September...it's all happening.

Clifton Springs, Australia

Colour everywhere in the garden......and to me this flower is the most beautiful..
It is a Cantua buxifolia........

There are 3 cultivars in Australia as far as I know....
C.buxifolia.....pink
C.buxifolia bicolour.....yellow with a white tip and red bars.
C.pyrifolia.....yellow with white tip..

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Clifton Springs, Australia

When they aren't in flower, they are totally insignificant....tiny leaves stringy stems..
But it's worth the wait....

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Brisbane, Australia

Wow, I've never seen those before. Quite stunning, both flowers and the colour.

This is epi. Pink Snowflake, open for me on the first day of Spring. A smaller flower, but the plant is covered with buds, with many on each stem. Can't wait until it is all out in flower, but so very happy to see the first one.

Karen

Brisbane, Australia

Um, forgot the pic, sorry.....

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West of Brisbane, Australia

Your cantua reminds me of the species fuchsias, plants which I've only recently become interested in. (I'm hoping my Bolivian fuchsia will flower this summer.)
Seem to prefer cooler conditions too but, whatever you're doing, it's working: they look lovely!
Did you buy them as plants or grow them from seed?
PS Anyone in Melbourne should keep an eye out for the sales from the Royal Friends of Melbourne's Royal Botanic Gardens. They had them listed in their autumn catalogue: http://www.rbg.vic.gov.au/__data/assets/word_doc/0020/14807/Autumn-2011-catalogue-.doc

And here's some local (Melbourne) info on the plant: http://www.global-garden.com.au/backissuez/0111feature1.htm
This is particularly interesting:
In the course of writing this article I spoke to a few nurserymen and one said that if you grow a bush long enough it will sport these variations and this statement was supported when I actually saw a bush with two different flower colours on it.

This message was edited Sep 1, 2011 10:02 AM

Clifton Springs, Australia

I bought the parent in a pot last year...since then I have been able to get 2 more plants from it from basal shoots with a couple of roots.
I have the parent in a tall pot and the small ones in the garden...
I don't think that I have ever seen a seed pod on one, cestrum... my last one I had about 5yrs before we moved....but I only had one...I don't know if they are self fertile.
I want the other colours too, so that little nurseryman in Portarlington is keeping an eye out for me...

I looked up your Bolivian Fuschia, very lovely too..http://www.strangewonderfulthings.com/109.htm

Pink Snowflake is very pretty Karen, I don't have even one Epi open yet....don't forget to post when it's in full flower.

West of Brisbane, Australia

Given what was written about the sports, I wouldn't be pruning any of them ...
My Bolivian fuchsia came from Honeysuckle Cottage, along with the 'true' variegated abutilon (i.e. not the virus variegation).

West of Brisbane, Australia

This is Dombeya calantha from Wanda Hirth's stall. It's only in a tube pot but in flower, yet I have seedlings (of different Dombeya species) that are over a metre tall and yet to flower. I hope it doesn't die after flowering! The flowers have a mild fragrance, nothing to write home about but still a bonus.

This message was edited Sep 1, 2011 4:12 PM

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Clifton Springs, Australia

That's a very pretty flower....a large plant must be spectacular....

The Cantua has to be pruned or it will turn into a mass of long thin stems...
It flowers on the previous years growth so any sports will be there still.

Imagine the growth at the top of the pot in this pic as a 5' x 5' bush...yikes

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Victoria, Australia

Yeah the local Cantua are going off at the moment.
I see them in older suburbs, though fairly uncommon.
I think they went out of fashion, that and/or people can't put with a straggly nondescript shrub for most of the year lol.
I believe they are cool climate plant like B. sanguinea, they look like a Brug or Iochroma to me lol.

Sydney, Australia

Don't they look like Iochroma with bling ...are they the same size ? (the blooms I mean).
Yes another cool climate beauty, thanks for the pics Dianne, great picture showing the growth habit too.
Guess you need to move to Victoria to grow many lovely things. I do admire cool climate beauties, guess we can't grow everything we would like.

The Dombeya is a darling cestrum, why do you think it may die ?
What a treat to have one in bloom when it is so little, it's a little like the prickly hibiscus, maybe the tips are blooming wood.
You northerners get such a great variety of plants up there. :)
Loving the pics.

Clifton Springs, Australia

The Cantuas home is the Andes and it's fertilized by Humming birds......sounds very Brug-like to me Chrissy......it grows very well in California.......so if you want to try a cutting in the summer...let me know and I'll send some up to you...

They are slightly larger than Iochromas.....

West of Brisbane, Australia

Quote from chrissy100 :

The Dombeya is a darling cestrum, why do you think it may die ?
....

