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Vegetable Gardening: multiple-eared corn

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snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 28, 2011
9:47 PM

Post #8782277

I have spent a large portion of today looking for "Hastings Prolific Corn". The first references I saw about it said that it was very hard to find, but I thought that that was written before search engines became available. I was wrong; in fact, now that I've spent many hours with Google on its trail, I'd use the word "impossible" rather than "difficult". Anyway, as a last effort, I thought I'd ask about it here. Does anyone have any idea as to where I might find it? From what I've read, it was really something special, so it's hard to believe that it has just disappeared from the face of the Earth. Someone must still grow it. Does anyone know where? Also, is there a comprehensive plant source index still in existence? There may be, but I have the strong feeling that one no longer exists. The "Garden Seed Inventory" was pretty good (8,500 varieties), but the 6th and last edition was in 2004. Other than that, I know of only "The Plant Locator" and "Gardening by Mail," neither of which is current. Could it be that the "catalog of catalogs" I am searching for now only resides on the Internet? If so, where? One last point: the 6th edition of "The Garden Seed Inventory" says that "Hastings Prolific Corn" was dropped in 1998. Presumably, dropped from any American seed catalog. Is that the end of the story? Fearing that it might be, I've now ordered two packets of "Six Shooter Corn". "Hastings Prolific Corn" had more than six ears per stalk, but six isn't too shabby, especially if HPC no longer exists.
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


August 29, 2011
5:13 AM

Post #8782548

Southern Seed Legacy does not list it, so it may be extinct. Never encountered it and I use to buy seed from Hastings back in the 70's. Expect it is a novelty like Six Shooter.
Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

August 29, 2011
7:10 AM

Post #8782751

The seed savers exchange lists a



Plant Type: CORN/DENT (Zea mays)
Variety: Hastings Prolific White
Seed Type: Large Seed
Members: IA SSE HF - HAS - MO WI H
SSE CORN 151

You have to be a member to request seed.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

August 29, 2011
12:10 PM

Post #8783293

Thanks to both of you for your interest in and your efforts on my behalf. I'm happy to report that I am now able to send in my check for a packet of Hastings Prolific Corn seeds which, I'm told, should be about 400 seeds for the very reasonable price of $5.00. So, my long search has finally came to a happy conclusion: I found a source for the seeds and I also found the "Catalog of Catalogs" that I have been looking for, and I should be getting the next catalog in January. Also, as a member of Seed Savers Exchange, I can view it Online.

Just in case you're curious about this corn, it supposedly has from 14 to 18 ears on one stalk. I've also ordered Six Shooter, so I suppose I'll become some sort of a minor expert on the subject of multiple-eared corn. Keep tuned. You'll be seeing the results on this site. It's a little late in the year, but since I'll have an abundance of corn seed, I'll probably plant some now and the rest next year.

Just goes to prove how great Dave's Garden is. I should have come here first.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

September 2, 2011
4:48 PM

Post #8790617

Hastings is sadly now out of business. I don't know who, if anyone, will carry their seed forward in the future or if they have a proprietary interest in the name. I know this because the Atlanta Orchid Society board meets there and we have lost our meeting place. They were a southern institution for so many years. Sad to see them go.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 5, 2011
11:56 AM

Post #8794538

MaypopLaurel,

I've ordered Hastings Prolific corn from for the Seed Savers Exchange. To do so, I had to become a member, which was just fine with me. With membership you get their "catalog of catalogs," Which is the most comprehensive list of available plant seeds that exists, as far as I know. I'm really looking forward to it...and the seeds.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 5, 2011
12:29 PM

Post #8794591

"14 to 18 ears on one stalk"...

Snorkelpop (love that name!), is that a typo or for real? I've never seen any corn that produced more than 3 ears per stalk. Or perhaps Hastings is a mini-corn, not a field corn or sweet corn? You sure have my interest.

