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Accessible Gardening: Still Laughing For Joy #7

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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 18, 2011
11:59 PM

Post #8701052

OK There's a good chance I started a new thread.
Welcome everyone. Come join this group of people,Who never say quit.And firmly believe laughter is great medicine. At least it's better than crying tho we all do that sometimes too.
Anyway come talk to us.Any age,any affliction. Got a funny experience or story? Tell us. Want to cry? We'll listen.
Vickie
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 19, 2011
6:25 AM

Post #8701300

You did it just fine, Miss Vickie. :-)
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 19, 2011
9:09 AM

Post #8701613

Here's my story that may be funny a year from now. Yesterday the electricity went off around 10am. Thinking it was one of our normal summer blackouts I did nothing. Realized at about 6 pm that I'd neglected to pay the electric bill. They don't give a warning here - if it's not paid by the due date - sap. Last night was one of the hottest we've had this year and I didn't even have a fan. Hardly slept, sweated a lot. Because the electricity got turned off the bill has to be paid in Santa Rosalia 35 miles north of here. Tony is going to pay it. He said they took five days to restore the electricity of one of his neighbors so he will tell them I am very old and sick and I I really need it back on.. Meanwhile, the electricity of Neighbor Dana is still on so Tony thought to run a series of extension cords so I have my puter and a fan.

Since I spent most of the long, hot, sleepless night thinking I'm too stupid to live, all I need now are some "poo baby"s.

Have I mentioned what a help Tony is?

hugs, katie
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 19, 2011
12:07 PM

Post #8701938

Poor baby, Tony will take care of it for you. :-) (pat, pat on back, there, there)
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 19, 2011
12:41 PM

Post #8701997

Thank you. I needed that. kb.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 19, 2011
2:57 PM

Post #8702226

I wish I had the excuse of old age. I goofed us up with the water bill a few months ago. I thought I would be nice and picked up the mail at the end of the road so Papa Jim wouldn't have to walk out in the heat to get it. I even dropped it into one of my shopping bag so I didn't lose the index size card. I somehow forgot to put it on PJ's desk. Now, he insist I only get my own mail out of the box.
I recently read an article in a writer's magazine. A successful novelist (Can't remember who at the moment.) told the story of how he was dropping some mail off in an outdoor box on the way to his car. He dropped his keys in the box and didn't realize what he had done until he moved to insert the letter in the key hole. He said it wouldn't have been so bad going to the post office to get his keys back except he had done the same thing a few weeks before and the same person was working behind the desk at the post office.
Maybe, I could claim being a space cadet is a trait of highly creative people? A truly blond and very competent friend threatens to do me bodily harm if I say I'm having a blond moment ever again.
Stay cool and don't beat yourself up, Kb. S...Stuff happens. :-)
If PJ thinks the CanDo Garden is pinked out now, wait until he sees it next May. The pink rose you sent Amargia, Debra, is about 8' tall. It loves its spot. We've started a cutting for you. ~Nadine~
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 19, 2011
3:41 PM

Post #8702343

Tony told them I was old and infirm and they turned the electricity back on within the hour.

He called later to be sure all was OK and I told him (again) to come in late tomorrow and pick up orange juice on his way out here.

I'm trying to stay awake until early evening so I don't wake up in the middle of the might. Also must get the dogs fed before I crash.

Tony and I have both worked on encouraging the other not to sweat mistakes. Over the years we've bult up a good ability not to waste time on recriminations.

The air conditioner is on in my bedroom and it's not going to take me long to get to sleep once I lie down.

hugs, katie
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 19, 2011
7:46 PM

Post #8702778

Thank you, Nadine. That will be fun. :-)

Yea, Tony!!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2011
3:25 PM

Post #8704416

Wait, Katie, the same neighbor with whom you were feuding last year? Yikes. When one is desperate, one is desperate.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 20, 2011
3:30 PM

Post #8704422

They are in Washington for the summer. And we weren't feuding - they are too insesative to feud with. kb

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 20, 2011
4:13 PM

Post #8704492

lol!!!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2011
2:18 AM

Post #8705450

Glad you got your tricity back on ASAP.Afraid I'd have to go stay in the creek without tricity.
Glad your neighbors are out of country and you can get some peace and quiet.I see i'm not alone getting my days and nights turned around.
I can't seem to do anything but sleep the last couple of days.
I can play the lil ole lady to the hilt.Tho doctors seem to think that, when i'm serious.
Thats ok, My dogs think I'm smart. My cats don't think any human has one brain cell.
I am getting nowhere sorting things to do away with.It'd be good if i just bagged everything as i find it but i put things in piles of this stays and this goes. When I,m thru I look at it and decide i can't really do with out it. I have got another box ready to go out the door tho.
Nadene, I do feel for you. Have done the same thing with DD,s mail. Now i leave it in the car and they check my car. It's a mile to our mail box.
I had a tomato sandwich last night from my own potted tomatoes.Gonna have to have more pots and more plants next year.
Vickie
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 21, 2011
9:01 AM

Post #8705944

Vickie, it may well have been Sasquatch. He IS a mischievous sort of soul, I think. :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 21, 2011
5:23 PM

Post #8707149

http://www.highcountrygardens.com/library/view/article/330/

An article about scented gardens!
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 22, 2011
10:31 AM

Post #8708638

Squatch can be BAD! He got me into trouble yesterday. He checked out a library book using PJ’s card and forgot to return the book to the library PJ thinks it was me because one of the books was Phoenix. I know it was Squatch wanting to catch up on the doings of his mythical kin, but I didn’t rat on him to Papa Jim. Squatch checked the books out in MARCH so the fine was outrageous! I told the librarian about Squatch and how he was a slow reader. She cut me some slack by letting me work the fine off. (Although, she asked me to tell you that you should get Squatch his own library card, Vort, and teach him social responsibility. She was impressed that he had taken such good care of the book and thinks he’s ready for his own card. Vickie must be a good influence.) So, I’m “Story Lady” during children’s hour at the library once a week until I work the fine off. Vort, you can tell Squatch he can pay me back in Choc. Basil.
I harvested lots of cukes from my own planter box today. I will never plant ‘Straight Eight’ in a planter again though. The vines grew up and over the hog wire fence attached to the back of the planter for them. Down the back to the ground and then, below ground level into the still roofless Stormroom. They are taking over the walls there by using the metal mesh meant to reinforce the concrete of the walls. MK says to let the cukes be. The vines aren’t damaging anything. (I’ll just have to remove the dead vines at the end of the season.) It is too hot for concrete work anyway. (The rule in concrete work seems to be the faster it cures the weaker the finished product is and, of course, we want the walls of the Stormroom to be as strong as possible.) PJ likes the arrangement. He can stand on the floor of the Stormroom and harvest the fruit without bending or stretching. Lol. I guess it is the Cucumber Room for the remainder of cukes season. ~Nadine~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 22, 2011
12:21 PM

Post #8708856

Nadine, sounds like a lovely arrangement to me. Serendipity. Did you know that the concrete deep inside the Hoover Dam is still curing? I didn't until I saw a Modern Marvels show. :-)
(I like cukes. :-)

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 22, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8708937

San--you know Squatch didn't do that. He's been totally tied up in Washington defending himself from the accusations that he is solely responsible for 3 wars, the national debt and rheumatism.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 22, 2011
1:50 PM

Post #8709043

Then, Squatch must have an evil twin. ~N~

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 22, 2011
5:25 PM

Post #8709442

Now you know.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 23, 2011
5:59 AM

Post #8710335

Vort, Who said Squatch was responsible for all that political stuff? "rheumatism????" Now there I'll come to Squatchs defence.He is totally apolitical and is innocent of any trashy stuff.Herumph!!! Herd Squatch to the Tarzan books.

I love cukes too.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

July 23, 2011
8:28 PM

Post #8711606

We were given a washer drum to turn into a planter that wasn’t uniformly rounded. There were two large indentations that were evidently part of the design of the washer. Kay was planning to fill the indentations with crete to give the planter a uniform look. But, she has such a backlog of concrete work to do, she asked Nadine to go ahead and paint it as is in a neutral color. That way it wouldn’t be uselessly taking up space. We could start using it in the utilitarian veggie garden until Kay has a chance to work on it.
I don’t think Nadine is capable of doing a straightforward paint job without putting some kind of artsy touch on it. This is how she painted the indentations. ROFL. (Jim)

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katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 23, 2011
9:06 PM

Post #8711686

That's funny. Do you have a couple of hands (or paws) that you can hang over the sides? kb

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 24, 2011
6:09 PM

Post #8713146

Thank you for the link, Carrie. In addition to the article, they have two roses I’ve been looking for and some unique agastache. Also, a few fragrant plants I wasn’t even aware of.
I’m not going for all sweet and perfumey in the VI Garden. I can't imagine trying to keep a scent-based garden going if you limit yourself that much. Besides, in my opinion, you need sharp, resinous, culinary and even some bitter, acrid and sour scents to make things interesting. With the exception of those plants designed to attract beetles that have a smell like rotting flesh and those that smell sort of skunky. I’ll give anything aromatic a chance.
Sharp culinary scents dominate the garden at the moment. The scent-scape is being carried by rosemary, fennel, different basils and culinary sage Backed up by the slightly acrid scents of marigolds, maypops (Passiflora incarnata) and wild sage.
A like or dislike for a certain scent is so individual. My mother loved the acrid scent of marigolds. I enjoy the odd scent of Vitex negundo. It doesn’t have a common name I’m aware of, but Nadi has christened it the lemonpepper tree. Jim likes large waxleaf privet. I personally think it has a rodent-y smell under the sweetness, but Jim adored his pet ferret so he would have a pleasant association with that smell. It is said the emotional quality of a life experience links to any scents present and those links are hard to break. That, more than chemistry determines whether or not you like a scent. If a woman you detested wore a white ginger based perfume, it is unlikely you will ever enjoy the fragrance of white ginger. Although, you might not consciously understand why you dislike it. Your sense of smell is connected directly to the emotional, instinctive part of your brain, unlike any other of your senses there is an involuntary knee jerk response to scent. That’s interesting to me. This ability to bypass the higher critical brain functions is probably behind the success of aromatherapy.
Squatch is responsible for rheumatism? I’ve got a few choice words for him.
I like that show, Debra. Am I officially a geek now? lol. It might be contagious. Nadine just read a book that mentioned fractiles. Now, she is exploring the strange world of fractile geometry.
I think I have an inner ear infection. I never knew you could get dizzy while laying down. Believe me, you can. k*


Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 25, 2011
12:38 PM

Post #8714455

Kb, I'll check out the Halloween decorations and see what I find. :-) A cut tire retaining wall was built across the driveway that led to my Bee Corner and Kay's Kitchen Garden. The driveway was an erosion problem. We plan to plant the new wall with something tall. It will then be blocked off visually from the rest of the property. What this all means to me is I can cut loose and have fun with the Bee Corner. I see no reason utilitarian has to be boring.
I just finished reading "Altar of Eden" by James Rollins. I wouldn't recommend it to Squatch. The giant saber-tooth jaguar would probably give him nightmares. I'm still trying to get the connection the doctor in the book made between genetic structure and fractiles. Hopefully, it will sink in eventually. ~Nadine~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 25, 2011
5:32 PM

Post #8714997

My friend, Shelley, took this on the way to work today. Its in northern New Jersey

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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 26, 2011
11:09 AM

Post #8716393

Nadene, The doctor made have been referencing the repeating pattern in both genetics and fractals, You get the same repeating pattern in genetics and fractals.My favorite pattern in fractals is the edge of lakes. Microscopically you get the same pattern between a grain of sand and the edge of water and the whole lake and the edge of water.or a rock and edge of water.And you can build a mathmatical formula on it. The same with a genetic spiral and the building of a cell wall ,a spleen, or a whole human. We are basically a tube from mouth to anus with odds and ends of surrounding tissues.basically so is a cell. I probably did,nt "splain" that well.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 26, 2011
11:40 AM

Post #8716466

It paints a lovely picture. kb
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

July 26, 2011
2:10 PM

Post #8716725

Wow, sunflowers are gorgeous in mass.
I guess we could find Nadine her very own version of Ratty. He is Kay's favorite Halloween decoration. She refuses to allow Nadine to dismember him. :-).
That makes sense, Vickie. Endlessly repeating patterns. Larger and smaller. You see the same ones under a microscope and in the way galaxies arrange themselves.
Debra, here's one to bring your interest in space exploration and gardening together. They discovered roof moss grown in zero G forms precise patterns instead of the random way it grows in gravity. Seeds exposed to outer space grow ginormous fruit and vegetables when returned to Earth. China is even experimenting with that to feed their masses. I can just imagine the first outer space daylilies finding their way to your garden. lol. (Jim)

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lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 26, 2011
4:19 PM

Post #8716972

By all means, Ratty should stay intact.

Zero G makes cool stuff, don't it? I'd love to see a space-grown daylily. :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:32 PM

Post #8721581

OK folks, I dutifully went and took a lot of pictures today. The battery was wearing out or maybe it was the sun but I couldn't see ANYTHING so I pointed and shot with no idea if I was even pointing in the right direction.

A balloon flower.

This message was edited Jul 28, 2011 5:32 PM

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:36 PM

Post #8721594

Crocosmia 'Lucifer'

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:37 PM

Post #8721598

I think,,,

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8721601

Yup, above is coreopsis 'moonbeam' - anybody want some?

This message was edited Jul 28, 2011 5:38 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:40 PM

Post #8721605

sweet potato vine alone - very dull.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:43 PM

Post #8721610

Achilllea something or other from high country gardens.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:45 PM

Post #8721616

Maybe,,,

A sort of ok container. The problem with those plugs, Debra, is I don't have space to grow them out inside and they don't have time to grow out inside.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:48 PM

Post #8721622

I believe this is mother-of-thousands flowering, but it might just be the handle of the wheelbaarrow!

