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Handyman: need advice on old storm windows

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ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

July 25, 2011
11:39 AM

Post #8714374

This a big project for me to take on but I can't afford new windows. Most need new glazing, all need fresh paint.
First issue is the glazing. I'm in the prosess of removing the old glazing. Should I put linseed or primer on before the glazing? Is there any product that is easier than Dap? How dry does the glazing need to be before you paint it? It's really humid now. I've done some touch-ups over the years and it hasn't stayed in very well. I'm doing something wrong.
Now, the paint. Some parts I can scrape down to bare wood, some not. I suppose the bare wood should be primed. The old paint was oil-based. Can I paint water based over oil or should I prime the whole window, then paint?
Any advice would be greatly appreciated!


ecrane3
Dublin, CA
(Zone 9a)

July 25, 2011
6:44 PM

Post #8715163

I can't help you on the glazing questions, but you can't paint water based paint over oil, you'd need to use primer first.
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

July 26, 2011
7:19 PM

Post #8717296

Good to know, ecrane, that's probably why the last paint didn't stay on so well. Now, I hope someone knows something about glazing. I'm always a bit sceptical of advice from someone that is trying to sell you something.
raisedbedbob
Walkerton, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 6, 2011
5:32 AM

Post #8739801

A question, ghopper: Are you temporarily removing the glass panes as part of your project; or are you just scraping off the old stuff and moving on?
RBB
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

August 6, 2011
10:43 AM

Post #8740236

I'm leaving the glass panes in place. Some of the old glazing is in pretty good shape so I've decided to just remove the bad stuff. That is now done and I've applied linseed oil to those areas. While that is soaking in I'm priming the other side of the windows a few at a time. The temps are a bit better now, mid 80's, but the humidity is still high and it takes forever for stuff to dry.
Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 6, 2011
4:31 PM

Post #8740768

This brings back memories. I did 17 windows on my last house.
Linseed oil before glazing is recommended. An oil based primer Can be painted over with latex if the primer is low luster or flat finish.
Be sure to stabilize the glass with those clips/triangles. You can use the glazing in tubes like caulking. Have a 1 inch flexible plaster (putty) knife to run along the bead of glaze at an angle that matches the old stuff.
Let the linseed oil and oil primer cure at least a day each before painting. Two finish coats recommended.
Please use a quality sash brush! ! ! A good brush can give you a clean sharp line for minimal razor work.
Be careful with the razor blade. DO NOT chisel into the glazing. Cut a straight line 1/16 inch onto the glass then run the blade straight along the cut to lift the excess paint. This leaves a good seal
Andy P
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

August 7, 2011
6:10 AM

Post #8741487

Now that's advice I can use...Thank You! I've done minor repairs in the past but they haven't held. Now I know it's because I didn't let the linseed cure. The clips are all in place, still. I'm thinking I may second coat the primer over spots where the wood was bare. Another big problem is keeping my new puppy busy so I don't trip over her while moving windows around. This has been kind of a fun project so far. Can only work with 4 windows at a time on each step as I don't have much room in the shed. Will have to check on the sash brush. Sounds like a good idea. Thanks!
Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 7, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8742051

I like an angle cut sash brush rather than the straight cut. Angle cut make a nicer edge IMHO. Quality matters a lot. Expect to pay over $12 for a good 2.5 inch brush, $15 for a 3 ". Worcester and Purdy are the best. All brands have a variety of quality grades. Hold the brush, feel for softness and quantity of bristles. More bristles will hold more paint.
I've been a professional painter for decades. I hear disgruntled would be painters complaining all the time. They hate painting and they do a lousy job. I look at their equipment and see the reason. Throw away brushes, the cheapest roller sleeves & arms. And worst of all ~ Masking tape, arghhh. They spend days masking everything when a good brush and steady hand will do a better job with less clean up.
Don't think for a minute the guy behind the counter at a big box store knows more than you. If you need advise go to a smaller independent paint store. The guy/gal behind the counter there will help.
While shopping pick up a brush brush. They look like a stainless steel or brass tooth brush. Use the brush brush to start cleaning the brush. A real time saver. Always wrap the brush in the case it came in and hang it up to dry. The case will maintain the straight bristles.
Andy P
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

August 9, 2011
6:48 AM

Post #8746219

Now you've touched on a big problem for me. I agree that quality brushes are well worth the money. I just never seem to get them cleaned properly when using oil based paint. Perhaps the brush brush is part of the answer. The smell of paint thinner puts me off so I probably don't stick with the cleaning process long enough.
Big box stores are fine for paper towels and notebooks but I never count on them for plants or paint! Love to go to the local stores where "everybody knows my name."
Today I start the glazing. Wish me luck! And thanks for your input!
Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 9, 2011
10:17 AM

Post #8746614

I actually enjoyed the window glazing/painting project. I did remove the glass, though. This allowed me to oil the sash add a little glazing then re-seat the glass with new clips. There were so many broken panes it was a habit by the time I got to the whole windows, lol.
Do they glide up & down smoothly? Sash cords?
Let the glazing cure for a full day before painting. Paint too soon and it will crack & break the seal.
Andy P
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

August 10, 2011
7:16 AM

Post #8748338

My first day of glazing went pretty well. Maybe not professional looking, but way good enough. Was getting better as I went along. I considered removing the glass but decided againt it. None of the windows are broken and I didn't want to chance it by trying to get the solid glazing out. Call me a chicken!
These are the old removable storm windows. Will need to patch the outside of the inside windows, too. Want to get the storms done first.
OK...sash cords...Do you mean the cords that hold the wieghts inside the window it'self? Several of those are broken. Someday I'll need to dig in there and replace them. So for now they get braced up with a piece of wood. I'm pretty good at making do!
Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 10, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8748373

Good luck and have fun. There is nothing like practice to improve speed & quality of the work.
I didn't realise these were removable storms. You should be expert when you start on the interior windows, lol. Changing sash cords is easy with a few tricks, post again when that starts if you need help.
Andy P
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

August 12, 2011
11:39 AM

Post #8752289

Are you still out there Andy? Another question. How solid should the glaze be before painting it? Most of the windows have been glazed for several days now but I can still easily leave a fingerprint in it. They're sitting in a shed with the doors open and a fan running, also the humidity isn't as bad as it had been. Should I go ahead and prime and paint them or let them dry further and go on to another project?
I did get some good sash brushes and they work like a charm. Found some brush brushes, too. I'll try to do a better job with the brushes when I get back to the oil based primer.
Thanks for hanging in here with me.
Sarahskeeper
Brockton, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 12, 2011
2:35 PM

Post #8752584

Finger prints? What did you use for glaze? The stuff takes for ever to harden but it should resist finger prints after a day.
Check the label/directions to see if it needs priming. It may not if it's latex based.

There's a trick to use the brush brush. Always brush down away from where the bristles are attached to the handle, never brush up. A squirt of liquid soap at the start helps clean latex. Save the dirty ThinX paint thinner after using it to clean oil paint. It can be used again after the muck settles. Always use virgin thinner for the last rinse.
ghopper
Brewster, MN
(Zone 4b)

August 16, 2011
6:35 AM

Post #8759205

Guess the choice got made for me, got sidetracked with other stuff and now the glaze has set up nicely. I'm using Dap. Now the Fair will be keeping me busy for several days so it'll be even better. I'll get a chance to try the b-b when I get back to the windows. So many fun profects, so little time.

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