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Vegetable Gardening: Table Top Gardens

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
12:16 PM

Post #8734516

Built a few Table Top Gardens so I don't have to bend over so much. Everything is waist high. 3ft high to the top of the garden. Each person can make them as high as they need to to make it more comfy to garden.
I do like big plots of gardens too but these are extra special. One 2ftX8ft TT Garden will grow 16 cabbage , broc, or cauliflowers or mixed. One per every square foot depending on how big the plants natural space should be. Or you could grow 256 carrots.
Or a salad garden. In addition to having a Table Top Garden, You can build an extra frame rather it be pvc or wood so you can cover it with shade cloth when it is too hot or you can cover it with plastic when frost is about to arrive, or get an early start.
I think covering the squash is a great idea to keep out the squash bugs. You can uncover it in the mornings and pollinate the females yourself or let the bees have a turn. Check for bugs before you cover it back up. If you don't mind pollinating a few plants, You could make screen box frames to keep out even smaller insects. The possibilities are endless so let the imagination run wild.

Table Top Gardens can be made from anything you can box in and fill with soil. The whole Idea is to bring it up to your waste.
Old Picnic tables, Pallets, bed frames, deck banisters, etc... I prefer my gardens to be at least 8 inches deep. 10 is better and 12 is excellent.
I personally don't like growing pole beans , vine veggies, or sweet potatoes in the table top gardens because they take over the box and you end up loosing a lot of good growing space. I prefer to grow the vine plants on the ground with a trellis. Unless you want to take the time to train the plant to grow over the sides and downward. Wave Petunias did great in the TT garden.

Here is an example of making a PVC hoop over the TT garden for early plants or protecting from the first few frost to extend the harvest time.


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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
12:26 PM

Post #8734547

I will post pictures a few at a time as I find time to post. I have several.

The soil should be able to retain moisture and my favorite mixture is 1/3 peat, 1/3 vermiculite, 1/3 compost
If you cannot get vermiculite, 1/2 peat and 1/2 compost works good too.

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
12:36 PM

Post #8734571

Another good soil mix is simply= ProMix BX. Yep, it's expensive but you only have to add it once. A good fresh compost mix can be added every time you plant something new.


Ignore the new house= it is still under construction and over in another thread topic.

These Table Top Gardens have marigolds that were planted back in April. It has new squash plants. Current sown carrots and radishes and one square foot of garlic chives growing. The carrots have taken the place of potatoes that have been dug up and there use to be a few melon vines in there. Mini.

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
1:06 PM

Post #8734643

Making 5 more Table Top Gardens at the moment. It will take me a few weeks to complete.
3= 2x8ft
1= 3x4
1= 4x4


A friend gave me some work tables from her shop and I will be using them for the TT gardens.
Some need 4x4 legs. Some need extra support in the center to hold up the weight. Reconstruct to make it work.
I will also be adding a few work shelves on the end of the tables to hold small tools or transplant pots while working.
Someone else said they had a mail box on theirs that they kept their tools in. I thought that was a cute idea.

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
1:13 PM

Post #8734660

If you have Table Top Gardens, have pictures, have ideas, suggestions, opinions, please feel free to chime in and add to the topic. I live to garden and garden to live. vice versa

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 3, 2011
3:17 PM

Post #8734928

I imagine that's a LOT of weight when the soil is wet. What kind of reinforcing under the bottom?
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
4:11 PM

Post #8735071

Since the beds are only 2ft wide, it only needs a 2x4 across with legs holding it up. The four tables that are completed only have 4x4 leg supports in the center and the bottoms are 3/4 ply.
The boxes are lined with 6 mil plastic.
jeffinyorktown
Yorktown, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
4:30 PM

Post #8735128

I love these Cricket!

I think I will copy them for next year's deck project! :) Is it all just untreated pine? I really love the relative narrowness. Mine is 2 1/2 feet deep, so it is a little bit of a stretch to get to the back. I could easily make two and put them perpendicular to each other in the same space. Luckily we only grow herbs in it right now. One question though, if the bottom is plywood, how do they drain?

The one that I made has hardware cloth topped by window screen on the bottom. It almost drains too well, taking nutrients with it in the process.