Oh, no, that's hydrangea Quickfire which we moved this spring (wrong time of year) and which is so much happier in the sunnier spot! We thought we woild be giving up blooms this year, but not hardly!

This message was edited Jul 28, 2011 5:50 PM

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katiebear
mulege
Mexico

July 28, 2011
3:51 PM

Post #8721631

Oh, Carrie, thanks for making me laugh. katie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:52 PM

Post #8721635

Then I believe THIS phallic looking item is the blooming succulent.

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:54 PM

Post #8721642

Yay, I got it right, and apparently I treated it right. I've never seen one bloom!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 28, 2011
3:55 PM

Post #8721645

Back to out regularly scheduled program which is WORKWORKWORK on this article article article!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

July 28, 2011
9:56 PM

Post #8722297

Thanks, Carrie, that should keep your bloom starved southern associates going for awhile. :-)
Some wildflowers are blooming well here. The Ohio spiderwort was blooming like crazy today. None of it on the Wildflower Slope where it is supposed to be, of course. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 29, 2011
4:38 PM

Post #8723936

Do you have signs for all your different spots? Is your spiderwort the same Transcendentia (sp?) I'm trying to grow here? We have some signs but some of the areas have changed since they were first named.
We have:
R.R. Carrie
Rose Boxes
Wall Garden
Coral Garden
Family Tree
as actual signs. Daylily Row, The Annex and The Iris Pie don't have signs. R.R. Carrie extension, the back garden room and The Shade Garden are all just fantasies at this point.

The Coral Garden was only supposed to have salmon and coral colored plants (pink and orange were OK too) but it gets way too much shade, and more every year. Somehow some lilac or lavender miniature monarda snuck in, and they get mildew every year, without fail.

article article article article write write write
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 29, 2011
5:48 PM

Post #8724058

Littletunia Petunia still gamely skipping on...

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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

July 30, 2011
10:52 PM

Post #8726712

I have a white petunia,pink petunia and lavender petunia,red zennia,yellow zennia,pink rosemoss,pink sedum,and one pink daylilly blooming.tomatos,and cukes did not do well at all.
Vickie

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 30, 2011
11:40 PM

Post #8726736

If I put up little signs identifying each garden area do you think the plants would be better about staying in their alotted places? LOL. It's a bit of a maze around here. That sounds like a fun idea.
The spiderwort I grow is the straight species Tradescantia ohiensis. I think it has some more refined relatives. Incredible blue and they bloom all year if you keep deadheading them. It is determined to grow along the irrigation trench no matter how many times I dig them up from there.
Sounds like I need some petunias, if they are blooming for you guys. My mother had the old-fashioned kind growing around the base of all our huge pecan trees. They didn't mind the high canopy shade. k*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 31, 2011
8:54 AM

Post #8727220

Whoa, would that spiderwort bloom for me? Be perennial for me?

DH spent a few hours working in The Annex and came down with a horrible case of poison ivy or something! Poison ivy doesn't spread, right? I mean if you have it on your left arm, touching it to your right arm won't make it spread to there. You have to have actual contact with the oils from the plant. He definitely has something. He got cuts, like the superficial slashes in your shins you might get from walking in tall, sharp grass, but they're all quadrupled in size, like the P.I. got in his blood right there.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 31, 2011
12:07 PM

Post #8727691

If there is oil on the skin from the first area of contact, and you touch another area of skin, the oil can transfer. It can also transfer from clothing to skin.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

July 31, 2011
2:44 PM

Post #8727994

Carrie, PF says Tradescantia ohiensis is hardy up to zone 4b. I was going to put some in one of your packages because I know you like blue, but was afraid it might be too weedy looking for a suburban lot. I would be happy to send you some if you would like. This shade of blue is the only color I have.
If you can talk your DH into taking an oatmeal bath that will help both the itching and aid the healing process. The simplest way (and the one with the easiest cleanup) is to put a cup of oatmeal in a bath bag or (a tied off knee-high stocking will work). Put it in the bath water. Stay in the tub for, at least, 15 minutes. Gently pat skin dry when you get out. No vigorous rubbing. It is a little more effective to grind the oatmeal in a coffee grinder or something and put it directly in the water. But that is a little messy. Oatmeal has anti-inflammatory properties so it speeds healing in addition to alleviating the itch. You can buy the packaged oatmeal baths, but I’ve never used one so I don’t know how effective they are. With the little cuts, Echinacea wouldn’t be a bad idea either. You can find that just about anywhere these days even some grocery stores and Wal-Mart.
You might want to wash his shirt separately from the other laundry. Debra is right. The oil can cling to clothes and skin. Jim doesn’t react much to poison ivy so he usually pulls up any we have. Then, comes inside and chases me around the house saying he wants a hug. lol. As he well knows, the oil can be transferred from one person’s skin to another with direct contact. -There is still a 9-year-old boy living inside that 6’3 body. He comes out to play sometimes. k*
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2026/

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 31, 2011
5:58 PM

Post #8728431

We don't have a bathtub but I guess he could soak in a dish pan. The weird part is that it seems to be spreading up his leg with no new contact with the PI, wearing different clothes etc. I'll suggest the oatmeal idea.

Kay, I would love the spiderwort! I'll have to make sure DH plants it.

Jim, heuchera 'Firefly' is blooming, so I know which one it is. Want some?

This message was edited Jul 31, 2011 8:01 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 31, 2011
6:07 PM

Post #8728447

He says I should tell you guys we haven't had a bathtub since 2008 when we took it out and had a roll-in shower put in. "No" to the soak his feet in a dishpan idea, lol.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

July 31, 2011
7:24 PM

Post #8728588

Horse trough in the back yard? It's warm enough he could do it at night. 'Round here, we call it a redneck swimming pool, but it works well enough as a tub. :-D
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 31, 2011
9:45 PM

Post #8728818

Yes, I imagine tubs would present a problem. I’m afraid P.J. is going to become a grump when he is forced to give up his jacuzi tub. I think he is saving up for a shower set-up that has all the bells and whistles so maybe not too grumpy.
I’ve heard medical experts say you can’t spread a poison ivy rash from say your hands to your face or from one person to another. And I’ve heard country people sneer at that because it doesn’t jive with their real life experiences. I think the confusion is a matter of WHEN we are referring to. Medical experts only see a person after a rash has developed. By that time it is very unlikely it could spread because the affected area has been washed many times and there should be no irritating resin left on the skin.
Rural kids learn to recognize poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac about the time they are learning their ABC’s. It’s a basic survival skill in the deep south. :) I grew up in an apartment, but I played in the woods behind the complex so I received a proper rural education from the elderly couple who owned the woods. Rural kids also inevitably goof up and learn to recognize they have a case of poison ivy before symptoms fully develop. (It takes a day or two for most.) The resin is both oily and sort of sticky and it can VERY DEFINITELY be transferred from one part of the body to another. I had it on the side of my face once. The pediatrician said I must have crushed the plant with my hand, and then transferred the oil to my face when I brushed the hair out of my eyes. I had a case on my arm from where P.J. took my elbow to steady me right after he had been pulling it. He had rinsed his hands at the outdoor sink, but we didn’t keep hand soap out there then. We do now. I’ve also picked it up from Fenny-dog after she has been playing in the woods.
If he has already developed a full-blown rash, what you describe sounds more like a running allergic reaction. Benadryl’s allergy formula stops the domino effect for me. Hope he is better soon. PI rashes are a pain in the aster. ~Nadine~
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

July 31, 2011
10:08 PM

Post #8728844

Hi, Vickie. When my Da wouldn't let me go to a friend's swim party. Miss Helen ran a big galvenised tub full of water and gave me a big bowl of ice cream to eat while I was playing in it. Could I have been in a redneck swimming pool and not even known it? Not sure what the tub was used for when there weren't little girls in Wonder Woman underwear playing in it. ~N~

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2011
7:46 AM

Post #8729402

I've been trying to get him into something like that! I'll try the ice cream temptation trick. But it's been since Dec. and he's lost 40 lb.s! Maybe don't want to disrupt that success, and besides, we don't have a man-size galvanized tub.

We do have some leftover Avedo (?) oatmeal bath packages from when my DDs were littler. As asthmatics, they were both much more likely to be itchy little girls from dust, grass, pets, rugs, floors, whatever kids roll in. Sometimes it would leave them itchy ... hence the oatmeal bath stuff. Maybe if I make it into a paste?

Debra, the (what in tarnation is the name?) CONEFLOWER you sent me is flowering and flowering. It is reaching its true height. I was wondering how tall it would turn out to be. Thanks again.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 1, 2011
2:43 PM

Post #8730238

I’ll get your spiderwort in the mail, Carrie. It grows fast. It might put on a show for you this year. And, yes, I would like to try ‘Butterfly’ Heuchera’. It’s a gorgeous plant and I think it would work well in theSoldier’s Garden. There is a cooler micro-climate there where I think it will do well. Might want to tie a ribbon around the 'Butterfly' for now to let your DH recover and let things cool down.
I’ve heard Bobby McFerrin has something cooking that he will be serving up next year. Can’t wait to see what he comes up with. Hang in there, Debra. Pick your favorite flower from this garden. (Jim)
http://www.quotegarden.com/worry.html


This message was edited Aug 2, 2011 3:41 PM
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 1, 2011
4:33 PM

Post #8730541

Carrie, it is Sundown. The one I had some years back was Sunset and it's hard to find now. Has a problem with the petals quilling. The Sundowns here are struggling. Too hot for too long. I'm keeping them going, if barely, and hope next year is more normal.

Thanks, Jim. :-)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 1, 2011
11:28 PM

Post #8731376

Hydrocortazone lotion from Walmarts helps alot but you can't use alot of it.
The galvanized tubs were used to wash clothes along with good ole rub boards, I've used them as a teenager. When you wrung the water out of the clothes they got very wrinkled.(Cotten that is,wool had to be washed gently by hand.synthetics were'nt invented yet.Have also used the heavy irons that were heated on the stove. You had to have at least 2 irons so you could iron with one while the other was heating.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 2, 2011
1:19 PM

Post #8732315

Praise for modern conveniences! Without them I would certainly be wearing dirty, wrinkled clothes. Nadine is talking about "living primitive" off the land for a year and writing about the experience when we have things set up better. Yeah, right. This is the girl who pulls her rolling desk chair into the kitchen when she cooks and does dishes. (Our dishwasher in doing downtime. I'm not going to replace it until I can afford a high quality one.) Jim

This message was edited Aug 2, 2011 3:23 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 2, 2011
1:39 PM

Post #8732356

Is there such a thing as a high quality dishwasher?
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 2, 2011
2:08 PM

Post #8732399

I think that's what I am. kb

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 2, 2011
2:14 PM

Post #8732403

Nothing is made as well as it used to be. I know a story DH tells of c. 1955-60 their (B&W) TV stopped working. So his big brother (age 11, I believe) took it apart, checked every circuit, figured out which one was not working, went to the hardware store and bought a replacement fuse or circuit took it home, plugged it in and shazzam, the TV worked!

Then they invented planned obsolescence and now you just throw it away (or make a planter out of it) and get a new one. They have the means to make EVERYTHING unbreakable - washing machines, cell phones, computers, fans, cars, EVERYTHING. They don't because the economy would grind to a halt. People would have to find some other way of spending their time besides wishing they had a better snow-blower. There would be world peace and harmony. Who wants that? We need more generations of Wal-Mart customers, all over the world!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 2, 2011
2:17 PM

Post #8732405

Yeah... you and me both, kb!
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 2, 2011
4:26 PM

Post #8732701

I've lived pretty primitive a time or two and I'll take modern conveniences every time. ESPECIALLY given today's 110 degrees in the shade. Primitive means no AC, no running water, no electricity, no clothes washer...un-uh, me is a creature of comfort and climate control and like it that way!! :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 3, 2011
8:21 AM

Post #8734097

Yeah, but wouldn't you rather have an unbreakable laptop? That kids could use as a teething toy?
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 3, 2011
12:47 PM

Post #8734594

There’s a running debate in the house as to whether hand washing or the dishwasher does a better job. I think I do a better job.
No electricity?! No running water?! NO COMPUTER?! No way, if I can help it!!! “Primitive” is not the right word for what I’m considering. I envision more of an experiment in food self-sufficiency. I would like to see if I could thrive, not just survive, for a calendar year without buying groceries and keep records of the effect on my health. I would need a milk goat and chickens before I tried it or someone I could trade with for milk, eggs and meat. I know I couldn’t do vegetarian. All this is an idea for several years down the line because I don’t imagine doing without.
I remember listening to the stories of a very old man who grew specialty melons here to supplement his income. He told cool stories. The coolest were, of course, the ones the church ladies said he shouldn’t be telling around children. Those were usually about his rum running days. Anyway, he always started his stories, “Back in a time when panthers still screamed at night in these woods, in the tough old days of outdoor plumbing and polio…. “He never sugar-coated his stories because of that I don’t think I romanticize the past. Old people’s stories make for interesting listening, but I’m glad I didn’t have to live those stories. My love of ease and comfort coupled with all the naked truth stories I heard growing up are probably what is behind my interest in wild foods and rudimentary, “from scratch”, cooking skills. I actually enjoyed sitting out of sight and listening to the older adults talk. I absorbed all those stories about the Depression, the aftermath of hurricane Camille and the Dust Bowl years. (There are many transplants from Oklahoma in this immediate area.) If some major financial or natural disaster occurs in my time, I want to come through it in as comfortable a way as I can manage. Knowing I could do it if I had to gives me a sense of security. I’ve read and heard too much history to believe I won’t have to deal with any sort of major catastrophe in my lifetime. ~Nadine~

