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Recipes: Native American Recipes and Plant Uses

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maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2011
8:46 PM

Post #8720060

Kawonkamish Nishnoh(Greetings Everyone),

I will be posting some Native American recipes you may like to try. I will start off with recipes containing Sunflower seeds. Koowomantam(Enjoy)!


Sunflower Seed Cakes/Sunflower Bannock (Algonquin speaking tribes)
3 cups Sunflower seeds, shelled (fresh or dried)
3 cups water
6 tbsp fine Cornmeal
2 tsp maple syrup or honey
1/2 cup Sunflower oil

Bring water to a boil in a heavy saucepan; reduce heat. Add the seeds and simmer, covered, for 1 hour. Strain the seeds and grind.
Make a stiff dough by mixing in the cornmeal and syrup, alternating,1 tablespoon at a time. Shape into firm, flat cakes 3-inches in diameter.
Heat oil in a heavy skillet; brown cakes in the oil on both sides. Drain on brown paper and serve hot. Makes 15 cakes.


Sunflower Coffee (Many Eastern Tribes)
Roast the hulls and seeds; grind. Measure and brew as you would regular coffee.


Sunflower Tobacco (Many Eastern Woodland Tribes)
Dry leaves and use in place of tobacco.


Hickory Nut-Corn Pudding (Eastern Algonquin speaking tribes, Cherokee and Creek)
3/4 cup Hickory nuts, roasted, shelled and chopped
1½ cups Corn, cooked
2 tbsp nut butter
1 cup boiling water
2 eggs, beaten
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp fine Cornmeal
1/4 cup Sweet Goldenrod blossoms

Preheat oven to 350°F. Combine 1/2 a cup Hickory nut meats, corn, nut butter, water, eggs, honey, cornmeal and Sweet Goldenrod blossoms thoroughly and pour into a well-greased casserole. Sprinkle the top with 1/4 cup Hickory nut meats and bake for 1 hour. Serve hot. Makes 6 servings.


Aquene(Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo(SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")


This message was edited Jul 30, 2011 7:08 PM

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 27, 2011
9:05 PM

Post #8720111

Here are a few more recipes for Hickory nuts.


Hickory Nut Milk (Algonquin speaking tribes, Cherokee and Creek)
Hickory nuts, roasted and shelled
Water

Grind the nuts, then place meal in a heavy saucepan. Add water and bring to a boil. Strain the out the meal; reserve the oily part of the liquid. It will be rich like fresh cream.


Hickory Nut Butter (Algonquin speaking tribes, Cherokee and Creek)
1 cup Hickory nut meats, roasted and shelled
2 tsp honey or maple syrup(optional)

Grind nut meats into a paste with a stone, grinder, mortar and pestle, blender or food processor. Sweeten if desired with the honey or maple syrup. Keep refrigerated. Good with bread, cakes fruit or vegetables.


Pumpkin-Hickory Cakes(Algonquin speaking tribes)
2 cups fine Cornmeal
1 cup Potato flour
1½ cups stewed or steamed Pumpkin meat, beaten smooth
3/4 cup Hickory nuts, roasted, shelled and chopped
1 egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water
1/2 cup maple syrup or honey

Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix together the cornmeal and potato flour in a large bowl. Gradually add the remaining ingredients to the flours, blending thoroughly into a smooth batter. Pour into a well-greased 9" x 5" loaf pan and bake for 1¼ hours or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean. You can also spoon the batter into greased muffin tins and bake until golden on top, about 25 minutes.


Aquene(Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo(SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

This message was edited Jul 30, 2011 7:07 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

July 28, 2011
5:29 PM

Post #8721783

Cool... the hickory nut recipes sound interesting although I doubt I could find the nits for sale locally. They DO grow here, just none on our hill, nor nearby.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 29, 2011
4:31 PM

Post #8723923

Nice idea. Could you please credit the tribe's recipes that you post? I'd like to know what region and people the food is coming from. I'm sure Seminole food is nothing like Navajo. I see you are from MA. Are you Wampanoag?
Aquene

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 30, 2011
4:34 PM

Post #8725972

MaypopLaurel wrote:Nice idea. Could you please credit the tribe's recipes that you post? I'd like to know what region and people the food is coming from. I'm sure Seminole food is nothing like Navajo. I see you are from MA. Are you Wampanoag?
Aquene


Kawonkamish MaypopLaurel,

I will go back and try to post the tribe the recipes come from; I am not sure if I have all the tribes listed in my papers. As for the name Wampanoag, it is a broad term, that the English called the northeastern coastal native tribes*. It encompassed many different tribes in New England. I believe am part of the Chappiquiddic Band, which is an off shoot of the Pokanoket Tribe (but more genealogical research needs doing, to be 100% sure).

EDIT: So far, We can trace Mattakeesett, Mashpee, and possibly Chappiquiddic and Narraganset.(still not 100% sure of the last two)

Aquene,
WautuckquesSochepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")-(")

* NORTHEAST COASTAL NATIVE TRIBES
Gay Head or Aquinnah (western point of Martha's Vineyard)
Chappiquiddic (Chappaquiddick Island)
Nantucket (Nantucket Island)
Nauset (Cape Cod)
Mashpee (Cape Cod)
Mattakeesett (Barnstable, Yarmouth Port Massachusetts)
Patuxet (eastern Massachusetts, on Plymouth Bay)
Pokanoket (eastern Massachusetts and Rhode Island (RI) near present-day Bristol, RI)
Pocasset (present day north Fall River, Massachusetts)
Herring Pond (Plymouth & Cape Cod)
Assonet (Freetown)
and approximately 50 more groups


This message was edited Sep 4, 2011 3:43 PM

This message was edited May 6, 2014 12:53 PM

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

July 30, 2011
7:04 PM

Post #8726294

Kawonkamish Nishnoh (Greetings Everyone),

These are plants used by Native peoples for tobacco.

Mountain Alder- Alnus viridis ssp. crispa Dried bark is pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Red Alder- Alnus rubra Dried bark is pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
New England Aster-Aster novae-angliae and spp. Dried roots and blossoms are pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Bearberry, Kinnikinnick- Arctostaphylos uva-ursi Dried leaves are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Wild Bergamot- Monarda fistulosa Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Clover- Trifolium spp. Dried leaves and blossoms are pulverized and used to flavor herbal mixes and snuff.
Sweet Clover- Melilotus spp. Dried leaves and blossoms are pulverized and used to flavor herbal mixes and snuff.
Corn- Zea mays Cornsilks can be dried and rolled in the dried leaves and smoked as cigarettes..
Sweet Coltsfoot- Petasites palmata and P. frigidus var. palmatus. Dried leaves were smoked as a sore throat remedy.
Dittany- Cunila origanoides Dried leaves are pulverized and used to flavor smoking mixtures.
Dogwood- Cornus sericea Dried bark is pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Panicled Dogwood- Cornus racemosa and spp. Dried bark is pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Red Osier Dogwood- Cornus stolonifera and spp. Dried bark is pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Life Everlasting- Gnaphalium hydrocephaly Dried blossoms and leaves were smoked as a sore throat and headache remedy.
Pearly Everlasting- Anaphalis margaritacea Dried blossoms and leaves were smoked as a sore throat and headache remedy.
Goldenrod- Solidago spp. Dried blossoms and leaves are used to flavor smoking mixtures.
Juniper Berries- Juniperus communis and spp. Dried berries used to flavor smoking mixtures.
Licorice- Glyccyrrhiza glabra Dried blossoms and leaves are used to flavor smoking mixtures.
Field Mint- Mentha spp. Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Wild Mint- Mentha punctata Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Meadowsweet Spiraea alba and spp. Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Mullein- Verbascum thapsus Dried leaves were smoked as an asthma remedy.
Partridgeberry- Mitchella repens Dried leaves are pulverized and used to flavor smoking mixtures.
Pussytoes- Antennaria neglecta Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Sacred Tobacco- Nicotiana rustica, N. tabacum Dried leaves are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Indian Tobacco- Lobelia infalata and spp. Dried blossoms and leaves were smoked (in moderation) as an asthma remedy. Plant can be poisonous if used in quantity
Sassafras- Sassafras albidum and spp. Bark of dried root is pulverized and smoked like tobacco.
Smooth Sumac- Rhus glabra Dried leaves, berries and bark are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Staghorn Sumac- Rhus typhina and spp. Dried leaves, berries and bark are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Sunflower- Helianthus annuus Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked alone or in herbal mixes.
Willow- Salix spp. Dried bark is pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Yarrow- Achillea millefolium Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes.
Woolly Yarrow- Achillea lanulosa and spp. Dried leaves and flowers are pulverized and smoked in herbal mixes
Wild Lettuce- Lactuca virosa and spp. Dried leaves were smoked for it's hypnotic and sedative qualities.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8727201

Thanks for the education about the tribes. As for the native tobacco...so glad I don't smoke anymore! Peacing out pipeless.
Laurel
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 31, 2011
12:51 PM

Post #8727777

Ethnobotany by Erna Gunther is a wonderful read for folks interested in tribal uses of native plants.
ZZsBabiez
Lodi, CA
(Zone 9b)

July 31, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8727796

Very interesting indeed! Thank you Maccionoadha
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

July 31, 2011
4:40 PM

Post #8728273

About Erna:

http://www.washington.edu/research/pathbreakers/1930a.html

http://www.burkemuseum.org/exhibits/browse/ethnobotanical_garden

This message was edited Aug 1, 2011 12:44 AM

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2011
10:03 AM

Post #8736522

Kawonkamish Nishnoh (Greetings Everyone),

The following are natural flours and flour extenders. All you need do is dehydrate and grind them, except for Cattail and Great Bulrush pollen; they are the finest flour in nature and need no sifting or refining. Also Red Oak Acorns must be soaked, in several water baths, to remove the tannin which is toxic.

The name of the plant, the part of the plant used and the harvest times are as follows: A: All year, Sp: Spring, S: Summer, MS: Midsummer, F: Fall.

White Oak Acorn- Quercus alba: nutmeats (S,F)
Red Oak Acorn- Quercus rubra (must be leached of tannin): nutmeats (S,F)
Arrowhead- Sagittaria latifolia: tubers (S,F)
Beech- Fagus grandifolia: nutmeats (F)
Black Walnut- Juglans nigra: nutmeats (F)
Butternut Juglans cinerea: nutmeats (F)
Cattail- Typha latifolia: roots, pollen (A, MS)
Corn- Zea mays: kernels (S,F)
Daylily- Hemerocallis spp.: tuber (S,F)
Dock- Rumex crispus and sp.: seeds (F)
Great Bulrush- Scirpus validus: roots, pollen, seeds (S,F)
Green Amaranth- Amaranthus retroflexus and spp.: seeds (S,F)
Groundnut- Apios americana: tubers (S,F)
Hazelnut- Corylus americana, C. cornuta: nutmeats (F)
Hickory- Carya spp.: nutmeats (F)
Jerusalem Artichoke Helianthus tuberosus: tubers (F)
Lamb's Quarters- Chenopodium album: seeds (F)
Potato- Solanum tuberosum: tubers (F)
Purslane- Portulaca oleracea: seeds (F)
Shepherd's Purse- Capsella bursapastoris: seeds (F)
Sunflower- Helianthus annuus: seeds (F)
Sweet Potato- Ipomoea batatas: tuber (S,F)
Wild Leek- Allium allegheniense, A. burdickii, A. tricoccum: bulb, greens (Sp)
Wild Rice- Zizania palustris, Z. aquatica, Z. texana : seeds (F)
Yellow Pond Lily- Nuphar lutea: tubers (F)


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

This message was edited Aug 14, 2011 5:14 PM

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 14, 2011
5:24 PM

Post #8756515

Kawonkamish,

These plants are good for salads and for raw nibbles.

Usage Codes:
F = Food
T = Technology
C = Charm
D = Dye
B = Beverage
M = Medicine

Harvest-time Codes:
A = Autumn
As = All season (growing season)
Ay = All year
MS = Mid-Summer
Sp = Spring
S = Summer
W = Winter

Wild Vegetables and Flavorings (Raw)
Barberry- Berberis vulgaris, B. canadensis: leaves, berries (M, B, D, F) Sp
Blackberry- Rubus ssp.: shoots, leaves (M, B, F) Ay
Brooklime- Veronica americana: leaves, stems (M, F) Sp, S
Burdock- Arctium lappa: leaves, leaf stalks (F) Sp, S
Calamus- Acorus Calamus var. americanus: shoots (M, F,) Sp
Catbrier- Smilax rotundifolia: shoots, leaves (B, F) Sp, S
Cattail- Typha latifolia: shoots, stems, pollen (T, B, F) Ay, Sp, MS
Chickweed- Stellaria media: leaves (F) Sp, S, A
Chicory- Cichorium intybus: leaves (B, F) Sp
Chive, Wild- Allium schoenoprasum : leaves, blossoms (M, F,) As
Cleavers- Galium aparine: shoots (T, B, F) Sp
Clover- Trifolium spp: leaves, blossoms (M, B, F) As
Coriander- Eryngium foetidum: leaves, seeds (F) As
Dandelion- Taraxacum officinale: leaves, blossoms (M, B, F) Sp
Daylily- Hemerocallis spp.: tubers, blossoms (F) Sp, S
Dewberry- Rubus alter, Rubus sp.: shoots, leaves (M, B) Sp, S
Dill- Anethum graveolens: leaves, seeds (M, F) As
Great Bulrush- Scirpus validus: shoots, pollen (T, F) Sp, S
Horseradish- Armoracia lapathifoli, A. rusticana: young leaves (M, F) Sp
Indian Cucumber- Medeola virginiana: roots (F) As
Jerusalem Artichoke- Helianthus tuberosus: tubers (F) A
Lamb's Quarters- Chenopodium album: leaves, seeds (F) As
Leek, Wild- Allium allegheniense, A. burdickii, A. tricoccum: bulbs, leaves (F) Sp
Milkweed- Asclepias syriaca: young sprouts (T, M) Sp
Mint, Wild- Mentha punctata: leaves (C, M, B, F) As
Mustard, Wild Black- Brassica nigra: leaves (F) Sp
Nasturtium- Tropaeolum majus, spp.: leaves, buds, blossoms (F) As
Onion, Wild- Allium cernuum, spp.: bulbs, greens (M, D, F) As
Pasture Brake Fern- : fiddlehead (C, F) Early Sp
Pennyroyal- hedeoma pulegioides: leaves (M, B, F) As
Purslane- Portulaca oleracea: leaves, stalks (F) As
Raspberry- Rubus idaeus, spp.: shoots, leaves, berries (M, B, F) As
Rose- Rosa virginiana: blossoms, hips (C, M, B, F) As
Sheep Sorrel- Rumex acetosella: leaves (F) Sp
Shepherd's Purse- Capsella bursapastoris: leaves (F) Sp, S
Thistle- Cirsium vulgare, C. arvense, C. scariosum: leaves (T, F) Sp
Violet- Viola sororia, V. novae-angliae, spp.: leaves, blossoms (M, F) Sp, S
Watercress- Nasturtium officinale : leaves, shoots (F) As
Winter Cress- Barbarea verna: leaves, shoots (F) As
Wood Sorrel- Oxalis stricta, Oxalis acetosella, spp.: leaves, blossoms (F) As



Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")


This message was edited Aug 15, 2011 2:24 PM
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 15, 2011
12:07 PM

Post #8757832

Didn't know you could eat the leaves on horseradish. I'm going to try them next Spring. Thanks.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 15, 2011
1:04 PM

Post #8757914

Kawonkamish,

These plants must be rinsed in cold water and then steamed in plain or salted water. Dress with 'natural'* vinegars, nut oils or butters.

Harvest-time Codes:
A = Autumn
As = All season (growing season)
Ay = All year
MS = Mid-Summer
ESp: Early Spring
Sp = Spring
S = Summer
W = Winter

Wild Vegetables and Flavorings (Steamed)
Bracken Fern/Eagle Fern/Pasture Brake- Pteridium aquilinum: fiddlehead (ESp)
Brooklime- Veronica americana: leaves, stems (Sp, S)
Catbrier- Smilax rotundifolia: shoots, leaves (Sp, S)
Cattail- Typha latifolia: shoots, stems, pollen (Ay, Sp, MS)
Chickweed- Stellaria media: leaves (Sp, S, A)
Cinnamon Fern- Osmunda cinnamomea: fiddlehead (ESp)
Cleavers- Galium aparine: shoots (Sp)
Coltsfoot- Tussilago farfara: leaves (Sp, S)
Dandelion- Taraxacum officinale: leaves, blossoms (Sp)
Daylily- Hemerocallis spp.: tubers, blossoms (As)
Green Amaranth- Amaranthus retroflexus and spp: leaves, shoots (Sp, S)
Horseradish- Armoracia lapathifoli, A. rusticana: young leaves (Sp)
Horsetail Field Fern- Equisetum arvense: stems (ESp)
Lamb's Quarters- Chenopodium album: leaves, seeds (As)
Milkweed- Asclepias syriaca: young sprouts (Sp)
Mint, Wild- Mentha punctata: leaves (As)
Onion, Wild- Allium cernuum, spp.: bulbs, greens (As)
Ostrich Fern- Matteuccia struthiopteris: fiddlehead (ESp)
Plantain- Plantago major, P. lanceolata: young leaves (Sp)
Purslane- Portulaca oleracea: leaves, stalks (As)
Sensitive Fern- Onoclea sensibilis: fiddlehead, rhizomes (ESp)
Sheep Sorrel- Rumex acetosella: leaves (Sp)
Thistle- Cirsium vulgare, C. arvense, C. scariosum: leaves (Sp, S)
Violet- Viola sororia, V. novae-angliae, spp.: leaves, blossoms (Sp, S)
Watercress- Nasturtium officinale: leaves, shoots (Ay)

* Natural vinegar is made by exposing fermented saps, fruit and vegetable juices to air; for about 3 days. This action allows for the acetic acid bacteria to oxidize the alcohol in the fermented liquid, to produce vinegar. This action depends on temperature and atmospheric conditions.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 15, 2011
6:39 PM

Post #8758393

Thank you so much for sharing all of this info! Beyond just being interesting, and good to know in case I'm lost in the woods, feeling adventurous, or just really broke and hungry (lol) it's a really good list of native species, literally! :)
I grew up near the onondaga nation as a kid, and have had a strong fascination with the culture. I would love some iroquois recipes.

@maypop lol at peacing out pipepless!!! I'm trying to quit. I smoke native cigarettes made on the oneida nation, as it is the cheapest way to go. NY tax is ridiculous. Not only is it a local economy, and one worth supporting...who am i kidding, I'm hooked and it sucks lol anyway these native herbs listed may be a great quitting tool for me!! Or if NY finds a way to impose it's tax on native cigarettes i won't be able to afford them anymore, at least I'll have this list as backup! :)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 15, 2011
7:36 PM

Post #8758498

OH81, you can do it just keep trying! It took a long time and many tries before I made it. When I think about what I am most proud of it is my family and that I quit smoking. It's a huge accomplishment.