Jeff
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 3, 2011
7:13 PM

Post #8735522

I drilled holes in the bottom of the plywood. Some of the boxes are treated but all will be lined with plastic. After I put the plastic in place, I punched holes in the plastic to match up with the holes in the plywood. When I put the soil in, I tried to make sure that the holes were still in line with each other. Drain holes need to be every 6 inches and 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch wide.


Hubby built the first ones for me back in Feb. After he was through he called me outside and when i got there he was laying in one of them.

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CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 3, 2011
8:03 PM

Post #8735625

Really getting into his work. LOL
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

August 4, 2011
2:19 AM

Post #8735867

LOL! He sure built some nice raised beds☺ I think that those are the best ones that I have seen. (comfy lookin' too, LOL)
Desertdenial5
Tolleson, AZ
(Zone 9a)

August 4, 2011
7:45 AM

Post #8736284

Great picture!!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 4, 2011
9:36 AM

Post #8736474


The first four tt gardens are really heavy...It takes at least two people to move it without soil and that was still really heavy. You have to make sure they are where you want them before you fill them up cause after they are full of soil, It would take at least 6 men to move it. In order to move the other 3 gardens to my deck after the deck is finished, I will have to unload all the soil to move the box.
We had built the gardens on the deck to begin with. But we had to move them off the deck into the yard so we could move the mobile home and build a house and lower the deck. Hubby had a good set of hand trucks to wheel them around to the back yard. I thought they were going to break my back just getting them off the deck. I will have to round up a few men with good backs to move them back on the deck and feed everyone a steak on the grill.

The cost of two boxes , which uses up a whole sheet of plywood, is about $100 total for all the wood and hardware.

If I had a chance to do those 1st four gardens again, I would of made them 4 ft long instead of 8ft long just because I have had to move them around a lot due to construction.

Had 5 hours of windy storms this morning and it blew my squash plants around like pretzels. They don't seem to be broken and I will have to reposition them gently. I should of anchored them down before now.

happy gardening
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2011
12:08 PM

Post #8736719

I built some boxes 6 inches x 6 inches x 8 feet long to grow stuff in.These boxes sit on saw horses and can be moved with one strong man or a couple of people. I like this size it has some obvious short commings but has a lot of good points to.It grows lettuce great and it is especially nice because it is slug free.

I also grew bush beans and bush peas not so good but I see hope that they will do better if I plant less seed. Next year I will plant more boxes of both.

Swiss Chard was a total failure it needs more space for its roots.This is a no try again.

Next year I will probably make a stair step for the boxes to set on in place of the saw horses.

This is five of them side x side snug and warm inside my gh.They will be put out side as soon as they are a bit bigger and the hard freezes turn into hard frost.
Right now I just cover with ins blanket when it is going to freeze hard and then drape a pc of visqueen over that and down to the ground and put a small elect heater under there. You could use a couple of light bulbs/. Thats my story and I am sticking to it.

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 4, 2011
1:14 PM

Post #8736867

that worked out pretty good eweed.
I was thinking about making my 4x4 and 3x4 tables with 2x8s and making sure I had plenty of vermiculite in the soil so it doesn't dry out so quickly. These are the tables that I want to grow my salads in along with radishes and short root crops. I have to order more lettuce seeds. With all the moving around we have been doing since Feb, I have lost my gallon baggie of lettuce ,, carrot, radish, and cold crop seeds. Already ordered the cold crop seeds.

This table had been painted already. After I build the sides for it, I will line it with plastic and drill a few holes.
All the tables will be painted on the outside. Hoping they will last at least 6 to 7 years. This table will make a perfect salad TT garden.

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jeffinyorktown
Yorktown, VA
(Zone 7a)

August 4, 2011
3:05 PM

Post #8737053

Great picture!

I think that I will use the same setup, but with window screen over the drainage holes. What is the purpose of the plastic? Purely for protecting the wood I assume.

Thanks again!

Jeff
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8737307

Cricket if you just want to grow lettuce and are into experimentation you can grow lettuce in a hunk of residential rain trough which is about 4x4. Lettuce will grow but you need to keep the water going to it

This is nice bug free lettuce.I think maybe the new cedar smell of the boxes helps drive them away.