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 3, 2011
12:57 PM

Post #8734622

Probably right. I have a good friend who says if nuclear power and nuclear weapons are 99% safe, given the amount of each that we have, and the probability of some person or machine failing at some tiny key step along the way, nuclear disaster is inevitable. He has devoted his life to the cause of nuclear disarmament.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 3, 2011
11:05 PM

Post #8735830

I agree Nadine, We'll survive up here should most any disaster happen. But I'll injoy my comforts till then and not worry about it.The hot air bothers me some cause i can't breathe hot air. It just don't seem to go where it's supposed to.But i can lay down in the creek.The air just above the water is cooler.But i prefer AC. lol

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 4, 2011
11:36 AM

Post #8736662

It would be an interesting experiment. It would necessarily be a low-carb diet. Even if you were willing to do the work of processing wheat. It doesn’t grow here. Even pioneers purchased flour, coffee and salt. I don’t know of any way to get around buying salt.
There was a strange story in the March issue of Outside. It was entitled something like “My Primeval. Teaming Irradiated Eden.” The writer visited Chernobyl and encountered large mammals such as wolves, bears, foxes, elk, roe deer and even large herds of wild boar. Lower animals are known to have a higher tolerance for radiation, the presence of large mammals in the exclusion zone that show no obvious health problems is a surprise to everyone. Chernobyl has become a huge wildlife park/radiation laboratory. Their genes are almost certainly being scrambled. Some strange new creature is bound to come out of the exclusion zone. Although, officially there are no people living permanently in the zone, the writer claims some displaced farmers have crept back in. He claims to have talked to some and drank somegone (the Ukrainian equivalent of moonshine) with them. That’s spooky! I couldn’t believe anyone would be willing to pay to take a tour of Chernobyl, but it is the new destination for extreme tourism.) That’s strange enough, but for those farmers to live there….and they are living off the land. Will they produce children who are more tolerant of radiation exposure? Will they even be able to produce children? Talk about experiments!
We have a nuclear plant in an adjacent county. I will breathe a big sigh of relief when someone comes up with a safe, viable energy alternative. k*
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 4, 2011
3:35 PM

Post #8737096

We have one to the southwest. Right in Tornado Alley and the prevailing winds are generally to the northeast. Right over Dallas-Fort Worth. Nuclear power, per se, is fine. But with that 99% safe, it is inevitable that somehow, somewhere, that 1% is gonna be a problem. I'd just agree with Kay that I'll feel more relieved when something else workable and cost-effective is available.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 5, 2011
9:00 AM

Post #8738538

Like WIND or SOLAR! So much of the earth is desert, even the US Southwest can have solar energy farms, can't it, doesn't it? Or at least wind farms? If there's enough wind for a Dustbowl to happen, surely there's enough wind for a couple hundred windmills? The Middle East will stop selling barrels of oil and start selling big batteries powered by the solar farms they have over there. Or on the OCEAN? How about a giant floating solar/wind farm floating in the middle of nowhere, filling batteries? We have the technology.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 5, 2011
9:18 AM

Post #8738567

I just ordered a solar power book in Spanish. Tony is very smart and may be able to start doing solar here. He also has a wife and three smart children who could help get this going here. There was a solar power store here a few years ago but it was probably too expensive for most people. I found a solar site on eBay that is connected with a group that goes to poor villages and teaches the people to build solar stuff. They suupply components at cost.

We also get a fairly steady wind here and I've been told the wind turbines have improved a lot recently.

Of course a lot of the problem is that many of the people working on it want to get rich. Learning to build and maintain your own system seems to be the best way to go. But, then, it's another set of stuff to learn. And I'm so tired of learning. Can't I just veg for a while?

kb

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 5, 2011
9:41 AM

Post #8738613

Oh, OK, Katie, YOU can veg, we can all veg. But the rest of the slackers out there in the world had better get on the ball or my 5 grandchildren and one nephew that are all under 11 are going to have nothing except these radiation-tolerant bears to eat.

Nadine, you're young and comparatively healthy. Maybe you could spend one hour a week trying to understand how to use passive solar to power something at Armagia. In Boston we DO have a program where if you have something (solar or wind or bicycle, whatever) that provides your energy, the elec. company will buy your extra when you don't need it and give it back to you when you do need it. Hmm I don't think I explained that well. The elec.co. is like a huge battery, it will store your extra (and pay you) and sell it back to you on a cloudy day. So you don't need to buy a huge battery, just get hooked up. You can tell we pay for ALL our energy and are not part of the program as I don't really understand it.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 7, 2011
10:35 AM

Post #8741950

We have a nuclear plant in the next county. Have 2 nephews that work there.In tornado alley.I work hard at not thinking about it.
This lazy person just wants to go simple life and live next to a creek and have lots of firewood.
When we lived in Texas. There was a caddo Indian museum near Crocket. A and M students had built an exact replica of a Caddoan straw hut. That hut was cool with a breeze in the hot summer.Native Americans were a long way from being ignorant.
Nadine, I saw a picture of a swiss house and the whole roof was a solar panal.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 7, 2011
12:51 PM

Post #8742281

Yep, American Indians had lived their way of life for millennia and found a way that worked for them. I remember going on some tour with my father and we stepped inside the dwelling (teepee, wigwam, whatever) and he said something sarcastic to the local guide who was sitting in a bench inside about how the system was totally flawed, since he (my father) was standing in a plume of smoke from the fire in the middle of the tent. The seated guide said something like "you're not supposed to stand in the smoke, you pale-faced idiot, you're supposed to sit down, then all the smoke can go out through the hole in the roof." That shut my father up for a few minutes. (Of course he didn't actually call my father a pale-faced idiot.)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 7, 2011
5:14 PM

Post #8742990

Didn’t mean to go MIA, but no one has had any free time lately. MK’s been giving us some scares the last few days. She has a mitral valve prolapsed that causes heart arrhythmia. They don’t think her condition has worsened. The episodes she’s been experiencing were brought on by heat stress. Never thought of heat stressing the heart.
PJ and I don’t mind taking up the slack, but we given up trying to get her to stay inside. She’s gone back to doing the majority of the outside work again. PJ and I are far less tolerant of the heat than she is and she claims there is a sensation of heaviness in the chest, like she can’t take a deep breath, that tips her off to an impending attack of arrhythmia and now that she recognizes the warning sign, she has plenty of time to get out of the heat before it becomes a problem. We’ve come to a compromise. She confines herself to the deck and the Fragrance Garden visible from the windows when PJ and I aren’t out with her. Everyone has to observe the 15-minute limit for staying outside. I’ve taken over the heavy earth work of the ramp project. This new set-up seems to be working. MK gets antsy and irritable being inside all the time. I guess not having an outlet for all that nervous energy isn’t good for the heart either. There isn’t a cool part of the day to work in anymore. Just a less hot part. It feels like the very high humidity doesn’t allow your lungs to take in as much oxygen. Even I feel out of breath when the work is heavy. Humidity is 88%, at the moment. Yuk!
A couple of months ago I read a book by Ed Begley of HGTV fame. I think it was called Living like Ed. There is a small scale wind turbine he mentions I’d like to try to power the Stormroom. We’ve got powerlines in the field behind us. (One reason MK was able to buy this property so cheaply.) The power company keeps their right of way for the lines clear of trees so ironically it creates a clear path for the wind like you would normally only see in the Great Plains. I’m still researching things, but I haven’t found a reason yet why I couldn’t use that wind to power the Stormroom. I wonder if Alabama Power would buy the power back or decide they should charge me for making a wind turbine possible. ROFL. We are not allowed to grow large trees on our property line to block the view of the power lines so we might as well make it work for us somehow.
In the long run, I think solar power would be our best bet here, but solar panels are very expensive and rather high maintenance. They must be kept very clean to maintain efficiency. Someone needs to design something like the automatic windshield washer in cars. Amymone, MK’s oldest GD, wants to be an engineer and work on developing better alternative energy tech. She’s 17 and I know enough like her our age to have plenty of hope we will have the breakthroughs we need to make things more affordable in the none-too-distant future. Right now the tech is more like computer technology in the early 70’s. Just beginning to come into the hands of Jane and Joe Average. The tech will be made more affordable and user friendly in time. You won’t need as much technical expertise as you do now. You will be able to have a home energy system and veg too. :-) ~Nadine~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 7, 2011
5:26 PM

Post #8743009

Thank you for catching us up. Can see where would be a frightening situation. Sounds like a reasonable compromise was worked out. :-). 88% humidity! Aiiiiii! Our 105 is bad, but it's been dry, so breathing not bad. Just a few more weeks, Nadine, and it will be better.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 8, 2011
3:45 PM

Post #8745063

Our summer has already almost passed :(. I mean it's not reliably hot enough to wear skimpy clothes around. I believe I mentioned that I've lost 10-20 lb.s in the last few years; I get weighed infrequently so I'm not sure how much I used to weigh, and probably I'm steadily converting muscle to fat. Anyway you put it, I've changed sizes. My old bathing suits were swimming on me, to make bad pun, many of my pants could slide on and off without undoing the fly, basically, I've changed sizes. Add to that: where I used to wear long underwear even in the summer and could NEVER not wear socks, NEVER wear shorts, ALWAYS wear a sweater in air conditioning, well, that's changed too. My body has changed heat zones. I drag this cotton sweater around with me everywhere but I just don't put it on.

All of this is leading up to the end result that now I have a new skinnier body and a few skinnier, skimpier clothes, and now it's going to be winter again for 9 months!
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 8, 2011
6:24 PM

Post #8745500

Always tradeoffs. :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 9, 2011
9:18 AM

Post #8746479

Snort. My old size was fine.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 9, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8747360

I think I know what you mean, Carrie. It is hard to keep up with the necessary adaptations when you have a chronic illness or are going through a normal life transition. Nevertheless, when both things hit at once. I’m still learning how to handle a normal body temperature. Before I started thyroid replacement, I was always cold and working in heat wasn’t a problem. It felt good, in fact. I have to re-learn the symptoms of heat illness. Not sweating much is a sign you are always told to watch for when high summer arrives. It is a sure give-away that heat illness is on your horizon. But, not sweating much is normal for hypo-thyroidism. I have inner ear problems so dizziness and poor balance are routine things I just deal with. It isn’t easy to determine if it is day-to-day stuff or a sign I’m too hot. When you start experiencing mental confusion, it is dangerously late in the game. I have to learn to listen to more subtle and individual signals.
It actually starts cooling noticeably there by the beginning of Sept.? Sept. as a part of Autumn is one of those academic things you learned in school that didn’t quite jive with reality. Like the snowy scenes on Christmas cards. Most of Sept. feels like part of summer here. It might start becoming cool at night in mid-Oct. All bets are off this year, however. This is normally our dry season. Don’t know how all the Mediterranean plants I’ve introduced are going to cope with the rainy high summer. They aren’t designed for that. k*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 11, 2011
7:07 AM

Post #8750139

Oh, that's another thing, I never used to sweat, except on my face. Seriously. Now I am a sweaty pig all over and have to, like, WASH! But you can smell it in the air already, fall is on the way.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 11, 2011
10:39 AM

Post #8750386

Yep, same here. That's my tradeoff. Hormone replacement means less fatigue, but more perspiration. It might be time for a reality check. Sweating like a pig does describe it better. lol. I think it's better for your skin this way though. That was a rude surprise of aging. I never imagined there would be a need for acne cream in the medicine cabinet once you got passed 60. It just isn't needed quite so often and is joined by the bottle of Oil of Olay. :-)
Nadi is giving each of the gardens its own animal logo. A skunk for the Fragrance Garden, a rabbit for my kitchen garden and so forth. Anyone have an opinion on an emblematic animal logo for the w/c and standing garden? Nadi wants it to be an animal associated with tenacity and stubbornness. Being Scottish, a spider fits the bill in her mind. There is some old highland story about William Wallace being inspired by a spider when he was almost ready to give up the fight. k*
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 11, 2011
2:38 PM

Post #8750775

http://wildlife.visitscotland.com/species/
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 11, 2011
3:09 PM

Post #8750808

Actually, the story is of Good King Robert (Robert Bruce) and the Spider. Not William Wallace. It could be a story like George Washington and the cherry tree. It is strange to think the fate of a country might have been decided by the efforts of a spider.
http://www.longlongtimeago.com/llta_history_bruce_page02.html

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 12, 2011
4:30 PM

Post #8752747

Scottish terrier? Are there such a thing? I know terriers are terribly tenacious.

YES! Kay, on the acne and dry skin at the same time! My MD says acne in adults is only caused by stress--and true, I can often notice pimples after DD#1 visits--but also if I don't wash my hair well enough or other oily-causing things like that.

It starts cooling noticeably in the middle of August. Pleasantly cool, but not sunburn or sweat or water park weather any more.