I've been lost in the woods plenty of times and that's right here on my own property. Luckily we have trail trees http://www.waymarking.com/cat/details.aspx?f=1&guid=135b8de2-1d55-448f-9a1c-19ba9710493e along with small stone cairns (mounds) on the property that I learned to recognize thanks to those here before me.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 15, 2011
7:53 PM

Post #8758540

Those are so cool!!! Since i don't have any in my yard i will stick to the old wisdom of sitting on a stump till someone finds you... Hopefully alive. Lol
my yard isn't that big... But i have NO sense of direction lol
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 16, 2011
4:08 PM

Post #8759925

I will try to remember to take photos and post the two handy to the house. It's easier in the winter when the leaves are down.

SnowRabbit, having attempted to transplant cattails around my pond, harvesting cattails would be a challenge. They love muck bordering on quicksand.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 16, 2011
7:58 PM

Post #8760459

So i was in the woods in my yard this morning, look what points to my house!!!! Lol i doubt it's the real deal, but it made me smile.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 16, 2011
8:00 PM

Post #8760464

Ok, whoops, here it is...

Thumbnail by OutlawHeart81
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 17, 2011
11:58 AM

Post #8761495

It should look authentic in another 100 years or so.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 17, 2011
7:43 PM

Post #8762151

Lol. I thought of putting a big boulder up against it and making it bend a little more, just for fun. :)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 17, 2011
8:32 PM

Post #8762232

Kawonkamish,

OutlawHeart81, I will check to see if I have any Iroquois recipes.

MaypopLaurel, I know, We have quicksand here too. It sure makes it hard to harvest things... lol.


Here is another list of plants. Some of these plants need to be cooked in two or more water changes, because they contain poisonous substances that are water soluble and are destroyed by heating them. They have an asterisk next to them*. Burdock, chicory and poke can be tenderized by adding a pinch of wood ashes or bicarbonate of soda, to the first cooking water.

Harvest-time Codes:
A = Autumn
As = All season (growing season)
Ay = All year
MS = Mid-Summer
ESp: Early Spring
Sp = Spring
S = Summer
W = Winter


Wild Vegetables (Well Cooked)
Burdock- Arctium lappa: leaves, leaf stalks (Sp, S)
Chicory- Cichorium intybus: leaves (Sp)
Dandelion- Taraxacum officinale: leaves, blossoms (Sp)
Jewelweed- Impatiens biflora, I. capenis, I. pallida: shoots, leaves (ESp)
Mallow- Sphaeralcea ambigua, S. coccinea, S. incana, Sidalcea malviflora: leaves, fruits (Sp, S)
Marsh Marigold- Caltha palustris, C. leptosepala, ssp. leptosepala var. leptosepala : leaves (Sp)
Milkweed- Asclepias syriaca: shoots (Sp)
Mustard, Wild Black- Brassica nigra: leaves (Sp)
Nettle- Urtica dioica and spp.: tops, leaves (Sp, S)
Ostrich Fern- Matteuccia struthiopteris: fiddlehead (ESp)
Pokeweed- Phytolacca americana: shoots, leaves (As)*
Salsify- Tragopogon porrifolius: roots, leaves (As)
Shepherd's Purse- Capsella bursapastoris: leaves (Sp, S)
Winter Cress- Barbarea verna: leaves, shoots (As)


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 17, 2011
9:09 PM

Post #8762282

For you OutlawHeart81.

Iroquois Soup- U'Nega'gei

Two 3 lb fish(trout, bass, or haddock), cleaned, bones removed, but with skin left on
3 quarts water
4 large fresh mushrooms,, sliced
3 wild onions(Allium cernuum) or 1 large yellow onion, chopped
2 cups dried Lima beans
2 tbsp fine cornmeal
2 tbsp fresh culantro or cilantro, chopped
1 wild garlic plant(Amianthium canadense) or 1 regular garlic clove, chopped
1/2 tsp dried wild basil(Pycnanthemum virginianum) or regular basil(Ocimum basilicum)
Garnish: fresh dillweed, chopped

Place water, fish, mushrooms, onions, beans, cornmeal, culantro, garlic, and basil in a large kettle and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Remove fish from kettle, remove skin and flake, return fish to kettle. Simmer for another 30 minutes, stirring frequently. Serve hot and garnished with dillweed.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 18, 2011
6:08 PM

Post #8763712

Mmmmm... I love the sound of that!!!

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 25, 2011
7:52 AM

Post #8775950

Kawonkamish Nishnoh (Greetings Everyone),

Wilderness Beverages
Acorn- Quercus sp.: Roast acorn shells, then steep in boiling water or sap and use as a coffee substitute. Measure 1 teaspoon per cup of water, put into saucepan and simmer for 15 minutes, strain and serve.

American/Allegheny Barberry- Berbis canadanse: To make a midwinter tea, boil 1 teaspoon of young leaves per cup of water; remove from heat and steep, covered for 15 minutes. A "lemonade" is made by cooking the berry juice in a simple syrup which is made from a one to one ratio of water and honey or maple sap. Dilute the cooked berry juice, mixing together 1/4 cup berry juice and 1 cup water.

Bearberry- Arctostaphylos uva-ursi: Dry leaves and crush. Mix 1 teaspoon per cup of boiling water and steep, covered for 15 minutes. The tea is used to sooth stomach upset.

Beechnut- Fagus grandifolia: Roast the husked nuts in a preheated 300°F oven for 30 minutes or, if camping, roast near a campfire to crack the shells and shell the nuts. Dry them further until brittle; grind them fine or pound with rolling pin or mallet, place in a mason jar. To prepare: allow 1 teaspoon per cup and place in saucepan, cover with boiling water; simmer for 15 minutes. Strain and serve.

Dandelion- Taraxacum officinale: Dig up and wash second year or older roots; dry and slowly roast in over a fire or in a slow oven (300-325°F) until crisp and brown, which can take up to for several hours. Grind fine and store in a sealed jar (mason) measure and brew like coffee. Wine and tea can be made using the blossoms.

Dewberry- Rubus spp.: The shinny berries can be made into wines or fruit drinks. The leaves can be made into a tea. Muddle 3 to 5 leaves in a mug and cover with boiling water, cover the mug and steep for 5 minutes.

Dill- Anethum graveolans: Muddle 2 to 5 seeds in a mug, pour boiling water into the mug and let steep, covered, for 15 minutes. Use as a digestive aid and appetite stimulant.

Dittany- Cunila origanoides: Make a hot infusion from the leaves to ease cold symptoms. Steep 1 tablespoon of leaves to in boiling water, covered, for 15 minutes.

Elderberry- Sambucus Canadensis: Elderberry has been used in tisanes for immunity boost. Boil-down the berries to make a sweetened syrup (Elder Rob). Dry the flowers and steep them, using 1 teaspoon per cup of boiling water, for 15 minutes. Add 1 teaspoon of Elder Rob per cup.

Goldenrod- Solidago spp.: Collect flowers and leaves, on a dry day, and air-dry. To make a light tea; add 2 teaspoon of flowers and leaves to a small pot of boiling water and steep, covered, for 15 minutes, strain and sweeten with honey or maple syrup.
Grape- Vitis spp.: For tea crush 3 to 5 grapes in a mug and pour boiling water into the mug, cover, steep for 15 minutes.

Ground Ivy- Nepeta hedracea: Dry leaves and blossoms; add 1 teaspoon to 1 cup of boiling water and steep, covered, for 15 minutes.

Icelandic Moss- Cetraria islandica: Dry plant. In a mug, pour 1 cup of boiling water over 1 teaspoon of moss. Cover and steep for 30 minutes. Let cool, strain and sweeten. Serve either warm or cold. You may also mix it with nut milk or fruit juice.

Juniper- Juniperus communis and spp.: You can make a coffee substitute by roasting and grinding the berries; measure and brew like coffee. You can also so make a tea that is high in vitamin C.
Juniper Tea
20 sprigs of juniper
½ cup blue juniper berries
2 quarts water
2 tablespoons honey

In a large pot, combine all ingredients and bring to a boil, cover, lower temperature and simmer for 10 minutes.

Labrador Tea- Ledum greonlandicum: Dry leaves, muddle 2 to 3 leaves in a mug. Pour in 1 cup of boiling water and steep for 10 minutes. Sweeten to taste with honey or tree syrup.

Life Everlasting- Gnaphalium polycephalum: Place entire dried, blossoming plant in 2 quarts of boiling water, cover and steep for 15 minutes. May be sweetened to taste.

Linden/Basswood- Tilia americana and spp.: Dry cream-colored blossoms and inner bark. Steep in 1 ½ cups boiling water, 1 teaspoon of fresh or dried blossoms and/or inner bark for 10 minutes, strain and sweeten to taste. It is an excellent remedy for colds.

Lovage- Ligustrum canadanse and Scotch Lovage- L. scoticum: Dry leaves and roots. Add ¼ cup to 1 quart of boiling water and steep, covered, for 15 minutes. The tea can be sweetened, but is not really necessary. The tea is rich in minerals and is communally used as a digestive aid.

Maple- Acer spp.: Sap is drunk, in the later winter/early spring as a nutritious drink. You can refine it by simmering it for hours, until it becomes an amber color.

Mint Mentha spp. Use fresh or dried. Add I teaspoon to a mug and pour boiling water over it, steep, covered for 15 minutes.

New Jersey Tea- Ceanothus americanus: Use fresh or dried. To make the tea, steep 1 tablespoon fresh or 1 teaspoon dried leaves per cup of boiling water, covered for 15 minutes. Sweeten to taste. Dried root bark can be steeped in water to make a sedative tea and the entire plant can be steeped in boiling water to create an infusion for external skin conditions.

Pennyroyale/Squawmint- Hedeoma pulegioides: Steep, 1 tablespoon of fresh leaves and stems in 1 cup of boiling water, covered, for 15 minutes to make a tea to relieve headaches and cramps. Steep entire plant to make a external wash for rashes and itching.

Persimmon- Diospyros virginiana: Dry leaves. To make the tea, add 1 cup boiling water and 1 teaspoonful of dried leaves to a mug, cover, and steep for 10 minutes. You can add the ripe fruit to any other fruit, to make drinks or flavorings.

Raspberry- Rubus spp.: See Blackberry.

Rose Hips- Rosa spp.: Use either fresh or dried and grind the hips to extract the vitamin s C and E. Steep 2 teaspoons in 1 quart boiling water in a covered pot for 10 minutes.

Sassafras- Sassafras labium: The leaves, roots and bark were used to make teas. Muddle 2 to 3 fresh young leaves in a mug and cover with boiling water, steep for 10 minutes. Alternatively, pour boiling water over dried roots or bark and steep, covered, for 30 minutes. This was used as a remedy for fevers and also used as a Spring tonic.

Spicebush- Lindera benzoic: Tea was made by covering 3 to 5 leaves with boiling water and letting steep, covered, for 10 minutes or by pouring 2 cups boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried roots and bark, covering and steeping for 30 minutes.

Strawberry- Fragaria spp. Use leaves and fruit fresh or dried. Place 1 tablespoon of leaves and fruit in a mug, pour in 1 cup boiling water, cover, and steeping 10 minutes. For Strawberry Ade
4 cups water
1 cup of crushed strawberries
Honey to taste

Combine strawberries and water in large pitcher; add honey to your taste.
Chill for 30 minutes. Serve cold.

Sumac- Rhus glabra, R. typhina: The berries are high in vitamin C and malic acid. Gather ripe red berries in late Summer, use fresh or dried for out of season use. Bruise 1 cup of berries and steep in 1 quart hot water for 15 minutes; cool and strain.

Sunflower- Helianthus spp.: Roast hulls and seeds, then grind. Brew as you would coffee.

Sweet Fern- Comptonia peregrina: Use the leaves to make a delicious tea. Cut up a 10-inch piece of branch in 2 quarts of boiling water, cover and steep 20 minute.

Sweet Vernal Grass- Anthoxanthum odoratum: Harvest leaves in spring and dry for later use. Pour boiling water over 1 teaspoon, steep, covered for 10 minutes.

Wild Chamomile- Matricaria chamomilla: Steep fresh or dried blossoms in 1 cup boiling water for 5 minutes. A strong infusion can be used as an external ear rinse, and can be used to relieve earaches and can also be used as a shampoo and hair rinse. To make a strong infusion, place 1 tablespoon in 1 cup water and steep 20 minutes.

Matricaria matricariodes: See Wild Chamomile

Wild Sarsaparilla- Aralia nudicaulis and spp.: Dry roots and grind. Put 1 teaspoon in 1 cup of boiling water, cover and steep for 30 minutes.

Witch Hazel- Hamamelis virginiana: Steep 5 fresh leaves or 2 teaspoons dried, in 2 cups boiling water, covered, for 5 minutes.


maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 26, 2011
8:22 PM

Post #8778934

Kawonkamish Nishnoh,

Here are some recipes using nuts.

Black Walnut-Maple Cookies
1 cup nut butter
2 cups maple sugar
2 large eggs
1 cup Black Walnuts, shelled, roasted and chopped
2 cups cattail flour
2½ cups potato flour
1 tsp wood ashes
1 cup hot water
Optional: additional nuts for topping

Preheat oven to 350°F. In a large bowl cream together all ingredients. Drop batter by teaspoon onto greased cookie sheets. Sprinkle tops with additional nuts. Bake for 20 minutes.


Beechnut Pie
1 cup cornmeal
1 cup nutmeal
3 eggs, beaten til frothy
1 cup beechnut butter, softened
1 cup light corn syrup
1/2 cup maple sugar
1 cup roasted beechnut meats

Preheat oven to 325°F. Prepare pie shell by blending cornmeal and nutmeal; press evenly into greased pie plate.
Cream together eggs and beechnut butter, gradually add corn syrup and maple sugar. Turn into prepared pie shell and bake for 35 minutes. Remove from oven and cover the top evenly with beechnut meats. Return pie to oven and bake an additional 20 minutes.

The recipe can be adapted to any nut. Example: Black Walnut Pie, substitute 1 cup dark corn syrup.


Cranberry-Walnut Cakes*
1 cup cranberries, chopped
3/4 cup Black Walnuts, shelled, roasted and chopped
1 egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water
1/2 cup honey
2 cups fine cornmeal
1 cup cattail flour

Preheat oven to 350°F. Blend cornmeal and cattail flour; gradually add each ingredient, blending thoroughly into a smooth batter. Lighten with warm water if the batter seems too thick. Pour into greased 9x5-inch loaf pan and bake for 1 hour. Or spoon into 12 greased muffin cups and bake 25 minutes or until tops are golden brown.

* Pecans can be substituted for Black Walnuts.


Beechnut Currant Cakes
1 tbsp wood ashes
2 cups boiling water
1 cup dried currants
1 cup beechnut meats, roasted and chopped
3 cups fine cornmeal
1 cup beechnut flour
1 cup maple sugar
2 eggs, beaten
3 tbsp nut butter

Preheat oven to 350°F. Stir wood ashes into boiling water and pour over currants. Let stand for 15 minutes to cool. Mix together remaining ingredients, blend in currants and water. Spread into into a greased 9x9x5-inch pan and bake for 45 minutes. Cool slightly and cut into 12 squares.


Meatless Pemmican*
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup hog nuts(can substitute peanuts)
1/2 cup hickory nuts
1/2 cup dried apples
1/2 dried pumpkin or squash
1/4 cup acorn
1/4 cup cornmeal
1/3 honey or maple syrup

Set oven at lowest possible setting. Combine the acorn and cornmeal. To make sure the acorn and cornmeal are bone-dry, spread in a thin layer on a cookie sheet and place in a warm oven for 15 to 30 minutes, checking frequently. When dry, combine them with the raisins, hog nuts/peanuts, hickory nuts, apples, pumpkin/squash and either chop or coarsely grind them. Add honey or maple syrup and blend thoroughly. Divide the mixture into 1/4-cup portions, press into cakes, and store in the refrigerator for use later.

* You can make traditional pemmican by combining dried and shredded, bear, bison, or venison, with suet, nuts, dried fruit and/or berries.


Lakota Plum Cakes
1 cup dark raisins
1 cup boiling water
16 oz beach plums, pitted or 16-oz can purple plums, drained and pitted
1 cup toasted hazelnuts, chopped fine
1/2 cup melted butter
4 cups sifted all-purpose flour
3 teaspoons baking soda
1 1/2 tsp coltsfoot ashes (or salt)
1 1/2 tsp allspice
1 tsp. ground cloves
1 cup honey
1/2 cup maple syrup

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Lightly oil 24 or more muffin cups.
Place raisins in small glass bowl, cover with 1 cup boiling water; soak 30 minutes till plump.
Mash plums in a large mixing bowl, add remaining ingredients to plums and mix well. Add soaked raisins and their liquid. Blend together well. Fill each muffin cup 1/2 way full. Bake 30 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean.
Cool 10 minutes on wire rack, loosen sides, and turn out of muffin pan. Serve warm with honey or raspberry-plum butter.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")


This message was edited Aug 30, 2011 12:06 PM
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

August 27, 2011
11:09 PM

Post #8780551

Really cool info I shared the SUnflower recipe/info at my fb group Sunflowers and Edibles

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 30, 2011
11:20 AM

Post #8785145

Kawonkamish Nishnoh,

Buffy, Koonepeam (You are welcome).

Here are some of the fruits and berries used by Native Americans.

Edible Fruits and Berries
American Cranberry- Vaccinium macrocarpon: Used to flavor Autumn and Winter foods.

Barberry- Berberis canadensis, B. vulgaris: Eaten fresh or dried. A drink can be made by stewing. As it is high in pectin, it can readily made into jams, jellies, preserves and pies. It can also so be added to apple and peaches to boost their flavor.

Candleberry/Bayberry- Myrica pensylvanica and spp.: The berries were not used in cooking, but the leaves were used as a flavoring for sauces, stews and chowders.

Kinnikinnick/Bearberry- Arctostaphylos uva-ursi: The berries are bland in taste and are best cooked with other fruit in jams, jellies, preserves and pies.

Beach Plum- Prunus maritima: The fruits are sweet and juicy. They can be eaten raw, dried or cooked in jams, jellies, preserves and pies.

Squaw Root/Blue Cohosh- Caulophyllum thalictroides: The seeds, when roasted make an excellent coffee substitute.

Blueberries- Vaccinium augustifolium and spp.; The berries can be eaten raw or dried for future used. The fresh berries can be made into jams, jellies, preserves and pies. The dried berries can be used in stews and in flavoring game.

Bison/Buffalo Berries- Shepherdia canadensis and spp.: The berries are gathered after the first frost and dried; it is then used as a flavoring for Bison meat.

Chokecherry- Prunus virginiana: The pea-sized berries are eaten raw. They are tart, and tasty. They can be made into jams, jellies, preserves and pies. DO NOT eat the leaves or pits, they are toxic when ingested.

Wild Black Cherry- Prunus serotina: See Chokecherry.

Ground-Cherry- Physalis pubescens: The bright-orange berries looks like a tiny tomato and when fully ripe has a pleasant flavor. They can be eaten fresh or dried for Winter use. It is great when used as a preserves, jam, jellies, pies or in sauces. When making preserves, jam and jellies, a pectin rich fruit, or berry must be added, as ground-cherries are low in pectin.

Squawbush/Highbush Cranberry- Viburnum trilobum: Pick berries after the first frost and eat fresh or dried. They can be used in preserves, jam, jellies, and pies.