This is outside now still on saw horses lol I have lots of horaes and I built 12 boxes.

This message was edited Aug 4, 2011 5:16 PM

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CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 4, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8737557

Wow! I think that is the prettiest lettuce I have ever seen. I so wish I had a GH or even a hoop house.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 4, 2011
8:02 PM

Post #8737690

You can make a small one pretty cheap. I have some like cricket shows at the top of this thread only mine are on the ground.

This is one nof two that are filled with peppers I remove the plastis cover in July to keep the peppers from getting leggy . I will replace it in a week or so. I had the boards which happen to be 2x8 and the left over rebar stubs. I paid $1.20 for five pc of 1/2 inch sch 40 pvc pipe. I spent about 10 bucks more for some really neat clamps to hold the plastic down

This message was edited Aug 5, 2011 12:18 AM

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 5, 2011
7:43 AM

Post #8738369

Yes, gutters. I think it was Bernie who showed us a couple years ago how he had several gutters on the end of his greenhouse wall and all were growing lettuce. That was a sight to see too.
I chose not to use gutters cause they dry out so quickly but someone suggested to use more vermiculite in the gutters so the gutter idea is not completely out of the question for the future.

Eweed= your lettuce is beautiful.

I have greenhouses too. I do not grow in them during the summer except for tomato produce in one of them . I am gradually making grow box beds in the greenhouse. That's a whole different subject with hundreds and hundreds of photos since I been doing that for 8 years in the greenhouse.

I grew lettuce last fall in a raised concrete block bed and it did great. The bed is 2 feet deep and unnecessary to grow lettuce in such a deep bed. I had raised the beds to bring them closer to my waist but that takes a lot of soil which is why I decided to make Table Top Gardens. Now if I could figure out how to make table top gardens out of concrete blocks that would last me for the rest of my life, I would be extremely happy but I haven't figured that out yet.

Why I use plastic= well= mostly cause of peer pressure. Others think the plastic blocks the chemicals in treated wood from getting to your food and some think the plastic blocks any type of micro harmful chemical that would be in the paint, and some of course it would preserve the life of untreated and unpainted wood.
Me, myself and I had rather paint it all with elastomeric which is a rubber roof coating for mobile home roofs. The rain runs off of that roof into garden beds all the time and no body ever says anything but if you want to put it inside the actual bed to save the wood, some folks have a stroke. The elastomeric is also white. And if you had concrete block beds it can be painted on them to help prevent the blocks from heating up.

CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 5, 2011
7:59 AM

Post #8738391

2ft deep raised block beds...they are great but they are not high enough. I will keep these beds but I will not build anymore like them... but I will be building a wood frame around the top of the bed to bring it up a little higher and closer to my waist

This message was edited Aug 5, 2011 9:00 AM

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 5, 2011
8:07 AM

Post #8738412

another view.

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8742048

Ok, I bit the bullet. I bought Elastomeric Rubber roof coating to paint my TT gardens with. It cost $23 a gallon at HD. I have enough wood to complete 4 tables. One table is actually 9 feet long x 3 ft wide. The bed for it will be 3x8 with a 1 ft working shelf on the end. I will be painting all the wood before I assemble it. Pics later. I'm off cut wood and paint.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2011
3:14 PM

Post #8742679

The tables are a little too tall. I will have to cut 11 inches off the legs to lower the tables.
I asked hubby to buy 1x10s but he got 1x12s. While I was building them I thought , wow this is a deep
10 inch...so I got the measuring tape out and they are 1x12s. A little deeper than I wanted.

I also constructed the 8 ft garden bed with a 2x6 in the center to help prevent it from pushing out in the center.
The side boards are also screwed to the table. That white sure is bright. I might paint it with a different color.

This message was edited Aug 7, 2011 4:17 PM

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2011
3:33 PM

Post #8742732

The 4x4 table. I have to lower it too.