I got married twice in the end of Aug and once in the beginning of June. Weather was pretty much the same all three days. Not too hot for me to wear panty-hose, perfectly comfortable. Outdoor receptions twice, perfect weather.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 12, 2011
8:00 PM

Post #8752977

Somewhere I saw garden statues of dogs of all different breeds. I think there was a Scottie among them. I'll see if I can find that site again. I like that better than a spider. k*
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 12, 2011
8:25 PM

Post #8753006

scotties became especially popular last year when Sadie, a Scottish Terrier won Best in Show at Westminster . i donate to this rescue group when i can.
http://www.scottiekingdom.com/
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 13, 2011
7:17 PM

Post #8754817

Talk of dogs got us playing, "If ______ were a dog, what kind of dog would ______ be?" It has been decided I would be an English mastiff, Kay a Great Dane and Nadine a Bassett hound. What kind of dog would YOU be? lol. Or, maybe, there are some cat people hanging here? (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 13, 2011
9:59 PM

Post #8755095

Bernese Mountain Dog
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 13, 2011
11:59 PM

Post #8755239

I would be a black witch cat.M-E-O-W-SPIT-HISS-HISS!
lol

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2011
5:57 AM

Post #8755467

I would be a fish, maybe, or a bird.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 14, 2011
1:24 PM

Post #8756117

Glad to hear that, Carrie. You'll see why when your package arrives. ;-)
MK and PJ say "No more dogs" after Tate and Fenny have crossed the rainbow bridge and only a strictly outside cat. I've set my heart on a black cat. PJ isn't much into cats, but he had a silly black cat called Gypsy he really liked.
I’ve only known one Burmese Mountain Dog. He was called Bernie and he was like my best friend when I was little. He was the most AWESOME dog ever. He was rescued from the river after a flood and no one ever claimed him so he was sort of passed around between 3 families. (No one family could afford his food and vet bills.) I remember he would pull me around in my wagon and I would lie in the field reading using him as a pillow. lol. Miss Helen’s old mama cat, Patches, would sleep snuggled up against him. Her kittens would climb all over him. But, he would transform into something more akin to Cujo if someone he didn’t like came too close to the kid’s Bernie considered his responsibility or if another dog bothered Patches or her kittens. He would let Miss Helen’s little Japanese Chin, Pixie, play alpha dog. He was at least 10X Pixie’s size, but she would grab a mouthful of his ruff and growl deep in her throat. Bernie would fall on his side and lay perfectly still until Pixie let him go. It was hilarious to watch. The big guy wasn’t meant to live in humid low country though and he was plagued by a terrible skin condition in the summer. The vet finally found a home for him in the mountains of TN where the weather didn’t injure his health.
I think I will use a dog motif in the w/c and standing Garden. I’ve met some great service dogs so that seems appropriate. No animal can be as stubborn as a dog that’s made up its mind about something. ~Nadine~

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2011
1:57 PM

Post #8756181

Fish bowl? Bird cage? Bird seed? Fish food? Fish that birds like to eat? Flowers that fish like to eat?

Thank you for the things which I can't remember the name of right now. They made lovely foliage again, but no flowers again. Dang, there must be a plaque right on top of the word! Not canna or calla but in that same area.

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2011
9:26 PM

Post #8756867

Neat posts
Here's my buddies:
Isn't it neat how 2 species can get along so well?

Thumbnail by VORTREKER
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 15, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8757417

that photo is so coooool. :-)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 17, 2011
6:58 PM

Post #8762078

Did those guys grow up together? I would like another cat, but I'm a little afraid of how Fenny will react. She grew up with a cat, but with Fenny and Catherine it was more like they had fun terrorizing one another. Cat gave as good as she got. She was the Grand Mistress of Sneak Attacks. Fenny wouldn't know how to act with a more timid cat.
Lots and lots of flutterbyes around today. I'll see if they will pose for the camera tomorrow. MK lets the butterflys have the passionvines after mid-August. They will be eaten down to nothing by mid-Sept., but the butterflies are like flying flowers so I guess it is worth it.
The catalpaworms are devouring the catalpa tree. I think I will go find out what catalpa worms become when they grow up. I'm assuming it is a little more dramatic than reallly big catalpa worms. :-). ~N~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 18, 2011
12:01 AM

Post #8762371

Please let us know what they turn into.
Vort, That pic is priceless. Your cat looks like two of mine,except they have black feet instead of white. My cats and dogs work hard at ignoring each other.
Catalba worms turn into wonderful fishbait before they turn into whatever.LOL

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 18, 2011
9:35 AM

Post #8763038

You don't suppose Nadi put some Caltalpa worms in Carrie's package, do you? ;-) I've heard Catalpa trees called "Fish Bait Trees." BTW: Vickie has the authenic spelling, it was named for the Catalba tribe. Botanist insist on keeping the misspelling for some weird reason only understood by botanist. k*
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 18, 2011
1:50 PM

Post #8763390

Naw, if Nadine were going to send Carrie a caterpillar, I’m sure it would be the caterpillar of a pretty moth or butterfly. Catalpa worms turn into brown sphinx moths. They are showier as caterpillars than adult moths. Only a bird or bat or something that dines on Sphinx moths would consider them attractive.
That is something I’ve never understood. Rats are repellent, but give them a fluffy tail and put them up in a tree and people call them squirrels and think they are cute. Even some of those “Ewww, a bug!!!” types, “ “Ooooo”and “Ahhhh” when a bug is given big, bright wings. It is one of the mysteries of life. :-) Even my pragmatic wife, who refers to squirrels as “tree rats”. Falls prey to the butterfly mystique. (Jim)
Photo: Catalpa “worms”

Thumbnail by seacanepain
Click the image for an enlarged view.

seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 18, 2011
1:52 PM

Post #8763396

These are the only leaves left on the tree OY VEY.

Thumbnail by seacanepain
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 18, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8763954

The catalpa tree has to go. The catapillers can produce three or four generations in a growing season so it never has a chance to flower. I thought I had gotten rid of it. I cut it to the ground, but it was back up to 8' in a single growing season. I'm told they are a nice ornamental tree where the moths are limited to one generation a year. It recovers quickly and easily from defoliation, but that is just in time for the next generation of moths in our region. Do they flower and produce their "beans" in AR, Vickie?
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 18, 2011
11:59 PM

Post #8764108

Kay, the trees are just as persistant as the worms.They keep coming back.They do bloom and bare beans here. What you need to do is roll the worms in cornmeal and package them up and sell them to Northern fishermen thus making a fortune.Which reminds me Have you heard of Catfish Charlie(a catfish bait?)It stinks to high heaven and catfish love it.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 19, 2011
8:13 AM

Post #8764600

You sent me a package of WORMS or CATERPILLARS?
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

August 19, 2011
10:17 AM

Post #8764778

Hi - This is to let you know my puter is dead. I'll be going to Ca. in early Sept and will get a new one then. Meanwhile, I'll be here through my internet cafe a couple of times week. Don't worry if you don't hear from me.

We had a big wind storm yesterday and some rain. Things are quiet here and I'm working some on the second bedroom - brown bagging the walls and sealing the conrete floor.

hugs, katie
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 19, 2011
12:22 PM

Post #8764985

I’m sure if she did, Carrie, she sent them already rolled in cornmeal and frozen. The package should arrive tomorrow so they shouldn’t be too squishy. After we sell them all to the fishermen for an exorbitant amount and have our own fortunes, I think we should visit poor, wormless Debra and Katie in our luxurious, customized travel trailers bearing lots of Catalpa tree seeds and a box of hibernating worms. (Jim)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 19, 2011
1:21 PM

Post #8765073

Y'all are going to have Carrie afraid to open her package!!! ROFL. There are no catapillars inside...unless they snuck in while I wasn't looking. They feed exclusively on Catalpa. Tradescantia isn't part of their diet so nothing in the package would appeal to them. If one did peek in, I'm sure the fish scared it away. ;-) ~N~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 19, 2011
8:42 PM

Post #8765668

Think I'd rather have the worm in a package. That fish might be a little ripe by the time it gets to MASS.roflo

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 19, 2011
11:08 PM

Post #8765795

Just wrap them in chocolate basil--prevents all spoilage.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 20, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8766102

rofl
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 20, 2011
10:30 AM

Post #8766351

Vort, I will trade you some catalpa seeds and "worms" for some chocolate basil. I'll even throw in some fish. ~N~

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 20, 2011
12:20 PM

Post #8766671

Oh dear, oh dear, I never said I wanted anything! It's my DH who wants more spiderwort to go between the daylilies on the days they aren't flowering.

I finished my Halloween Theme Garden article and managed to make it sound upbeat and amusing instead of dark and scary -- the scariest thing in there is mosquitoes, real ones. Now I want to do a Harry Potter theme garden, with all the leftover plants I found and didn't use for this article. The trick is getting around the copyright, because I'm sure the words "Harry Potter" were copyrighted long since. Maybe "Modern Day Witches -- what ingredients do they grow?" or "Witches, Past and Present" and then I could include Shakespeare's witches and the Salem "witches" and the J.K. Rowling witches. Who are GOOD not evil. Actually, the Salem witches were really sort of mass hysteria and lack of due process, and Shakespeare's witches are just atmosphere, they don't DO anything, that I remember. Then there are the Land of Oz's witches, which had two Wicked and two Good, kind of like the Supreme Court. Who can forget that line, "are you a good witch, or a bad witch?" More thinking definitely indicated.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 20, 2011
2:53 PM

Post #8766842

I've never researched it, but someone told me once "witch" means "wise one" in some old European tongue. I stopped to listen to MK's latest Analog: Science Fiction & Fact magazine. Many of the fact articles are over my head, but there was a cool one this month. They think they've finally unraveled the mystery behind C.L. Lewis's Chronicles of Narnia books. ("The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe'...) It has long been believed the seven books were some sort of allegory, but no one could agree on what they were an allegory for. Lewis was a student of medieval history. Based on a poem he wrote in the 30's, the new theory is each book represents the seven other celestial bodies known in Medieval times. Sun, Mercury, Venus, The Moon, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn, I assume. I want to read the Chronicles of Narnia again with the new insight.
You know some plants are said to "belong" to one or another of those seven celestial bodies. It's all tied up together in some ancient European healing practices. Like, The Moon has long been associated with women because it mirrors a woman's reproductive cycles so plants that "belong" to the Moon were used by midwives. But, then, for some reason, aloe vera and spearmint are considered "Moon plants". Not sure why. I'll ask MK. There might be a seed of an article idea there.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 20, 2011
8:44 PM

Post #8767727

"Bubble, Bubble. Toil and trouble..." Was that from Shakespeare? I think a classic western European witchy garden would HAVE to contain mandrake. There is a very old article in one of my herb gardening magazines on the subject. I’ll ask Nadi to look at it. I can’t remember all the plants listed and it’s in print.
You can’t study herbs without running into the work of Nicholas Culpepper. He predates Linnaean taxonomy by about 100 years. Astrological association was the system of his time for understanding and classifying plants. You see it in all his books. An article about Culpepper would be appropriate leading up to Halloween, but the powers that be would probably say it is too serious a subject for your writing style, Carrie. There’s a lot of irony in the story of Nicolas Culpepper, but not much humor. .
He was the son of a clergyman and worked hard to provide medical care to the poor. That didn’t keep him from being accused of witchcraft. The accusation came from the guild of apothecaries. Well, duh. He was teaching people how to use plants growing in the woods and meadows to solve their health problems. Meaning, these people were not buying from the apothecaries. Culpepper’s cures probably worked as well as anything that came from the apothecary. If what he said in the introduction to one of his books is the way he truly approached things, probably better.
“I consulted with my two brothers, Dr. Reason and Dr. Experience, and took a voyage to visit my mother, Nature, by whose advice, together with the help of Dr. Diligence, I at last obtained my desire; and, being warned by Mr. Honesty, a stranger in our days, to publish it to the world, I have done it.”
More than 350 years later, you can still find Culpepper's books. For people interested in the history of herbs, they remain fascinating. k*
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 20, 2011
9:59 PM

Post #8767852

thanks kay. :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 21, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8769039

Never herd of Culpepper, but that quote is remarkable. especially for so long ago, although I guess that was the age of serious Allegory, like A Pligrims Progress, and Chaucer, whatever it was he wrote (feeling dumb or lazy).

You think the Powers would object to my writing a serious article? I wasn't the one who labeled me a "garden humorist!" I do have trouble taking things quite as seriously as others would like me to, but I am perfectly capable of doing a dull boring subject like "New Diascia Varieties" and doing a bang-up job!.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 21, 2011
4:56 PM

Post #8769432

Go for it Carrie, If they don't want it Sell to someone else. I love your articles.
Isaac Asimof was my favorite science auther,and he never wrote solumn science stuff.but it was factual and fun. I never read any of his Science fiction.
I have some herbal books. My favorite is one by Charles Millspaugh-"American Medicinal Plants"
It has always amazed me that these doomsday planners never seem to allow for medicinal knowledge.
I would have been considered a witch.I have no doubt.
Another amazement is the things witchs were accused of but the accusers were never afraid of being effected by these socalled witches.Beleive me if i were a witch I'd turn my accusers into toadstools.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 21, 2011
7:18 PM

Post #8769668

LOL, Vickie.
I have no doubt you could write a good serious article, Carrie.
Are you getting any of this cooling trend, Debra? (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 21, 2011
7:33 PM

Post #8769698

noooooooo. sob..sob...sigh...hiccup...103 today. 100 or higher at least rest of week. Still no rain in sight. Most of Texas now in "Exceptional Drought." No higher designation on "their" rating scale. the burglary has had benefits. was taking vacation days last friday and tomorrow. changed them to be home whenever contractors are on-site. was/will be much too hot to work outside, which was the plan. muy better later.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 22, 2011
3:05 PM

Post #8771516

Sounds hot, Debra!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 22, 2011
11:32 PM

Post #8772311

Am wishing a cold front for you Debra. Our temps have normalised.
Our county fair starts tomorrow. We are all planning to go. All of us want to ride the Ferris Wheel.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 23, 2011
8:21 AM

Post #8772723

thanks youse all :-)

no ferris wheel fer me--i'se skeered a heights
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 23, 2011
10:48 AM

Post #8772974

Our fair isn't until the end of October when it's time for the peanut harvest and it is more comfortable to be outside. It has been in the high 90's, but drier and with a breeze. Typical for this time of year. Hope the midwest gets a weather break soon.
I was looking at a list of America's most fattening foods yesterday. The classic fair foods were well represented. Good thing the fair only comes once a year. The only "food group" better represented were those on the menus of fast food restaurants and, unfortunately, they're around all the time.
Sorry, Carrie, I must have thrown away the old herb magazine Kay mentioned. I did throw away lots and lots of magazines not too long ago. ~N~