Shadbush/Juneberry/Serviceberry- Amelchier canadensis and spp.: The berries are juicy and black, best picked early, before wildlife gets there first. Can be used in preserves, jam, jellies, and pies.

Juniper Berries- Juniperus communis and spp.: Use fresh or dried for winter use. The berries are used in cooking to enhance bear, bison, venison, wapiti and salmon. The berries can also be used as a tea.

Wild Raisin/Nannyberry- Viburnum lentago: Eaten fresh or dried; the blue-black berries should be picked after the first frost. Frost sweetens the berries. Can be used in preserves, jam, jellies, and pies.

Nightshade- Solanaceae spp.: When FULLY ripe the berries can be cooked in stews. Picking the berries, when fully ripe and cooking them well, destroys the solanine alkaloid.

Squaw Vine/Partridgeberry- Mitchella repens: The berries taste bland and are rich in tannin. The berries are used in teas as a diuretic tonic.

Feverbush/Spicebush- Lindera benzoin: The yellow-red fruit has a spicy flavor. Can be dried and ground for use as you would black pepper.

Wild Plum- Prunus americana- See Beach Plum.

Teaberry/Checkerberry/Wintergreen- Gaultheria procumbens: Berries can be eaten raw or dried for later use. The berries and leaves were eaten raw or brewed into a tea to reduce fevers, minor aches and pains, and to reduce inflammation. They have a similar quality as willow, in that it contains a compound that is similar to aspirin.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 30, 2011
12:09 PM

Post #8785213

Can you actually buy cattail flour? Is there a substitute?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 30, 2011
4:06 PM

Post #8785601

MaypopLaurel, I could only find this place.:

http://www.yellowpollen.com/
All prices include shipping and handling.

1 cup/4 oz $20
4 cups/1 lb. $60
16 cups/4 lbs. $225


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
7:03 AM

Post #8786613

Yikes! Maybe I should be out there harvesting and planting my cattails.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2011
7:58 AM

Post #8786722

So... catttail pollen is the same as the cattail brown fluff we see at the top that looks like a brown hot-dog but is also cattail flour?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
12:16 PM

Post #8787161

Hmm, I thought it was made from drying and pummeling the roots. I do know the brown stuff eventually blows up into a zillion white fluffy seed heads that look like dandelion seed. Wish I had known that before I made a huge arrangement of cattails in the guest bathroom. The room was inches deep in fluff.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 31, 2011
3:11 PM

Post #8787376

Like I said... I have NO clue! I'd have thought the flour was from the roots too... so, what is the cattail pollen, and how does one use it?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
3:44 PM

Post #8787441

Ditto here in the clueless dept. but this knowledge is all that's standing between me and a small fortune what with all the cattails here.
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

August 31, 2011
4:33 PM

Post #8787507

Just grab Google, enter cattail pollen into the search space, and jump back - because you are going to learn a lot more than you even need to know. All the helpful hints are there on how to collect it, and use it.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

August 31, 2011
5:15 PM

Post #8787583

Yes, but there is also information about making flour from the stalks and roots.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 1, 2011
8:54 AM

Post #8788487

Since I don't have any cattails growing, it's not very high on my research "to-do" list.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 1, 2011
12:28 PM

Post #8788802

lol. Since I don't care for standing in pond muck with the hellbenders and crawdaddies I'm with you there.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 1, 2011
2:16 PM

Post #8788935

None the less, it is a great service maccionoadha has done here...
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 1, 2011
2:31 PM

Post #8788968

Absolutely and I am having a real education. Wonder if there are places where you can go and try these exotic foods?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2011
1:36 PM

Post #8793002

Kawonkamish Nishnoh (Greetings Everyone),

Where do I begin... You can make flour from the cattail pollen and roots. You can harvest the roots all year round, the young shoots and hearts in spring, and the pollen about mid Summer. The male "flower", which contains the pollen, is the skinny part found at the top of the plant; it is located above the female "flower" (which is green in Spring and brown in the Summer, when it has been pollinated).

You can collect the pollen by gently bending the stalk over a bucket or inside a bag and shaking it vigorously. If the Cattail patch is of a decent size, you should be able to collect up to a pound of pollen. The pollen can be used as a substitute for some of the regular flour in recipes; approximately 30 to 50%.

To make the roots into flour: Collect the roots and wash them, now peel them and rinse well. Next chop them into small pieces and dehydrate them. After thoroughly drying them, grind and sift, until you get a fine flour.

You can eat the unripe, green, female flower spike in the Spring. It resembles a baby corn cob. It is best boiled for 3 minutes or until tender, than scraped from the stalk and seasoned with salt, pepper and butter. You can mix the scrapings with quinoa and the scrapings can be made into a casserole (see below).

To extract the Cattail hearts: You need to peel off the outer stalk, until you come to the white tender part, this is the heart. It can be eaten raw or steamed ,as you would asparagus, and seasoned with salt, pepper and butter.


Cattail Casserole
2 cups scraped spikes
1 cup bread crumbs
1/4 cup of egg substitute
1/2 cup milk
salt and pepper
1 onion diced (and other vegetables, example: mushrooms, peppers, tomatoes, etc.)
1/2 cup shredded cave-aged Gruyere cheese (or aged Gouda or Cheddar)

Preheat the oven to 350°.
Blend the scraped off cattail grains with the bread crumbs. Beat the egg substitute and stir into the bread crumb mixture. Sauté the onions and other vegetables (if using).
Combine the vegetables and the breadcrumb mix, season to taste and pour into a casseroles dish. Sprinkle cheese on top and bake in the oven for 25 minutes. Serve hot.


Huckleberry Bread
1 cup flour
1 cup Cattail pollen
1 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. baking powder
1 cup sugar
1 cup milk
2 cups huckleberries (blueberries can be substituted)
1 egg
1 stick butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease loaf pan; set aside. Sprinkle flour on berries to prevent them from going to the bottom.
Cream eggs, butter, and sugar together; add flour, milk, and vanilla. Add berries to mixture.
Pour into baking pan and bake for approximately 40 minutes or until done.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

This message was edited Sep 4, 2011 4:17 PM
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 4, 2011
2:51 PM

Post #8793110

Anyone who knows me here on DG knows I'm going to try something here. Thanks (maybe). :>)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2011
3:49 PM

Post #8793181

MaypopLaurel wrote:Anyone who knows me here on DG knows I'm going to try something here. Thanks (maybe). :>)


MaypopLaurel,

N'ahhânu mishontoowaeu (lol). :-)


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 4, 2011
3:56 PM

Post #8793193

Thanks for the info on cattails!

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 4, 2011
5:57 PM

Post #8793371

Koonepeam (You are welcome).


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 8, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8799699

Awesome recipes :O)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 9, 2011
8:10 PM

Post #8801539

Taubotny(Thank you) Buffy.


Aquene,
WautuckquesSochepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 10, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8802071

Kawonkamish Nishnoh,

Here are some wild fruit recipes.

Beach Plum Jam
1 qt beach plums
4 cups water
8 cups maple or cane sugar
Sterile glass jars

1) In a large covered saucepan cook the plums in the water, over low heat for 15 minutes or until soft. Remove from heat and cool slightly. Seed the plums, but do not mash. return the fruit to the juices in the saucepan. Return to a boil; add the sugar, stirring constantly for 15 minutes more.
2) Skim any froth from the surface of the jam. Ladle the jam into glass jars and seal immediately with 1/4-inch of liquified paraffin. Store in a dark, cool, dry place.


Stewed Wild Cherries
1 qt wild black cherries, stoned, cracked and cherry kernel saved
1 cup maple syrup
1 cup cider

1) In a large covered pot, simmer the cherries with their kernels, plus the syrup and cider. Stir occasionally, for 30 minutes.
2) Serve hot or cooled over puddings or to flavor cornmeal dishes.


Baked Stuffed Apples
6 firm apples, cord through to almost the bottom, Do Not remove skins
1/2 cup dried wild currant, raisins or fresh blueberries
6 spicebush berries, dried and crushed
1/2 cup honey

1) Preheat oven to 300°F.
2) Arrange apples in a greased baking dish. Blend the berries and honey in a saucepan over medium heat, until heated through.
3) Stuff each apple center with the hot mixture, drizzle some over the skins.
4) Bake for 30 minutes, basting once. Serve hot. This recipe is excellent, when served with vanilla ice cream.


Indian Pudding
2 cups Wild Raisins or Nannyberries
2 cups fine cornmeal
4 cups water
1/2 cup Nut Butter
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup Juneberries, fresh or dried
1/4 tsp ground Wild Ginger root(Asarum canadense)
1/2 tsp nutmeg

1) Preheat oven to 325°F. Grease a 2½ quart casserole and set aside.
2) Gently toss raisins or nannyberries and cornmeal together.
3) In a large saucepan, bring to a boil water and the nut butter. Gradually add the cornmeal-raisin mixture and simmer, stirring until it thickens; about 15 minutes.
4) Add remaining ingredients, blending well. Pour into casserole. set in a pan of water, 1 to 1½-inches deep and bake for 2½ hours.
5) Cool thoroughly before serving. It can be serve topped with nut milk or an additional sprinkling of nutmeg or both.


Wild Grape, Plum or Apple Butter*

1) Preheat oven to 325°F.
2) Pick fruit before first frost. Stem and wash well.
3) Place them in a large, covered, stock pot. Cover them with water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 minutes or until skins pop.
4) Pour of juice, add a mint leaf, sweeten it with honey and drink; this makes a refreshing hot or cold drink.
5) Sieve the remaining pulp to remove seeds and puree. Ad an equal amount of maple syrup or honey, blending well.
6) Pour into a beanpot. Bake, stirring occasionally, for 3 hours. Seal hot in sterilized mason jars.
*You can combine applesauce and wild grape puree or wild plum and apple butter to make interesting taste treats.


Dried Apples, Pumpkin, Plum, Etc.

1) Turn oven on to 150-200° F. (50° C).
2) Peel and core Harvested fruits. Wash fruit and cut into thin slices, about 1/4 to 1/2-inch thick.
2) Lay fruit on a rack in a sheet pan or on a parchment covered cooking sheet. Fruit slices should not touch each other.
3) Place tray of fruit in oven. You only want to dry the fruit, not to cook it. The drying process will take several hours. Do Not try to increase heat, to speed up the drying process, for this will cook the fruit not dehydrate it.
4) Remove the pan from oven, when fruit is sufficiently dehydrated. Fruit should be chewy, not crunchy or squishy.
5) Put into an airtight container and store in a tight fitting lid and store in a dark, cool, dry place.


Aquene (Peace),
WautuckquesSochepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 12, 2011
11:59 AM

Post #8805256

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),

I thought you might like to learn the Algonquin (Natick dialect) names, of a few fruits and vegetables.

Fruit- Meechummūonk
Fruits- Meechummuōnkongash
Unripe Fruit- Asq, Ashq
Unripe Fruits- Asquosh, Ashquash
Berry- Minne, Min
Berries- Minneash
Blackberries- Wuttohkohoominneōnash
Grape- Weenom
Grapes- Wenominneash
Sour Grape- Seane Wenom
Grape Vine- Weenomis
Strawberry- Wuttahminneoh
Strawberries- Wuttáhimneash
Whortleberry- Attitáash
Summer Squash- Askútasq
Summer Squashes- Askútasquash
Pumpkin/Gourd- Quonúasq
Melon- Monoskútasq
Cucumber- Moonosketåmuk
Muskmelon- Quinosketămuk
Watermelon- Ohhosketămuk
Seed Corn- Skannémunash
Corn in the field- Weatchemin
Corn in the fields- Weateminminneash
Green corn in the field- Munnequomin
Green ears of corn- Munnequamininneash
Dry ears of corn- Missunkquaminneash
Blasted (dried up) ears of corn- Missunkquaminnémesash
Succotash- M'síckquatash
Parched or roasted corn- Appúminneónash
Cornmeal/flour- Pishquèhick
Polenta- Aupúmineanawsàump
Onions- Weenásog



Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 12, 2011
12:13 PM

Post #8805280

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),

Whortleberries are any of the following species of the genus Vaccinium:

Grouse Whortleberry- Vaccinium scoparium
Highbush blueberry- Vaccinium corymbosum
Black Highbush Blueberry- Vaccinium fuscatum
Blue Ridge Blueberry- Vaccinium pallidum
Small-flower Blueberry- Vaccinium virgatum
Thin-leaf Huckleberry- Vaccinium membranaceum
Velvet-leaf Huckleberry- Vaccinium myrtilloides
California Huckleberry- Vaccinium ovatum
Red Huckleberry- Vaccinium parvifolium


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001)

This message was edited Sep 12, 2011 2:22 PM

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 12, 2011
2:04 PM

Post #8805442

Is this a language you are teaching yourself?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 13, 2011
1:39 PM

Post #8806995

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ (Good Afternoon) Darius,

I have taken 5 years of language class. I figured, since I am posting the plants and there uses ie. recipes and such, that the Native American's used, I would post the names of them as well. I thought people would like to know the names.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

September 13, 2011
2:39 PM

Post #8807046

It's very cool. I am sure if i tried to say any of that aloud I'd simply tongue tie and embarrass myself. Lol. It took me forever to figure out that what was written on the side of the ice rink on the Onondaga Nation, said...Onondaga in native Onondagan. #>_

Thumbnail by OutlawHeart81
Click the image for an enlarged view.

BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 14, 2011
3:58 AM

Post #8807723

Gonna Hafta try the Apple Butter we are getting fresh picked apples next week
maybe pumpkin butter too

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2011
7:35 AM

Post #8807942

I have to get stuff for the Indian pudding. Mmmmm...

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 14, 2011
8:22 AM

Post #8807996

Wunne Mohtompan(Good Morning) Buffy690 and OutlawHeart81,

OutlawHeart81, I know the feeling, when I first started language class, I was forever tripping over the words. Even now, I sometimes have a hard time with some of the words, especially the long ones. N'ahhânu mishontŭwaeu (lol) :-)


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001)

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

September 14, 2011
11:43 AM

Post #8808228

Sad and strange how schools push language classes like Spanish and French, but not indigenous languages. then us crazy white people have the nerve to say " it's America! Why do i have to press 1 for English?!" "learn the language or leave." lol...
If you wanna complain about illegal aliens you better be native. ;)
wannadanc
Olympia, WA

September 15, 2011
10:26 AM

Post #8809623

OutlawHeart81 - I agree about the seeming injustices, but I would immediately go to my experience in taking Latin. It was the MOST valuable of all my high school classes because of the jump start it gave me on binomial nomenclature, when that came into my life years later. However, I was saddened to realize that in spite of the value it had for me, there was no one with whom to converse. I fear it would be the same for indigenous languages. Perhaps, though, there could be some deep study of history that included language.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 15, 2011
7:11 PM

Post #8810306

Feverfew uses? Just curious any herbal recipes applications, healing practices?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 15, 2011
8:20 PM

Post #8810386

BUFFY690 wrote:Feverfew uses? Just curious any herbal recipes applications, healing practices?


Kawonkamish BUFFY690,

No Native American uses that I know of, as Feverfew- Tanacetum parthenium is an introduced plant. For Native fever reducers, there are:

Black Alder/Feverbush- Ilex verticillata: A tea was made by pouring 2 cups boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried fruit and/or bark, covering and steeping for 30 minutes.

Feverbush/Spicebush- Lindera benzoin: The yellow-red fruit has a spicy flavor. Can be dried and ground for use as you would black pepper. Tea was made by covering 3 to 5 leaves with boiling water and letting steep, covered, for 10 minutes or by pouring 2 cups boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried roots and bark, covering and steeping for 30 minutes.

Feverroot/Horse Gentian- Triosteum perfoliatum: A fever reducing tea was made by pouring boiling water over 3 to 5 leaves and letting steep, covered, for 15 minutes.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001)
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 15, 2011
8:47 PM

Post #8810414

What about headache/migraine remedies?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 15, 2011
9:08 PM

Post #8810441

Pennyroyale/Squawmint- Hedeoma pulegioides: Steep, 1 tablespoon of fresh leaves and stems in 1 cup of boiling water, covered, for 15 minutes to make a tea to relieve headaches and cramps. Steep entire plant to make a external wash for rashes and itching.

Sweetflag or calamus (Acorus). The root has been used to treat headache, sore throat, spasms, and swellings. Tea is made by pouring 2 cups boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried roots, covering and steeping for 30 minutes.

* Lobelia- (Lobelia cardinalis) : The leaf tea was used for treating fever, headache, and rheumatism. Lobelia inflata (Indian tobacco) yields lobeline sulfate, used in antitobacco therapy. It is also used to treat aches and asthma. Tea was made by covering 3 to 5 leaves with boiling water and letting steep, covered, for 10 minutes.

* White willow (Salix alba). The bark contains Salicylic acid (used to make aspirin). Leaves and bark of different willows are used in a tea to break a fever. Tea was made by covering 3 to 5 leaves with boiling water and letting steep, covered, for 10 minutes or by pouring 2 cups boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried bark, covering and steeping for 30 minutes.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001)
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 16, 2011
11:36 AM

Post #8811082

Thank you so much, you are quite the knowledgable little bunny aren't you...how long did it take you to learn about all these things and to recall them so quickly :O)
V
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 16, 2011
11:37 AM

Post #8811083

Oh and I have had great success with my young ones reducing fever with catnip tea

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 18, 2011
1:03 PM

Post #8813600

Kawonkamish Buffy,

I have been learning the holistic uses of plants most of my life. My earliest memories for picking wild plants for their medicinal value, was when Nokas(Algonquin for my mother) had us picking leaves and blossoms of Clover(Trifolium spp. or Melilotus spp.), Dandelion and Violets(Viola spp.) for Spring tonics. We would treat the Dandelion, as you would Spinach, sauteing the leaves in butter, with a pinch of salt and pepper. It tastes slightly bitter, but it is rich in vitamins and minerals.

I am not sure of the vitamin content of the Clovers and Violets, but I know that one cup of raw Dandelion leaves contain: Vitamin A 5588 IU, Retinol 279 mcg, Alpha Carotene 200mcg, Beta Carotene 3220 mcg, Beta Cryptoxanthin 66.5 mcg, Lutein+Zeaxanthin 7485 mcg, Vitamin C 19.3mg, Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol) 1.9 mg, Vitamin K 428 mcg, Thiamine 0.1 mg, Riboflavin 0.1 mg, Niacin 0.4 mg, Vitamin B6 0.1 mg, Folate 14.9 mcg, Choline19.4 mg and 1.5 grams of Protein.

Deep-Fried Dandelion Blossoms
1 tbsp seltzer water
2 eggs, beaten
1/4 cup nut oil
2 qrts freshly picked Dandelion blossoms, washed and dried*
1½ cups fine cornmeal
1/2 tsp Coltsfoot(Tussilago farafar) or Sweet Coltsfoot(Petasites palmata) ash

Heat nut oil to sizzling in a cast-iron skillet. Mix coltsfoot ash with the cornmeal; set aside. Add the seltzer water to the eggs; mix gently. Dip the dandelion blossoms, one at a time, into the egg mixture and then into the cornmeal mixture. Sauté, turning often, until golden; drain on brown paper or paper towels. Serve either hot or room temperature.