Shoe
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

September 5, 2011
3:41 PM

Post #8794910

Snorkelpop, The only "prolific" corn I have ever grown was Mosby Prolific. It is a white field corn. 2 ears to the stalk. I will be watching, because I would like to know more about Hasting's Prolific. Luciee {;^)
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 5, 2011
3:48 PM

Post #8794921

I think it must be a popcorn, Luciee. A small eared variety similar to "strawberry popcorn" maybe.

I've grown Chires baby corn, which is those little tiny ears you get in Chinese veggie stir-fry dishes. It was really fun to grow and produces lots of little ears.

Shoe

Thumbnail by Horseshoe
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luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

September 6, 2011
11:29 AM

Post #8796136

Thanks, Shoe!! Makes sense. We grew popcorn once or twice years ago, but I do not remember how many ears were to the stalk. Luciee {;^)
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 15, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8809828

There's one sure way to find out, and I did it today. I planted 55 seeds in a tray in my bathroom. This is going to be better planned than is usual for me.I have a warmer under the seed tray, and I'm going to follow all of the instructions this time. I'm also going to hand-pollinate the corn when the time comes. Finally, I'm going to keep records of what I do. I want this experiment to be a success, which means I'll be going by the book. No creativity, no innovation for me this time. Next year I'll be more adventurous. I have plenty of seeds left for that.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 19, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8814701

Progress Report: I planted the corn on September the 14th. Here's the way it looks today. Of the 55 seeds I planted, there are now 46 viable seedlings.

Thumbnail by snorkelpop
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snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 23, 2011
2:16 PM

Post #8820946

Progress Report as of 9/23/11: I received the seeds from Seed Savers Exchange around the 10th of September. I planted them on September the 15th (55 seeds). On September the 19th, there were 46 viable seedlings (see above). Today, (September 23) I planted 24 of the plants in my outdoor plant box (See picture below). Tomorrow I will plant 24 more in pots and various places around the house. A few days later I will transplant the three stragglers that aren't yet big enough to transplant.

I want this to work. Today, before planting the seedlings, I checked the Ph and fertility of the soil. While doing this, I noticed that the soil was teeming with grub worms, so I have placed styrofoam collars around the plants. I also gave each plant a squirt of Pyrethrum. I then watered in each plant and called it a day. Oh, one more thing: I have to get some cat repellant so I don't go out some morning to see my hard work dug up.

The package the seeds came in said, "Germination %: 89& and Date completed: 01-30-09" I take this to mean that these seeds were harvested then. Anyway, The Seed Savers Exchange encourages participation and feedback, so I'll be telling them that the germination rate for my seeds was 51/55=93%. I'm no expert, but that doesn't seem bad to me.

Yes, I did get a late start, but I'm hoping that the San Diego climate will be forgiving.


Click the image for an enlarged view.

snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 23, 2011
2:40 PM

Post #8820972

I can't seem to get the picture from Flip to this site. I'll keep working on it, and when I succeed, I'll post it.

Thumbnail by snorkelpop
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Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2011
5:28 PM

Post #8821159

I'm interested in your grow out, snorkelpop. Thanks...

As a tidbit of into, grub worms tend to eat roots of plants so those collars won't help you there. I think you must've read about cut worms being deterred by collars. (Or at least temporarily detained.)

As for the pyrethrin, that is a contact pesticide so if you sprayed it on your plants and no bugs were on it then you wasted your money and product. Best to wait till you see bugs on your plants to use a pesticide like that.

Shoe.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 23, 2011
5:53 PM

Post #8821174

All I can say is that I've seen the collar-trick for grub worms recommended in many places. Some of them go so far as to guarantee that using the collars will absolutely prevent any grub worm incursions. Same for Pyrethrin. What I hate the most, what I hope to avoid, is visiting my plants some morning only to find that some of them have been cut-off at their base. However, I didn't put the Pyrethrin on the plant, I squirted it on the soil at the base of the plant. I also thought about biologicals (I thought I had treated that bed with nematodes. Either I didn't, or nematodes are overrated) and other toxins, but collars seemed like the simplest and best solution. Just a barrier. What could be simpler? Oh, another recommendation I read was to encourage grub eating birds. That was good for a chuckle
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 23, 2011
9:44 PM

Post #8821435

Heheheh, good luck with the grub eating birds. Chuckling right there with ya.