Only because it's so small and probably should be putting all its energy into growing rather than flowering, but I don't have the heart to cut off the flowers. (The unopened buds look like those of miniature roses, I think.) I haven't even tipped it out of its pot to check the size of the rootball. I was pleasantly surprised by the shrimp plants because, although they are also only small plants in tubes, each has a good bundle of thick roots and so should get established quickly. (Unlike the variegated shrimp plant bought last year, which was a small plant in a small pot with scant roots--but then, it is a slow grower generally. Although my friend planted hers out in quite a shady spot, in among a clump of nasturtiums that pretty much shaded it from the sun, and her cutting is larger than my original plant. So perhaps I'm giving mine too much sun.)

There's a lovely pic of this Dombeya taken at Coffs Harbour: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony_rodd/3674787820/
The photographer casts doubt on its identity, and I must admit it does resemble a Dombeya wallichii: http://www.rareflora.com/dombeyawa.htm (Which I've tried growing from seed. There is a seedling labelled D. wallichii but last time I looked it was too small to identify (by the shape of its leaves) and so might just be something that got blown into the pot. On second thought, the flowers do look different from that photo of the wallichii. I'm treating it as a calantha unless proven otherwise!)

Anyway, it's just new plant anxiety!

This message was edited Sep 2, 2011 8:52 AM

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Clifton Springs, Australia

That Dombeya wallichii...is a stunner...how lovely it is in full bloom.
What is the texture of the Dombeya petals, cestrum...in some pics they look papery and in others they look thicker...

This is my favourite white Camellia.."Nuccio's Gem.......it is so perfect.

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canada, India

[deleted by admin]

Victoria, Australia

Awesome first post!
location: "canada India."

I like that Dombeya, cestrum.
and Wow Dianne that is, for sure the best white Camellia I have ever seen. a pearl.

This message was edited Sep 2, 2011 12:59 AM

West of Brisbane, Australia

Quote from Seachanger :
That Dombeya wallichii...is a stunner...how lovely it is in full bloom.
What is the texture of the Dombeya petals, cestrum...in some pics they look papery and in others they look thicker...

Not papery, just soft (normal) petals ...
I reckon any of the dombeyas would look good when in full bloom. Hopefully the scent on this one will be stronger too.

Forgot to say that I saw (and squashed!) the first 28-spotted ladybird of spring :-(

This message was edited Sep 3, 2011 9:34 AM

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Clifton Springs, Australia

Last of my Tulips...it's a new one for me..
It is named Claudia....
Very pretty type of flower, not a typical Tulip cup...

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Merino, Australia

I went out for a garden wander while the sun was out this morning. Heres a few pics of whats going on .
It will be a lot more colorful later during late spring/summer.
These are all out and flower most of the year.
Wallflowers and daisies.
Jean

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Merino, Australia

This is under the willow tree. I let everything do their own thing here.
A mix of species geraniums, acanthus, arums, nasturtiums and forget-me-nots along with anything else that happens to be passing and drops a seed or two.

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Merino, Australia

This is the path coming up from the willow to the iris area. You can see the green lavender in the front right nad at the top, my echium hedge. They are only last years babies but are already 3' high and starting to get flower stems.
far top right is the huge white ceanothus. If you want an easy care fast growing plant, this is it.

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Merino, Australia

This is the side path next to the greenhouses. The blue flower is borage. It self seeds everywhere and will grow to over 4'most years.
The tall green at the back is the top of my best boy, brug , GHA. He is going great guns and is over 8'high.Jean


This message was edited Sep 8, 2011 4:02 PM

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West of Brisbane, Australia

Funny thing is that there isn't much in flower here.
Here's a calliandra flower, common as mud here. When I first moved to Qld and saw one of these flowering from a distance, I thought it was an Albizia julibrissin.

West of Brisbane, Australia

Ok, perhaps I should actually attach the image ...

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Clifton Springs, Australia

Just got home, Jean and took a walk around your pretty garden....I love the touches of purple/blue everywhere.....and your path from the Willow to the Iris field is charming.

Talking of Iris, just had a look at the online catalogue and I am determined not to buy, just look...
They are all so lovely...I have to dig out a couple of mine that have been overtaken by the Phormiums..but that can wait until next year.

cestrum, I have always admired Calliandras, never having seen one in the flesh...I love the pics.

Here is some of the Boronia, beautiful perfume on this one B.purple jarod....with S.wendy's wish behind it.