* To keep the blossoms full, pick just before using. This recipe is best in early Spring and autumn. Dandelions bolt when temperatures near 90°F.

Violet blossoms can be added to many baked goods or used in salads.

Violet blossom-Zucchini Bread
3 eggs, beat until fluffy
1/3 cup Sunflower or Nut Oil
2 1/2 cups Natural Tree Sugar*
1/2 cup sour cream
3 tablespoons vanilla
2 cups grated, peeled Zucchini Squash
2⅓ cups flour**
1/3 cup Potato flour
1/3 cup Cattail pollen**
1 teaspoon baking soda
3 teaspoons cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon Coltsfoot ash or sea salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1 cup chopped nuts
1/4 cup Violet blossoms, rinsed and air dried

1) Preheat oven to 350°F. Grease a 9 x 9 x 5-inch loaf pan.
2) Stir together eggs, sugar, oil, sour cream and Zucchini.
3) Sift flour, soda, ash/salt, cinnamon and baking powder; add to mixture. Stir in vanilla, nuts and Violet blossoms.
4) Bake for 1 hour and let cool.

*Natural Tree Sugar can be made, in the same way as Maple sugar, from Black/Cherry/Sweet Birch, Yellow Birch, and White Birch sap.
**Only if using Cattail pollen in recipe, otherwise use 2⅔ cups flour.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001)
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

September 19, 2011
4:20 AM

Post #8814441

cool about the dandlions, I just got a weeder to try and send back a evaluation of it at a gardening club. Guess what I am gonna be digging...:O)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2011
11:46 AM

Post #8829356

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),

Here are a few sauce recipes.

Cranberry Sauce
2 lbs fresh Cranberries, rinsed
1 cup dried Black Walnut meats, chopped
1 cup Maple sugar
1 cup Apple cider

Combine all ingredients in a large kettle. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat; simmer for 30 minutes, or until the cranberries' skins burst and mixture appears glossy. Cool slightly and chill.


Cranberry and Walnut Sauce
1 lb wild Cranberries, rinsed
2 cups water
1/2 lb dried Black Walnut meats, chopped
1 cup Maple syrup
2 tbsp Cornstarch,with enough water to make a paste

Place the cranberries and water in a covered pot, bring to a boil, and simmer until berries burst. Add the walnut meats and syrup, simmer for 10 minutes, then thicken with cornstarch paste, blend thoroughly. Serve either hot or chilled. Good with game or fowl.


Creamed Beechnut Sauce
2 cups water, with 1 tbsp wood ash
4 tbsp Beechnut butter
4 tbsp fine Cornmeal
1/2 cup dried Beechnut meats, chopped

Bring water and wood ash to a boil, then simmer. Add the nut butter and blend till smooth and thick. Gradually stir in the cornmeal, blend until smooth and thick. Add the nutmeats, and simmer for 2 minutes, serve hot. Great with fried fish, roasts and vegetables.

Garlic Sauce
2 cups fresh Garlic Mustard leaves, chopped coarsely
1/2 cup nut oil or Corn oil
1 tsp dried Spicebush berries, ground

Thoroughly blend all ingredients together. Cook in a heavy bottomed skillet, over moderate heat, for 5 minutes or until Garlic Mustard leaves are limp and warmed through. Best served over fish.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001


This message was edited Dec 16, 2011 6:50 PM

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 29, 2011
11:53 AM

Post #8829365

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),

The following trees can be tapped as you would Maples.

Tree to Tap for Sugars and Syrups:

Black/Cherry/Sweet Birch- Betula lenta
Yellow Birch- Betula lutea
White Birch- Betula papyrifera
Great Bulrush- Scirpus validus
Black Walnut- Juglans nigra
Butternut- Juglands cinerea
Hickory/Swamp Bitternut- Carya spp.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

September 29, 2011
3:24 PM

Post #8829621

I have a friend in the next town who taps several kinds of trees for syrup. I'll have to ask him which ones, because I think they are not on your list.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

October 1, 2011
7:34 AM

Post #8831523

What do you have for Cherrokee corn, Job's Tears, axa Coix
Have seen it is medicinal, edible, and even thought to have magical powers.
V

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 1, 2011
12:57 PM

Post #8831851

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ (Good Afternoon) V,

Job's Tears/Cherokee Corn- Coix lacryma-jobi is not native to the US, but was introduced from Asia: China, India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, and Malaysia, etc., but has been naturalized in the south and southwest. One of it's uses by the Native Americans' is as natural beads. The beads turn shiny, by absorbing body oils, after much wearing.

It is well known to the Cherokee. "The Trail of Tears" legend states, that wherever a tear fell, a plant sprang forth from the earth, which was the corn bead plant, Job's Tears. It is made into jewelry, to symbolize the continuing memory of "the trail where the Cherokee cried.", because it is tear-dropped shaped and colored in shades of gray, which symbolizes the color of grief.

It can be used in any recipe that would use barley- Hordeum vulgare. Job's tears has antioxidant properties, which can slow and decrease the growth of parasites and bacteria. It also contains chemicals, that may inhibit the growth of cancer cells and contains a lot of fiber, that can help in decreasing or stopping the absorption of fat and cholesterol.

Turkey and Job's Tears Soup
1 each bone-in turkey breast half and thigh
10 cups water
1/2 cup Job's Tears, soaked in water overnight and drained
1/2 tsp ground Wild Ginger root(Asarum canadense)
2 cups fresh mushrooms, stems removed, caps sliced
3 wild onions(Allium cernuum) or 1 small yellow onion, chopped
2 tbsp Birch beer (alcoholic not soda)
1 tsp Coltsfoot ash or sea salt, or to taste
1/2 tsp freshly ground dried Spicebush berries or black pepper

1. Clean and wash the turkey breast and thigh, then place in a stockpot with the water. Bring to a rolling boil, reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 2 hours or until the turkey is tender and cooked.
2. Remove the turkey from the pot and pull from the bones. Discard the bones and return the shredded turkey to the stockpot.
3. Add remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer for 1 hour. Serves 6 to 8.

Job's Tears Salad
1 cup Job's Tears
2 cups of water
1 tsp Coltsfoot ash or sea salt, or to taste
1/2 cup 'Cherokee Trail of Tears' beans, cooked
1/3 cup of pine nuts
1/2 cup sun-dried tomatoes, chopped (dried, not in oil)
1 red pepper, diced
1/8 cup of coriander, chopped
1/8 cup of parsley, chopped
1 clove of garlic, minced
3 wild onions(Allium cernuum) or 1/2 small purple onion, finely chopped
1 tbsp of dried cumin powder
2 tbsp of olive oil
2 tbsp of fresh lemon juice
2 tbsp of Maple vinegar

1. Soak Job's Tears for at least 30 minutes in water. Then rinse them, pouring off any hulls until the water is clear. Then combine them with Coltsfoot ash or sea salt and water in a pot and bring to a boil. After it comes to a full boil, turn heat down and simmer for 2 more minutes or until the grains are tender yet firm. Remove from heat, drain, but do not rinse. Let stand until warm.
2. While the grain is cooking, lightly toast pine nuts in a dry frying pan. Chop and measure all other ingredients into a mixing bowl.
3. Add warm Job's Tears to mixing bowl with the other ingredients.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001









This message was edited Oct 8, 2011 4:38 PM
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2011
1:55 PM

Post #8840975

Thanks so much I plant to grow quite a bit of this next year.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 8, 2011
2:41 PM

Post #8841018

Koonepeam(You are welcome).


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

October 8, 2011
2:56 PM

Post #8841031

How would you say "Wishing You Beauty" in native speak?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 8, 2011
5:37 PM

Post #8841202

Kodtweantamŭnat(Wishing you) óne(beauty).


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 8, 2011
5:40 PM

Post #8841206

Ya know, you really are amazing with your contributions. I don't thank you enough.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 9, 2011
10:24 PM

Post #8842869

I thank you guys also. I'm not native American. But my grandmother allways told me i was a throwback to cavemen,Does that count? I grow,collect,and use natures bounty and do my best to replace it.I respect the land and what nature offers.
Have you ever made pine tea? Take a few green pine needles from the tree and steep in hotwater for 5 to 10 minutes.
I fond out the hard way - If your blood sugar falls when you are in the woods in spring. A couple leaves of sweetgum will bring your sugarlevel back up.
Vickie
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2011
11:05 PM

Post #8842885

I just thought I'd sign off my notes when I trade with the same thing just in a different way...I like to change it up...LOL
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

October 9, 2011
11:17 PM

Post #8842896

I know I just drive ya crazy...LOL
I have a question on Rose Hips...I know they are a valuable vitamin c source and I save up some for flu season...Are all roses consumable and what are ways to consume :O)

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

October 10, 2011
5:30 AM

Post #8843089

Rose petals are edible, and a pretty addition to a garden salad. Lots of recipes for roses on the 'Net.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 11, 2011
10:45 AM

Post #8845050

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh(Good Afternoon Everyone),

In regards to Rosa ssp. the petals and rose hips, to my knowledge, are the only edible parts of the plant. The hips themselves are high in vitamin C and the whitish seeds are high in vitamin E, but you must grind the seeds to extract it.

Rose hip Tea: Steep 2 teaspoons of the ground whole rose hip in a quart of boiling water, covered, for 10 minutes. The petals are great in salads. They impart a pleasing flavor and appearance to any salad.

Rose Hip Puree
2 lbs. fresh hips
1 quart water

Simmer fresh hips in water until tender; about 20 or 30 minutes. Puree in a food mill or processor and store in a covered container in the refrigerator. Put 1 teaspoon in soups, casseroles, etc. to boost your intake of vitamin C.


Rose Petal & Cranberry Jam
1 cup fresh rose petals(organically grown/chemical free)
1 cup fresh cranberries, rinsed
1 cup water
2½ cups raw honey

1. Puree rose petals, cranberries, water and honey in a blender until smooth.
2. Pour mixture into a nonreactive saucepan and bring to a boil, and boil hard for 5 minutes or until thickened.
3. Pour into baby food jars. Let set for 6 hours, till firm. Will keep one month in refrigerator. Freezes well.


Rose Hip & Cranberry Jelly
8 cups of rose hips
2 cup fresh cranberries, rinsed
6 cups of water
5 cups of raw honey
1/2 tsp sunflower oil

1. Boil the rose hips, cranberries and water for 10 - 15 minutes. until the cranberries' skin pop and rose hips are soft enough to crush.
2. Crush them and add honey (to sweeten) and sunflower oil (to prevent foaming). Bring to a boil; boil hard for 5 minutes or until thickened.
3. Remove from heat and pour into sterilized jars and seal with caps and rings. The jelly has a lovely flavor and has the consistency of pasteurized honey.



Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

October 11, 2011
11:37 AM

Post #8845105

Ok... Awkward question.
*guys skip this*
I have tons of false or starry solomon's seal growing here and as i understand it this is good for "the moon"...*ahem*
Do you have any recipes for how to use this?
I am at a point where I'm willing to try anything!!! Lol I'm sure i can still find some root but most of the berries are done for the year.
Any other recipes for that most wonderful time of the month would be appreciated as well. :)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2011
7:27 AM

Post #8846083

Wunne Mohtompan (Good Morning) Outlaw,

False Solomon Seal / False Spikenard / Scurvyberries- Smilacina racemosa: The berries can be eaten raw or used as a seasoning, but because the berries can be cathartic, they should only be eaten in moderation. The young shoots are gathered in Spring and lightly steamed, before blossoming, the young leaves can be harvested and eaten raw in salads or gently steamed and eaten as a potherb. A poultice can be made with the root-stalk to treat sunburn and stopping bleeding. The root-stalks can be cooked like potatoes or pickled like cucumbers, but before doing so, you must soak them, for 2 hours, in a combination of water and wood ash; rinsed and boiled in fresh water to remove the lye from the wood ash. This eliminates the bitter taste. Some tribes smoked the root to cure insanity and to quiet the nerves. The berries can aid with constipation.

False Solomon Seal Tincture
2 cups berries
Raw honey, or to cover
Blackberry brandy, to cover

In a large mason jar, fill half way with dried berries, cover the berries with the honey, and stir well. After it is well mixed, fill the remainder of the jar with brandy. Stir well and let sit for six weeks in a cool dark location. After six weeks, strain through a jelly bag, reserve juice.
Take this by the tablespoon full at the onset of illness and continue until you feel better. You can also use flavored vodka, in place of the brandy.


False Solomon Seal Ade
1/2 cup berries
1 tsp lemon juice
Raw honey to taste

Crush berries in the bottom of a saucepan, cover and cook at medium heat for 10 minutes. Strain mixture through a jelly bag and recover the juice. Add lemon juice and honey (to taste). Stir thoroughly until honey is dissolved, then place into refrigerator. Serve chilled.


False Solomon's Seal & Cranberry Jam
1 quart ripe berries
1 cup fresh cranberries, rinsed
1 cup water
1 cup raw honey, per cup of sauce

Wash and stem fully ripened berries, then place in saucepan with water. Cover and cook over medium heat till all berries pop and juice runs freely. Strain fruit through a food mill, then measure out the juicy pulp. Add honey as directed above, then bring to a boil while stirring constantly till all honey has dissolved. Bring to a boil and hold at a hard boil for 5 full minutes or until mixture has thickened, while stirring constantly. Skim off foam, pour into hot, sterile jelly jars and seal.


False Solomon's Seal Sauce
4 cups ripe berries
1 orange rind, grated
2 cups water
2 cups raw honey

Place water, grated rind and honey into a saucepan and mix thoroughly. Cook over medium heat for 5 minutes. Add washed and stemmed berries and continue to cook till berries begin to pop. When cooking is complete, place the mixture into a food mill and strain out the seeds. Place sauce in a bowl and chill in refrigerator. Serve chilled.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001

This message was edited Oct 12, 2011 9:30 AM

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

October 12, 2011
7:37 AM

Post #8846100

Awesome! Thank you!!!! :)
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

October 12, 2011
2:53 PM

Post #8846575

Kewlio
Tanks a bunch

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2011
7:31 PM

Post #8846945

Koonepeam(You are welcome).


Aquène (Peace),
WaûtuckquesSóchepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2011
8:36 PM

Post #8846992

I thank you for the receipes also. False Soloman Seal grows wild in the woods here.
Is there any useful receipes for plantains.I have a lot of them also. And huckleberrys.
TIA
vickie

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 15, 2011
8:46 AM

Post #8849774

Wunne Mohtompan (Good Morning) Vickie,

Plantain/White Man's Foot- Plantago major and P. lanceolata: The Shoshone would heat the leaves and apply it as a wet dressing to wounds. They chewed the roots to cure mouth sores, toothaches and to relieve thirst. They also used it as an antidote to insect and snake bites, by macerating the entire plant and applying it to the wounds. The seeds can by used as a remedy for worms.
it is high in vitamins A,C, K and calcium. It also contains allantoin, apigenin, aucubin, baicalein, linoleic and oleanolic acid, sorbitol and tannin.
Harvest the young leaves for salads or steam, then saute in butter, as you would spinach. Eat the immature flower spikes raw or cooked like asparagus. Harvest the seeds, which have a nutty quality, which can be parched and ground into flour. You can use the leaves, seeds and roots in teas.

Plantain Tea use three times a day
1/4 tsp fresh leaf (or 1/2 teaspoon dried leaf)
1 cup boiling water
Raw honey

Steep leaves in water for 10-15 minutes. Sweeten to taste.


To treat a cough or congestion:

Plantain Tincture
2 cups leaves
Raw honey, or to cover
Blackberry brandy, to cover*

In a large mason jar, fill half way with leaves, cover the leaves with the honey, and stir well. After it is well mixed, fill the remainder of the jar with brandy. Stir well and let sit for six weeks in a cool dark location. After six weeks, strain through a jelly bag, reserve juice.
Take this by the 1/2 teaspoonful three times a day, at the onset of illness and continue until you feel better.
*You can also use flavored vodka, in place of the brandy.


For sun burn this infusion is best made and used the same day, but can be stored in the refrigerator for two days.

Plantain Sunburn Relief
1/4 cup fresh leaves
1 cup water

Add fresh plantain leaves to water, and bring to a gentle boil. Turn off heat, and let steep 15 minutes; strain out the leaves.


For use in place of petroleum jelly and baby lotions, to cure diaper rash and cradle cap or as an overall body salve:

Plantain Skin Care Salve
Fresh plantain leaves, bruised or crushed
Sweet Almond oil (or your favorite vegetable/nut oil)
1-2 oz beeswax, melted

Fill a 1 quart mason jar full of bruised leaves. Cover leaves with oil, cap jar and sit on a sunny windowsill for 2 weeks. The oil will turn a deep green. Strain out the leaves and use as is for diaper rash and cradle cap. Add melted beeswax to warmed oil and mix well. This can be used as a salve as a heal-all, excellent for work-weary hands.


Wild Rice with Hazelnuts and Huckleberries
2 cups wild rice, rinsed in cold water
5 cups water
2 wild onions (or 2 scallions), diced
1 cup hazelnuts, shelled, dried, and diced
1 cup dried huckleberries(or blueberries)

Combine rice, water and onions in a large stockpot, bring to a boil and cover and simmer for 45 minutes or until most of water is absorbed. Add hazelnuts and berries, mix thoroughly. Cover and steam for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Fluff and transfer rice mixture to serving bowl. Serve hot.


Aquène (Peace),
WaûtuckquesSóchepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 18, 2011
12:31 PM

Post #8854201

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh(Good Afternoon Everyone),

Additional Wild Flavorings
Black Mustard- Brassica nigra: Harvest seeds in summer and dry and grind to use as a black pepper replacement. It is also the source for table mustard.

Catbrier- Smilax spp.: The ground roots make a fine gelatin, which taste somewhat like wild sarsaparilla.

Garlic Mustard- Alliaria officinallis: Garlic Mustard is an herb introduced from Eurasia. Use leaves, blossoms, and young pods from Spring through Summer. It can be eaten raw or lightly steamed and sautéed with butter.

Purple/Water Evans- Geum rivale: Though acidic and mildly astringent, the well sweetened roots are quite tasty. The roots have a pleasant chocolate flavor.

Sassafras- Sassafras albidum: The bark, roots and leaves are used as a medicine and for teas. The dried leaves, when powdered, are used as a sweetener and thickener. The powder is called Filé and is used to thicken gumbo.

Filé Powder
Gather young leaves and spread out to dry on a screen. When crisp, crumble into a powder or grind in a spice/coffee grinder; sift and store in a mason jar. Use 1 tablespoon powder per pot of gumbo or stew. You must remove stew from heat before adding Filé. If you add while it is still cooking the Filé will become stringy.

Wild Ginger- Asarum canadense: The roots can be used fresh or dried. Wild Ginger is a protected species in most areas. You should only harvest where it is permitted and only do so sparingly.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget 9/11/2001

This message was edited Oct 26, 2011 10:38 PM
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 25, 2011
6:22 PM

Post #8863718

Thank you for the receipes.Somehow natures medicine is much more of a comfort than the cold sterile meds pumped out by big Pharma. Tho some of it is good it all came from natural sources.
Vickie

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 26, 2011
8:39 PM

Post #8865285

Wunne Wunnonkou (Good Evening) Vickie,

Koonepeam (You are welcome).