But again, grubs only eat under ground roots, and those appear in lawn grass usually. What you are thinking might be the same as grub worms are more'n likely cutworms, a whole 'nother ball game. And yes, many people, books, garden gurus recommend collars for staving them off. Sometimes it works, sometimes not, since cutworms can easily come up from the ground within the collars.

Love your beds, by the way. You should be able to grow nearly anything in those! Good goin'.

Shoe
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 24, 2011
10:54 AM

Post #8822073

Thanks for the information. I have quite a few books on horticulture, and now--finally-- I'm starting to read them. I've found that "Grub worm" is not a universally accepted term. All of my books mention "Cutworms," but only a few have any entry for "Grub worm". The things I saw are called "White Grubs" in one of my books. In other books they are called "Japanese Beetle Grubs". Actually, there are several kinds of ground caterpillars that some people call
"Grub Worms".

You are right about Cut worms. Grub Worms are what I saw, but Cut Worms are what I fear. It's downright demoralizing to visit your garden and see seedlings cut-off at their base overnight. Grub Worms are not beneficial, but they don't do in a plant overnight. Sure, they like to take their little nibbles, but I can live with that. I can't live with overnight extirpation.

I just bought 50 pounds of diatomaceous earth from Amazon for about $22.50. The price is great, and I think it should be a valuable weapon against cut worms. I don't know if I have them in my plant box, but I'm certainly going to be sprinkling some inside the collars. Collars are also great for irrigation. They channel the water to exactly where it's needed. Thanks again for your information.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 24, 2011
11:27 AM

Post #8822104

Yeh, I have grub worms too but they do very little damage, probably because in a garden the ground is disturbed enough with tilling or planting or cultivating. Lawn grasses suffer much worse them them I have Jap beetles, too but fortunately there was only a small outbreak of them this year.

Good deal on the DE. That should go a long ways for ya. For most worms I use a Bt product but your DE will last as a barrier much longer.

Plenty of rain here today so gonna go check the rain gauge. Love it!
Shoe
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

September 24, 2011
1:03 PM

Post #8822195

If you have a plant cut off by a cutworm, dig around in the soil there and kill the bugger.

Shoe, I have only seen 8 JBs this year. In 2003 I trapped an estimated 280,000 of them. I have only used a small amount of Milky Spore here.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 24, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8822199

Congrats, Indy, Milky spore sure helps, eh?

I was trying to get a neighborhood to use it but only a few wanted to. And it was the kind of place that used to be a big pasture and turned into homesite after homesite. They were loaded with JB's. Unfortunately unless everyone uses it they wouldn't see great results in a situation like that.

Shoe
Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

September 24, 2011
1:59 PM

Post #8822287

Shoe, No one else used ANY Milky Spore and I used very little of it. Perhaps weather conditions helped plus a lot of trapping and killing on my part.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 24, 2011
2:25 PM

Post #8822321

I've never used it either have seen the big reduction in JB's.

I think it all balances out when you have a good blend of various plants, a good insect population (both beneficial and non) it keeps populations in check. I have no doubt you probably still have milky spore working for you since it multiplies in the soil as long as there are host grubs. I hope since you've only seen 8 adults then they are laying fewer and fewer eggs each year now.

Shoe
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 27, 2011
6:10 PM

Post #8827170

9/27/11: I had planned on transplanting 24 plants to pots and whatever available space could be found. It's a good thing I didn't because I'm having problems with the corn I transplanted to my raised beds, and I'm going to have to replace a number of the plants there. I noticed some problems the day I transplanted the corn and the day after, but I thought I'd give the seedlings a chance to recover. They didn't. Here's the score. Out of the 24 plants I transplanted, 4 are dead or will soon be, and 8 have fallen over and won't stand. On close examination, some of the stems near the roots look as if they've been crushed. At present, I have 24 seedlings in the tray where I grew them. They are all standing and look to be in good health. However, so did the ones that have now died or fallen over. They are also two more in the seedling tray, but they are too small to be transplanted at this time.