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2011
3:39 PM

Post #8742763

that's all I made today. It is really hot outside. I am surprised that I got that much done. The other table that I want to work on will be framed with 2x8s. Some wood I already had. I haven't looked at it yet and hope it's not warped.
We already lowered the table legs on the previous two tables. Did that while photos were loading.
I already have the soil to fill the TT gardens with. It is soil that I have in 25 gallon containers. (12 of them).

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 7, 2011
4:01 PM

Post #8742826

Girl, you truly inspire me to go fire up my Craftsman saw!

You are my Hero(ine)!!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 7, 2011
4:46 PM

Post #8742915

Thank you Gymgirl. In addition to making table top gardens, I made a chicken coop door for one of the chicken coops.
Can't wait to make compost with all the chicken manure, rabbit manure, goat manure, little horse manure, little cow manure====all to add to the ttgardens in the spring. Excited.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 8, 2011
5:33 AM

Post #8743774

I had hoped to add some raised beds in an area where running bamboo was growing. Unfortunately, the bamboo is growing faster than I can kill it! So I'm intrigued by the idea of table top beds.

My entire gardening area is on a slope. How do I figure out how to cut the legs so the actual raised table top is level? I'm absolutely useless with math!

Also, how about watering these beds? Do they dry out as fast as plastic pots?
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 8, 2011
7:12 AM

Post #8743938

No, they haven't dried out as fast as pots do. Plus you can mulch them better than you can pots.

I don't know all the methods of Math. But if it were me and I knew exactly where I wanted the bed, I would mark out the area according to how big I wanted the table, drive an iron rod in the ground at all corners or a firm stick. Tie a string from back to front and get it level by using a Line Level or you can use a regular level. After string is tied level , measure the difference between the front legs and the back legs. If the height is 4 inches shorter on the back then that is how much you shorter the back leg will be compared to the front leg. Hope that made sense.
eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 8, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8744072

Or you could just dig the legs down and call it good.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 8, 2011
2:54 PM

Post #8744931

CricketsGarden - yes, your explanation did make sense. I can now see in my *mind's eye* how to make the table level. My hubby has a line level. Thank you :)

eweed - I thought of doing it the way you suggested, but the ground is hard red clay and I was concerned the legs would rot if I placed them below ground level. I can put some metal plates on the bottom of the legs to protect them from rot.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 10, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8749306

Do you find that your roots can grow all the down to the bottom, or does perched water keep air out of the bottom inch or two of soil? Especially if the upper layers compress the mix, and you have lots of rain.

If a soil mix is too fine or too water-retentive, the bottom inch or so may not drain out, which can restrict root depth, at least in small pots and where roots are not vigorous enough to just suck the soil dry despite drainage or "perched water" issues.

One idea to beat that is to drop cotton or rayon wicks from the drainage holes. The wicks pull capilary water down out of the soil, improving aeration and making the whole depth available to the root zone. (A wick adds capillary attraction to gravity, beating surface tension and whatever else contributes to perched water.)

Addititonally, you can build a very slight slope into the bottom, like 1/2" or 1", and then place the wicks at the low edge or low corner.

On the other hand, if your roots are vigorous enough to withstand periodic flooding, that "perched layer" serves as a reservoir to allow you to water less often.

Corey
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 10, 2011
5:00 PM

Post #8749393

Corey. Thank you so much for mentioning the drainage on the TT gardens.
I don't seem to have a water drainage problem in the TT gardens. If I ever have a drainage problem in the future I will certainly give your wicking idea a chance. I think I have drilled enough drain holes to keep the excess water drained. When I cleaned the boxes up and got them ready for carrot seeds, the soil was good in the bottom. I had to dig down deep to dig out the potatoes. Which tasted great too. I will keep an eye on the water perching in the bottom during our rainy season and see how it does. It has been raining all week and now would be a great time to check it out too.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 10, 2011
6:48 PM

Post #8749552

>> the soil was good in the bottom.

Bingo! That proves you're in good shape.

>> It has been raining all week and now would be a great time to check it out too.

Even better.

I think that, once roots are well-established and fully deep, they can pull some perched water out, like a man in a flooded phone booth drinking enough water to get his head above water. Seedlings can't do that, but a bed full of potatoes or carrots can.

