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Aroids: What are these?

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Forum: AroidsReplies: 15, Views: 120
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themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2011
9:23 AM

Post #8725218

I was going to re-pot this new alocasia into a heavier pot as it keeps tipping over, when I noticed these tiny "aliens". I am not sure what they are and would appreciate any help in ID-ing them and knowing what to do with them. The first pic is of the plant

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themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2011
9:24 AM

Post #8725221

These are the "pods" in question


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themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2011
9:25 AM

Post #8725223

second pic

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themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2011
9:26 AM

Post #8725227

Final pic. My first thought was baby plants. There are 7 of them and they appear to be coming from the stem, not the petioles.


This message was edited Jul 30, 2011 11:30 AM

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LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 30, 2011
9:38 AM

Post #8725250

Those are cormels - each one can grow into a new plant, but getting them to sprout can be a challenge. My view is that the plant produces them as a sort of insurance against unfavorable growing conditions in the future. They are usually pretty durable and can survive in the soil unsprouted for years in some cases. I still have some that come up from old soil thrown out years ago, and the cormels sprout after that long!

LariAnn

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2011
10:02 AM

Post #8725282

Thank you LariAnn. A couple of them have a bit of green showing on them. Do I leave them attached to the Mother, and if not, how do I go about taking care of them?

RachelLF

RachelLF

July 30, 2011
5:43 PM

Post #8726115

LariAnn may have a different answer but I would leave them alone at this point and not seperate.

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 30, 2011
5:51 PM

Post #8726140

Hi Rachel. That is kinda what i figured. They have gotten this far with no help from me...I figure they know what to do...GRIN

RachelLF

RachelLF

July 30, 2011
6:00 PM

Post #8726160

That is exactly my view too;-)
LariAnn
Miami, FL
(Zone 10a)

July 31, 2011
5:22 AM

Post #8726884

Rachel is correct - unless you are anxious to propagate your plant, the cormels are better off left where they are. If/when you repot your plant, you can then remove some and see if you can get them to start. Because they are survival insurance, cormels are irregular about how quickly they come out of dormancy, so patience pays. I seem to have had some success at starting cormels when applying weak fertilizer solution to the soil they are in. My hypothesis is that the presence of nutrients seems to let them know that conditions are good for growth.

LariAnn
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2011
5:55 AM

Post #8726926

Keep it almost rootbound and water as if it was a succulent, I recently killed mine that was about 4' tall with the last leaf well over 2'. I was sick!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


This message was edited Jul 31, 2011 7:56 AM

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

July 31, 2011
7:14 AM

Post #8727084

One more question. Will the cormels root on their own while attached? as I mentioned, 2 of them are showing some green. i am content to leave them alone...no sense trying to make more plants before I make sure I can give this one what it needs to thrive.

Oh Homer, that must have been heartbreaking. I am not moving mine to a larger pot, just taking it out of the lightweight plastic one. I figure as moisture sensitive as this seems to be, unglazed clay orchid pot would be a better choice.
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2011
9:09 AM

Post #8727273

Definitely Moonhowl! Would gladly pay you for one of your pups or off sets when they get large enough! I have not seen them on E- bay in a while!

A good size would be a 5-6'', to 3' tall... and 8'' after that to maturity(around 5' with 3' leaves)! It is such an awesome plant! The petioles are slick as glass (especially after a new leaf has been out a week or so)with that cool dark-light pattern.

RachelLF

RachelLF

July 31, 2011
6:32 PM

Post #8728492

Thanks for confirming LariAnn.

Jean, yes they will and Drew, I'm sorry you lost yours.
homer1958
Huntersville, NC
(Zone 7b)

July 31, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8728524

Thanks Rachel, I was devastated! going through the hard work in the garage all winter! I will not, Repeat; will not place one in the ground again!Live and learn...usually takes me a few times to learn though! :^(

RachelLF

RachelLF

July 31, 2011
7:00 PM

Post #8728535

Just note it as an educational experiment. Brian W. has one for sale on ebay at a buy it now price.

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