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

August 24, 2011
9:23 AM

Post #8774585

We were hurricane tracking this morning. Irene is now expected to hit New England. Prayers it brings nothing more serious than rain, Carrie.
Vickie, you might enjoy this. "A Glorious Dawn--Symphony of Science. (A tribute to Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking. k*
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zSgiXGELjbc&feature=player_embedded


lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

August 24, 2011
12:03 PM

Post #8774776

kay that is very very cool.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 25, 2011
5:07 PM

Post #8776873

Everyone here is flipping out about hurricanes and earthquakes. Lots of people say they felt or saw the quake on Wed - I didn't - but it looks like it's going to storm for sure! I was looking at blooms I could send you guys - we still have lots of impatiens marigolds, monarda, phlox, the black-eyed Susan vine is very disappointing this year. 2-3 flowers so far that only last a day! Anyway if I get my butt in gear I can send you SOMETHING!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 25, 2011
10:45 PM

Post #8777415

Carrie, YOU JUST TAKE CARE OF CARRIE. I'll be watching the Weather chanel this weekend.
Do you know anyone with a HAM radio? They're good at getting messages out during disasters.
I need to water my flowers.
Am going to have to get on a real computer to see that site. But I'll do it.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

August 27, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8779735

Don't worry about sending us anything, Carrie. That's just an experiment. May would be a better time to send you bluejackets (Ohio spiderwort) for bedding use. After experimenting with those few, your husband can decide if it is something he would like to plant among the daylilies. I don't know how they behave there, but they are fairly aggressive here. I don't mind them because they are easy to pull out.. But, again, that's here. Our soil is loose and sandy. Experimenting to be sure will save him some work.
Do tell me how the pail holds up though. I want to make them so they can stand up to things for , at least, one garden season.. We've always got used paint buckets around. I would like to re-purpose them if I can. I painted fish and coral on this one, guys, so the fish I sent Carrie didn't stink. lol.
The purple leaved plant is Tradescantia pallida 'Purple Queen'. Johnny had his apple seeds, I have my purple wandering jew.
There was an article in Analog, Science Fiction and Fact about the New Madrid fault zone and how dangerous it actually is. There is only a 10% possibility of a major quake any time soon. Those are fairly good odds. The problem is there is so much human interstructure that can be damaged by even minor quakes. Dams and bridges would be my biggest concern. ~Nadi~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2011
2:03 PM

Post #8779932

Nadi, and there is real concern about the bridge between Memphis and Arkansas over the Mississippi river. It always has heavy traffic.
We've used paint buckets to keep odds and ends of nails and little bits of hardware in.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 27, 2011
5:46 PM

Post #8780198

No, Nadine, I meant PICTURES. Jim or one of you said I was responsible for flower pictures in August - I think I missed the whole month.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 28, 2011
12:08 AM

Post #8780573

Thats ok Carrie, Anytime will do.I'm working on away to post pictures(not mine)but free to post.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

August 28, 2011
10:36 AM

Post #8781211

I never have the camera at hand when photo worthy scenes present themselves. This morning Fenny was walking around checking the clumps of mondo grass for lizards. While she had her nose buried deep in a clump of grass a huge yellow and black butterfly landed on her back, right at the base of her tail. She just twisted around and watched it open and close its wings with this quizzical expression on her face until it flew away. The scene was priceless. But, I could only click the shutter in my brain to preserve it. (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

August 28, 2011
9:19 PM

Post #8782247

Thats the problem with pets. They do the cutest things when the camara is packed away.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 3, 2011
1:04 PM

Post #8791694

Well, I have had an ADVENTURE! DH and I were scheduled to go to this 5-day conference in the Hudson Valley. Arrive Sunday (Irene Day) between 12 and 7pm, or something. I mean, people were coming from all over the WORLD to this conference in the Hudson Valley. Wouldn't you know it, Irene devastated the Hudson Valley! Sorry this is repetitive - copy and paste from a letter.

I'm ok now, at home with my computer and my own internet. We were scheduled to go to a 5 day conference in the Hudson Valley/Catskills area (foothills 90 min N of NYC) and they kept telling me WE ARE NOT CANCELLING and we were supposed to get there Sun aft or eve. It should have been a clue that we couldn't find a gas station with power to work the pump credit card thingie! Finally we found one, filled up the van and set off. Driving a van in windy conditions is like driving a sail!! DH drove through all this wind and rain on the Mass Pike -- which is well-graded and starts out pretty flat. After all this wind and rain, the sun came out and it was clear and beautiful and we thought "that wasn't so bad." But after about 20 min. it went back to stormy and windy, more marshy and swampy along the road. We looked at each other and said OMG I think we just drove through the EYE of the hurricane.

The Mass Pike goes uphill pretty much all the way to the NY border, then you go S 20 min and you're at this rugged, mountainous (for New England) Conference Center. Except THIS time, we went S 18 miles and were re-routed about 1K times and finally stayed in a Best Western 20 mi W of where we were supposed to be. We left around 3pm and got to the B. W. by midnight! There were trees down, roads under water, gullies turned into rivers, etc. In some places we were driving on one-lane pavement but there was water maybe 2 inches away from the pavement.

Some people with iphones had a new google app (?) that could tell them which roads were open and which were closed. We heard they closed parts of the Mass Pike shortly after we left it. We had NO clue; just drove down roads until we had to turn around.

Luckily DH camped in the area as a kid, unfortunately he was a kid and didn't memorize back routes and stuff. The nearer hotels -- there was like a Comfort Inn or something -- were packed with people, both with people who were forced off the NY Thruway and people who were evacuated! In fact our hotel was packed too; we made a reservation by cell phone from 6 hours earlier when we were turned away at all the places near our destination. All in all a harrowing experience, especially because we thought it had been downgraded to a tropical storm. And usually hurricane predictions for us are a little gusty wet wind, so we're not used to taking them seriously. Very glad to be home safe and sound. We were really stupid.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 3, 2011
1:14 PM

Post #8791702

...and you can forget about getting them to pose for pretty pictures. Vickie.
Sorry, Carrie, we cross-posted. Glad you are okay. That sounds spooky. If the Atlantic hurricane usually don't amount to much by the time they make it that far north, I bet no one was very prepared.
This is Amargia's "Blunder of the Week." Months ago, when we were creating the western boundary bed of the CanDo Garden, I said, "Jim are you sure this is a white canna, it feels like a 'Florence Vaughn. The canna and rose periwinkle will be in bloom at the same time. The orange in the canna and the pink of the periwinkle will seriously clash.
Jim replied, "It came from the bed with the white canna. How could it be a flame canna?" Good question.
Jim says it doesn't actually look too bad. It creates an edgy, tropical feel. That isn't the look we are going for in the CanDo Garden, however, so 'Florence' will have to be moved.
We are spending our Labor Day weekend lazing about at home. Nadi hurt her foot and wouldn't have enjoyed an outing. The beach will be crowded this weekend anyway. We will do the beach on a quiet day when we can bring the dogs. Fenny's never been to the beach. I think she would have a blast. k* .



This message was edited Sep 3, 2011 2:31 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 3, 2011
1:19 PM

Post #8791708

I love orange and pink together, but that's just me. And if it's wrong for the Can-Do garden, then it's Wrong.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 3, 2011
2:04 PM

Post #8791748

MK has to go by the science and tradition of color since she can't really discern color anymore. Traditionally, orange and pink are no-nos. I think you just have to be a little more careful pairing orange and pink. I don't think this combination looks bad. The pink is strong enough to hold its own. I like bright colors and a lot of contrast.
I remember reading about one hurricane that struck that far north. I don't remember its name, It stuck in my head because it hit the coast on Halloween night. (Trick or Treat!). Here the saying goes:
June, too soon. July, stand by. August, prepare, you must. September, remember! OCTOBER, ALL OVER.

Thumbnail by Sansai87
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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 3, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8791769

But it's not October yet!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 3, 2011
4:54 PM

Post #8791904

The “trick-o-treat” storm that hit New England in 91 never had a real name. Hurricane Grace helped to spawn it, but meteorologist thought the hurricane that developed within the storm would be such a short-lived phenomenon; they never bothered to give it a name. It was one of the few unnamed hurricanes since they started the naming system. I was still in NM when it hit. I remember it from the movie, “The Perfect Storm.” “Perfect” conditions and timing created that one. Hopefully, New England won’t have to face one like that again for a long, long time.
Kay claims chive flowers are good sprinkled in salads or topping potatoes. anyone ever try that. I’ve never eaten the flowers. (Jim)

Thumbnail by seacanepain
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lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 3, 2011
5:29 PM

Post #8791940

she's right. taste like the green parts
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 3, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8792131

Gee Carrie,Now you have something to tell your grandkids. How you survived the storm of 2011.Glad you were safe. We've run into that in ETEX when theres a hurricane near Houston, All the motels in Kilgore fill up. They also fill up when Dallas Cowboys blackout the game in Dallas.
I love the wild colors together if they're kinda blended in with other near colors.Like from one tone to another.I like pink and orange but i march to the beat of different drummers.
Got my TX DD situated. I got her a cell phone so she can call if she has problems.Its amazing what a determined mother can do to straighten a bad situation out.It's also amazing what one can do if they know there is someone to back them up.And why do somepeople think they have to bully someone weaker than themselves.Gr-r-r-r!!! My youngest grandson decided he had controll of their house. AND HE DID.He's supposed to move out in 30 days.He told them they could'nt see his son.(I need to add he never sees his son nor pays child support.) Now they are going to see that child again.I cannot understand anyone being totally under controll of someone else nor someone controlling someone else.I guess i controlled the situation. but i sure won't do anything except remove the son then they're on their own.
Forgive me for ranting but thanks for listening.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2011
7:37 AM

Post #8792506

I sure do, Vickie. But the Blizzard of '78 lasted for weeks -- I mean the effects of it.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 4, 2011
10:54 AM

Post #8792811

Big bear hug,Vickie. There are times when you have to rant….or break something. Ranting is cheaper and less messy.
Another one headed in your general direction, Carrie. Aren’t you lucky? NOT!!! Virginia looks like the most likely place for landfall at this point, but you might want to track it. She’s been named Katia. We are getting the feeder bands off Lee. We are under a flood watch, but all I’m seeing so far is a much needed gentle rain. Is Lee going to do anything to improve the rain forecast for you later in the week, Debra? (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8792983

LOL !
Quoting:Ranting is cheaper and less messy.


DH and I were just marveling at all the clearly dead trees that Irene left standing, around here at least. I think the woods in the Hudson Valley are pretty well "thinned" or "pruned" by now. Of course, that was at night, the driving around, and we didn't really stop to check what type of tree was toppling the most frequently. Around here my brainiac part would say Norway maples, but I really don't know. We drove home from visiting my Dad (and Brandeis) just now, and saw tall straight up and down trees that were completely dead standing in place.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2011
9:18 PM

Post #8793642

Jim, Lee made things worse for Texas not better. Got wind and no rain my SIL said it seems like half of Texas is on fire.There is alot of fires around our folks but none directly threatened yet.Texas has had a long drought.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 5, 2011
6:23 AM

Post #8794010

BTW, Debra (and folks), our grandchildren (+ their parents) are moving to Dallas/Ft. Worth. DH now has a lonng range plan that he and I move out there when JetBlue opens a station there. DSS is already teaching in Saginaw TX. Yikes.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2011
12:05 AM

Post #8797068

Oh Carrie!!!!! We'll be neighbors!!!
Guess I'll have to start edecating you on Texas.Know Debra will help.First thing you'll have to go snipe hunting. The #1 sport is FOOTBALL!!!! bE IT Dallas Cowboys or The Longhorns of UTEXAS. or the local highschool. Tho actually i was a Texas AGGIE fan. Had to be,there was an Aggie research center where we lived.Tho secretly i was an Arkansas razorback fan.
lesson 2 will come later.LOL

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2011
7:57 AM

Post #8797510

Everything has to be big and in a 40 gallon hat. What the heck is a snipe? No baseball? Hmmm I can't think of a TX team. Remember the Alamo!
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 7, 2011
11:01 AM

Post #8797704

Oh my, forget football--our major league team made it to the World Series last year! Go Rangers! Lol. Have Houston Astros, too, if you are a National League fan.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 7, 2011
7:57 PM

Post #8798351

Can't give the snipes away. You'll just have to go hunting them.LOL
You're right Debra,can't forget those Rangers.
Texas B-B-Q get togethers are biggies too. Spring roadside wildflowers are spectacular.friendly people,rolling hills,There are more pickups than cars.holidays of June teenth and Sinco de Mayo,and Quanza. Azalia and rose festivals,Fall brings German Oktober fests with polkas and good german cooking. Can't think of more at the moment.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 8, 2011
6:26 AM

Post #8798888

Right, Texas Rangers and Houston Astros. I guess I am more of a baseball fan than football.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 8, 2011
8:09 PM

Post #8800012

In this country, my father’s family based itself in the Houston/Galveston area. I lived there many years. I’m almost ashamed to say I never attended a sporting event at the Astrodome. Some concerts, but never a sporting event. It was the first multi-sport domed arena ever built. I can remember when it was hailed “The 8th wonder of the World.
No one in the general public is allowed inside now. The last I heard, Harris County was considering selling it to movie makers I would like to see it preserved for its historic significance if nothing else. Performers from Elvis to Metallica performed on Astrodome stages. Not to mention, the political and sporting events held there. What would Houston have done with all the refugees that poured in during Katrina, if they hadn’t had the Astrodome?
This was either one very calm or one very hungry bumble bee. Bumbles are less aggressive than honeybees, but the camera was inches from her. Nadi says bees will raise one of their middle legs when agitated and this little lady isn’t even doing that.

