8694620

the omelets were terrific. Shallots, onion, kale & eggs from the property. Mushrooms, milk & spices were store bought.

Laurel - It really helped to cook all those meals for my dad to help use the produce from the freezer. But I can see how it could be a problem. We focussed on eating from the freezer before the garden started producing and did pretty well!

Tam
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 15, 2011
5:14 PM

Post #8694643

Learning learning = piadina

In Canada, I learned about poutine.

Now - how many know what THAT is without cheating? - and how many have tried it? - and how many LIKE it!????

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2011
5:18 PM

Post #8694662

I know poutine without looking. Does it count that I've never eaten it? We don't have those cheese curds that are popular up yonder. lol.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 15, 2011
5:30 PM

Post #8694697

I knew poutine. It look a little like fries that someone threw up, but the meat-eaters seem to love it.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 15, 2011
5:43 PM

Post #8694723

I knew poutine too, but only because I hang out on a cheese forum. ^_^
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 15, 2011
5:53 PM

Post #8694746

Obviously, you all have the knowledge - but maybe we will still score a taste tester!!!!!!!!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 15, 2011
6:28 PM

Post #8694829

They've started serving poutine at our ball park this year. I had it in Canada when I took the drive around Lake Superior. I thought it was brilliant!! LOL Haven't had it since though. Probably enough fat in there to clog up my entire system.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 15, 2011
6:48 PM

Post #8694875

I've never had a cheese curd. Does it come in a fat free version like a giant cottage cheese curd? Probably not or it wouldn't get such raves.

Celene, you should be a food writer with that description. Come to think of it the meat eater might take issue with the aspersions. lol

Tomato pie is still cooking.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 15, 2011
7:45 PM

Post #8695038

I don't know if they have a low or no fat version of cheese curds.
They squeak when you bite them.

Dinner was a banana split. Too hot to cook.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 15, 2011
7:52 PM

Post #8695061

Exhausting day with 2 year old ...wore me slap out babysitting. Had the salmon filets and too tired to make as I planned... ( ie; in the daylight on the grill) Not wanting to waste and wanting to cook fresh...and so...poached in some tomato basil soup, a little chicken broth, a little fresh lemon slices, sautéed sweet red pepper added ( did those first in the pan in butter ) seasoned the broth with some dill, tarragon, and celery seed... When almost done...added a wee bit of wine and fresh grated parm... And let it all complete. It was pretty darn good for canned ingredients. Nice flavorful broth
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 15, 2011
9:45 PM

Post #8695189

meezers5 - gets the taste test award!!!!!!!!!!!

'Twas so funny when I asked the Canadian waiter what that item was on the menu. Of course, he thought me to be a tad unwrapped!!!!!! LOL Kind of like not knowing what "Vegemite" is when in Australia!!!!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 15, 2011
10:41 PM

Post #8695228

Vegemite and marmite, ugh. I got fooled with marmite in England, they asked me if I wanted it, I thought it'd be good, like marmalade. More like scrapings from an aquarium filter, lol.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 16, 2011
5:42 AM

Post #8695420

Oh, I know I had the same thing happen to me, being somewhat adventurous in food, I had to try both of them, in the UK and in Oz. Oh the grossness, I still can bring up sense memory of that awful stuff. And Shandy, in England, another queasemaking taste, in addition to being the odd combination of drinks, it's not chilled, adding to the ewwwwwww factor.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 16, 2011
5:47 AM

Post #8695422

I had a shandy, it was chilled, and not bad. Though I'd prefer a snakebite.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 16, 2011
5:55 PM

Post #8696521

Tomato pie from last night.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 16, 2011
5:59 PM

Post #8696527

I make pan sauteed okra in olive oil and garlic. The okra cooks for just a few minutes until it colors, I toss it in garlic and cook and cook it a minute or two more and it's done. See...not gooey at all. We use leftovers on salad. It still has a bit of crunch.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 16, 2011
5:59 PM

Post #8696529

It looks great, can't wait for our own ripe tomatos.

We had stuffed flounder, baked sweet potatoes,fresh Italian beans, salad with our lettuce no fat cottage cheese and Tennessee tomatos...
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 16, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8696531

Thank's Meezers. Hope your tomatoes come in soon to. We are officially drowning in tomatoes. I need to start canning. I got a food mill attachment for the mixer I was given during the holidays.