Probably perched water is a bigger problem in a tiny 2-3 inch deep pot or insert than it is in a deep, wide raised bed. But I was thinking that an 8" deep bed might benefit from every last inch of usable soil.

Corey
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 10, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8749559

"Probably perched water is a bigger problem in a tiny 2-3 inch deep pot or insert than it is in a deep, wide raised bed"

Yep, that's correct, Rick. The wider the container the less height to a perched water table. Also, the potting mix/medium comes into play as well.

Shoe
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 10, 2011
8:14 PM

Post #8749682

My mix is promix bx and commerical compost. I liked the commerical compost that I use cause it has small bits of barky wood and some sand in it.

I went out right away and checked all the way to the bottom of the garden box on the deck and it is good soil. Not soggy at all. No water ran when I squeezed the soil and we had hard heavy rain for 4 days off and on.
JuneyBug
Dover AFB, DE
(Zone 7a)

August 10, 2011
9:53 PM

Post #8749768

I have been using2˝" of fine bark mulch in the bottom of my containers because of the funky-wet mess that I found in the big/deep ones. It seems to work OK, but I am going to try the wicking when I get new pots/get back to the states. Thanks, Rick!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 11, 2011
6:56 AM

Post #8750130

[quote]One idea to beat that is to drop cotton or rayon wicks from the drainage holes[/quote}

Corey - . Would the drainage wicks in table top containers take all the available moisture out? I'm concerned this might lead to having to water the boxes more often. I can see using wicks to draw moisture up from the bottom - I've used a similar idea in potted houseplants in the past. (I don't have houseplants here, our rooms are too dark for them)

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 11, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8750395

JuneyBug, you might consider using coarser pine bark mulch. That will have more open space to let air in, and hold less water.

>> Would the drainage wicks in table top containers take all the available moisture out?
>> might lead to having to water the boxes more often.

Yes to both, as long as the bottom layers are NOT currently getting so wet as to drown roots or encourage anerobic fermentaion.

A dangling wick will tend to pull any "loose" water down and out of the box. Like removing water from gaps beteen soil particles, so those gaos can fill with air and permit diffusion of oxygen and CO2. But they can't make those bottom layers dry, just not-drowned.

It's almost like adding the weight of the water column in the wick to the capillary force of the wick pulling against the capilary attraction of the soil mix.

But if the bottom few inches of your bed are serving as a water reservoir by holding so much water that most air is excluded, roots can't grow down that far, which seems very bad iIf a bed is relatively shallow.

On the other-other hand, if your bed is so deep that the roots don't need the bottom few inches of soil, and those inches do serve as a water reservoir, like an Earth Bucket, maybe that's not too bad. But my belief is that anerobic or hypoxic soil is "bad".

If your roots can grow down to the bottom of your bed, you already have enough aeration and don't need to increase drainage. The "wick water out" idea is only desirable if the bottom layers get too water-logged.

Wicks would protect against over-watering a soil mix that was too retentive. Even if you flooded the whole bed excessively, they would speed up the drainage so no roots drowned.

Intermittent water-logging with insufficient draingage may be the worst, because roots would grow down to the bottom while that soil was aerated, and then flooding would drown and kill them, or at least kill their root hairs. That seems like an unhealthy situation for both the plants and the soil.

Another view is that, if you have soggy or stinky soil at the bottom of a bed, what you really need is better-draining soil mix, at least lower down. (BTW, avoid sudden changes in soil texture because that can break the capillary action. If you put coarser mix at the bottom, mix it up a little to make the changeover gradual.)

The best thing is to have soil that holds as much water as practical without excluding air. That's why I like big fibers like medium pine bark chips or grit, and less "fine stuff" like peat moss. (But my experience is with small 3 inch pots and raised beds that sit on the ground, not elevated 3 foot wide raised beds. It's true that perched water is usually less of an issue in large containers than in small ones.

>> I can see using wicks to draw moisture up from the bottom

True, that would provide some deep moisture even between waterings, if your bed is more likely to dry out than to become waterlogged. It sounds to me like this might be the best solution, if it's worth the effort: instead of using the bottom few inches of soil as a possibly-anerobic water reservoir. Put a tub under the bed, and wick clean aerated water up into the soil when the bottom dries out.