Thumbnail by Amargia
Click the image for an enlarged view.

seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 12, 2011
6:54 PM

Post #8805890

Sagina...that's a suburb of Fort Worth, isn't it? Most people like Fort Worth. There’s something for every taste. You can put on your gown and heels to take in the Fort Worth Symphony at Bass Performance Hall or put on your hat and boots to visit The Stockyard, then finish up the night at a honky-tonk like Billy Bob’s Texas. (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 12, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8806109

Yup

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 13, 2011
12:23 PM

Post #8806895

I’ve been told they revived Gilley’s Club somewhere in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area. Everyone who visited me in Houston in the early 80’s wanted to go to Gilley’s Club. Mostly because some of the scenes in the movie “Urban Cowboy” were filmed there. I’ve also heard that the original El Toro was taken to the new club in D/FW. Lol. I guess it wouldn’t be Gilley’s without the famous mechanical bull. k*
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 13, 2011
6:07 PM

Post #8807319

I remember Gilleys. Never went there but it sure was talked about.There was another bar in Kilgore TX that had short lived fame.Can't think of the name ,but i will.
Gee Kay, We were Texans at the same time.I was president of an Astronomy club and got an escorted tour of Johnson Space center.It was unforgetable for me.Got to go in controll central.Got some strange looks wondering who the heck i was.Would'nt they have been surprised to find out i was a nobody.
Family told me i was a very persistant nobody.LOL
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 13, 2011
9:03 PM

Post #8807551

When I think of Houston, what pops into my head is, "Houston, we have a problem." It was what Kids my age said when something went wrong. We stole it from the movie, "Apollo 13." ~N~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 14, 2011
11:06 PM

Post #8809048

LOL!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 17, 2011
12:22 PM

Post #8812364

WE say that, not just kids!

I'm glad there won't just be white kids with blond hair, I'm assuming. In Utah the kids ALL look like they're related, which maybe they are! I want my grandchildren to know that the world is more interesting than just Shasta daisies!

Church is fine, but there are other churches besides Mormon ones! And there is no separation of church and state in Utah, excuse me for debating religion. Cub Scouts meets at the church, so to my 11 yo grandson, cub scouts was part of church. DH (=Grandpa) tried to say he was a cub scout when he was a little boy, but DGS knows we're not members of his church, so he didn't understand how Grandpa could be a cub scout without belonging to the same church. Argh!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 17, 2011
8:56 PM

Post #8812893

Kay always has me invite the Mormon missionaries in.


This message was edited Sep 17, 2011 10:18 PM

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 17, 2011
9:29 PM

Post #8812918

Yes, I feel sorry for some of the young LDS men on their first mission tour. You can usually tell the ones who came out of the Salt Lake area. They go through some serious culture shock in those two years. Mormonism is the fastest growing faith in Latin America, however, so more than white flour is beginning to be incorporated into the dough. I was a Mormon for many years, but chaffed under the rigid gender roles. My religious affiliation has always had more to do with the man in my life than any strong views of my own. For myself, I feel most spiritually connected under an open sky, than within the confines of a church or temple.
Nadine is determined to learn and remember the botanical names for her plants. She is a visual learner so she makes little cartoons to remind her of the plants name. The drawings are a sort of visual memory mnemonic. They are something like the password hints many websites ask you to set up in case you forget your password. Jim and I make a game of trying to figure out the identity of the plant by the drawing. After Jim describes the drawing I can usually puzzle it out, but I was at a loss as to what was planted under a cartoon of a red hippo mopping a gnarled old tree with a clock in the background. It turned out to be Standing Cypress (Ipomoposis rubra) When I asked what the clock was about she explained it was Big Ben to remind her that Ruby is a Cockney hippo so she drops her “h”s. Ipomopsis rubra. Well, they do say it doesn’t matter how absurd a memory mnemonic is. Of course, all this led back to our ongoing debate on the pronunciation of “herb.” I don’t pronounce the “h” which Nadi thinks is funny.
What part of TX were you in during the 80's, Vickie? k* .
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 18, 2011
7:38 AM

Post #8813281

I am afraid I have sometimes turned wicked when the proselytizers knocked on my door. I'd tell them thank you for their time, but I am Buddist. Or Atheist. Depending on how irritated I was with the world that day. Now, I just don't answer the door. :p

Here is the new car. It is a bare-bones, no frills of any kind, car. But it is a 4-door sedan, with a CVT transmission, AC, tinted windows, and a radio/CD player. $15K including TTL. Going to need something over the seats. Black cloth that is already attracting anything light that is even just floating by on the air. Russell will be "hairing it up" going back and forth to vet so time to dig out tablecloths and such. :-)

Thumbnail by lovemyhouse
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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 19, 2011
3:08 AM

Post #8814371

I was in a little town called Overton. It was near Kilgore.That was where we settled after DH got out of the army. Stayed there 20 years. I love shopping in ETEX. Plus lots of relatives there.So go back fairly often. One DD stayed in Texas the other came to Arkansas.We're going to have a family reunion in a couple of weeks in Broken Bow Okla.It's about the halfway point for all of us.
Debra, If it has a CD player and a heater and AC, What more can you ask? LOL! Mine has cruise controll and i've never used it.I do like the warning system on mine.Low tires etc.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 19, 2011
7:51 PM

Post #8815676

There was a time I liked what I bought to have all the bells and whistles, now I think it is just more things that can go wrong.
Seeing me take out her car seat blanket is one of the few things old Miss Tater-dog still gets excited about. I’ve never known any dog who likes car rides so much. Kay told me after having to spend 5 minutes in a hot parking lot brushing yellow dog hair off her navy skirt that I either had to stop taking Tate for rides or get Tate her own seat cover. Car rides are one of Tate’s joys in life so she has her own car seat cover. She has never liked riding in the bed of the truck or even the back seat, but she will sit in he front passenger seat and behave like a perfect lady. The only problem I have is when I need to go somewhere with both Miss Tate and Kay. Tate doesn’t like relinquishing HER seat to Kay. :-)
When I moved south, I quickly learned a windshield sun shade and a steering wheel cover that didn’t hold the heat were well worth their small price, especially when your car has a dark interior. Nadine jokes about the “parking lot art galleries” or the “high summer philosophers.” Windshield shades were once plain, utilitarian things in reflective silver-gray, now they come in all sorts of artsy designs or are used like giant bumper stickers.
. (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 22, 2011
6:49 PM

Post #8820018

Have blooming things again.

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Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 22, 2011
7:51 PM

Post #8820075

Glad the heat and drought conditions are easing up. Did you lose much because of it? ~N~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 23, 2011
7:14 AM

Post #8820430

Quite a bit. Mostly annuals and some fragile water-loving perennials new this year. Bearded Iris, Trailing Lantana, Provence Lavender, Dahlberg Daisy, Daylilies, and--get this--June Hosta did reasonably well. As did the Caryopteris and Mexican Feather Grass. Yard was mostly brown and dull, dusty green, but it was still alive. And much is springing back up with the cooler temperatures and short rains. Hope!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 23, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8820519

LANATANA!!!!!! Love 'em!

My article on The Royal Wedding Theme Garden is today. It's secretly a whine about my father. It starts "When I was little, my father didn't tell me I was his princess. He told me that when I grew up, I would marry Prince Charles." Well, he did. I think it was an excuse to get us to use better table manners but still, if you're 11 and your father tells you something, you tend to believe him, right? So even though MY father thought Prince Charles was too old for me, Lady Di's father must not have felt the same way because she was exactly my age!

Anyway, this morning Dad called and said "when I moved back East, it was so my children could visit me, whine whine whine." And I felt like saying a.you moved east because none of your so-called friends wanted to visit you post-stroke, b.if you were a little nicer to me, I might come visit you more often, and c.your nursing home is 45 minutes away without traffic, and there's usually traffic (had he picked something closer to me and where we all live, it would be easier for all of us). I have 2 brothers. The latest zinger from my father (before this morning): he has very curly hair, but it was usually short when I was a kid so I didn't realize how curly it was. I used to have curlier hair than he did, and my 17 y.o. daughter has curlier hair than I did. So last week or earlier this week, on the phone, he says "I've always been attracted to women with straight hair, like your mother, and Pam (my former step-mother)." And all those girlfriends, my mind fills in. I guess that's why you never liked me much, my mind says, or why I never liked me much.

My mom, without a perm, has bone-straight hair. She didn't know what to do with a little girl with wavy/frizzy/curly hair, and there were no "products" back then. She kept taking me to the hairdresser and having them cut it short or ear length, which looked awful on me, was a frizz-factory. I would brush my hair before school and when i got to school (with a lot of straight-haired kids) would get teased. "Didn't you brush your hair this morning?" Of course I did.

OK, end of True Hair Confessions by Carrie Lamont.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 24, 2011
10:10 AM

Post #8822022

Your article reminded me of something, Carrie. You should send your GD, the one who thinks princesses must be blond, a picture of Princess Margarette. It is Queen Margarette now, soverign of Denmark. The first woman to rule Denmark since the 1300's. She is actually a little older than I am, but I'm sure there are pictures online of her as a young princess with a crown adorning her head of dark curls. The example of a real life princess might be just the thing...minus Margarette's chain-smoking habit, of course. Being a real-life queen is evidently a very stressful job.
http://www.monstersandcritics.com/people/royalwatch/features/article_1547983.php/In-Pictures-Queen-Margrethe-s-70th-Birthday
I want to add the 'Royal Pomp' chrysanthemum to our mum collection this year. Or, at least, check it out to see if it is really fragrant. k* .
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 25, 2011
6:28 PM

Post #8823943

What do father's know! You have gorgeous hair, Carrie! My hair is thick and tends to frizz out. My Da's was solf, dark and wavy. When i was a little girl and he took me to the beauty shopto have it thinned. He would grin and make some comment to the lady behind the counter like< "Can one of you ladies do something with this kid's rat's nest to make it more manageable." Yeah, father's can definately be rough on egos. ~Nadine~ .
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 27, 2011
1:07 PM

Post #8826787

Yeah! Esecially if he drops you off at your maternal grandmothers and disappears till you hunt him up 15 years later. Then you find out he did the same thing to your half-brother.
Both you girls have beautiful hair.
My hair was straight and grandmother saw to it i had a permanent every 6 months. Thats one thing from my youth I've kept up.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 28, 2011
9:16 PM

Post #8828686

Ouch! Well, at least, learning he did the same thing to your brother must have helped you see it as his flaw and not to internalize it and think you had something to do with his actions. Is this the half-brother you finally met a few years ago?
My hair wouldn't take a perm. they were much harsher on hair way back when than they are now. For me, it was either braids or Dippety-Do and sleeping in curlers and praying the day wasn't humid so the curl would last all day. Not surprisingly, I usually opted for the braid. I wanted curly hair more than anything when I was young. k*
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 2, 2011
5:14 AM

Post #8832469

Yes,He lives in Houston. I did'nt know about him untill a couple years ago. His mother was brutelly murdered when he was about 3 or 4. It was a reporter that called me and told me about him. She wanted to do a story on his mother and the man that killed her. She wanted to know how my mother had died. (A botched surgery)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 3, 2011
9:28 AM

Post #8834239

Wow, Vicki, that's a story and a half - yours, I mean!

Fathers (Jim excepted) can really decimate a little girl's ego. I saw it happen with my two little girls and their father, and it happened with me and my sister and my father. And there's only so much a mother can do to alleviate a little or big girl's negative feelings about herself. And what is it with women/girls and their hair? I include myself in this one!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 3, 2011
12:48 PM

Post #8834492

That must have been more than a little spooky, Vickie.
Carrie, I’ve always wondered the same thing about women and their hair. I did like Kay’s hair long, but you would have thought I had threatened to leave her if she cut it the way other women responded when she had it cut this last time. There were comments like, “Oh my god, -what does Jim think of it?” Uh-h-h, I think it is her hair and she can do with it as she pleases. When I was stationed at Tyndall and Kay and I first re-connected, she had this radical cut. The back of her skull was shaved up to her ears, but the hair on top fell to about chin length. I love the lady, not the lady’s hair. I would have to be very adaptable to have stayed with her if I’d loved the hair. In the last 15-years, it has been everything from shaved off completely to falling below her waist. It has been many shades of blond, several shades of red and two shades of brunet. Straight, wavy and tightly curled. I’ve got to say though, I’m glad she settled for it straight and it’s natural color this time around and a cut that is youthful and a little sassy, but not radical. You could probably write a book the size of “War and Peace” filled with psycho-social commentary on women and their hair, Carrie. And, unlike “War and Peace”, people would actually read it without being forced to. lol. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 3, 2011
6:25 PM

Post #8834974

Hah! I just spent 15 min. on Facebook looking at all my different haircuts because I think I need a trim before we leave. There are a lot of different versions of "short back and sides" I can do with not much hair - which do I want?
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 3, 2011
11:42 PM

Post #8835254

When I travel It has to be wash and wear. I loved the cut you had in the picture you posted.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 4, 2011
10:12 AM

Post #8835737

Whether I travel or not, it has to be wash and wear!!! Which picture? (And thanks!)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2011
1:30 AM

Post #8845858

I think it was on the last thread we had before this one.
We got some rain tonight.Hurrah!!
I bought some hamburger meat and am undecided if I want spegetti and tomato sauce or soup.
Vickie

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 16, 2011
8:02 PM

Post #8851811

I love soups when the weather starts cooling off. Potato is one of my favorites. The last time Nadi made it and she put in a little sauteed hamburger meat. It was good. k*
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 17, 2011
8:15 PM

Post #8853442

...but Yogi, the carbohydrates.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 18, 2011
9:19 AM

Post #8854010

Not to worry, Boo-Boo. The batteries in Ranger Nadi's scales are missing. No weigh-in this week k*
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 19, 2011
8:28 PM

Post #8856520

The pecan and walnut trees aren't the only places you can find nuts around here. :-)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 19, 2011
8:42 PM

Post #8856529


Is that where the batteries,Igot in the mail came from? !! Is ranger Nadi being a dictator? LOL I have missed you guys.