Aquène (Peace),
WaûtuckquesSóchepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 27, 2011
11:49 AM

Post #8865928

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh(Good Afternoon Everyone),

Winter Squash Casserole
1 large winter squash (e.g. Acorn, Butternut, Hubbard, etc. )
1/2 cup water
1 tsp maple sugar
2 eggs, beaten
1 stick butter, softened
2 tsp. ground Cinnamon (Cinnamomum verum: Ceylon/Sri Lanka or C. aromaticum: Cassia/Chinese cinnamon)
1 tsp Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum: India)
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 tsp black pepper

1. Preheat oven to 350°F. Place squash in a large baking dish. Pour water around squash and bake for 45 minutes or until squash is tender; turning halfway through cooking. Keep oven on.
2. Take skin off when cooled enough to handle. Put in a large bowl and whip them until fluffy. Add maple sugar, eggs, butter and cinnamon. Pour into a greased casserole; bake for 45 minutes.


Aquène (Peace),
WaûtuckquesSóchepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

October 29, 2011
10:28 PM

Post #8868718

You know, this would make a wonderful series of articles. You could focus on one particular plant at a time, and include any personal stories you have regarding that recipe or plant. Just thought I'd throw that out there.

JuJu55

JuJu55
Jasper Co., MO
(Zone 6b)

October 30, 2011
7:28 AM

Post #8868971

I let the DG about this to hold as "sticky" this thread I would to read this and I'm part tiny of Indian blood in me... Cherokee...and I gonna to read this and try my best to copy it and hope I try to eat this foods...

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 1, 2011
2:46 PM

Post #8872253

Wunne Wunnonkou (Good Evening)

The thread is now a sticky. Taubotny, Moderators!
It seems the Moderators heard you, Bookerc1. Also, I will think about writing some as an article, as you suggested.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 1, 2011
3:37 PM

Post #8872314

Actually, it was Rusty that asked for it to be made a "sticky." I just kept reading the recipes and thinking about all the stories that must go along with them. It's exactly the kind of article I like to read. :)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 1, 2011
4:12 PM

Post #8872350

Wunne Wunnonkou (Good Evening)

Nutaiuskoiantam (I am sorry) My apologies to Rusty56.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2011
6:02 PM

Post #8875356

Wunne Wunnonkou Nishnoh (Good Evening Everyone),

Here is a menu, I thought you might like to try, for a Harvest/Hunters Moon feast.


HARVEST/HUNTERS FESTIVAL MENU

SHAGGY MANE PIE
4 cups large fresh shaggy manes, caps only(Caprinus comatus)
Water, to almost cover
4 cups fine cornmeal
1 cup cattail flour
2 tbsp fresh chives, chopped
1/4 cup nut oil
4 large eggs, beaten

1. Preheat oven to 375° F. Grease a glass baking dish with some nut oil; set aside.
2. Cut the mushroom caps into ½-inch slices, place in a pot and almost cover with water. Bring to a boil and simmer, covered, for 10 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool in broth.
3. Mix together the cornmeal, cattail flour and chives. Strain the mushrooms.
4. Layer the mushrooms and cornmeal mixture, alternately. Cover with the eggs and drizzle the remaining nut oil over the top. Bake until set; about 40 minutes.



PURSLANE AND GROUNDNUTS
1 quart groundnuts (Apios americana) or hog peanuts (Amphicarpaea bracteata), washed
1 leek, washed and sliced
3 cups boiling water
1 quart fresh Purslane (Portulaca oleracea), washed twice
2 small fresh dillweed fronds, chopped
1/2 cup sunflower seed butter

1. In a covered stockpot, simmer the groundnuts and leek for 20 minutes. Partially drain.
2. Add the Purslane, dill and sunflower seed butter. Stir and blend thoroughly. Steam for 5 minutes more. Serve hot.



BAKED BUTTERNUT SQUASH
2 butternut squash
4 tbsp nut butter
4 tbsp honey
4 tbsp maple syrup
Nutmeg and cinnamon

1. Preheat oven to 325°F.
2. Place squash into a roasting pan and bake for 40 minutes, turning once, or until the skin wrinkles and is easily pierced with a fork,
3. Remove and let cool slightly, cut in half and scoop out the pulp and seeds*; reserve the seeds. Dot each portion of squash with nut butter and drizzle with honey and maple syrup. Season lightly with spices and return to oven.
4. Bake an additional 30 minutes or until tender. Serve hot.
* Toast the seeds on a cookie sheet in the oven at the same time for 30 minutes and serve as an accompaniment.



FRIED SQUASH/PUMPKIN BLOSSOMS
1 cup milk
1 egg
1 tbsp rice flour
1 tsp ground dried sassafras leaves(File powder)
36 male, squash/pumpkin blossoms, picked before they open, mashed
1/2 cup nut oil
Garnish: fresh mint or dillweed

1. Blend milk, egg, flour and Filé powder in a bowl with a fork. Beat until smooth.
2. Place the mashed blossoms in batter, stir gently, and allow to soak for 10 minutes.
3. Heat the oil in a cast-iron skillet until hot.
4. Fry the batter-coated blossoms, a few at a time, until golden, turning once. Drain on brown paper. Garnish and serve hot.


BAKED BEANS
1 lb dried Anasazi or trout
1 lb dried navy bean
2 quarts water
1/2 lb salt pork, cut into 4 pieces
1/2 cup tree sugar
1 tsp dried mustard
1 green pepper, diced
2 wild onions, chopped
1 cup cider

1. Preheat oven to325°F.
2. Place beans in a large stockpot, cover with water, add salt pork and simmer, covered for 2 hours. Add more water as needed. Drain beans and save 1 cup of cooking liquid. Stir in tree sugars, dry mustard, green pepper, wild onions, and cider, into the beans, blend thoroughly.
3. Pour the bean mixture into a oven-proof crock and bake, covered, for 1½ to 2 hours. Serve hot.


ROAST VENISON SADDLE with WILD RICE
5 lb saddle of venison, dressed and severed for easy carving
Dried juniper berries
Peppercorns
6 to 8 strips thick-sliced maple-smoked bacon

Basting Marinade
2 tbsp honey or maple syrup
2 cups cider

1. Preheat oven 350°F.
2. Stud the venison with juniper and peppercorns. Lay the bacon strips over and secure with toothpicks. Stand the saddle on a rack in a large roasting pan.
3. Prepare the basting marinade by simmering, in a small saucepan the honey (or maple syrup) in cider until it is well dissolved and steaming.
4. Roast, basting often, for 1½ hours. Cool the roast for 20 minutes. Carve, serving 1 rib per portion.
5. Serve on a bed of wild rice, together with the pan drippings.


Wild Rice
4 oz wild rice (Zizania aquatica, Z. palustris, Z. texana))
2 1/2 cups no salt added broth
1/4 tsp sea salt
1 tbsp toasted nut oil

1. In a medium saucepan, bring broth and salt to a boil.
2. Stir in rice, reduce heat, cover and simmer for about 60 minutes. For firmer texture, decrease cooking time. For softer, more tender texture, increase cooking time.
3. Once desired texture has been reached, remove from heat. Drain excess liquid, fluff with a fork and serve.


BAKED STUFFED BLUEFISH
4 lb bluefish, split and cleaned
2 tbsp nut oil
Black mustard seeds, ground
Your choice of herbs
1 cup fresh mushrooms, chopped
1 cup shucked oysters and liquor
1 cup shelled chestnuts, chopped
1 wild onion, chopped
1 ramp, chopped
1 tbsp maple syrup
2 cups cornmeal
1 cup cider
1/4 tsp File powder

1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
2. Wipe the clean fish inside and out with the oil. Season with ground mustard and herbs.
3. Mix the mushrooms, oysters, chestnuts, wild onion, ramps, maple syrup and cornmeal together and stuff into cavity.
4. Lay oiled, stuffed and seasoned fish on a large sheet of aluminum foil in a roasting pan. Fold and wrap the foil tightly around the fish, cut a vent, in the top, for steam to escape. Bake for 1 hour, basting several times through the vent hole with cider
5. Remove from oven. Cut open aluminum foil and sprinkle with Filé powder.


BAKED STUFFED APPLES
6 whole firm apples, cored almost through to the bottom
1/2 cup dried wild currants, raisins, or fresh blueberries
6 spicebush berries, dried nad crushed
1/2 cup honey

1. Preheat oven to 300°F. Grease a baking dish; set aside.
2. Arrange apples (in their skin) in the baking dish. Blend together the berries and honey and heat. 3. Stuff each apple center with the hot mixture, drizzling some over the skins.
4. Bake for 30 minutes, basting once. Serve hot.



INDIAN PUDDING
2 cups Raisins or Nannyberries
2 cup fine stone-ground Cornmeal
4 cups water
1/2 cup nut butter
1/2 cup raw Honey
1/4 Juneberries, fresh or dried
1/4 tsp ground Wild Ginger
1/2 tsp nutmeg

Preheat oven to 325°F. Toss the raisin (or nannyberries) and cornmeal together gently. Bring water to a boil with the nut butter in a large saucepan. Gradually add the cornmeal-raisin mixture and simmer, stirring until thickens - about 15 minutes. Add remaining ingredients, blending thoroughly. Pour into a 2½ quart greased casserole. Set the casserole in a pan of water, 1" to 2" deep, and bake for 2½ hours. Cool thoroughly before serving. Serve with nut milk or additional nutmeg for topping.



SWEET FERN TEA (Comptonia peregrina)
10-inch branch sweet fern
2 quarts boiling water

Cover branch with boiling water and steep, covered, for 20 minutes. Strain and serve.



SUMACADE (Rhus glabra and R. typhina)
1 cup bruised berries
1 quart hot water

Soak berries in hot water for 15 minutes, strain and cool.


Wunne Tabuttantamóonk (Happy Thanksgiving)!


Aquene,
WautuckquesSochepo

Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)


This message was edited Nov 25, 2013 12:54 PM
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

November 12, 2011
9:26 PM

Post #8887974

Anything on Prickly Pear pads and fruit?

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 13, 2011
6:10 PM

Post #8888996

Wunne Wunnonkou (Good Evening) BUFFY690,

Opuntia vulgaris and spp.- Prickly Pear, Indian Fig, Beavertail, Devil's Tongue, Tuna: They are a common hardy, broad-leaf Cacti. They range from coast to coast. The pads(leaves) and fruit are commonly used for food, by the Native Americans. The scraped pads can be used fresh in salads, chopped into omelets, stews and as pickles. The red fruits can be used as a juice or in jellies, jams, and as candy.

Cactus Pads or Nopalitos: Chose new tender pads, from new growth. Clean Cactus Pads: First to protect from spines, don rubber gloves (ones used to wash dishes work well)! Now carefully pick up pad and with an ordinary kitchen peeler, begin peeling cactus pad. Remove all spines and the eyes; wash well. You now can remove your gloves. Trim the edges to remove bruised and dry parts; wash well again. By washing them, you will be removing some of the sticky liquid the plant exudes. Dice it to the size of small green beans, and simmer in water or sauté in butter for a few minutes; salt to taste. You can also steam them over boiling water for a few minutes and then combined with other foods. Most people favor Nopales with eggs, added to soups or chili, mixed into tortilla fillings, or even stuffed with cheese and deep fried. Older pads can also be used as a substitute for okra, due to it's being high in mucilage.


Cactus Salsa
2 lbs. cactus pads
2 cans of diced fire-roasted tomatoes
3 pickled jalapeno peppers, chopped
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 medium onion, chopped
1 can each of red kidney beans, rinsed
1 can black bean, rinsed
1 can pinto, rinsed
1 tbsp basil, chopped
1 handful of cilantro, chopped
1/4 cup of olive oil
1/4 tsp of salt
1/8 tsp ground black pepper
1/4 cup sunflower seeds, shelled pumpkin seeds, or pine nuts, or any combination of them

1. Clean Cactus Pads: First to protect from spines, don rubber gloves (ones used to wash dishes work well)! Now carefully pick up pad and with an ordinary kitchen peeler, begin peeling cactus pad. Remove all spines and the eyes; wash well. You now can remove your gloves. Trim the edges to remove bruised and dry parts; wash well again. By washing them, you will be removing some of the sticky liquid the plant exudes.
2. Dice it to the size of small green beans. Mix all the ingredients, blending well. refrigerate 2 hours (minimum) to overnight. Great as a dip for tortilla chips, or a relish . It makes a great garnish for burritos, meat dishes or as a spicy condiment.


Lima Bean and Nopales Soup
1/2 lb Lima beans, rinsed well and drained
1/2 cup nut oil
1/2 cup wild onion, chopped
1½ quarts of water
2 cloves of garlic
Sea salt, to taste
4 to 5 cactus pads
Garnish: 1/4 cup chives, snipped

1. Clean Cactus Pads: First to protect from spines, don rubber gloves (ones used to wash dishes work well)! Now carefully pick up pad and with an ordinary kitchen peeler, begin peeling cactus pad. Remove all spines and the eyes; wash well. You now can remove your gloves. Trim the edges to remove bruised and dry parts; wash well again. By washing them, you will be removing some of the sticky liquid the plant exudes. Sauté in butter for a few minutes; salt to taste. Set aside.
2. Combine the Lima beans, oil, onion and garlic. Cook in a covered pot, bring to a slow boil; continue to cook until the beans are soft and the liquid is thick. Do not salt. This takes about 2 and 1/2 hours. Stir frequently. Add salt and boil for about 15 minutes more. Before serving, add the cactus to the soup and stir well. Makes approximately 6 servings.


Nopalitos Con Chile (Cactus Chili)
2 lbs cactus pads
1/2 cup wild onion, chopped
1/8 cup corn, sunflower, or nut seed Oil
2 jalapeno chilies
2 Serrano chilies
1 wild garlic, chopped
1 cup cilantro, chopped
Sea salt, to taste

1. First to protect from spines, don rubber gloves (ones used to wash dishes work well)! Now carefully pick up pad and with an ordinary kitchen peeler, begin peeling cactus pad. Remove all spines and the eyes; wash well. You now can remove your gloves. Trim the edges to remove bruised and dry parts; wash well again. By washing them, you will be removing some of the sticky liquid the plant exudes.
2. Sauté in butter for a few minutes; salt to taste. Add garlic, chilies and salt. Cover and simmer until tender. Serve over diced and toasted tortillas or a bed of rice.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Cactus Pears: Cactus Pears taste like a watered-down version of watermelon. The pulp is a brilliant red. Cactus Fruit can be sliced an added to fruit salads or puréeing and straining out the seeds. Cleaning Cactus Pears: First to protect from spines, don rubber gloves (ones used to wash dishes work well)! Now carefully pick up pad and with an ordinary kitchen peeler, begin peeling cactus pears. Remove all spines and the eyes; wash well. You now can remove your gloves and don food-grade gloves(trust me on this, cactus pears will stain anything and everything a lovely shade of red). They can be used as a substitute for: watermelons, or pepino melons.


Prickly Pear Candy
1 cup strained prickly pear tuna juice
1 cup tree sugar

1. Wash and chop (as previously instructed) prickly pears. Cover chopped fruit with water, even with level of the pears in pan. Cook over medium heat for approximately 20 minutes. Slightly cool and Purée fruit. Using cheesecloth and a colander, strain liquid from cooked prickly pear fruit.
2. Heat strained juice to a rolling boil and add tree sugar. Stir until sugar is dissolved into juice completely. Remove pan from heat and promptly pour mixture on cookie sheet, covered with parchment paper. Place candy into 350 degree oven for about 5 minutes.
3. Remove prickly pear candy from oven and allow to cool. Cut candy into serving size pieces and wrap in plastic wrap for your later enjoyment.


Prickly Pear Syrup
6 cups strained prickly pear tuna juice
6 cups tree sugar
4 tbsp. lemon juice

1. Wash and chop (as previously instructed) prickly pears. Cover chopped fruit with water, even with level of the pears in pan. Cook over medium heat for approximately 20 minutes. Slightly cool and Purée fruit. Using cheesecloth and a colander, strain liquid from cooked prickly pear fruit.
2. Combine strained prickly pear juice and lemon juice and cook over medium heat, until mixture comes to a boil. Once boiling add sugar and stir constantly. Keep at a rolling boil until all of the sugar is dissolved. Then remove pan from heat. If canning syrup, ladle into sterilized jars and water bath can for 16 minutes. If using syrup immediately, cool syrup and store covered in the refrigerator for up to one month.


Prickly Pear Jelly
4 cups strained prickly pear juice
6 cups tree sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 package pectin

1. Wash and chop (as previously instructed) prickly pears. Cover chopped fruit with water, even with level of the pears in pan. Cook over medium heat for approximately 20 minutes. Slightly cool and Purée fruit. Using cheesecloth and a colander, strain liquid from cooked prickly pear fruit
2. Combine strained prickly pear juice and lemon juice and cook over medium heat, until mixture comes to a boil. Once boiling, add tree sugar and pectin and stir constantly. Continue to keep at a rolling boil for two minutes; remove pan from heat. If canning jelly, ladle into sterilized jars and water bath can for 16 minutes. Prickly pear jelly may take up to two weeks to gel inside the jars. For fresh jelly, cool and store, covered, in the refrigerator for up to one month.


Prickly Pear & Jalapeno Jelly
4 cups strained prickly pear juice
6 cups tree sugar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1/4 cup jalapeno peppers, chopped
1 package pectin

1. Prepare jalapeno peppers by rinsing and chopping the fresh peppers very finely; sauté in butter over medium heat, until peppers are soft. Remove from heat and set aside.
2. Wash and chop (as previously instructed) prickly pears. Cover chopped fruit with water, even with level of the pears in pan. Cook over medium heat for approximately 20 minutes. Slightly cool and Purée fruit. Using cheesecloth and a colander, strain liquid from cooked prickly pear fruit
3. Combine strained prickly pear juice and lemon juice and cook over medium heat, until mixture comes to a boil. Once boiling, add tree sugar and pectin and stir constantly; add cooked jalapeno peppers. Continue to keep at a rolling boil for two minutes; remove pan from heat. If canning jelly, ladle into sterilized jars and water bath can for 16 minutes. Prickly pear jelly may take up to two weeks to gel in the jars. For fresh jelly, cool and store, covered, in the refrigerator for up to one month.


Wunne Tabuttantamóonk (Happy Thanksgiving)!


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2011
5:22 PM

Post #8897666

so off topic and I mean no insult. Have been reading (almost finished), The Clan of the Cave Bears that came out sometime in the 80's. This reminds me much of the dialogue in the book. I have no way to know if it is fiction or has some grain of truth. I have enjoyed this thread immensely and am currently printing the entire post. Thank you for sharing your vast knowledge. My mother was adopted into the Acoma tribe before she passed. What an honor.

Christi
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

November 19, 2011
6:47 PM

Post #8897784

We grow the prickly pear here also and this year during the dry summer I would peel and chop them to feed to the chickens since there was no grass.