You can also park a reservoir above the bed, and use wicks to draw water down to the surface of the soil . Water will flow down faster than up, even in a wick.

Those may all be over-engineering! If your mix has enough "loft" to stay aerated down to the bottom of the bed, and holds enough water that you don't need to water more often than you want to, you don't need tricks, not even watering with a timer.

Corey

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 12, 2011
11:46 AM

Post #8752309

Corey - I understood everything you wrote - thank you :(

In my garden raised beds, I use a lot of coir - the finer kind. I can also purchase a coarser coir and am wondering if this fits your "big fibers" scenerio?

I'm also experimenting with mowing over the smaller twigs that fall from our trees to add to the soil in TT gardens.

I wish I didn't even have to consider TT gardens, but the running bamboo is still being a problem. We've dug part of a trench to keep it confined, but it's a "slow go"

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2011
11:55 AM

Post #8752337

>> In my garden raised beds, I use a lot of coir - the finer kind. I can also purchase a coarser coir and am wondering if this fits your "big fibers" scenerio?

Yes! I like coir for that reason, but this year I've come to like screened pine bark mulch even better, especially when i can get "big bark fibers" instead of "Pine Bark Fines".

I guess as the size of a tabletop bed increases, it acts more like "the ground" and less like "a pot". For "in ground soil", for some reason even small stuff improves the driangee. Or maybe that's just my local experience, because ANYTHING improves the drainage of pure clay!

In pots or small contianers, I prefer the bigger coir fibers over coir powder, in order to get more air spaces and less compression. I bought one brick of coir that turned out to be all powder, and didn't like that at all (for pots or seedling trays). I also dislike regular commercial peat-based seedling mixes, becuase they are so easy to drown by over-watering.

I should probably say that I tend to overwater, and that's one reason I obsess on drainage and drowned roots in the bottoms of pots.

Corey

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 12, 2011
11:59 AM

Post #8752344

Off-topic Suggestion for Honeybee... if you can hire someone with a DitchWitch, have them dig a narrow trench about a foot deep, and put a vertical piece of aluminum flashing (comes in a roll at big box stores) running the length of the narrow trench. It will stop bamboo runners.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2011
12:03 PM

Post #8752346

Honeybee, I've used coir off and on over the years and tend to equate it with peat, even the coarser coir. It readily holds moisture and tends to compact like peat so I've had to amend it heavily with perlite and such.

Al's Mix of pine bark/tad bit of peat/perlite is great for many containers. The ratio of each would be contingent on your plants needs (e.g., cacti vs veggie crops vs perennials). I have no doubt it would be good for table top beds as well. And of course don't forget to lime your mix.

Rick, I go with the coarser pine bark for many of my nursery pots (perennials) and it does great.

Cricket, nice project you have going! I think you're gonna love it! Thanks for posting.

Shoe

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2011
12:13 PM

Post #8752365

Shoe,

I agree that "coarser is better" with pine bark sold "mulch".

However, "orchid bark" tends to be coarser than I like ... I have some chunks almost as big as golf balls!

Corey

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 12, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8752449

Run the orchid bark through a chipper/shredder?

I'm loving the pine bark fines (coarser) cause it's so clean to work with. I'm about to order another yard or two to build my raised bed (s), since it looks like I might have a fence up soon, and can move forward with building at least one bed.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2011
1:18 PM

Post #8752464

Big as golfballs!? Lordy mercy me, I'd consider that a yard ornament. *grin

I'm lucky, I get my fine pines, pine bark, etc at a large nursery/landscape supplier and take my trailer. It lets me see what I want to get and make more choices than bringing a bag of something home and wondering about its contents.

Linda, hope you get your bed built, soon be planting time your way, won't it?

Shoe
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2011
2:34 PM

Post #8752582

Thank You Shoe.


I am growing a white patty pan squash in one of the table tops and It is suppose to be bush but it seems to be running. I have never grown the patty pan squash before now. ARe there varieties that run? This one has grown out of the box, and has reached the deck banisters already. Grown out about 2 1/2 feet long now. I don't think it's a bush ..I know it is a patty squash cause I now have little famale buds. They're so cute!