I am on the computer all by myself. I feel very brave.Tho i miss my Webtv. Noone will let me have it back.
Am still cleaning everything I can get my hands on. It is amazing how many what-nots I have and planning on getting more.
DD and I went to get groceries tonight. Left at 2:00 and just got back. I'll get a $50 raise in SSI January. I need it.
Vickie




This message was edited Oct 19, 2011 9:46 PM
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 20, 2011
7:28 AM

Post #8856911

Hi, Vicki. :-)

If I got any batteries, they were lost in all the ones we recycle, so I would never know the difference...or be able to tell anyone.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 21, 2011
7:44 PM

Post #8858756

I just can’t seem to find the right kind of battery as a replacement either. I'm so upset. ;-)
Vickie, Kay had to re-discover computers after being away from them for 15 years. That is when I discovered she can cuss in 6 languages. I don’t have to gag her now when she is on the computer and people are around. Hang in there.
We have to give Nadine credit. Both Kay and I are losing on our individualized diets. Individualizing our meals isn’t something we would take the time to do left to our own devices. The South Beach diet is what two different doctors recommended to me and I do well on it. On the other hand, Kay didn’t really lose any weight and felt terrible when we were both trying South Beach. The doctor said it is because Kay comes from sub-Arctic stock and goes into “famine mode” very easily when calories are limited. Restricting calories automatically slows her metabolism. It doesn’t seem fair she gets to eat more fatty foods than I do and still loses weight, but I can’t argue with the results. However, she is more restricted than I am on WHAT she can eat. She gets virtually no bread or anything made with wheat flour. So, she does get the peanut butter I’m denied, but she has to eat it on celery. Ha! (Jim)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 23, 2011
2:40 PM

Post #8860537

I don’t think there have to be ancestors from the sub-arctic regions to run into the “famine mode” problem when trying to lose weight. Having a stable amount of food throughout the year is a modern phenomenon. A good indicator that it will be a dieting problem would be if you suffer from seasonal effective disorder (S.A.D.) or even really bad winter blahs. (If I understand everything right, that is part of the same misguided survival mechanism that has outlived its usefulness.) . When your body doesn’t receive the amount of calories it is accustomed to, it tries to slow down the need for fuel in order to get through the “famine”, and historically that was a long, cold winter. I do suppose the more brutal the winters your ancestors had to survive, the more likely you would be to have that survival mechanism built in and the more sensitive the trigger would be. It might also explain why those New Year’s resolution diets so often fail. Our bodies probably rebel at having calories restricted in the middle of winter. I know the thinnest I’ve ever been was when I had a high school coach that seriously made us work-out during P.E. She definitely did her part in the battle against teen obesity! I wasn’t dieting at all. Exercise is the key for me.
Vickie, ‘Smart Computing’ is one of the more useful computer magazines out there. It’s not all sales pitch and it goes into the nuts-and-bolts of computer use. If you stick this out, I bet Santa would give you a subscription for Christmas. If you can master the beast, there are little ways you can use it to supplement your income.
I took over a hundred pics while at the Agricultural Heritage Festival and Botanical Garden. I didn’t get the pictures MK wanted of the sugar cane processing. I was hanging out with the bees while they were processing the sugar cane. I got there just in time to watch the boiling down process and get a bottle of warm cane syrup. That bought me pardon until next year.
They had some outrageous “scarecrows” at the Dothan Area Botanical Gardens and some beautiful roses still in bloom. ~Nadine. Kitchen Queen and Diet Dictator

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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2011
6:32 PM

Post #8860843

Thanks Nadene for the encouragement. I will try again after Christmas. Right now I have too many irons in the fire.
Bet that was cool watching syrup being made.
I'll be glad to get my cleaning finished up so i can play with my
Christmas crafts.I am a definate hoader with craft things.
I built a fire outside tonight but the wood was too damp and I got tired of working to keep it going.

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 24, 2011
4:38 PM

Post #8862082

It's a small world.
Nadine--next time your at the Botanical Gardens visit the culinary herbs section--I have no idea what it looks like now but I originally built all of it and had 88 different herbs and spices growing.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 25, 2011
6:00 PM

Post #8863683

Vort, I'm impressed. Now I know where to come for herbal advice.
Now! If you tell me Chocolate Basil is a figment of someones imagination. I'll hang my head and cry and let it go to a natural death. Think I'll google it one more time tho.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 25, 2011
6:37 PM

Post #8863735

You lived around here once, Vort? That would explain a lot. ;-) I’ll take some pictures of the herb gardens, I think there are two, next time I go. I can post some and you can see if anything still looks familiar. I want to make another trip soon specifically to do a grand tour of the Dothan Area Botanical Gardens. I just dropped by on my way home from the Agricultural Heritage Festival at Landmark Park this last time. The master gardeners were having a plant sale at the Botanical Gardens. I didn’t intend to wander the gardens at all, but the scarecrows, late season roses and veggie garden lured me into spending time there. I stopped to smell the roses and never did get around to buying any plants. :-)
The CanDo Container Garden has turned into an herb garden so I was happy to meet a local herb grower and a beekeeper who shared her list of the best bee plants for this area. That is the coolest thing about going to places and events where gardeners congregate. ~N~

Photo: From the DABG Herb Area, Basil I think.

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VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 25, 2011
8:18 PM

Post #8863877

Sansai-that is the old herb garden---"mine" is up the hill from there with the pergola--near the greenhouses.

Watch out for Squatch up there :)

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katiebear
mulege
Mexico

October 26, 2011
7:18 AM

Post #8864284

You'll find him eating the chocolate basil. kb
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 26, 2011
9:45 PM

Post #8865319

Now the herb gardens at DABG are going to be to CB hunters, what Area 51 is to UFOlogist. No basil will go unsniffed to check for a tell-tale chocolate aroma.
Here is a source of affordable garden labor I hadn't considered before. Zombie gardeners. (Jim)

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carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 27, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8866075

Zombie gardeners? What have you-all been up to while I was gone? PS I'm back!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 27, 2011
4:37 PM

Post #8866225

When the cat is away, the mice will play. There hasn't been anyone to keep us in line so we've been up to all sorts of mischief. How was Spain? (Jim).

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 27, 2011
5:41 PM

Post #8866312

Spsin was magnifico! (Is that Spanish?)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 27, 2011
9:52 PM

Post #8866549

Sounds spanish!! Glad you're back Carrie.
I was wondering---What would Squatch have on his Christmas want list? What is he dressing up as Halloween? Miss bear has a canary costume.

This message was edited Oct 27, 2011 10:55 PM

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 28, 2011
10:24 AM

Post #8867020

Seem to have lost my ability to spell. (SPAIN, of course, not Spsin.) Actually, it's that my computer died a tragic death the day before we left, and I'm using my husband's, which does not like FF so well, so I'm being forced to do manual typo checks. I can tell it's time to change my contacts when the reading glasses don't help!

Spanish lantana (a lot like ours...)

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Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 28, 2011
12:47 PM

Post #8867106

Oh-h-h, I like the colors on that lantana. I haven’t encountered that combination before. The butterflies like lantana so much, I want to add some different kinds to our landscape.
Vickie, I think I saw mjsponies ole Dodge Ram in Halloween costume. Covert operations probably. Keeping an eye out for Squatch. BTW, do you happen to know what ammunition works best on zombies?
Don’t worry Vort, Vickie and I won’t let anyone turn you into a zombie to work in their herb garden. “Friends don’t let friends go zombie.” ~N~

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VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 28, 2011
2:41 PM

Post #8867243

:)

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 28, 2011
3:20 PM

Post #8867297

If you are planning to “save” any of the undead from an afterlife of garden drudgery this Halloween, please be certain about identification. Persons guilty of no greater crime than being avid gardeners have been misidentified as ghouls in the past. It is easy for an enthusiastic collector of vintage roses to forget that digging in a graveyard can be misconstrued by non-gardeners. (Note to rescuers of old roses: It is highly advised that you inform a cemetery grounds keeper of any rose rescue activities that involve digging in advance to avoid misunderstandings.) Just saying. If the individual in question has a pocket full of rose hips, ask before you shoot. :-) Kay

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VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 28, 2011
8:41 PM

Post #8867626

Enter the DABG------ and tread reverently--

It is the birthplace of the elusive chocolate basil--You folks are getting way too close!

The little building beneath the windmill, just south of the culinary herb garden, was Squatch's secret lab where CB was created. He calls it "Redneck Area 51"--And--here is a secret -- CB can only survive if it is watered exclusively from the sacred water from the trough beneath the windmill.

Also take heed!---- those Zombies were real human gardeners 'till they got too close to his CB patch.

There's an 'ol Dodge, with three wheels, somewhere around there.

Look up "Helen Sue" at the greenhouse and ask her about chocolate basil--Her veggie garden was next to Squatch's and was (is) one of the 8 wonders of the world.

Love your forum but will not butt in again with the history of C.B. on here.

Regards,

Squatch's adopted dad.





This message was edited Oct 28, 2011 9:49 PM
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 29, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8868098

Those in the north should be safe from ghost, ghouls and probably trick-o-treaters. I've heard they avoid snow. Kay is working her way through Christmas carol tunes trying to write a Halloween carol for you, Carrie. Snow in October! Welcome home. :-)
Barge in anytime, Vort. I'm outnumbered. Think I'll go barge in on the Herb forum and find out if Nadine's suspicions are correct. (Jim)

This message was edited Oct 29, 2011 7:46 PM
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 30, 2011
3:32 AM

Post #8868785

Vort, You are always welcome here. we'll make you an honorary member or ornry member whichever you want.
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

October 30, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8869041

Vort, I think you are as disabled as any of us, at least mentally, so you know you belong.

katie

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 30, 2011
11:12 AM

Post #8869251

LOL--Thanks
katie---THAT IS AN INSULT!!!! even if it is true. :)
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

October 30, 2011
11:35 AM

Post #8869282

No more to you than to myself and the rest of us. kb
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 30, 2011
1:42 PM

Post #8869412

As in, "I resemble that remark" ? Dats me, too. LOL
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 30, 2011
2:11 PM

Post #8869444

aup

Thumbnail by lovemyhouse
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 30, 2011
3:37 PM

Post #8869527

There is nothing wrong with me…with me…with me…with me….with me… :-)
My father was more the age of my friend’s grandfathers and he was a Type I diabetic so I’ve been hangin’ with elderly and physically challenged people all my life. It is a situation I feel perfectly comfortable in. In fact, talking to many T.A.P.’s (Kay-speak for Temporarily Able-bodied Persons) sometimes feels like I’m talking to a very intelligent kid. My intellectual equal. Or superior, but emotionally naïve. They seem sort of innocent. I feel like I need to protect them from the harsher realities of life. Like they are living in a protective bubble you don’t want to burst. Time wears away that protective bubble and no young physically challenged person is going to have a good life unless they first face the harsh realities of their situation. Growing up continually exposed to life’s harsher realities, but also continually seeing people deal effectively and with humor, I guess I never felt any need to form a protective shell. From the vast wisdom of my 24 years, I say it is just life. No one gets out of here alive and intact so you squeeze it for all the honest and real joy you can get. You learn to actually LOOK for the good things in life. lol. Like the people on the “Today, I am thankful for…” thread Debra started on the General Discussion forum.
I was SO close, Vort! I toured the Veggie Garden.

Thumbnail by Sansai87
Click the image for an enlarged view.

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 30, 2011
5:02 PM

Post #8869641

Well said Nadine.



When you were at the veggie garden you were between the lab where Squatch created CB and the herb garden where it grew before we moved it to Texas. Did you catch the lingering smell of chocolate?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 31, 2011
6:50 AM

Post #8870196

Off topic, but the Halloween article that had its origins right here on this very thread appears today. Happy Halloween, or All Hallow's Eve, or eve of All Saints' Day or whatever, but here's the article for your perusal.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/3369/#discuss

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 31, 2011
7:23 AM

Post #8870234

Neat article carrie
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 31, 2011
3:11 PM

Post #8870862

Carrie, it is Candy Corn Day, if you ask my dearly beloved. I'm almost afraid to grow a plant named after candy corn...
I like those, Debra. What are they? :-)
The Great Oz has to do some serious work with this guy. It seems only logical that a scarecrow made out of tin will need both a heart AND a brain.

Thumbnail by seacanepain
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 31, 2011
3:39 PM

Post #8870895

Profusion Zinnias. The landlord's landscape company put them out in Spring and most fried fast. But obviously reseeded first. :-) I like them, too.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 31, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8871093

I smell chocolate!

Thumbnail by Amargia
Click the image for an enlarged view.

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

October 31, 2011
6:43 PM

Post #8871126

Oh my gosh folks---what a small world---You are looking at the nursery were CB was raised as a mere babe.
The windmill in the background stands beside the lab where Squatch created the little monster that would for evermore haunt the dreams of Dave's CB searchers.
I think we moved just in time--"ya'll" are getting way too close on the trail.