There were yellow collards with jalapenos too.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 16, 2011
6:50 PM

Post #8696617

I've seen collards in some of our supermarkets, inner city mostly but I've never prepared them. Are they similar to spinach and chard? I grow both. How do you prepare them?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 16, 2011
7:18 PM

Post #8696656

When you get cold weather ones they are very tender. You strip the leaves away from the main stalk and roll them up and slice into ribbons 1"-2" wide. You can saute them in olive oil with garlic or in peanut oil and add soy sauce near the end for an Asian flair. When young they don't need long cooking. However, older leaves or summer grown collards generally require long, slow cooking. In that case they are cooked long and slow in water with something smokey. Traditionally it was a meaty ham hock but smoked turkey legs or wings work great too. They may take a few hours to get tender. They are served with the liquid, called potlikker, and topped with hot sauce according to taste. Corn bread is often served for dunking in the potlikker. The leaves are more sturdy than spinach or chard. When I make up an extra good batch I can't stop eating bowlfuls at all times of day, much to the detriment of my innards.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 17, 2011
3:40 AM

Post #8697093

We had chuck steak marinated in worcestershire sauce, red wine and garlic along with tiny new potatoes from our first barrel and string beans from our garden, both collected shortly before dinner. We don't have any ripe tomatoes yet, except for the currant variety which are just good for snacking, but I'd like to try that tomato pie when we do.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 17, 2011
5:06 AM

Post #8697177

[quote="MaypopLaurel"]Tomato pie from last night.[/quote]

yum!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 17, 2011
5:11 AM

Post #8697181

We had a crowd here last night for my mother-in-law's birthday (and our oldest son's which is today.)

There were our three kids, plus my SILs two high school boys and one of their friends. Big eaters, all of them. They devoured a platter of burgers and brats, along with watermelon wedges, baked beans, potato salad, chips and dip, and made some pretty good inroads on two cakes (red velvet and a yellow butter with a cream filling and chocolate frosting - I didn't mean for it to, but it wound up tasting a bit like a Boston cream pie.)

Swimmer Girl heads off for a week of work in Joplin MO (youth group helping with storm damaged homes), so dinners this week will probably be light, but won't have to fit in around her swim schedule. According to the calendar, summer is fading fast, although the thermometer says otherwise :-)

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2011
5:49 AM

Post #8697215

Terry, I'm so envious of your large, local family. Even when you are an empty nester it sounds like you will have a full house. Our boys work weird schedules and our daughter lives in D.C.. They visit as often as possible which is not often enough for us. Boohoo.

I made a veggie stuffing casserole and kitchen sink salad last night. The stuffing casserole has eggs and cheese so no need for meat.

Today is a travel day. We'll have frozen pre-made (but not cooked) fish cakes and left over salad with mozz and tomatoes for dinner. I've got a three cheese bread that never got eaten. It will make yummy croutons.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 17, 2011
6:06 AM

Post #8697254

I have small cubed taters in the oven with scallions and spices tossed in a little oil...when done I'll add the eggs for a breakfast casserole and top with a little sour cream. No meat. Let the whining begin.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8697276

Perfect missing...I've been wondering what to do with a few fingerling potatoes left over from a potato salad fix up last week. That sounds like the perfect use. That's breakfast - dinner will be chicken won-ton soup.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 17, 2011
7:42 AM

Post #8697362

For supper I plan to sauté some squash blossoms, cherry tomatoes and garden herbs, then add eggs for a fritatta.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
7:52 AM

Post #8697370

I found gorgeous oyster mushrooms and garlic quark at the farm market, so we'll have crostata with quark and sauteed mushrooms, a salad, and some fruit. I have soap/lotion/candle work to do before I go back to my day job tomorrow!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 17, 2011
8:57 AM

Post #8697509

Mary, have you tried a warm German potato salad, with a vinegary dressing? It's great with fingerlings. I grew them once, and usually just buy them when we are I am in a mood for that salad :-)

Laurel, we are stretched out, too - I know what you mean. Only one of my husband's siblings is nearby; the other two work pipeline construction, so they and their families are often in farflung places like Nevada and Pennsylvania. Adult niece and nephew are geographically close but have families and jobs that keep them busy. My parents are in Kansas and my brother is in Colorado, so unfortunately we don't get impromptu time or meals with them either :-(

Both our sons have or are attending MTSU here in town. (One graduated a couple years ago, the other is GOING to graduate someday soon - we think and hope :-) and it is really nice to have them nearby (or still living at home as the case may be...but we know that may not always be the case. Careers and families can change your location on a dime, as we can attest first-hand. We just enjoy their proximity while it lasts..