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Merino, Australia

Very pretty Cestrum. Looks like an old fashioned powder puff. .
I dont know if these grow up your way. This Kangaroo Apple just popped up a few years ago and has steadily grown to around 9'high and covers about 4 square metres. I leave it because it is a great windbreak and I love the purple flowers.
Jean

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Merino, Australia

Not flowers...yet....
some of the liliums coming up.

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Merino, Australia

This is the first time this clivia has flowered. It came from a very old farm garden. There were hundreds of them but the whole place was being knocked down to make room for blue gums. I rescued about 20 plants , which were enough for me as they are all the same color.
Jean

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Christchurch, New Zealand

White hellebore & sweet violets in the woodland corner

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Christchurch, New Zealand

love this blue, bought myself a dress almost this colour :)

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West of Brisbane, Australia

Your blue bloom (anemone?) reminds me that I don't actually have any blue flowers in my garden! (Purple, yellow and blue are supposed to attract bees.) I think it's because I've been concentrating on trees, shrubs and vines--I'm not ready yet to think about the smaller plants :-) There's plenty of yellow--I just noticed a Jesus (i.e. carpenter/Jesus was a carpenter/the only way I can remember their name/no, I'm not religious!) bee over the yellow cassia blooms.

Dianne, I *love* the smell of brown boronia: sheer heaven! Yet I could never get it to grow for me in Melbourne, so congratulations on your lovely beauty.

I too have the Wendy's Wish salvia. Seems like a tough plant here, apparently not bothered by the humidity. Have you smelt the flowers? I didn't realise it was scented until I kept brushing up against it while working outside. The flowers have a delightful aroma with a citrusy tang when you brush against them.

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West of Brisbane, Australia

Nasturtiums are a winter flower here, so long as they don't actually get frosted. By summer, they've died back from the heat and humidity. These are still going strong as we've had a very slow start to spring: in previous years we've been known to have a day of 35 deg. C by this time. Not so far, though.

This message was edited Sep 12, 2011 1:11 PM

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West of Brisbane, Australia

Here are those two shrimp plants still in flower, the variegated one with pink flowers and the green one with russet-brown blooms. Coincidentally, you can see the 'fruit salad' shrimp plant flower in the background at right.

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Merino, Australia

Cestrum, those shrimps are so lovely. The variegated leaf is very pretty.
My nasturtuims are definite lovers of heat here. They are up and running everywhere now but in summer they will grow twice as tall. I love them for covering areas that are usually bare or weedy.
You will find that a lot of salvias have that tangy scent as you brush the foliage. I am smelling it now as I was just outside and pulled a couple of unwanted seedlings from near around a salvia.
Jean.

West of Brisbane, Australia

Yes, the variegated foliage is pretty but it's such a slower grower. I still don't feel completely certain that the plant won't just die on me one day. I hope that it puts on some real growth over the coming months as it's barely grown in the year that I've had it.

This purple shrimp plant (Porphyrocoma pohliana) should be much stronger. According to DGs, it readily self-sows : http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/55371/
I can't wait to see if I get seedlings sometime down the track.

I forgot to say that it's the flowers of Wendy's Wish that have that citrusy tang to them, not the leaves ...

This message was edited Sep 12, 2011 3:27 PM

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Clifton Springs, Australia

I have had S.wendy's wish for 3 yrs and never noticed a perfume....just sniffed it cestrum and Jean..
Almost a pineapply citrus smell.....lovely....it is very tough I have found that too.
The real Wendy who grew that Salvia has released another this season...can't wait to see it....
I know that it had a man's name, just can't remember it...we were driving while I was listening to the 3CR gardening program....

Love the white Hellebore, Teresa.

Jean, just how many Liliums do you have?

cestrum, I am not a shrimp plant fan...but those two together with the variegated foliage of the pink one look beautiful....
Here is a little patch of Freesias

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West of Brisbane, Australia

Dianne, it seems that you need to stroke the flowers of Wendy's Wish (which I did unwittingly when I first rubbed up against it) to release that lovely citrus aroma ...

West of Brisbane, Australia

Here are my mixed sprouts: radish (the tall ones), broccoli and alfalfa. I have radish in flower now, so I should have plenty of my own seeds to sprout later.

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Merino, Australia

How many liliums, Dianne ???? ummmmmm.
No where near as many as Anthony , but enough for me to look after.
At a rough guess, about 40 with some seeds sprouting too.
While looking at the liliums, I just realised, I have around 30+ clivias. ( plants & seed ) Now where did they all come from ?? lol
Jean.

Merino, Australia

Colleen, look look !!!!!!
Its out. Well not fully out, but enough for me to run and get the camera.
There is a second bud too.
aulicum forma robustum
Jean.

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