The main problem is that something is happening to too many of the corn stalk/stems near their roots. For some reason they are losing the rigidity and health they had in the planting tray. For some reason, they become weak in the knees and fall over. Fortunately, I have 24, maybe 26 spares. I just hope the same thing doesn't happen to them when I use them to replace the plants that didn't make it.

JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

September 27, 2011
9:33 PM

Post #8827382

Seems that I have read somewhere that corn dislikes being transplanted--
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 29, 2011
1:30 PM

Post #8829479

9/29/11: I talked to my nurseryman. He thinks the problem may be overwatering. He suggested letting the plants in the seed germinating tray grow more before transplanting them to the raised plant bed. He also suggested transplanting the plants into pots as a middle step and later transplanting from the pots to the raised plant beds. I don't care for the last suggestion, so I'm going to replace the dead or dying plants in the raised plant bed with the plants still in the germination tray. I'm going to do this now. I still have 24 healthy seedlings and fewer dead or sickly plants in the raised plant bed, so there is an adequate safety margin--I think.

Proper watering is crucial, so I'll be checking the plants twice a day until they are past the danger zone.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

September 29, 2011
5:24 PM

Post #8829771

9/29/11: Excuse the multiple entries, but I'm using Dave's Garden for my personal log book. It's more convenient than writing in a notebook. Anyway, I've had to change my plans a bit because of what I found when I started replacing the dead corn seedlings in my raised plant box: grubworms, too many grubworms. I knew I had them, but I hadn't realized how many. In one fist-sized hole I dug for a replacement plant, there were 12 grubworms. That's a serious infestation, one that calls for immediate action. I had planned on using nematodes and/or Milky Spore; in fact, I've bought both. However, there's no time, so as soon as I saw the problem, I went to Home Depot and bought a strong chemical pesticide. The only problem with that is that it must be watered-in, and I'm afraid my corn problems were caused by overwatering. The grubs gave me no choice, though, so I opted for the pesticide...and the water
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

October 24, 2011
10:14 AM

Post #8861587

Here's the way my corn crop looks today. I had planned on taking this picture thirty days after I planted the corn, but although I planted the seedlings in this raised bed on September the 23rd. I actually planted the seeds in the germination tray on September the 14th. Oh, well. Also, all of these plants have not been here since the 23rd. Many of them are replacements for those that died. Grubworms? Probably. However, I'm determined to see this experiment through to the end, and I have reserves on hand should I need them later.











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snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

November 5, 2011
10:05 AM

Post #8877615

One of the corn stalks--the tallest one-- fell over the other day, so I propped it up with no apparent ill effects. This is one of the problems of growing tall plants in potting soil. True, my growing medium is more stable than most commercial potting soil, but it's not like real soil, so I'm soon going to have to rig-up a supporting structure for all the plants. Fortunately, the design of the plant box is such that this shouldn't be difficult, I just have to do it. I had the same problem when I grew sun flowers in the bed, but it wasn't too difficult to fix things up.
kmom246
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)

November 5, 2011
7:58 PM

Post #8878271

Side note: we don't get much of anything in the desert, as far as grub worms go - but what few I do encounter are welcomed with much enthusiasm by my chickens. Perhaps a future grub removal project may to invite an urban chicken fancier to bring their flock over for a pre-spring planting scratch & dust bath party. You might even luck out and get some yummy eggs out of the deal. :-)
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

November 6, 2011
11:43 AM

Post #8878999

Yeah, every time I harvest the Grubs, I think of that. Right now, I just toss them onto a grub-inhospitable patch of ground to wither up and die, but how much better it would to be have their glutinous careers nipped in the bud by an eager flock of Gallus gallus domesticus. Birds would like them, too, of course, but I haven't figured-out how to arrange their meetings in the small available window of opportunity. I might add that in my recent harvests I am increasingly finding sickly-looking , even shriveled-up, grubs for the first time. I guess my applications of nematodes and White Spore are finally taking effect.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

November 19, 2011
3:34 PM

Post #8897471

Here's how my corn patch (24 plants) looks today. I planted some of them on September the 15th, but because of necessary replacements, at least half of them are a week or two younger. The difference in heights is surprising. Fortunately, however, I think all of these plants will be here until harvest. If not, I have eleven still in reserve.