Swimmer Girl currently has her sights set on Charleston for school, and she has plans for med school, so there's no telling where she'll wind up getting accepted if she continues down this path. Given her roots (and her inborn dislike of cold weather), chances are good she'll end up settling in somewhere in the South but probably not here in the 'boro.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
9:02 AM

Post #8697520

I love warm potato salad, or Italian style with lemon juice, olive oil, parsley, salt and pepper. So fresh and delicious. Maybe it's a bit of dislike for mayo...
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2011
11:19 AM

Post #8697815

I think the warm German potato salad has bacon as a main ingredient and we don't do bacon...much. ;-)

Edited to say the breakfast of baked fingerlings and scrambled eggs, with jalapenos, scallions, cayenne, black pepper, little salt...was excellent. Sliced garden tom on top, dusted with grated jalapeno cheddar and broiled for a few minutes. Ummm ummm good. Thanks missingrosie.

This message was edited Jul 17, 2011 11:21 AM

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 17, 2011
11:40 AM

Post #8697855

We like the sweet sour of the german dressing, but I cheat and only use two slices of bacon. We buy a nice smoky bacon from up north, and it has a lot of flavor so I can get away with a lot less, and drain off all the grease.

Did any one else's parent have a can of saved bacon grease on the stove?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 17, 2011
11:42 AM

Post #8697860

Meezers, I often have a Pyrex custard cup full of it even today!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 17, 2011
11:51 AM

Post #8697879

I have a small glass yogurt container that I brought back from the hotel in Versailles for that very purpose.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 17, 2011
12:20 PM

Post #8697928

I keep a can of it bacon grease on my stove, lol... Being from the south,. I would not dare try to cook decent collards or other greens without it.. Supper tonight is what's left of the tomato pie we had for dinner today.. Yummy...

Larkie
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 17, 2011
12:45 PM

Post #8697952

I have a plastic potato salad container from a hundred yrs ago. I keep it on freezer door. Add as I go and when full, I pop it out frozen into the trash.

Tonight - grilled rib eye and deviled eggs. Sweet corn and Lima bean. Dish of ice cream. At least that is the plan.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
12:53 PM

Post #8697956

You can all hate me, but I used to throw out my mother's bacon grease. She had heart disease, and it couldn't be a condiment for her. And she would let it turn to a rancid horrible stinky fatty mess. I could always tell if she hid her little grease can, I could smell it and I'd look till I found it and throw it away. It's a taste I just can't appreciate.

Laurel, I got some okra today and I'm going to try frying it. If it turns to horrifying vegetable mucus, I am blaming you, lol. I'm dry frying it with garam masala and onions.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2011
1:13 PM

Post #8697975

Speaking of southern cooking and bacon grease, eating while a guest at my MIL's home in Alabama was quite a duel between us. She likes nothing healthy, lots of pre-packaged fare and *everything* fried in bacon grease - until well past well done.

Last time we visited it was for 5-days and at one point she called her other son and told him I was trying to poisen her...I had made thick pork chops slathered in mustard and broiled, served still moist in the center. She couldn't do it but that was one of my best meals ever. Fresh salad, fresh veggie. All her veggies come out of the can and are cooked until well past well done...oops, I think I said that already.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8697991

My mother was that way...so many foods I thought I hated, and what I hated was how she cooked them. Two bags of french green beans cooked in the crock pot over night with a lb. of bacon sliced into bits. Or collards done the same way, or broccoli. Army green sludge the next day. I am not sure what she did to rice, but it was so bad I wouldn't let it cross my lips again till I was 30. And the legendary "creamy chicken sandwiches"--put 1 tall can of Swanson's chicken in the crock pot, one can cream of mushroom soup, one can cream of celery soup, and let it cook from morning till dinner time, and scoop it out on buns.

