Photo by Melody

Rhododendrons and Relatives: wondering why

Communities > Forums > Rhododendrons and Relatives
bookmark
Forum: Rhododendrons and RelativesReplies: 14, Views: 116
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 2, 2011
7:19 AM

Post #8731755

I bought 2 Azalea's when I lived in MS - they were quite small. I moved to MN 3 years ago (in March) and planted them in my garden in the spring. They are in part sun/part shade (more shade than sun I guess). I am wondering, in three years, they have not died, have not grown, have not flowered...nothing. No new growth but no dead leaves either.
Should I move them? Should I feed them? If so, what do I feed them?
Thank you in advance. I've never had them before - but after 3 years I would think they would "do something".
luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 2, 2011
6:56 PM

Post #8733120

Azaleas can usually grow in zones 7-9 but only few can prosper in zones 4-6. It sounds like your shrubs are not winter hardy; that is, they are not able to withstand the cold winters. Some azalea varieties flat out die when exposed to too much cold; others return every Spring but are unable to bloom. The flower buds that azaleas develop in July-August get dried out by the dessecating winter winds or get killed by the low temperatures.

In order to protect the flower buds, you will need to apply winter protection techniques or you will need to grow them in pots that you bring inside during winter. For example, you could surround the azaleas with chicken wire placed 3-6" away from the end of the stems (sides and the top). When they begin to go dormant, fill the enclosure with tons of leaves so the leaves will protect the flower buds. The more dried out leaves you use, the more insulated they are so pack them good and top them with cardboard held in place with some rocks. Remember to leave 3-6" worth of leaves between the top stems and the cardboard. Store leftover dried out leaves so you can add more in the middle of winter; they settle down so you will probably need to add more then.

To cover all the bases, I would also suggest checking the acidity of the soil and the amount of nitrogen in the soil. There are soil test kits that will do this for you. And you can also send a soil sample for analysis to your Agriculture Extension Service.
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 2, 2011
8:33 PM

Post #8733384

Thank you for the information. I actually have to check if they are Az's or Rhodi's...I got to thinking they might be Rhodi's - but either way...
I have TONS of leaves in order to do that. I am still trying to dispose/compost some from LAST fall! and the acorns are already falling! I have acidic soil due to the oaks...they are planted about 5 feet away from the base of one.
I will check the tags if they are still legible to see if they are Rhodi's. I think they may be because I wouldn't have brought them if I would have known they wouldn't survive here in MN.
luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 3, 2011
7:46 AM

Post #8734036

Rhododendron hardiness varies too so see if the label will tell youif it is hardy there. Then check for too much nitrogen too just in case.
arfitz
Caldwell, NJ
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2011
7:47 AM

Post #8736289

I certainly would NOT fertilize now! Wait until Early Spring. I think the other people who responded have given you good advise.
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 12, 2011
12:33 PM

Post #8752401

They are Rhodie's. I have pics I will upload later. There is a tag on one of them - faded - not sure if it is legible or not...guess I need to check that too :)
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 13, 2011
5:31 PM

Post #8754566

Yep, Rhodie's. this one is "good" to -30* 'English Roseum'
the other is something similar - bought them together - probably pink. But again, they have been this size since I brought them home 3 years ago and haven't done a thing. They were "playing" evergreen - they didnt loose their leaves. But I guess I don't know if they are supposed to...?
Looking today, there seems to be a little new growth, so maybe there is hope yet.

Thumbnail by minnesippi
Click the image for an enlarged view.

minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 13, 2011
5:32 PM

Post #8754568

Here is the other one.

Thumbnail by minnesippi
Click the image for an enlarged view.

minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

August 13, 2011
5:37 PM

Post #8754576

And here is where they are in my garden...

Thumbnail by minnesippi
Click the image for an enlarged view.

luis_pr
Hurst, TX
(Zone 7b)

August 14, 2011
11:38 AM

Post #8755959

English Roseum is not a big fast grower, getting about 6' in cold zones by the time it is 10 years old. A little taller in areas where the growing season is longer.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

October 23, 2011
6:04 PM

Post #8860807

I have the same rhody. I planted it three years ago. Once I started to cover it over winter so it wouldn't dessicate, it blooms quite nicely. Really grew this summer, although more horizontally that up. I may have to move it though as it is within three feet of a large cotoneaster bush. On the sunny side at least.
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

October 23, 2011
6:10 PM

Post #8860812

I mulch really well...well, nature mulches for me. I have oak leaves that fall in the garden (as the garden surrounds the oak) and I dont rake it until spring. There is 2" of mulch and another 1-2" of oak leaves, depending on how much the wind blows before the snow flies.
Oberon~ do you use rose bush covers for them? or how do you cover them? Maybe I will burlap wrap them if I can find the time and energy.
I came across another - honestly dont remember if it was in the yard and I just moved it or if I bought another - how sad is that? It is in the back yard. Maybe it will do better than the ones in the front. Will have to see now.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

October 24, 2011
6:37 AM

Post #8861292

I surround it with a 36"h wire fence. Has 2" grid. Then I wrap with burlap, then fill with leaves, then cover top. Last year I just did the fence and burlap, and put a plywood lid on that was attached to the fence and kept up with two posts. Left a 2" gap at top. big mistake I guess. It allowed the wind in and the bush was very dessicated. Year before I just wrapped in burlap and fencing with some leaves and it came out in the spring looking just like it did in the late fall, all green and leaves standing out nicely. I need a taller fence, or need to just wrap it tightly in burlap as it is too tall for the fencing. Hate to do that as the bush gets mushed down with the snow and limbs break. It is usually about 1/3 to 1/2 buried in snow also
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

October 24, 2011
7:11 AM

Post #8861335

What about tying it around the bottom and bringing the burlap up around the plant (like you are folding up an artificial xmas tree) - then you would end up with more of a point at the top where the snow cant collect on the top. That should keep it from getting smooshed I would think.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

October 24, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8861507

That's an idea. The bush is rather oval shaped and somewhat wide at the top. The burlap is only 30" wide but I could simply stitch several pieces together, fill with leaves before tying off the top to give it more bulk and resistence to squishing. I didn't put the top on yesterday and it rained last night. :( So my leaves will be wet inside. Drat. So glad my husband raked up all my cuttings while I tended to the rhodys. I still have about 1/3 of the backyard to chop down, then the front yard which is partially done I have a honeysuckle running up a birdhouse pole next to a lilac. The moose chew the honeysuckle down so last year I wrapped it in burlap also, as well as a climbing rose that is by the mailbox pole. What a lot of work. But the moose can do a lot of damage. if they come before the ground is totally frozen their big hoofies cut deep holes in the garden. I spray blood around the front to keep them away until they can't do too much damage. One hoof on my peonies underground and no flowers til two springs away. they have already set buds for next spring. I also have an azalea out back. It had a hard winter also. I am not going to wrap it this winter. No leaves so hardly matters.

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Rhododendrons and Relatives Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Propagation: Azaleas and Rhododendrons Pete2 47 Nov 27, 2013 1:35 PM
Encore azaleas rylaff 11 Oct 22, 2007 12:22 PM
St.Louis Rhodo Fantatic declfi 19 Aug 22, 2008 7:04 PM
Pruning Azaleas gailgalex 7 Feb 12, 2008 4:36 AM
Zone envy celt33040 8 Apr 1, 2007 6:04 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America