Click the image for an enlarged view.

snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

November 19, 2011
3:57 PM

Post #8897500

I had problems above, but I was unable to make the necessary corrections. Clicking on "edit" didn't seem to be of any value. Anyway, I'll try again here. Is there a way to delete what has been posted?








Here's how my corn patch (24 plants) looks today. I planted some of them on September the 15th, but because of necessary replacements, at least half of them are a week or two younger. The difference in heights is surprising. Fortunately, however, I think all of these plants will be here until harvest. If not, I have eleven still in reserve.







This message was edited Dec 17, 2011 11:46 AM

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snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 9, 2011
8:26 AM

Post #8922551

I make it a practice to make a tour of my mobile home estate every day. It keeps unpleasant surprises to a minimum. Today I noticed the first tassel in my 24-member corn patch. I haven't checked the expected development tables for this variety of corn (Hastings Prolific), but today is that plant's 86th day. No ears yet, but I'm hoping they will soon be making their appearance.

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snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 14, 2011
1:28 PM

Post #8929591

I first planted my corn on September the 15th. However, because of problems with my corn (death), I planted more a week later, then a week or ten days after that. I had no more problems after the third planting, and my patch looks great. However, I do have one problem: no ears yet. One stalk has a developing tassel, but there are no signs of developing ears. It looks like my corn will not be developing ears, and I'm wondering why. What are some of the common reasons for this? Incidentally, I should mention that I got a late start this year. I planted my corn about a week after the close of the planting season. Other than that, I can think of nothing unusual. No pests, no disease, and no unusual weather. The only thing I can think of is water. The corn is growing in raised self-watering beds, and from probing the soil, I know that there is enough water: feel, abundant earthworms, etc. Also, the plants are a verdant green and very healthy in appearance. I was going to say that maybe I have been overwatering, but wouldn't there be signs of this? Doesn't overwatering tend to produce yellow leaves? Oh, one last thing, I have taken care to check on the nutrients. I know that soil testing kits are not very reliable, but what else can I do? I used them if that's not clear.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 15, 2011
12:28 PM

Post #8930802

snorkelpop, could you please go back up to your post of 11/19 and removed at least half of the --------

This will put this thread back to proper size and make it much easier for people to read w/out having to scroll back and forth.
Thanks.

As for your corn problems I'll be back later and re-read.

Best,

Shoe


This message was edited Dec 17, 2011 11:24 AM
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 16, 2011
11:53 AM

Post #8932140

Horseshoe,

A few comments: (1) I'm willing, but I guess I'm not doing the right thing. I click on EDIT; then, I erase almost of the line. That would seem to seem to accomplish what you want, but it doesn't. When I come back to the screen, the line is still there. If you tell me what I have to do, I'll do it. (2) I take your word that there is a problem on your screen, but there is no such problem on mine. Could it be the browser you're using? It took me a long time--years, actually--but I finally learned that many of the problems I was having with my computer were due to my browser. I have a Mac, and I started using Safari when I couldn't use Internet Explorer anymore, but I finally added Google Chrome as my default browser when I realized the many failings of Safari. I still have both browsers, but only because Chrome is deficient in certain areas. Sigh..nothing's perfect. (3) Now I remember why I came here today. I now see one very tiny ear appearing on the corn stalk with the developing tassel, and there might even be another even tinier ear on the same stalk. However, that's all. I just don't think it is possible for a decent crop of ears to appear in the time remaining. They're not mushrooms.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 17, 2011
8:28 AM

Post #8933046

Mornin'!
Yep, you click on Edit, then erase the hypens...maybe you're not erasing enough of them. Then hit Send. That should do it. If you're not hitting Send it won't make the change.

And nope, not my browser. This has been a common problem over the years on DG. Guilty of it myself years ago when I was too excited about something and added way too many !!! :>)

And it is just this thread, no others on DG or the other sites I visit.