Thumbnail by CricketsGarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 12, 2011
3:46 PM

Post #8752699

Pretty! One of my favorite squashes! The white patty pan is, in my opinion, one of the best.

And yes, it can still be considered a "bush" even though it'll grow 2-3ft. The main stalk/stem is what keeps growing, unlike other squash that has vines that take off like runners.

You're gonna love it! I like to make "bowls" out of them (see pic). 'Tis great to "eat the bowl and all!".

Shoe


Thumbnail by Horseshoe
Click the image for an enlarged view.

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 12, 2011
5:50 PM

Post #8752819

>> Big as golfballs!? Lordy mercy me, I'd consider that a yard ornament. *grin

LOL! Yeah, I wonder what kind of pot they would even fit in!


>> I'm loving the pine bark fines (coarser) cause it's so clean to work with.
Me, too. They worked really well even for seed starting, the first year I tried them, except for petunias.

>> Run the orchid bark through a chipper/shredder?

In priciple, yes, but I would have to rent one, and I only have a few quarts of the fancy orchid bark. And my lawn mower would make it too dirty.

I've been pricing Waring blenders and food processors at Goodwill, but the only one I considered a bargain didn't work at all. I have some big bags of pretty good mulch and lots of hardware cloth for screening it.

Maybe I'll crush up the orchid bark balls with a hammer for next years seedling mix. Or a cheese grater!

Corey
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2011
9:33 AM

Post #8753721

Shoe= that is an interesting picture...neat idea using the squash as a dish...but please tell me what is in the squash bowl.

I have a few female buds on the squash getting ready to bloom. Impatiently watching. I want to help her out when she opens.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2011
10:02 AM

Post #8753765

Here's my recipe, Cricket. I've given this out to customers for years now and they love it. It's very versatile as to what you want to include in the squash. (And in the pic above that is a side order of steamed Swiss chard alongside.)

Patty Pan Squash (Scallop Squash)

Use the squash(s) that most resemble a bowl. (You can cook quite a few of these at a time. It’s up to the size of your steamer pot and skillet.)

Cut the very top off. Scoop out the innards of the bottom part with a spoon creating your bowl.
Put the top and the hollowed out “bowl” in a steamer basket and start cooking. While it’s cooking…

Saute some fresh onions and several cloves of smashed garlic in a bit of olive oil. When onions are translucent add squash innards. Cook until tender, stirring to blend the oil and flavors, but NOT overcooked (overcooking turns them mushy and turning into nothingness)! Add salt and pepper to your liking.

The onions/garlic/innards should be done about the same time as the “bowls and tops”.

Remove the bowls, gently, and place on plate or serving platter. Fill with the sauteed goodies and a dab of butter (if you like butter). Also, if you like, you can top with grated cheese. Put the tops on to hold in the heat and help the cheese melt.

This dish makes a great presentation and is delicious! Eat hearty, bowl and all!

Hope you get a great harvest!

Shoe

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 13, 2011
12:15 PM

Post #8753961

darius - [quote]if you can hire someone with a DitchWitch, have them dig a narrow trench about a foot deep, and put a vertical piece of aluminum flashing (comes in a roll at big box stores) running the length of the narrow trench. It will stop bamboo runners.[/quote]

Thanks for your suggestion. Unfortunately, I don't have the funds for such a project :(

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

August 13, 2011
1:36 PM

Post #8754072

Me neither, but several years ago I moved to a place with NO bamboo, so it's no longer a problem.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2011
4:56 PM

Post #8754477

That sounds great Shoe. I will definitely try it that way. We love squash casserole with the onions, cracker crumbs, egg, chedder cheese, salt , pepper...so your dish sounds similar. I sometimes add a little eggplant to my squash casserole.

bounce bounce bounce

Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 13, 2011
6:13 PM

Post #8754633

I love squash casserole, too. I just haven't made one in years. Maybe you have an easy one to share, eh? Please?

eweed
Everson, WA
(Zone 8a)

August 13, 2011
6:33 PM

Post #8754692

Ah a few sips from the jar and no recipe needed lol.