The Lima Bean and Napoles Soup sounds good - might try that.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2011
10:56 AM

Post #8898653

LouC wrote:so off topic and I mean no insult. Have been reading (almost finished), The Clan of the Cave Bears that came out sometime in the 80's. This reminds me much of the dialogue in the book. I have no way to know if it is fiction or has some grain of truth. I have enjoyed this thread immensely and am currently printing the entire post. Thank you for sharing your vast knowledge. My mother was adopted into the Acoma tribe before she passed. What an honor.

Christi


Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ (Good Afternoon) Christi,

Though 'Clan of the Cave Bear' is fiction, Jean M. Auel did a lot of research. She studied Cro-magnon, Neanderthal, as well as Aurignacian and Gravettian cultures. She read extensively, visited archaeological sites and went to archaeological and paleontological seminars. So, it is not surprising, that the book sounds reminiscent of Native American ideals and practices.

Wunne Tabuttantamoonk! (Happy Thanksgiving!)


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2011
10:56 AM

Post #8898654

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ (Good Afternoon) Ladypearl,

I hope you enjoy it. Wunne Tabuttantamoonk! (Happy Thanksgiving!)


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2011
11:19 AM

Post #8898662

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),

Here is a recipe using wild rice.

Wild Rice Soup
1/3 cup wild rice
1 cup water
1/2 tsp sea salt
1/4 cup sunflower seed oil
1/4 cup almond nut butter (If allergic to tree nuts, sub. with toasted sunflower or sesame seed butter)
3/4 cup onion, chopped
1 cup celery, finely chopped
1/2 cup carrots finely chopped
1/4 tsp black mustard, ground
1/4 cup potato flour
5 cups unsweetened almond milk (sub. soy or rice)
Garnish: chives, snipped

1. In a sauce pan combine wild rice, salt and water; bring to a boil. Reduce heat and simmer 45 minutes.
2. Heat oil in a 2-quart saucepan until hot; add onions, carrots and celery, cover and reduce heat to medium and simmer gently for 5 minutes or until vegetables are tender. Do not brown vegetables. Stir in mustard powder and potato flour.
3. Remove from heat and add almond milk, stirring until flour is well blended. return to low heat. Cook, stirring constantly, until soup thickens.
4. Add cooked wild rice and simmer a few minutes more to blend flavors. Serve hot, topped with chives. Makes 6 (1 cup) servings.

Wunne Tabuttantamoonk! (Happy Thanksgiving!)


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
2:22 PM

Post #8898843

I don't why it has taken me so long to find this thread. I have pursued the entire thing and I can only gather that your name is Aquene, is that correct? You are a treasure. I was able to print the entire thing prior to today's postings. What a privilege we have to be able to share even a small part of your vast knowledge. Thank you for the side note about "Cave Bears". I am going to make time to finish it tonight. The clan gathering reminds me very much of our Thanksgiving traditions. I have been surprised at how many of the plants that are familiar. I can credit my membership in DG for that. Thanks you again for your generous spirit in sharing with all of us.

May you continue to be blessed.

Christi

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 20, 2011
6:59 PM

Post #8899248

LouC wrote:I don't why it has taken me so long to find this thread. I have pursued the entire thing and I can only gather that your name is Aquene, is that correct? You are a treasure. I was able to print the entire thing prior to today's postings. What a privilege we have to be able to share even a small part of your vast knowledge. Thank you for the side note about "Cave Bears". I am going to make time to finish it tonight. The clan gathering reminds me very much of our Thanksgiving traditions. I have been surprised at how many of the plants that are familiar. I can credit my membership in DG for that. Thanks you again for your generous spirit in sharing with all of us.

May you continue to be blessed.

Christi


Wunne Wunnonkou (Good Evening) Christi,

Koonepeam (You are welcome). I know the language can be a bit confusing, so I will break it down.

Indiani Algonquin: WaûtuckquesSóchepo
English: SnowRabbit
Sub breakdown: Waûtuckques = Rabbit, Sóchepo = Snow

Indiani Algonquin: Aquène
English: Peace

Wunne Tabuttantamoonk! (Happy Thanksgiving!)


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

JuJu55

JuJu55
Jasper Co., MO
(Zone 6b)

November 26, 2011
2:48 PM

Post #8906792

Well, I just love to read books of W. Micheal Gear and Kathleen O'Neal Gear that very excellant books I read all of it plus more new books coming up...

Other one is Jean Auel's books I has not read one new came out and sitting on shelf...

I just print it out of this thread and 31 pages...
I would try this recipes...Thanks!...

Take care,
Rusty56
(nick name is SnowElk or snowteka)...

Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

November 26, 2011
9:23 PM

Post #8907276

Greetings!

The Wild Rice Soup looks delicious - will have to try that too. I'm wondering what the most common source of milk was for the Native Americans. Did they ever milk animals or did they use nuts to make it?
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 27, 2011
10:44 PM

Post #8908527

Hi again guys, I keep up with this thread. Really appreciate you. I am a big fan of Jean Auel. She also wrote 2 sequals to Clan of the Cave Bear. Valley of the Horses, I don't remember the name of her last one.She also wrote the Mammoth Hunters. Valley of the Horses is a must read.She has since passed away.I've reread her books many times. The old crippled man character was taken from a skeleton from an archeological site. That proved the ancient ones took care of their sick.
Vickie

JuJu55

JuJu55
Jasper Co., MO
(Zone 6b)

November 28, 2011
4:14 AM

Post #8908612

Well, I have now is "The Shelters of Stone" and "The Land of Painted Caves".

I read finish "The Shelters of Stone" so, I try to read new book came out this year... Not read it yet!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 28, 2011
11:51 PM

Post #8909947

Oh ...OK... The Valley of Horses was next in line to Clan of the Cave Bear. I have an old copy of it. I'll send it to you if you'd like. Just D-Mail me.
I read the Shelters of Stone but could'nt get into it. I'll look for the Land of Painted Caves. Those books are popular here so should be able to find it.
Vickie

JuJu55

JuJu55
Jasper Co., MO
(Zone 6b)

November 29, 2011
4:31 AM

Post #8910002

cando1 wrote: Oh ...OK... The Valley of Horses was next in line to Clan of the Cave Bear. I have an old copy of it. I'll send it to you if you'd like. Just D-Mail me.
I read the Shelters of Stone but could'nt get into it. I'll look for the Land of Painted Caves. Those books are popular here so should be able to find it.
Vickie


I don't want any more books this time because I have over a thousands of books in my home which is old, used and new... I have no room for that... Sorry...

Here's the link:
As you can read her post...

http://www.jeanauel.com/about.php

cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

December 5, 2011
4:33 PM

Post #8917738

Thank you Rusty,I know the feeling. Have books stowed everywhere.
Vickie
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

December 7, 2011
8:44 AM

Post #8919971

I am very excited about the prockly pear recipes, I have a neighbor that has several quite large cactus plants, I am going to try and see if they would allow me to have a few of the new pads next year as well as the fruit (there are usually loads)
Thanks again this is fabu
annabelle15
Niles, MI
(Zone 5a)

December 14, 2011
11:15 AM

Post #8929421

I live in southwestern michigan, the local Indians are the Pokagon Tribe of the Potawatomis, here is their recipe for
Seskoo kwedik Kwezhg'n/ Fry Bread
2 cups flour ( you may replace 1/3 cup with whole wheat flour)
4 teaspoons baking powder
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 cup sugar
1/4 cup dry milk
3/4 cup water
4 cups vegetable oil ( olive or canola are the best)

Mix dry ingredients together, slowly add the water. Mix lightly, and pat dough 1/2 inch thick on floured surface/ Cut into 3-inch squares; handle ;ightly.
Using an electric fry pan at 350 degrees with at least 1 1/2 inches of oil, cook 3 minutes on each side and serve with honey, butter, or cinnamon.
Nutrition info: If you make 16 pieces of bread, 1 piece is 320 calories, 0 gm fiber, amd 27 gm fat

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 16, 2011
4:31 PM

Post #8932499

Kawonkamish Nishnoh,

Here is a Feast for Christmas/New Years>


Mid-Winter Ceremonial Feast

Codfish Balls
3 lbs fresh cod, salmon or halibut
4 cups Potatoes, unpeeled and diced
2 cups water
¼ tsp ground Black Mustard seed
2 tbsp oil (Corn, Sunflower seed or Grape seed)
2 tsp Maple syrup (grade A dark amber)
¼ tsp Saltgrass
¼ tsp Coltsfoot ashes
¼ tsp Sheep Sorrel
¼ tsp Cilantro
4 cups oil (Corn, Sunflower seed or Grape seed)

Boil the fish and potatoes in a covered pot for 25 minutes. Drain and mash. Mix in the black mustard seed, 2 teaspoons oil, maple syrup, dillweed, coltsfoot ashes, sheep sorrel and cilantro and shape into balls. Deep fry in hot oil (or fat), stirring until golden. Drain on brown paper and serve either hot or cold.


Oyster Patties
2 cups Potatoes or Jerusalem Artichokes, mashed
2 eggs, beaten
2 Wild Onions, minced
1 tbsp Coltsfoot ashes
2 tbsp Nut Milk
1 tbsp fresh Cilantro, chopped
1 tsp Black Mustard seeds
Sheep Sorrel to taste
12 dozen Oysters, shucked
Garnish: Cilantro and Sorrel leaves, chopped

Preheat oven to 375°F. Blend potatoes or Jerusalem artichokes, eggs, wild onions, Coltsfoot ashes, nut milk, cilantro, black mustard seeds, and sheep sorrel. Form a small cake around one oyster and gently flatten. Brush each cake with additional nut milk. Bake for about 30 minutes or until golden. Garnish with cilantro or sorrel. Serve hot.


Conch(Whelk) Stew
2 Channel or Knobbed Pear Conchs (Whelks), in the shell, scrubbed well
3 qt water
1 dried Cattail heart, chopped coarsely
½ cup Birch or Cider vinegar
2 cups ripe Wild Tomatoes, diced
Pinch Black Mustard seed, ground
Pinch Dill seed, ground
Pinch Sage, ground

Boil the conchs in the water with the cattail hearts and vinegar for 30 minutes. Drain and reserve broth; return broth to the pot and simmer. When cooked slightly, pull the meat out of the shells and slice off the long, muscular foot. Discard the remaining body. Cut the foot into thin slices and return to the simmering broth. Add the tomatoes and herbs. Simmer and stir for 10 minutes more. Serve steaming.


Shrimp & Scallop Pie
80 raw Wild Shrimp
30 Nantucket Bay Scallops
1 tsp fresh Cilantro, chopped
1 cup water
2 cups fine Cornmeal
4 ripe Tomatoes, chopped
½ cup dried Cattail hearts, chopped
1 tbsp Walnut oil (or Almond)
4 dried Bayberry leaves, crumbled
3 cloves Wild Garlic, chopped
1½ tsp Saltgrass (Distichlis spicata)

Preheat oven to 350°F. Combine all ingredients and blend well. Place in a greased baking dish and bake for 40 minutes. Serve either hot or cold with herbed wild rice and tomatoes sprinkled with chopped cilantro. Also serve with Seaweeds.


Seaweeds
1 cup Dulse (Rhodymenia palmata), rinsed
Sea Lettuce (Ulva lactuca), rinsed and chopped
1 cup Edible Kelp (Alaria esculenta), rinsed and chopped
1 cup Laver (Poryphyra vulgaris), rinsed and chopped
Water to cover
2 tbsp Sorrel leaves, chopped

Combine the seaweeds in a pot, cover with water and boil until tender. Drain and blend in sorrel. Serve with Shrimp and Scallop Pie.


Irish Moss Jelly
1 cup Irish Moss, washed
6 cups boiling water
1 cup nut milk (Almond, Coconut or Hazelnut)
½ cup wild fruit (Plum, Cranberries, Blueberries, Raspberries, etc.)

Cover with boiling water and boil for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally; strain. Boil briefly on nut milk and flavor (to taste) with the wild fruits.


Baked Eel
5 Eels (2 lbs each), cleaned, skinned, split, deboned and cut into 3" pieces
3 cups Groundnuts
3 cups Wild Leek bulbs
1/2 cup Sunflower seed oil
1/2 cup Birch or Cider vinegar
1 tbsp dried Spicebush berries, ground
1 tsp Saltgrass

Preheat oven to 350°F. Place the pieces in a large pan and surround with groundnuts and leeks. Sprinkle with remaining ingredients and bake for 30 to 40 minutes.


Smoked Eel
1 smoked Eel, (1½ lb) cleaned, skinned, split, deboned and cut into 2" pieces
4 potatoes, in their skins
8 Wild onions,
1 tbsp dried juniper berries
Pinch Black Mustard seed, ground
Pinch Dill seed, ground
Pinch Sage, ground
6 cups boiling water
Garnish: fresh cilantro, chopped, Saltgrass and grated cheese(optional)

In a large pot, simmer with the potatoes, onions, juniper berries and herbs in the water for 1 hour. Skim off excess fat. Serve hot, topped with cilantro, Saltgrass and cheese.


Iroquois Soup- U'Nega'gei
Two 3 lb fish(trout, bass, or haddock), cleaned, bones removed, but with skin left on
3 quarts water
4 large fresh mushrooms,, sliced
3 wild onions(Allium cernuum) or 1 large yellow onion, chopped
2 cups dried Lima beans
2 tbsp fine cornmeal
2 tbsp fresh culantro or cilantro, chopped
1 wild garlic plant(Amianthium canadense) or 1 regular garlic clove, chopped
1/2 tsp dried wild basil(Pycnanthemum virginianum) or regular basil(Ocimum basilicum)
Garnish: fresh dillweed, chopped

Place water, fish, mushrooms, onions, beans, cornmeal, culantro, garlic, and basil in a large kettle and simmer, uncovered, for 30 minutes. Remove fish from kettle, remove skin and flake, return fish to kettle. Simmer for another 30 minutes, stirring frequently. Serve hot and garnished with dillweed.


Johnny Cakes (Nokehick)
2 cups white stone-ground Cornmeal
4 tbsp Maple syrup
2 cups boiling water
2 cups light or medium cream
1/4 cup corn oil

Add cornmeal and maple syrup to the boiling water, stirring well. Boil for 20 minutes or until thickened. Cool slightly, then thin the batter with cream until dense, but not runny. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a medium-hot well-greased griddle. Flip after 6 minutes and cook for another 5 minutes.

Pumpkin-Hickory Cakes
2 cups fine Cornmeal
1 cup Potato flour
1½ cups stewed or steamed Pumpkin meat, beaten smooth
3/4 cup Hickory nuts, roasted, shelled and chopped
1 egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water
1/2 cup Maple syrup or raw Honey

Preheat oven to 350°F. Mix together the cornmeal and potato flour in a large bowl. Gradually add the remaining ingredients to the flours, blending thoroughly into a smooth batter. Pour into a well-greased 9" x 5" loaf pan and bake for 1¼ hours or until a toothpick inserted into the center of the loaf comes out clean. You can also spoon the batter into greased muffin tins and bake until golden on top, about 25 minutes.


Indian Cornmeal Dessert
1 cup white stone-ground cornmeal
2 cups cold water
¼ cup nut butter
1 cup cranberry juice
2 cups dried cranberries
1 tsp nutmeg
¼ cup cream
¾ cup maple syrup
3 eggs, beaten lightly

1. Soak the cornmeal in the water. Melt the nut butter in a large pot, add the cornmeal, and slowly heat, stirring constantly, for 15 minutes, or until thickened.
2. Add the cranberry juice, berries, and nutmeg and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Add cream and maple syrup, blend thoroughly.
3. Add eggs and remove from heat, stirring until the mixture stops bubbling. Serve hot or chilled.


Meatless Pemmican*
1/2 cup raisins
1/2 cup hog nuts(can substitute peanuts)
1/2 cup hickory nuts
1/2 cup dried apples
1/2 dried pumpkin or squash
1/4 cup acorn
1/4 cup cornmeal
1/3 honey or maple syrup

Set oven at lowest possible setting. Combine the acorn and cornmeal. To make sure the acorn and cornmeal are bone-dry, spread in a thin layer on a cookie sheet and place in a warm oven for 15 to 30 minutes, checking frequently. When dry, combine them with the raisins, hog nuts/peanuts, hickory nuts, apples, pumpkin/squash and either chop or coarsely grind them. Add honey or maple syrup and blend thoroughly. Divide the mixture into 1/4-cup portions, press into cakes, and store in the refrigerator for use later.

* You can make traditional pemmican by combining dried and shredded, bear, bison, or venison, with suet, nuts, dried fruit and/or berries.


Blackberry & Bergamot Tea
1 stalk Bergamot (leaves, stems and blossoms, but not the roots)
10 blackberry leaves
2 qt boiling water

Boil water in a 2½-quart pot. Remove pot from heat and add bergamot stalk and blackberry leaves, cover pot and steep for 15 minutes.


Spicebush Tea
Dried Spicebush leaves or roots and bark
Boiling water

Cover 3 to 5 leaves with boiling water and letting steep, covered, for 10 minutes or by pouring 2 cups boiling water over 1 tablespoon of dried roots and bark, covering and steeping for 30 minutes.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001

This message was edited Dec 21, 2011 1:26 AM
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 17, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8933066

Makes my mouth water just to read the recipes. Thank you once again for being so generous with your knowledge. May you have a Merry Christ-mas and a Joyous New Year.

Christi

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 20, 2011
10:25 PM

Post #8937795

Ladypearl wrote:Greetings!

The Wild Rice Soup looks delicious - will have to try that too. I'm wondering what the most common source of milk was for the Native Americans. Did they ever milk animals or did they use nuts to make it?


Kawonkamish Ladypearl,

Thank you for asking that question, Native American tribes used nut milk. We did not raise animals for milking.


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

December 20, 2011
10:42 PM

Post #8937804

LouC wrote:Makes my mouth water just to read the recipes. Thank you once again for being so generous with your knowledge. May you have a Merry Christ-mas and a Joyous New Year.

Christi


Muskouantamook Christwekonantamunat kah Wunnegen Wuske Kodtumoo (Merry Christmas and Happy New Year)!


Aquène,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")

Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

December 22, 2011
1:32 AM

Post #8939019

Nuts don't run away or kick you when you need milk so they were the smart choice - LOL! Thanks : )

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 14, 2012
5:26 PM

Post #9165405

Wunne Wunnonkou Nishnoh (Good Evening Everyone),

I am sorry it has taken me so long to post anything new. Well here goes.

A Spring Celebration Menu

Stewed Fiddleheads
4 dozen Ostrich Fern(Matteuccia struthiopteris) fiddleheads
2 cups boiling water
1 tsp nut oil
1/2 cup nut butter

In medium pot, cover the fiddleheads with boiling water and nut oil. Return to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered for 20 minutes or until tender. Drain. Top with nut butter to enhance flavor and serve hot.


Sautéed Spring Morels
2 lbs fresh spring Morels(Morchella esculenta), sliced long
2 tbsp nut oil

Brush morels to remove dirt. Heat nut oil in a medium fry pan, over medium heat. Add morels and sauté until tender. Serve hot.