We're going to have to transform Kay into a Zombie---She's too persistent.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 1, 2011
5:28 AM

Post #8871554

Vort! You leave Kay alone or you will have the granny goons come visit you.LOL

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 1, 2011
6:09 PM

Post #8872535

Thanks, Vort! I have been writing all afternoon and haven't even looked up. This two articles a month thing is going to take some doing.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 1, 2011
9:28 PM

Post #8872824

It's okay, Vickie. I have often been compared to a garden zombie, especially when I go out to work in the garden first thing in the morning before I have my coffee. I'm looking forward to seeing all the entries in next year's scarecrow building contest. k*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 2, 2011
8:13 AM

Post #8873163

Well if there are really zombies, I hope I meet one like Kay!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

November 2, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8873530

Writing under a deadline must be tough, Carrie. Are you still working with your DH’s computer? I hoped to have the Amargia website up and running today. But, Kay says there is no way she can keep a website current and active until she finishes the hardscaping. She says aside from all the writing itself there is the research and fact-checking on what she THINKS she knows. Nadine has a job now proofreading the work of would-be novelist in addition to her normal data entry. The last thing she wants to do with her time off is spend more time at the computer. She has no medical insurance so making enough money to pay for medical test is more important than anything else at the moment. She is still being plagued by chronic fatigue. That can be symptomatic of so many different things; it comes down to an elimination process. I'm just the maintenance man, tech staff and comic relief around here. I wouldn’t attempt the writing jobs alone. The reason I never went beyond Tech Sergeant was the higher the rank, the more paperwork there is. :-(
I got a good laugh today. Kay has a couple of army cots outside where she takes her noon break once S.A.D. symptoms start to creep in. A daily dose of sunlight is said to help keep the winter blahs away. Today I thought I would join her to see if sunlight would really help my psoriasis as I have heard. I discovered the second army cot was already occupied. Kay was sunning herself in one and Fenny-dog was doing likewise in the other. lol. There are times I wonder if that is really a dog or some alien life form sent to observe us. :-) (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 2, 2011
2:41 PM

Post #8873565

Nadine has no health insurance? But that's not good, in fact it's very bad. Does she have any options? Does she qualify for Medicaid in Alabama? Health Insurance is what made the decision for us about moving to NC. Now DH is entertaining dreams that JB will open a station in D/FW and that he'll be the general manager.

I got my computer back but it has no software on it. It can do Firefox but not save a picture! I need to remedy the situation soon - I can't get anything done like this. Hopefully writing on a deadline will make me more efficient. Instead of writing a 2,500 word article and then cutting it down to 1200 words, I'll write 525 word ones, I hope.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2011
2:09 AM

Post #8874221

OH Carrie, It'd be so much fun to have you in Dallas. HOWEVER!!! You and Debra cannot get together without ME. I know Jim and family are going to move to an Arkansas mountaintop anytime now.
I'm looking forward to reading somemore of your writings.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 4, 2011
2:51 PM

Post #8876650

Nadi falls between the cracks when it comes to medical insurance. My doctor is retiring because he doesn't like what is on the horizon. Soon it may be cash-up-front for good medical care.
Debra, I’ll have to add the Green Amber Gardens hat to my collection. I like the new tag line you chose.
There was no sunning today for Fenny or I. It was 65° at noon with a biting north wind. Fenny hates cold as much as I do. This morning she picked up her dog bowl, carried her breakfast to her bed and ate while under her blankets. I either need a heavier dog bowl or Fenny needs to learn to eat neater.
You need to warn Squatch, Vort. If Big&Hairy doesn’t get that library book back in time, Nadi is going to report him to “The Librarian.” In 4.4 of this article note that “the librarian” can travel through L-space to our dimension so Nadi’s threats should be taken seriously. k*
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Librarian_%28Discworld%29#Librarian


This message was edited Nov 4, 2011 3:58 PM

VORTREKER

VORTREKER
POTTSBORO, TX
(Zone 7b)

November 4, 2011
6:46 PM

Post #8876950

kud, I told him and he just shrugged and said "that's my cousin".
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 4, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8877001

Thank you, Kay. Hoped you would like it. Always knew something was a bit off. Lisa (1lisac who posted the original prayer request for Josh Cullins's family) finally pinpointed the discordancy for me in using 'one little tree...' with sunflowers and daylilies. With you supplying the site name and her goosing me on the tag line, we have a true group effort going. I am so happy to have been able to ship the family his daylily for receipt on the one year anniversary of his body's arrival back in the United States. And grateful for their support of not just Green Amber Gardens, but also the cafepress store. Been having a lot of fun creating bumper stickers. 'Fraid by time I'm done, there'll be more of those than everything else put together. LOL We have two veterans (one served in Desert Storm) at my office and I'm also having fun, with their input, making 'MEN' t-shirt designs for them. No frilly frou-frou pink, Jim!!
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 6, 2011
4:12 PM

Post #8879314

Look how intensely colored this Salvia is today. I do love Fall in Texas. :-)

Thumbnail by lovemyhouse
Click the image for an enlarged view.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
4:36 PM

Post #8879350

Wow, I love that blue, it's so intense, as you say. My front door is that color. ^_^
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

November 6, 2011
7:26 PM

Post #8879606

Oh, yours looks better than mine. Mine was in the bed the wasp took over this summer and it didn't get the care it should have. Maybe next year.
MK just traded for 4 new agastache varieties. Do agastache bloom into the fall? ~N~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
3:56 AM

Post #8879767

OK I'm ignorant whats an agastache?
Spring in Texas is the most memorable for me. Love those Bluebonnets.
Carrie, I want a red door.
Heard a gun go off shortly after dark. Decided we have poachers. That has got to end!Maybe I'm just being paranoid. Never a dull moment in these thar hills!
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

November 7, 2011
10:14 AM

Post #8880183

It's the drinking some hunters do that scares me. Alcohol and guns. BAD combination. Fenny isn't liking it, but she isn't allowed to run in the woods until hunting season is over. Sorry, I guess I should have said MK traded for some new kinds of hyssop. ~N~

This message was edited Nov 7, 2011 1:29 PM
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 7, 2011
2:50 PM

Post #8880538

Nadine, this one is...

Tutti Frutti Agastache

Thumbnail by lovemyhouse
Click the image for an enlarged view.

cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
10:44 PM

Post #8881032

Nadene, You were in the right. I just need to learn latin names. LOL
Beautiful color on that flower.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 8, 2011
8:42 AM

Post #8881471

Mmmm I love those but it is really too damp here to have really good luck with them. Agastache and most salvias are better treated as annuals; they are so fussy about their semi-arid requirements. Like just work 11/2-2 inches of pea gravel into your garden and then make a little hill anywhere you want to plant one so that water never pools! That's for agastaches, at least. Salvias, just add a few zones onto what it says on the label, ie if the label says hardy to z. 6 expect it's hardy to z. 7, we're in z. 6 so we need one that's hardy to z. 5 or z. 4. We've fallen for the pretty colored agastaches a few times from High Country Gardens but it was a summer we were eating outside a lot. So we just had it in a pot in the table we were eating at so we could admire it--with all senses--but then by the time we got it in the ground it was too late for it to grow enough roots (despite all my advice about planting perennials in the fall) and it froze. That was a wet, icy winter which is the opposite of the kind they like. (Cold and dry.) I like the orange and orange-and-pink ones!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

November 8, 2011
5:10 PM

Post #8882151

How neat to have a door that shade of blue. My front door is copper, but I want to replace it in spring. Nothing against Kay’s color choice, I just want a wider door. I’m a big guy so my w/c is wider than most. Isn’t there a perfume called Red Door?
I’m looking forward to sitting on the front porch and watching my hummers enjoy the new hyssops. Kay got the rowdy kinds that have to be corralled. The wild Texas variety, Orange hummingbird mint, Sunset and a thread-leaf type. (Jim)


This message was edited Nov 8, 2011 11:10 PM
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2011
3:30 AM

Post #8884277

There was a song in the 50,s called "What goes on behind
the green door?"
I used to have orange and apple mints but they died out.
Our hummers have left for greener pastures. PROBABLY to Alabama.LOL
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 10, 2011
5:58 AM

Post #8884402

well traveled, then?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2011
11:43 AM

Post #8884839

lol.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 10, 2011
11:53 AM

Post #8884874

I think the hummingbirds left here today. They are on their way down to visit Katiebear. We will have a nighttime low of 34° tonight.
Speaking of what goes on behind green doors, Nadi just finished proofreading an erotic fantasy novel. She asked me if I had any brain bleach. :-) Oh well, it paid well and she has more money for medical test. She has more than sufficient keyboarding speed to do medical transcription and ask if I would teach her that. She swears she would rather type autopsy reports than do another job like the last. We will see. k*
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

November 10, 2011
12:35 PM

Post #8884933

It was one of those supernatural romance things that are the rage. I hope that fad burns itself out soon. I’m sorry. Obviously, some women think a vampire would be hot, but I’m not one of them. Who wants to kiss on something that has been dead a hundred years? Anyway, a vampire is basically an intelligent tick. The werewolves aren’t TOO bad, but the vampires make me nauseous. Nope, just doesn’t do anything for me. MAN, the lengths I go to for good health!!! Where is that brain bleach? lol. ~N~
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

November 10, 2011
10:06 PM

Post #8885582

Br-r-r. Fenny says she wants to fly down and visit Kb too. She woke me up trying to steal the extra blanket off my bed. We rearranged the office so the gas fireplace was centered on a wall instead of in the corner and they don't hook us back up to the tank until tomorrow. That dog hates the cold. I bought her a sweatshirt last winter but it was a little too tight for her. When I finish organizing the art and sewing stuff in the barn, I'm going to make my first project a pair of footie pajamas for Fenny. :-)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 11, 2011
6:17 AM

Post #8885734

I want Fenny photos, then. :D
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

November 11, 2011
10:34 AM

Post #8885978

It is still t-shirt weather here. I just got back from Ca. Seem to have lost a pair of large clippers that I bought for Tony. Think my brain got fried this summer.

hugs, kb

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2011
12:12 PM

Post #8886050

maybe brain bleach would help kb too? I'd like to try some, for one you can't get an idiotic song out of your head...

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 11, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8886513

Commercial jingles are the worst. They must put brain glue on those.
I think a yellow flannel nightgown would be better for Fenny. I'm surprised Jim would want to put anyone in footie pajamas. He fell down the stairs when he was very little and broke his collar bone. He blamed the footie pajamas for his fall and refused to wear them afterwards. Of course, he also told us he had gotten out of bed just to get a glass of water. Yeah, right. The little brat was spying on his elders.
Vickie, I was just reading Carrie's most recent. Did you also have to grow up listening to adults telling you how hard they had it in those years? In my experience, the stories usually ended with a comment on how spoiled young people are now. I caught myself saying something like that not long ago. OMG, this is bad. I'm becoming my mother! I even believe what I'm saying. They do seem spoiled to me. I think I'm actually becoming old. Is there a cure? k*
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 11, 2011
7:31 PM

Post #8886575

Not old--aware and appreciative.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 12, 2011
4:48 PM

Post #8887573

I want some Fenny photos too. My poor ole Dillen is in the doggy hospital. He got fluid on the flap of his ear(No ear infection) They had to operate and put a drainage tube in. He was just supposed to stay overnight but the drainage was so much,They're keeping him for the weekend.They don't know what caused it. No heartworms or tickfever.At least he's had a complete checkup. He's quiet and laid back but I really miss him. He kinda reassures me. When he starts barking I know there is something to bark at around.
Have been crocheting alot. Scooter decided it would be great fun to take a couple of skeins of yarn outside to play with. I collected the yarn and beat him with it.LOL He was'nt impressed.But the word NO probably stuck in his mind.He's a good dog.
SIL got a deer this first day of deer season. There were two trucks parked alongside our road,when I went out to check the mail.
Have'nt been able to sleep in a couple of days. Restless Leg Syndrom has had me climbing the walls.
No cure for old.Just insist you are in your second childhood and have fun. Just blame the grey hair on the kids. The wrinkles on the DH.The aches and pains on a fun life.
I think the young people today in general are spoiled and ignorant. I just shake my head in amazment when someone goes out to interview young people and they don't seem to know,Who the president is,Whats the capital of Arkansas,Is the moon a star. etc
My grandmother had to work hard as well as go to school. Yeppee I,myself had to walk a mile to school everyday. No TV. We did have a Jersey Queen.You knew you'd get a spanking in school if you misbehaved. Unwed mothers were a social no no. The very worst of the worst tho was girls were not supposed to be smart in the sciences.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 14, 2011
10:51 AM

Post #8889911

The thing that bugs me the most, well everything bugs me, but one of my pet peeves is the way girls and young women don't care if their underwear esp. bra straps are showing! I remember in 6th grade saying "it's snowing down South" if a girl's slip were showing. Now nobody wears slips! Or panties. THe bra straps are another thing--if they don't wear bras they don't get the push up so they all wear bras--and the straps always show. I try to coordinate my bras to my shirts because I'm kind of slope-shouldered and don't have good posture, so often my bra shows by accident, and I want it to look like part of my clothes. My kids think I'm silly.

Amargia

Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 15, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8891257

YES, Vickie, and it even extended into what was "proper" for a young lady to read. Science fiction was very definitely considered proper reading only for boys. I had to stuff my Heinlein and Asimov under the mattress or behind the Nancy Drew mysteries like they were contraband. I tried pointing out once that women were WRITING science fiction, but there were few female SF writers published then. Leigh Brackett and, later, Ursula K. LeGuin. The male-female SF writer ratio is still lopsided, but getting better.
Carrie, I had that disagreement with Nadi not to long ago and came to the same resolution. She likes the extreme boatneck necklines and the style does look good on her, but there really isn't a way to wear that style without a bra strap showing.
When Mindy was a teenager having lots of frills showing at your hemline was the style...and you finished off the look with what amounted to combat boots. :-) I learned not to argue with my daughters much about what they wore because they would inevitably drag out some old pictures of me back in the 60's. lol. Not much I could say after that. k*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 15, 2011
10:15 AM

Post #8891285

She can wear a tank top or a sports bra that looks like a tank top -- but I'll get out of the way here. (ducking)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 15, 2011
11:11 PM

Post #8892242

I'll duck too. We can't leave the boys out. How about those droopy shorts that look like they'll fall off any moment. LOL

Thought it time to start a new thread.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1230210/

This message was edited Nov 16, 2011 1:27 AM

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