So many southern foods were so delicious, though--I love good fluffy biscuits, and I've been piddling around with my sweet potato pie recipe my whole adult life to come up with one as good as our neighbor Tressie's. Hers was a family secret so she didn't want to give it up. I never had plain baked sweet potatoes till I lived there, which I love. Let's not forget pimento cheese or mac and cheese, I can embarrass myself with those, too.

I learned to cook as a self-defense mechanism. At least Mom knew she wasn't a good cook and let me try my hand at it.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 17, 2011
1:47 PM

Post #8698018

My mother wasn't much of a cook; she tended towards steak, potatoes and salad, and brisket was about as fancy as she ever got. When I went off to college and had an apartment I taught myself to cook, first figuring out how to replicate my grandmother's stuffed cabbage and her Hungarian chicken with peppers and onions. I loved her cooking but she died when I was 11, so I never learned from her. An aunt finally tipped me off that the secret ingredient to Nanny's stuffed cabbage was sour salt (citric acid) to add that touch of tartness. I also found a great recipe for fish chowder in a cookbook at the Eighth Street Bookstore in the Village; I had been reading Moby Dick and they were always eating it, so I really wanted some. I made it (an all-day process) for my then-boyfriend, now DH, when he came to visit with a friend, and was very indignant when the friend just assumed that it had come from a can!

Tonight we are having Mahogany Chicken from the Williams-Sonoma grill cookbook, on the Big Green Egg, along with garden fresh cantaloupe (a friend's, since mine isn't ready yet), a cucumber and tomato salad (our cucumbers, her tomatoes), and baked beans.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 17, 2011
2:11 PM

Post #8698050

Mary, please don't judge all southern cooks or cooking by that regrettable visit. We have some wonderful food and some terrible food, just like everybody else :-)
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2011
2:19 PM

Post #8698058

Oh I know Terry, she's 86 years and loves to cook for "her two boys" (67 and 62!!)! She's moved into assisted living this year so we won't have to go through that again. When I'm traveling, I'm real careful about what I'm eating, unfortunately she was deeply hurt over my wanting to cook and I'm sorry for that...but an upset stomach on a long plane trip, is just not a good idea.

Back on topic, I need some help with my won ton soup, the request is in a new thread about substituting tomato base for chicken stock. Heeelllllppppp please.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

July 17, 2011
2:41 PM

Post #8698093

Having traveled quite a bit throughout my life, I can honestly say I've had some fantastic southern cooking and some that were barely edible. I do love the flavor of bacon so adding a dab to a spinach dish to to home fries isn't beyond me. I couldn't leave it out on the range though. And food peculiarities are not confined to our parents or grandparents. My daughter stopped by one evening just in time for yummy pork chops that I had saute'd and simmered for an hour, with shallots and mushrooms and garlic and they were to die for. She refused to eat one because, even though it was thoroughly cooked, it was pink in the middle. I told her that there hasn't been a case of trichinosis in the USA since the late 40s but she could not get it past her lips. ( I just shook my head, and thought, "more for us".)
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 17, 2011
2:48 PM

Post #8698103

[quote="Larkie"]I keep a can of it bacon grease on my stove, lol...
Larkie[/quote]

That was totally the way of life when I was growing up!!!!!!!!!! I miss that, now!!!! Of course, I don't consume enough bacon to collect anything; but I do find the Bacon Salt product to help immensely in getting that long ago marvelous taste!!!!!

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8698115

Oh my gosh, so many posts and everyone is in rare form today! I was cracking up all the way down the line ('cept I had a tear well up when I read Terry's post).

Terry, as much as I love family and friends at our table, we are reaching an age where many of ours are no longer here to join us. As much as I miss our children I can call them everyday. I'm not going to wax poetic here. Suffice to say bask in the glow of friends and family gathering for any occasion that involves food. For some reason food related events build memories.

Darius, your dinner sounds amazing and right up our alley.

Mary, German potato salad does involve bacon but you can substitute smoked turkey.