Congrats on your corn appearing!

Shoe (off to a high school play...Back later)
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 17, 2011
11:52 AM

Post #8933267

Horseshoe,

Not having any problems with that posting, myself, I just can't understand what problems my separating line are causing you. However, not wanting any of my immortal prose to be missed, I have just deleted the line entirely. I also increased the space between the two sections to replace that line. If this doesn't help you, I could just run all the sentences together; in fact, that's what I was thinking of doing.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 17, 2011
4:56 PM

Post #8933537

Thanks. That did it, putting it all back in place. Much obliged. I wonder if others who were watching this thread had the same view I was getting. Again, thanks for taking time to fix it.

Congrats on your corn. Will be looking forward to your next pics. Do you think you'll have a frost in your area soon? I have no idea when your cold weather kicks in in Ca/10a.

shoe

snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 17, 2011
9:37 PM

Post #8933923

I'm just curious as to what you were seeing on your screen and why and how it differed from what I saw on mine. However, I guess you did manage to eliminate your browser as the problem.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 18, 2011
4:53 AM

Post #8934061

Shoe, I saw what you saw... and figured you'd help get it fixed.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

December 18, 2011
9:34 AM

Post #8934306

Howdy, darius. Nice to see ya!
Yeh, I had an idea others would see it as well. Thanks for posting, it lets me know I still have my sanity! (or insanity, which is "funner"!?) *grin

snorkelpop, what happens with excessive characters in a line is it makes the thread screen exceptionally wide and causes people to have to scroll side to side to read each sentence. You may not have noticed it due to your screen settings or something.

Back to corn. Just curious, did you ever find out if Hastings Prolific makes full-sized ears? I've only read the few blurbs available online and none state the size of the ears.

You might also want to check your days to maturity on your seed pack. If it is a long season corn you may not be too far off track, just now getting tassels and and corn showing. What with all the stress/setbacks you've had would also add days.

Shoe- Hoping you see more corn appearing now that tassels are beginning to show
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 18, 2011
12:15 PM

Post #8934441

Horseshoe,

That's interesting, but I have been doing that for years. You might say that I do it routinely, and you're the first one to ever bring it up. Anyway, I'll remember it for this site, but I'll probably continue elsewhere with the lines until someone complains.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

December 21, 2011
5:17 PM

Post #8938611

There won't be any corn for me this year. The answer should have been obvious to me: I just planted too late. If you disregard the rules, you have to suffer the consequences. That's what my nurseryman told me, and it makes sense. Wait'll next year. However, I'm not going to take the corn down now. It may not bear any corn, but it looks great. I'm going to keep it until it dies. I just want to see the entire cycle. By the way, the planting period for corn in my area is from April to the end of August. I thought I might slip through by planting in the middle of September, but it was not to be. I'll still post some pictures from time to time, though.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

January 7, 2012
9:16 AM

Post #8958085

Talk about "Late Bloomers". I took a stalk-by-stalk inventory of my corn patch this morning, and things have surprisingly and unexpectedly changed. Today's ear/tassel count of the 24 plants is as follows: ears 15, tassels 13. That's definite progress, and I expect more because several of the plants are still in their plant adolescence. Nevertheless, these aren't the results I planted "Hastings Prolific" for. However, the plants are vigorous, healthy, and robust, so I know that my soil mix, plant nutrition, and irrigation are optimal and that the next corn crop I plant--at the proper time--will have a much better chance of producing the touted returns. This time around I don't believe I'll bother with hand pollination, since the patch is situated in such a way as to require ladders and scaffolding to do the job, but next time I'll make the necessary effort. One last thing, there were only two ears per plant, except for one that had three.

Final, final: I planted the corn on September the 15th, 19th, and 23rd.
snorkelpop
San Diego, CA
(Zone 10b)

January 20, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #8975701

Here's the way my corn patch looks today. No stalks with more than two ears, but a few 8-footers. That's a respectable height, in my book. Hopefully, my next planting--in season--will produce the multi-eared freaks that I bought Hasting Prolific for in the first place.

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