Shoe hard to believe with all the fixings I manage to grow I never did anything with summer squash but fry it untill Maria was here and she made a veg dish that was just awesome.
mom2goldens
Carmel, IN
(Zone 5b)

August 13, 2011
7:54 PM

Post #8754899

Thanks for that recipe, Shoe. I got a large patty pan squash in my CSA this week, and didn't know what to do with it. I've only cooked baby patty pan before. Your recipe sounds perfect, and can't wait to try it.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 14, 2011
7:28 AM

Post #8755566

Perfect timing, eh, Moms? Hope you enjoy it.

Ernie, I have no doubt Maria can cook up a storm. I bet she's a great cook. Hope ya'll get to meet up this year again.

Shoe (making my morning rounds with a .22, watching for a whistle pig who keeps eating my corn!)
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 14, 2011
12:04 PM

Post #8755990

A whisle pig? never heard of it. An actual pig?


My squash casserole is simple and easy.
I normally use yellow squash diced up with an onion diced up and both are pre-boiled together til the squash is
slightly tender. Then I strain it. Sorry, I have never measured anything. I just throw it together
I put the squash and onions in a casserole dish and add crushed crackers , a beaten egg, some shredded chedder cheese, salt and pepper. Mix it all together and bake on 375 til it is golden brown then add shredded chedder cheese on top and let that melt...wha-la. done. I guess one of these days I should measure everything out just so I can call it a recipe. My mama use to make it and she never measured either.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

August 14, 2011
1:35 PM

Post #8756145

Sounds good to me. And nope, I don't need measurements for many things, especially casseroles. Thanks!

Whistle pig. Ground hog. Woodchuck. All the same critter carrying different names. (I've been known to call them several names in a row! *grin)

Shoe

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

August 14, 2011
5:47 PM

Post #8756550

Y'all got me wanting squash casserole.. I always sautee my onion and diced squash instead of boiling.. It will give you a great added layer of flavor.. And if you aren't afraid of fat, just a bit of bacon or fried fat back grease in the sautee..Then I add a small can of evaporated milk along with the cheese.. Any will do.. I like cheddar and some velveeta type mixed together for creaminess.. Top with fresh bread crumbs, and bake til golden brown.. Really just has to bubble good and brown as there is no egg to get done.

Larkie
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

August 15, 2011
5:31 AM

Post #8757137

I planted my 4x4 TTgarden with carrots.
Before I sowed the seed, I added Cotton Seed Meal, Bone Meal, and Charcoal and Wood Ashes.
The 4x4 bed now has at least 256 carrot seeds. (actually more and will be thinned out later)
Using the Square Foot Gardening measurements which is 16 carrots per square foot.

The carrot seeds have already germinated in the other TTgardens. I have been thinning them out.
I did not use organic nutrients in the other TT gardens with carrots. It will be interesting to see the difference.
The newest carrot garden with organic nutrients will only get goat manure top dressing as a fertilizer.

She bloomed. :) and the bees are busy.
(I know= I have wood laying everywhere in the background===been lowering the deck and reconstructing it)

Thumbnail by CricketsGarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

August 15, 2011
7:27 AM

Post #8757343

Here's my recipe for Stuffed Merliton (Chayote Squash)

http://davesgarden.com/tools/tags/tag.php?tag=recipes%3Agymgirl%27s+stuffed+merlitons+%28chayote+squash%29
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 21, 2011
2:15 PM

Post #8769174

I wish I had room to grow mirliton. We love it. It's good pickled too.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

August 22, 2011
7:37 AM

Post #8770553

I seem to remember growing Chayote when I lived in South Florida. I think it just took off up a tree! It's been such a long time, that I don't remember the details. Isn't it a tropical vine? I hadn't thought about growing it here.

Although I don't miss South Florida, I DO miss all the wonderful tropical fruits I grew there. (sigh) Can't have everythig :(
CajuninKy
Biggs, KY
(Zone 6a)

August 23, 2011
8:51 AM

Post #8772776

They grow great in south La. Have not tried them up here.

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