Marinated Mushrooms with Wild Leeks
4 cups fresh, firm mushrooms(Shaggy Manes(Coprinus comatus), Meadow Mushrooms(Agaricus campestris, A. arvensis), etc.)
2 cups Wild Leek(Allium burdickii) bulbs
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup Sunflower seed oil
1 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
1 tsp dillseed

Blend vinegar, oil, parsley and dillseed into a sauce, set aside. Simmer the mushrooms and leeks in a small amount of boiling water for 5 minutes. Drain, cool, and place in a crock or glass jar. Cover with vinegar, oil, parsley and dillseed sauce and store in the refrigerator, loosely covered for 24 hours or more before serving.


Buttered Poke Sprouts
16 tender young Pokeweed(Phytolacca americana) sprouts
1 tbsp wood ash
2 clove Wild Garlic(Allium sativum)
Nut butter and cider vinegar to taste

Gather, wash and trim poke sprouts. Place into a large kettle and cover with boiling water; boil for 10 minutes. Pour off cooking water and discard. Cover sprouts with fresh water; add wood ashes and garlic. simmer slowly. Serve steaming hot topped with nut butter and vinegar.


Fresh Chickweed Salad
2 lbs young Chickweed(Stellaria media) leaves and stems
Boiling water
2 tsp raw honey
4 tsp roasted Sunflower(Helianthus spp.) seed butter
2 tsp Sunflower seed oil
1/2 cup cider vinegar

Wash chickweed and place into a medium saucepan, cover with boiling water. Simmer for 3 minutes, covered. Remove from heat and pour off water. 'Shock' chickweed by placing them into a colander and pouring cold water over them. this sets the color and stops the cooking process. Immediately drain. Combine honey, butter, oil and vinegar; blend thoroughly. Add chickweed, toss to thoroughly coat, chill for 1 hour before serving.


Shad Roe and Milt
Sac of roe and milt from 2 fish, wash lightly
Boiling water
1 tsp cider vinegar
2 tbsp nut butter
Fresh Sorrel(Rumex acetosa L. ssp. alpestris) or Violet(Viola spp.) leaves
2 hard-boiled eggs, chopped
Fresh Dillweed(Anthum graveolens), chopped

Place roe and milt, one at a time into a medium pot of boiling water and vinegar, and simmer for 5 minutes. Remove and carefully drain, sauté quickly on all sides in butter (or broil in greased baking dish for 15 minutes). Serve on a bed of sorrel or violet leaves and garnish with eggs and dillweed.


Wild Strawberry Bread
1 cup fine cornmeal
3/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 cup Cattail((Typha latifolia)) pollen
1 cup nut milk or water
2 tbsp nut oil
1egg, beaten
1/2 cup Strawberry leaves, finely cut
1 tsp coltsfoot(Tussilago farfara) ashes
1 cup Wild Strawberries(Fragaria vesca)

Preheat oven to 425°F. Combine the cornmeal, flour and cattail pollen in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, mix together nut milk or water, nut oil, egg, strawberry leaves and coltsfoot ashes. add to cornmeal mixture and blend well. Fold in the strawberries and turn the batter into a well-greased 4x8" loaf pan. Bake for 40 minutes.


Sunflower Seed Butter (This can be homemade or store bought. It can be found at Trader Joe's or any health food store).
1 cup Toasted/Roasted Sunflower seeds
Raw Honey or Agave Nectar

Grind seeds in a mortar and pestle or food processor. Sweeten to taste. Store in refrigerator.


Sweetened Labrador Tea
2 to 3 dried Labrador Tea(Ledum groenlandicum) leaves per person
Boiling water
Maple syrup, raw Agave Nectar, raw Honey, etc.

Steep leaves in boiling water for 10 minutes. sweeten to tasted


Elder Blossom Fritters
2 cups fine white cornmeal
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 cup spring water
1 tbsp Maple syrup, raw Agave Nectar, raw Honey
1/4 cup corn oil for frying
16 Elder Blossom clusters(Sambucus canadensis), washed and dried
Maple sugar

Prepare batter by beating together the cornmeal, egg, water and maple syrup ( agave, honey, etc.). Heat oil on a griddle and drop batter by large tablespoonfuls onto it, immediately placing a 1 blossom cluster in the center of each raw fritter and lightly pressing into the batter. Fry for 3 to 5 minutes, or until golden brown. Flip and fry 3 minutes more. Drain on paper toweling. Serve hot, sprinkled with loose blossoms and maple sugar


Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

June 15, 2012
6:35 PM

Post #9166893

Thank you,
Vickie
MerryMary
Ocoee (W. Orlando), FL
(Zone 9b)

June 15, 2012
7:45 PM

Post #9167010

I'm so happy you listed the elderblossom fritters! My grandmother made those when I was a tot, and I've never known anyone else to make them!
:)
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 15, 2012
8:28 PM

Post #9167102

So happy to see you back with us.

Christi

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 18, 2013
11:21 PM

Post #9525466

Hellooooo!!! I am back!
And...
In the meantime I have been to sweat lodge twice! It is the most amazing feeling ever. I love it.
Now I am curious if there are any dishes traditionally associated with the lodge?
We always bring food offerings and feast together afterwards so it would be great to bring something yummy and try a new recipe!

Nya weh

Kelly

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2013
1:00 PM

Post #9532657

OutlawHeart81 wrote:Hellooooo!!! I am back!
And...
In the meantime I have been to sweat lodge twice! It is the most amazing feeling ever. I love it.
Now I am curious if there are any dishes traditionally associated with the lodge?
We always bring food offerings and feast together afterwards so it would be great to bring something yummy and try a new recipe!

Nya weh

Kelly


Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ (Good Afternoon) Kelly,

To my knowledge there isn't any specific foods to bring to the ceremony. Just bring something light and healthy. Here are a few suggestions:


JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE SALAD Serves:6

1 lb Jerusalem artichokes (aka sunchokes), scrubbed and diced
2 scallions, diced finely (include tops)
½ cup nut oil (if allergic to nuts you can sub. with corn or sunflower seed oil)
½ cup cider vinegar
1 tbsp raw honey
1 tbsp fresh mint, chopped
2 cups salad greens

Place sunchokes and scallions in a large salad bowl. Add oil, vinegar, honey and mint leaves. Toss thoroughly. Marinate at room temperature for 1 hour. Add salad greens, toss again, and serve.


ELDER BLOSSOM FRITTERS Serves: 8

2 cups corn flour (fine white cornmeal)
1 egg, lightly beaten
1 cup sparkling spring water
1 tbsp maple syrup
¼ cup corn oil (for frying)
16 elder blossom clusters, washed and dried

Prepare the batter by beating together the corn flour, egg, water, and maple syrup. Heat oil on a griddle and by large tablespoonfuls, drop the batter onto the griddle. Immediately place, a blossom cluster in the center of each raw fritter and press lightly into the batter. Fry for 3 to 5 minutes, or until golden brown. Flip and fry an additional 3 minutes. Drain on brown paper or paper towels. Serve hot, sprinkled with additional loose blossoms and maple sugar.


LEMON-LIME-STRAWBERRY ADE Serves: 12
12 cups sparkling spring water
2½ cups crushed strawberries
½ cup lemon juice
½ cup lime juice
Raw honey or sugar to taste

Combine water, strawberries, lemon and lime juices, and sweeten to taste with honey or sugar.


Aquène (Peace),
WaûtuckquesSóchepo (SnowRabbit)
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(“)_(“)

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2013
8:50 PM

Post #9533092

Those fritters sound awesome! I will have to remember to plant some elder and Jerusalem artichoke! :) thank you. I will try these out when I can get the ingredients

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 27, 2013
9:09 AM

Post #9535697

Wunne Mohtompan (Good Morning) Kelly,

You could also try:

BATTER-FRIED DANDELION BLOSSOMS

¼ cup nut oil (sub. sunflower seed, safflower seed, grape seed or corn oil)
1 tbsp spring water
2 eggs
2 qts freshly picked dandelion blossoms, washed and dried*
1½ cups corn flour (fine cornmeal)

Heat the oil to sizzling in a cast-iron skillet. You can check if oil's hot enough by, placing the tip of toothpick in oil; if you see bubbles forming, then the oil is ready. Add water to the eggs and beat well. Dip blossoms, one at a time, in the egg mixture, then into cornmeal. Sauté, turning often, until golden brown. Drain on paper towls. Serve hot or cold.

* For full blossoms, pick just before using; blossoms close shortly after picking.


FRIED SQUASH/PUMPKIN BLOSSOMS Serves: 8

1 cup nut milk
1 egg
1 tbsp corn, quinua, or amaranth flour
1 tsp ground dried sassafras leaves (filé powder)
3 dozen male blossoms*, picked just before opening, mashed
½ cup nut oil (sub. sunflower seed, safflower seed, grape seed or corn oil)
garnish: chopped fresh mint or dillweed

Blend milk, egg, flour, and seasoning in a bowl. Beat the batter until smooth. Add the mashed blossoms, and soak for 10 minutes. Heat the oil to sizzling in a cast-iron skillet. You can check if oil's hot enough by, placing the tip of toothpick in oil; if you see bubbles forming, then the oil is ready. Fry the battered blossoms, a few at a time, until golden brown, turning once. Drain on paper towels. Serve hot. Garnish with mint or dillweed.

* The male blossoms are larger and do not have the swelling at there base, which the female blossoms do.


SUCCOTASH Serves: 8

1 red onion, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
1 cup spring water
2 cups shelled lima beans
2 cups yellow corn
2 tbsp nut butter

In a large pot, simmer all the ingredients for 20 minutes. Serve hot.


Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

This message was edited May 27, 2013 11:11 AM

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2013
6:20 PM

Post #9536208

oooh! i will try those squash blossoms for sure! i have always wanted to try those anyway! :)
LouC
Desoto, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 27, 2013
6:49 PM

Post #9536236

So happy to see this thread active again. Better than a history book.

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 27, 2013
7:03 PM

Post #9536259

i agree!!! and i feel silly... because i have always wanted to eat squash blossoms, and not lose all my squash... it really NEVER occured to me that some of the flowers were male and wouldn't produce fruit any way... (-_-;) oi!!! i need DG to help point out the obvious sometimes! and it never hurts to try and learn something new along the way.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 31, 2013
10:10 AM

Post #9540855

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),


SUMMER STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL

STRAWBERRIES, WILD AND CULTIVATED

SAUTÉED FAIRY RING MUSHROOMS
2 lbs fresh Fairy ring mushrooms (Marasmius oreades), sliced long
2 tbsp nut oil

Brush morels to remove dirt. Heat the nut oil in a medium fry pan, over medium heat. Add mushrooms and sauté until tender. Serve hot.


BUTTERED NETTLES
1 wild onion () or scallion, including tops
2 tbsp sunflower seed oil
2 qt young nettle tops*
½ cup boiling water
⅓ cup sunflower seed butter

In a large skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Sauté onions for 3 minutes. Add nettles, boiling water, and simmer, covered, for 20 minutes. Serve steaming hot with broth.

*Cooking the nettles will destroy its stinging properties.


WILD STRAWBERRY BREAD
1 cup fine cornmeal
3/4 cup whole wheat pastry flour
1/4 cup Cattail((Typha latifolia)) pollen
1 cup nut milk or water
2 tbsp nut oil
1egg, beaten
1/2 cup Strawberry leaves, finely cut
1 tsp coltsfoot(Tussilago farfara) ashes
1 cup Wild Strawberries(Fragaria vesca)

Preheat oven to 425°F. Combine the cornmeal, flour and cattail pollen in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, mix together nut milk or water, nut oil, egg, strawberry leaves and coltsfoot ashes. add to cornmeal mixture and blend well. Fold in the strawberries and turn the batter into a well-greased 4x8" loaf pan. Bake for 40 minutes.


STRAWBERRY-MINT BUTTER
½ cup nut butter
2 tbsp ground fresh mint leaves
2 tbsp ground strawberries
1 tsp raw honey

Cream together the ingredients. Store butter in a covered jar in the refrigerator.


BEECHNUT-STRTAWBERRY CAKE
1 tbsp wood ashes
2 cups boiling water
1 cup dried strawberries
1 cup beechnut meats, roasted and chopped
3 cups fine cornmeal
1 cup beechnut flour
1 cup maple sugar
2 eggs, beaten
3 tbsp nut butter

Preheat oven to 350°F. Stir wood ashes into boiling water and pour over currants. Let stand for 15 minutes to cool. Mix together remaining ingredients, blend in currants and water. Spread into a greased 9x9x5-inch pan and bake for 45 minutes. Cool slightly and cut into 12 squares.


STEAMED CLAMS
Clams (2 cups per person)
2 batches of Seawater (ratio of: 2 tbsp +1 tsp sea salt (non-iodized) to 4 cups water)
¼ cup cornmeal
1 celery stalk
1 tsp dill seed
Nut butter

To flush out sand from the clams, refrigerate them overnight in 1 batch of seawater, to cover, with added cornmeal. By morning the clams systems should be clean sand.
Place clams in a heavy kettle, cover with 2nd batch of seawater, and add acelery, and dill seed. Bring to a boil over medium heat, cover and remove from heat. Steam clams, off heat for 20 minutes. Serve hot with nut butter.


STRAWBERRY WATER
4 cups water
1 cup of crushed strawberries
Honey to taste

Combine strawberries and water in large pitcher; add honey to your taste.
Chill for 30 minutes. Serve cold


STRAWBERRY TEA
Use leaves and fruit fresh or dried. Place 1 tablespoon of leaves and fruit in a mug, pour in 1 cup boiling water, cover, and steeping 10 minutes.


Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)


This message was edited May 31, 2013 12:11 PM

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

May 31, 2013
10:49 AM

Post #9540893

Yuuuum!!! I know we have a strawberry festival here, I'm not sure when though. :-/ I hope I didn't miss it. I have always wanted to go
Gazoodles
Iowa Park, TX
(Zone 7b)

May 31, 2013
9:13 PM

Post #9541511

Thank you for the strawberry recipes! When this drought is over I hope to grow enough strawberries to make some of them (the recipes you gave us.)

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

August 3, 2013
7:58 PM

Post #9620703

Wunne Wunnonkou Nishnoh (Good Evening Everyone),

Sorry I've been recuperating from an accident. So I've not been able to update this as often as I would like. Any way here is a new ceremonial feast.


SUMMER GREEN CORN CEREMONIAL FEAST

BUTTERED BEECH LEAVES

2 cups young beech leaves*
¾ cup boiling water
1 clove wild garlic, crushed
1 tbsp nut butter

Combine all ingredients in a medium saucepan, stir thoroughly until blended, cover and simmer 8 minutes. Serve hot.

*Beech leaves should be picked by the leaf stalk and the blade eaten and stalk discarded.


NETTLES
1 wild onion or scallion, diced (including tops)
2 tbsp sunflower seed oil
2 qt young nettle tops*
½ cup boiling water
⅓ cup sunflower seed butter


MILKWEED BUDS & BLOSSOMS
1 qt. milkweed buds and blossom clumps, newly gathered
1 clove wild garlic, chopped
½ cup spring water
1 tbsp maple syrup

In a covered saucepan, steam the milkweed buds and blossoms with the garlic, for 15 minutes. Stir thoroughly and add the maple syrup. Serve hot or cold.


PURSLANE SALAD & WILD GREENS SALAD
2 qt purslane, washed twice
1 cup boiling spring water
1 qt watercress sprigs, washed, dried in towel or salad spinner
1 qt wild lettuce leaves, washed, dried in towel or salad spinner
1 cup wood sorrel leaves and blossoms, washed, dried in towel or salad spinner
1 cup mint leaves, washed, dried in towel or salad spinner
½ cup wild onions, chopped
2 ripe tomatoes, cubed or 1 cup wild tomatoes
¼ cup fresh dillweed, chopped
1 cup cider vinegar
1¼ cup nut oil (walnut, pecan, almond, etc.)

In a non-reactive bowl whisk together the vinegar and oil, set aside. In a covered saucepan, steam the purslane in boiling spring water for 5 minutes. Drain and cool. In a large non-reactive bowl, add the remaining ingredients to the purslane. Toss thoroughly.


NASTURTIUM SALAD & DRESSING
SALAD
1 cup young nasturtium leaves
1 cup nasturtium buds and blossoms
2 cups mixed greens
1 wild onion, chopped (including tops)

DRESSING:
1/3 cup sunflower seed oil
¼ cup cider vinegar
1 tbsp raw honey
1 tsp fresh dillweed, chopped

Combine dressing ingredients in a glass jar and shake to blend. Let stand at room temperature for an hour to develop flavor.
Combine all salad ingredients in a large non-reactive bowl and toss. Dress salad and toss to coat.


STEAMED SWEET CORN
Sweet corn (enough for crowd), husks removed
3 wild garlic cloves
Spring water (enough for steaming)
Sea salt (enough to taste like sea water + more for seasoning)
Nut butter

Using a large stock pot, add enough salted water for proper steaming. Add garlic cloves to water. Place steamer basket into pot. Put corn in steamer basket and steam approx. 20-30 minutes. Slather steamed corn with nut butter and sea salt to taste.



SUCCOTASH
1/2 cup wild onion, chopped or 1 medium onion, chopped
1 green bell pepper, chopped
2 cups Lima beans, shelled
2 cups sweet yellow corn
1 cup water
2 tbsp nut butter or bear fat if you want to be traditional

In a large covered stock pot, simmer all the ingredients for 20 minutes. Serve hot.


MEADOW MUSHROOM PIE
3 cups fresh meadow mushrooms, chopped (Agaricus campetris, A. arvensis)
3 tbsp nut butter
1 egg, beaten
4 cups mashed potatoes
2 tbsp fresh dillweed, chopped
1 tbsp coltsfoot ashes or sea salt
1 tbsp fresh parsley, chopped
1 tbsp wild onion, chopped
½ cups spring water
¼ cup fine cornmeal

Preheat oven to 375° F. Grease a deep baking dish. In a skillet, sauté the mushrooms in the nut butter for about 5 minutes or until golden. Combine egg and mashed potato, and press into the baking dish, to cover bottom and sides. Blend 1 tablespoon of the dill, coltsfoot ashes/sea salt, parsley, onion, and water with mushrooms and gently turn the mixture into the potato crust. Sprinkle top with the cornmeal and remaining dillweed. Bake for 30 minutes. Serve hot.


STEWED WILD RABBIT & DUMPLINGS
STEW
5 lb wild rabbit, dressed and cut up for stewing
¾ cup corn oil
1 ⅓ cup fine cornmeal
2 qt spring water
2 tbsp wood ashes or ¼ cup cider vinegar
12 dried juniper berries
12 spring onion bulbs (reserve chopped tops for garnishing)
1 cup baby carrots
2 sprigs fresh dillweed

Rub each piece of rabbit with a little oil and dust with the cornmeal. In a large stock pot, brown each piece of rabbit in hot oil. Turning until evenly seared on all sides. Add water and ashes (or vinegar) and simmer, covered, for 1½ hours. Add remaining ingredients and cook, simmering, for 30 minutes more.

DUMPLINGS
2 cups fine cornmeal
1 tbsp wood ashes or baking soda
1 egg, beaten
1 tbsp nut butter
1 cup spring water

In a large bowl, blend all ingredients thoroughly. Drop dumpling batter by tablespoonfuls into the simmering stew. Cover and steam for 15 minutes more. Serve hot.