Celene, I've never heard of these quarks with things in them. What I know as quark is like a liquid yogurt drink. As for the okra, just have a light hand on the cooking. Fast. If you overcook it there is no turning back unless you have photos to mount in your scrapbook. lol

I never had bacon or its grease until I left home. Bubby (Grandma) kept a Maxwell House can on the pilot light of the stove with schmaltz. It was used to cook with, bake with and as a spread on bread instead of butter. Since Jewish people were not allowed to own land in Europe they could not have cows. Butter was a rare luxury. Everyone had chickens and so that was the cultural fat of choice. I grew up next door to Bubby and her one pot, chicken fat laden cooking and then a post WW II, nutritionist/chef mom who used lots of butter in her classic fare but resorted to oleo/margarine to be a thoroughly modern American as well.

GH, we had a guest at our RU who is originally from Hungary. She drove many hours to join us from Augusta and brought boodles of strudles. She cooks three days a week in a Church kitchen. I enjoyed talking to her about how she had to learn southern cooking and how she tries to combine her roots in her food. She cooks mainly for southern seniors and tries to make healthy meals. They tell her her sauteed veggies are raw and she must come from up north. lol She did a major cook book clean out and brought the books to our house to share with the RU crew. They were in a beautiful wooden crate which she left. I didn't want to be greedy and only took a few of the books, many regional church and civic books, but no one else took any. She left the whole crate at my house. She lived in Ohio for years and so there are really cool mid western and Amish books as well. DG people never cease to amaze me.
Laurel

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
3:24 PM

Post #8698167

The fried okra was pretty good. I hate to admit it, but I ate okra and liked it. I cut the slices in half, and fried them in a little oil in a nonstick pan, then turned them for about five seconds with some garam masala, broth, cilantro leaf, and broken cooked vermicelli. This wasn't a meal, this was a test dish, and it was pretty good. I think I want something to up the heat with it, and maybe add cumin next time.

The quark here is German-style, it's somewhere between goat and cream cheese in texture. http://www.bluejacketdairy.com/cheesefolder/quark.html is where I get it. The plain is really nice with some angel hair pasta and garlic scapes.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

July 17, 2011
3:31 PM

Post #8698179

Quark: the stuff I learn from you people! Gonna look for this.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2011
3:39 PM

Post #8698187

We had two German nannies over the course of child rearing and they were quark freaks. I had to drive across the city to find it. It looked like slightly thicker kifer or thinner yogurt. They drank it for bkfst.

Mary, it's a cultured milk only with slightly different bacteria than yogurt.
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 17, 2011
4:10 PM

Post #8698239

Celene - I know you didn't mean for it to be funny but your description of your mom's food was hilarious. Well you have to understand the bad and the ugly before you can appreciate the good!

We had a jewish neighbor in our brooklyn neighborhood. Kaye...she made us periogi and fried dough that was sweetened. Very exotic ;0)
She put chicken fat on her daughter's beautiful shimmering blond curls during the wash cycle. I asked my mom if I could do it -- Blond was so wonderful to me -- she said "No, we are Italian and Italians use olive oil! No kidding!

Ps there is a cookbook... The Brooklyn cookbook and it has receipes from a few neighborhoods and ' famous' neighborhood eateries. All kinds of ethnic receipes. All the aunts and grandma's secrets.

This message was edited Jul 17, 2011 7:11 PM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8698357

We have to laugh at my mother's cooking, because you sure couldn't eat it. I remember my father asking if she used a cookbook. THAT was the wrong question, for sure.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8698358

Missing, the fried dough is known as sufganiyot or sufganyiyah. It's been glorified to look like doughnuts but the real thing is more dense and simple. It is especially eaten during Hanukkah when fried foods are part of the food tradition.

I remember my Bubby hanging out with a pile of chicken fat in her hair(s). There was timing involved before it could be washed out otherwise it wouldn't do its magic. You could count the hairs on her head at this point in her life. I'd help her apply it with a fat tongue depressor. The Maxwell House can had to go in the fridge for a while to get the fat to seize up. I'd be dieing thinking a friend might roller skate or bike over to our duplex and see Bubby, who lived next door, sitting outside in her lawn chair in a zip-up-the-front, flowered muumuu, reading her Yiddish paper with an almost bald head full of chicken fat. That and her rolling down 'round the ankles thigh highs and lace up the side black space shoes for bunions. Oy! I was so happy to be a modern American child and use olive oil like my Italian friends or mayonnaise which we heard was all the rage in France. Thank goodness Mom stopped torturing me with Toni home perms and those pink rods. I was so glad to move into modern times where I could style my hair with frozen orange juice cans. lol