QUAHOG FRITTERS
2 dozen quahogs, in shell, cleaned
2½ cups boiling spring water
2 cups fine cornmeal
1 egg, beaten
1/2 tsp dillseed, ground
1 tbsp wood ashes, baking soda
1 tbsp coltsfoot ashes or sea salt
¼ cup corn oil for frying

In a covered stock pot, steam quahogs until they open (discard any that do not open). Drain and reserve and strain the broth. Meanwhile, in a bowl, combine cornmeal, dillseed, wood ashes/baking soda and coltsfoot ashes/ sea salt; set aside. Remove quahogs from their shells and chop. Place them into a large bowl with 1 cup of the strained broth and add the remaining ingredients, blending thoroughly into a light batter. Drop by tablespoonfuls onto a hot greased griddle, fry quickly, flipping once, until golden. Serve with wild greens and remaining broth.


FRIED BULLHEAD CATFISH
5 to 6 lbs catfish, skinned, deboned and filleted
1 cup fine corneal
1 tbsp fresh dillweed, chopped
½ tsp coltsfoot ashes or sea salt
½ cup nut oil

Season the cornmeal with dillweed and coltsfoot ashes/sea salt. Roll cleaned fish in the cornmeal mixture and fry in nut oil until golden brown. Serve with wild herbs and corn bread.


INDIAN CAKE (BANNOCK)
1 cup white cornmeal
½ cup cattail flour
1 tsp wood ashes or baking soda
½ tsp ground ginger
1 cup sour milk
1 egg, beaten
2 tbsp raw honey
3 tbsp corn oil

Preheat oven to 425°F. Grease an 8”x 4” loaf pan. In a large bowl, mix together cornmeal, cattail flour, wood ashes (or baking soda), and ginger. In a small bowl or medium measuring cup mix milk, egg, honey and corn oil. Gradually add the liquid ingredients to the dry, blending well and working into a sturdy dough. Turn into the loaf pan and bake for 30 minutes or flatten dough into greased cast iron skillet and cook for 20 minutes turning once.


INDIAN CORNMEAL DESSERT
1 cup white stone-ground cornmeal
2 cups cold water
¼ cup nut butter
1 cup cranberry juice
2 cups dried cranberries
1 tsp nutmeg
¼ cup cream
¾ cup maple syrup
3 eggs, beaten lightly

1. Soak the cornmeal in the water. Melt the nut butter in a large pot, add the cornmeal, and slowly heat, stirring constantly, for 15 minutes, or until thickened.
2. Add the cranberry juice, berries, and nutmeg and bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Add cream and maple syrup, blend thoroughly.
3. Add eggs and remove from heat, stirring until the mixture stops bubbling. Serve chilled.


GOLDENROD TEA Collect flowers and leaves, on a dry day, and air-dry. 2 teaspoon of flowers and leaves
Spring water
Raw honey or maple syrup to taste

In a small pot of boiling water and steep, covered, for 15 minutes, strain and sweeten with honey or maple syrup.


CORNMILK
fresh raw sweet corn
Spring water (to desired consistancy)
Raw honey (to taste)
Ground cinnamon (to taste)

Remove raw corn kernels from the cobs and puree them in the blender with some water. Then strain mixture through a fine mesh sieve or a cheesecloth-lined fine mesh sieve. Store the mixture in the refrigerator in an airtight container. It can stay fresh for 48 hours. For thick corn milk, use 1 cup of fresh spring water per large ear of sweet corn; this will yield approximately 1 1/2 cups of corn milk. Adjust water to your desired consistancy; add honey and cinnamon to taste. .

(Use the corn “meat” in cakes, muffins, quick breads, cookie batters or add it to meat loaf or meatballs.)



Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001

OutlawHeart81

OutlawHeart81
Syracuse, NY
(Zone 5a)

August 23, 2013
9:44 PM

Post #9639674

oooh i can't wait for fresh sweet corn!!! :)
lovetopaint
Newark, DE

March 1, 2014
9:32 AM

Post #9779468

híŋhaŋna, (morning in Lakota) OutlawHeart

I am mixed - Cherokee, Cheyenne, Lakota, Catawba along with others (a real Heinz 57). I just found this thread and was reading and saw your question regarding "the moon problem" posted a long time ago. The best thing for that is Rasberry Leaf Tea, followed by Nettles and Linden Flower. I found a nice place to buy from that has always given me great service, their prices are fair and you can find a lot. For the "moon problem", this blend it great and you might want to try it -

http://www.herbco.com/p-299-wiccan-womens-brew.aspx

I have no ties to the company other than buying from them often and have a great experience. My tea, herb, apothocary shelves are full. It's my go to shelves for everything rather than drugs. Here is a pic of just one of them -

Be blessed,
Debbie

Thumbnail by lovetopaint
Click the image for an enlarged view.

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 6, 2014
11:00 AM

Post #9831421

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ (Good Afternoon) Debbie,

Taubotny(Thank you). Nice inventory... Wow.


Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

May 6, 2014
1:50 PM

Post #9831541

Wunne Quâttuhquŏhquâ Nishnoh (Good Afternoon Everyone),

Here is a new menu.


NATIVE THANKSGIVING FEAST

JERUSALEM ARTICHOKE SOUP
1 lb Jerusalem Artichokes (Sun chokes), scrubbed
6 cups Spring water
3 Wild Onions, chopped
2 tbsp dillseed
1 tbsp fresh dillweed, chopped
3 egg, slightly beaten

Boil chokes in water in a covered stock pot, for 25 minutes or until tender. Drain, reserving liquid, and slice in half. Scoop out the meat and mash until smooth. Combine the pureed chokes, reserved water, onions, dillseed, and dillweed, and simmer for 15 minutes. Pour several spoonfuls of hot soup into the beaten eggs, stirring well. Stirring constantly, slowly add the egg mixture to the soup, simmer for for 1 minute more. Serve.

Or

EVENING PRIMROSE SOUIP
2 cups Evening Primrose roots, quartered
2 cups Jerusalem Artichokes (Sun chokes), scrubbed and diced
2 quarts Spring water
3 Wild Onions, chopped
½ tsp dried spicebush berries, grated
3 Wild Leeks, diced
1 tbsp fresh dillweed, chopped

In a large stock pot, combine spring water, evening primrose roots, sun chokes, onions, spicebush berries, and leeks. Cover and simmer 40 minutes; add the dill and simmer 10 more. Serve hot, seasoned to taste.


LAMB'S QUARTERS (GOOSEFOOT) GREENS
8 cups Lamb’s Quarters leaves, washed
2 tbsp nut butter
½ cup Spring water
1 Wild Onion, diced
Combine all ingredients in a covered saucepan and simmer for 5 minutes, or until the greens are tender. Serve hot.


W ILD RICE WITH HAZELNUTS AND HUCKLEBERRIES
2 cups wild rice, rinsed in cold water
5 cups water
2 wild onions (or 2 scallions), diced
1 cup hazelnuts, shelled, dried, and diced
1 cup dried huckleberries(or blueberries)

Combine rice, water and onions in a large stockpot, bring to a boil and cover and simmer for 45 minutes or until most of water is absorbed. Add hazelnuts and berries, mix thoroughly. Cover and steam for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Fluff and transfer rice mixture to serving bowl. Serve hot.

SUCCOTASH
1 red onion, chopped
1 green pepper, chopped
1 cup spring water
2 cups shelled lima beans
2 cups yellow corn
2 tbsp nut butter

In a large pot, simmer all the ingredients for 20 minutes. Serve hot.


BAKED PUMPKIN
1 small whole pumpkin, washed (12-inch in diameter)
2 tbsp honey
½ cup + 2 tbsp cider, divided
2 tbsp nut butter

Preheat oven to350°F. Place whole pumpkin in a baking dish and bake for 1½ hours. Remove and cool, cut a 6-inch-diameter hole in the top. Remove the pulp and seeds, save the seeds. Remove the pumpkin meat and mix with the honey 2 tablespoons cider and nut butter, return to shell. Replace the top and return the pumpkin to the oven to bake,; baste occasionally with remaining cider, for 30 minutes more. Serve whole.
On a flat cookie sheet, lightly salt the reserved pumpkin seeds and toast in a 350°F. oven for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with the baked pumpkin.


PICKLED MUSHROOMS
1 cup Spring water
1 cup cider vinegar
1 tsp Coltsfoot ashes, optional
1 Wild Onion, chopped
1 tsp dried Bayberry leaves, crumbled
1 tbsp pickling spices
4 cups Wild Mushrooms, steamed and drained (use 6 cups raw mushrooms)

In a non-reactive saucepan, combine spring water, cider vinegar, Coltsfoot ashes, onion, bayberry leaves, pickling spices and simmer, covered for 5 minutes. Remove from heat and cool. Place the steamed mushrooms in a large glass jar and strain the pickling liquid over them, cover the jar and refrigerate for 24 hours or more before serving. It should keep for days under refrigeration.


BRUNSWICK STEW (Powhatan, Cherokee, and Chickahominy tribes)
One 5 lb Boiling chicken
Spring water
2 dried Bayberry leave
3 sprigs Parsley
1 stalk Celery, chopped
2 Potatoes, cubed
2 large Onions, cubed
2 cups Corn kernels
2 cups shelled Lima beans
10 dried Juniper berries
½ tsp dried Oregano
2 cloves Wild Garlic
6 ripe Tomatoes, quartered
1 tbsp fresh Wild Basil

Simmer whole chicken, with water to cover, in a large covered pot, with the bayberry leaves, parsley, and celery, for 2 hours. When the meat is tender, remove the chicken from the pot and let cool enough to handle. Separate the meat from the bones and return to the pot. Add the potatoes, corn, beans, juniper berries, oregano and garlic and simmer for 30 minutes or until the vegetables are tender. Add the tomatoes and basil and simmer for 10 minutes more. Serve hot.


TURKEY-OYSTER-CORNBREAD-RAISIN STUFFING
Giblet Broth
Giblets
1½ cups Spring water

In a covered saucepan simmer giblets in 1½ cups of spring water for 30 minutes. Remove, cool and chop. Return to cooled broth and save for gravy.

Turkey
One 12 lb turkey, cleaned and dressed for stuffing
1 cup Sunflower seed butter

Reheat oven to 325°F. Place turkey, breast side up, in a large roasting pan. Rub the bird with ¼ cup seed butter. Roast the turkey, uncovered, basting every 30 minutes with a mixture of 5 tablespoons oyster liquid and juices from the bird. Also dot every hour or so with spoonfuls of the remaining ¾ cup of seed butter. Roast for approx. 6 hours, allowing 40 minutes per pound as a guide. The bird is done when legs are easily moved and temperature of stuffing is 165°F, when thermometer is inserted in the body cavity. Remove from oven and let rest for 20 minutes.

Stuffing
5 tbsp giblet broth
8 cups cornbread or Johnnycakes, crumbled
5 Wild Onions, diced (including tops)
10 medium fresh Mushrooms, brushed and chopped
1 cup Black Walnuts, shelled and dried (can sub with English Walnuts or Pecans)
1 cup Wild Raisins (or Currants)
18 Oysters, shucked and chopped (liquid reserved)
5 tbsp Oyster liquid (for basting)
2 tbsp Parsley, fresh chopped
½ tsp Savory, fresh chopped
1 egg

Thoroughly mix all the stuffing ingredients in a large bowl. Lightly stuff the neck and body cavity, do not pack. Skewer the openings together and truss the legs together.

Giblet Gravy
Giblets in broth
½ cup drippings
3 tbsp cornmeal

Prior to serving, the giblet gravy should be made in a saucepan over medium heat, after the turkey is finished and being carved. Add ½ cup of seasoned drippings from the turkey to the giblets and broth. Bring to a boil, add the cornmeal and simmer, stirring continually until the gravy thickens and is creamy. Serve hot.


CRANBERRY SAUCE
2 lbs fresh Cranberries, rinsed
1 cup dried Black Walnut meats, chopped
1 cup Maple sugar
1 cup Apple cider

Combine all ingredients in a large kettle. Bring to a boil. Cover, reduce the heat; simmer for 30 minutes, or until the cranberries' skins burst and mixture appears glossy. Cool slightly and chill.


CREAMED OYSTERS
1 cup Sunflower seed butter
2 cups fine cornmeal
2 cups small oysters, shucked
¼ cup Nut milk or medium cream
½ tbsp Spicebush berries, ground

Preheat oven to 350° F. Melt the seed butter in a saucepan. Add the cornmeal, stir and blend until crumb like. Spread 1 cup of the mixture evenly across the bottom of a shallow baking dish. Evenly space the oysters on the bed of cornmeal. Sprinkle with nut milk or cream and season with spicebush berries. Top with the remaining cornmeal crumbs. Bake for 20 minutes; serve hot.


INDIAN PUDDING
2 cups Wild Raisins or Nannyberries
2 cups fine cornmeal
4 cups water
1/2 cup Nut Butter
1/2 cup honey
1/4 cup Juneberries, fresh or dried
1/4 tsp ground Wild Ginger root(Asarum canadense)
1/2 tsp nutmeg

1) Preheat oven to 325°F. Grease a 2½ quart casserole and set aside.
2) Gently toss raisins or nannyberries and cornmeal together.
3) In a large saucepan, bring to a boil water and the nut butter. Gradually add the cornmeal-raisin mixture and simmer, stirring until it thickens; about 15 minutes.
4) Add remaining ingredients, blending well. Pour into casserole. set in a pan of water, 1 to 1½-inches deep and bake for 2½ hours.
5) Cool thoroughly before serving. It can be serve topped with nut milk or an additional sprinkling of nutmeg or both.

With

CRANBERRY WALNUT SAUCE
1 lb wild Cranberries, rinsed
2 cups water
1/2 lb dried Black Walnut meats, chopped
1 cup Maple syrup
2 tbsp Cornstarch, with enough water to make a paste

Place the cranberries and water in a covered pot, bring to a boil, and simmer until berries burst. Add the walnut meats and syrup, simmer for 10 minutes, then thicken with cornstarch paste, blend thoroughly. Serve either hot or chilled. Good with game or fowl.


WILD GRAPE BUTTER*
1) Preheat oven to 325°F.
2) Pick fruit before first frost. Stem and wash well.
3) Place them in a large, covered, stock pot. Cover them with water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 30 minutes or until skins pop.
4) Pour of juice, add a mint leaf, sweeten it with honey and drink; this makes a refreshing hot or cold drink.
5) Sieve the remaining pulp to remove seeds and puree. Ad an equal amount of maple syrup or honey, blending well.
6) Pour into a beanpot. Bake, stirring occasionally, for 3 hours. Seal hot in sterilized mason jars.

*You can combine applesauce and wild grape puree butter to make an interesting taste treat.


BEACH PLUM JAM
1 qt beach plums
4 cups water
8 cups maple or cane sugar
Sterile glass jars

1) In a large covered saucepan cook the plums in the water, over low heat for 15 minutes or until soft. Remove from heat and cool slightly. Seed the plums, but do not mash. return the fruit to the juices in the saucepan. Return to a boil; add the sugar, stirring constantly for 15 minutes more.
2) Skim any froth from the surface of the jam. Ladle the jam into glass jars and seal immediately with 1/4-inch of liquified paraffin. Store in a dark, cool, dry place.


HICKORY NUT-CORN PUDDING (Eastern Algonquin speaking tribes, Cherokee and Creek)
3/4 cup Hickory nuts, roasted, shelled and chopped
1½ cups Corn, cooked
2 tbsp nut butter
1 cup boiling water
2 eggs, beaten
2 tbsp honey
2 tbsp fine Cornmeal
1/4 cup Sweet Goldenrod blossoms

Preheat oven to 350°F. Combine 1/2 a cup Hickory nut meats, corn, nut butter, water, eggs, honey, cornmeal and Sweet Goldenrod blossoms thoroughly and pour into a well-greased casserole. Sprinkle the top with 1/4 cup Hickory nut meats and bake for 1 hour. Serve hot. Makes 6 servings.


CRANBERRY-WALNUT CAKES*
1 cup cranberries, chopped
3/4 cup Black Walnuts, shelled, roasted and chopped
1 egg, beaten with 1 teaspoon water
1/2 cup honey
2 cups fine cornmeal
1 cup cattail flour

Preheat oven to 350°F. Blend cornmeal and cattail flour; gradually add each ingredient, blending thoroughly into a smooth batter. Lighten with warm water if the batter seems too thick. Pour into greased 9x5-inch loaf pan and bake for 1 hour. Or spoon into 12 greased muffin cups and bake 25 minutes or until tops are golden brown.

* Pecans can be substituted for Black Walnuts.


Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001

This message was edited May 6, 2014 3:51 PM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 23, 2014
2:23 PM

Post #9875450

Hi,
I just discovered this thread, and am wondering if there are any natural recipes for nausea and vomiting? My niece is taking chemo, and relief would be much appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Linda

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 23, 2014
6:20 PM

Post #9875641

Wunne Wunnonkou Linda,

I'll check and get back to you soon.


Aquène kah nahonnushagk,
WaûtuckquesSóchepo
(\__/)
(='.'=)
(")_(")
Ahque Wunantash: Paskoogan / Pio nabo nequt / Nees muttanonganog kah nequt (Do Not Thou Forget: 9/11/2001)

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 23, 2014
8:22 PM

Post #9875739

Thank you, so much!

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 28, 2014
8:21 AM

Post #9879797

Kawonkamish (Greetings) Linda,

I hope this helps her. A friend of mine is an herbalist. She said, she'd look into any other natural remedies, for people on Chemo, with nausea. Also, throw some Cardamom and Fennel seeds into all the brews and decoctions. Here is what we've come up with, so far:


How to brew Tea of the herbs below.

Instructions:

1 tsp of flowers, leaves and/or stems in 1 cup of boiling water; let steep 10 minutes; sweeten with Stevia or honey.

Oswego Tea (Monarda didyma): flowers, leaves, and stems
Wild Bergamot (M. fistulosa): flowers, leaves, and stems.
Peppermint (Mentha x piperita): flowers, leaves, and stems.
Spearmint (Mentha spicata): flowers, leaves, and stems.


Decoctions of the below herbs may help.

How to make a decoction:

Instructions:

1. Measure one ounce (25 grams) of herb material--root, bark or seeds--into your pan. Ideally, you should use a non-aluminum pan such as glass or porcelain.

2. Add two cups of cool water to the pan and cover. Bring the mixture to a boil. Lower the heat to a gentle simmer for about 15 to 20 minutes.

3. Strain the decoction into a mug or other container. Sweeten it with Stevia or honey, if desired.

4. Drink one cup of the decoction three times a day. Like herbal infusions, decoctions do not have a long shelf life, so you should brew as needed or refrigerate any leftover amount.

American Ginseng (Panax quinquefolius): roots
Nannyberry (Viburnum lentago): finely powdered bark


Peace,
Snow

This message was edited Jun 28, 2014 10:22 AM

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

June 28, 2014
8:20 PM

Post #9880279

Thank you soooooo much!

maccionoadha

maccionoadha
Halifax, MA
(Zone 6a)

June 29, 2014
10:15 AM

Post #9880616

Koonepeam (You're welcome)!


Peace,
Snow

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