This message was edited Jul 17, 2011 6:59 PM

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
5:02 PM

Post #8698362

I wasn't the only kid tortured with orange juice cans? Did you squish Dippity-Do on your hair first? Furthering my theory that I'm an alien baby, I have fine, thin, poker-straight reddish hair. The rest of my family..."Dago dark brown", thick, coarse curly hair. Nothing made it curl, in the late 70's when the big loose curls were popular. Mom wanted me to look like some woman on a soap, I forget her name, but she had flowing dark curls and Mom taped her photo to my mirror. A reminder of what my hair would never, ever look like, lol.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2011
5:34 PM

Post #8698409

I did and it was self imposed. To be truthful to "Hair, Not The Musical" we had a laundry/ironing maid, who came to work before I left for school every day. I had career parents. There were people who worked for us that did what regular parents (mostly moms) do. When I was in middle school Thelma was kind enough to set up the ironing board and iron my hair so I looked like Cher before I went off every morning. She almost scorched my forehead, ironing my bangs, on several occasions. I am blonde(ish) and have a ton of very fine hair. Not curly, just frizzy. In south Florida's humidity it lasted about five seconds I'm sure.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
5:49 PM

Post #8698452

My hair looks perfectly ironed every single day. lol

I made another test batch of rhubarb chutney, there is something I just can't get right. I think I need something acidic, that isn't vinegar. Lemon juice, blah. Sourer peaches, meh. Apricots or plums, meh. I may try orange juice.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

July 17, 2011
6:04 PM

Post #8698483

That Mahogany Chicken was really good. It involved simmering molasses, cider vinegar, a bit of oil and worcestershire sauce, whole Dijon mustard, orange juice, and orange zest together for about two minutes and then brushing it on the chicken as it cooked in the Egg over added hickory chips. Wonderful flavor! Son and two granddaughters were here for dinner, but oldest is still here because she isn't feeling good and would be coming over tomorrow anyway since everyone works in the family and I don't think kids should be left home alone all day...
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

July 17, 2011
6:55 PM

Post #8698577

The M chicken sounds great.
Celene you are braver than me with the okra...shudder...

I tried the cans and dippity doo in Fla...then came to learn the dippity worked just as well with hair 'wrapped' around the head to straighten...and easier to sleep without the cans.


What I can't figure out is why I have memories of those tiny pink rubbery "spoolies" ...my hair and Spoolies...nah not so much...but I sure remember them. Would have worked well on your hair Celene.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 17, 2011
7:11 PM

Post #8698587

Meezers, I was re-reading this thread and about the smokey bacon you get up north. What would be up north of you? The Arctic Circle? I'm envisioning you mushing off to the North Pole to buy a few slices of bacon for German potato salad. lol

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

July 17, 2011
7:12 PM

Post #8698588

Nothing but a perm made my hair curl. Shockingly, in that 80's kinda way, my hair did well with those stupid spiral perms. And the top of my dark hair was blonde, with a streak of a varying color in it, mostly electric blue, purple or teal.

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

July 17, 2011
9:31 PM

Post #8698717

My hair is baby fine and thin.. Since I was a baby, I have only used very thin socks or strips of old sheets to roll my hair, cause that's the way Mama did it.. Still works today at 55 years old, lol.. What a fright.. In my teen years I did the Dippity Do and cans and also the head wrap.. I always go back to the socks and rags, can wind tightly for super curly and not so tight for looser curls..No bacon grease needed..lol

Left over tomato pie is history...

Larkie

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


July 18, 2011
5:03 AM

Post #8698971

Time for a new thread - here's the link: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1197381/

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 18, 2011
5:03 AM

Post #8698973

Well, my sautéed squash blossoms were interesting in the egg mixture. If I do cook some blossoms again, I may stuff them with a cheese, lightly flour, and fry them alone.

I'm old enough that I missed the 'ironed hair' phase. My strawberry-blond hair is curly, and was just a wild frizzy mass in the Miami humidity. I do remember rag rollers with the wire inside, although they were useless in my unruly hair. Hah, I even remember having a 'duck tail' once in high school.


I came across a seasoning yesterday that sounds interesting... Uncle Roy's Flowers of Scotland.

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