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Accessible Gardening: #12 Practical Matters for Physically Challenged Gardeners

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Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 15, 2011
3:14 PM

Post #8809977

I think a new thread might make life a little easier for those who have dial-up access. The old thread was getting long.
We welcome newcomers to this thread where we discuss the practical, day-to-day issues of gardening and spending time outdoors when you are also coping with some sort of physically limiting condition.
Over on the "Kneeler" thread I brought up the possibility of having a Sticky on the forum for online resources we all like. (A short list of the better books on the subject might be a good idea, as well.) Does anyone else think this is a good idea? If so, I was thinking it wouldn't have to be a Sticky. That would fall under the category of Practical Matters and we could keep a running list of what's current in this thread's intro. After all, accessible gardening as a niche of gardening is relatively new and there aren't that many really useful resources.. ~Nadine~


This message was edited Sep 15, 2011 5:33 PM
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 15, 2011
4:20 PM

Post #8810080

We came from here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1195873/
There will definitely be red poppies in the Old Soldiers Garden. I’m hoping I can talk Kay into creating the poem and its response poem “We Shall Keep the Faith”by Moina Micheal on matching concrete slabs by next year. There is a lot of utilitarian concrete work (like the w/c ramp) that needs to be done first (Jim)

Thumbnail by seacanepain
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 15, 2011
4:39 PM

Post #8810099

Sure, Nadine.
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 16, 2011
3:12 AM

Post #8810608

I'm with you Nadene.My #1 suggestion for anyone who can still garden on 2 feet is to have sitting stations every few feet to rest and to injoy your garden. It's made a big difference to me. Also for me big flowerpots are the way to garden.
Vickie
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 16, 2011
5:58 PM

Post #8811551

Yes, containers are my favorite method too. I did a little more work on my deck rail planter. I dug my paintable silicon sealant out of the plumbing supplies and put small PVC pipes in the drainage holes. The wood around the drainage holes tends to rot fast. I’m hoping this will solve the problem. Well, slow it down anyway. In our humidity wooden anything has a limited life span. We are big fans of the new recycled, plastic-wood composite lumber in the humid south.
I think the book All New Square Foot Gardening: Grow More in Less Space by Mel Bartholomew should be on our resources list. For garden newbies or lazy gardeners like me the SFG method is ideal. There have even been SF Gardens set up on old hospital gurneys and wheeled to the gardeners. :-) People like Kay think SFG is a little confining. I say when she has been humbled by a few more birthdays, she will change her mind.
Since Vickie posted a Thrive link about seed sowing with low vision, Carrie submitted their “Carry on Gardening” link, and Nadine re-posted the link because it had gotten buried up, I’d say Thrive is a given as a resource link.
My garden work for the day involves sitting at my desk and running old telephone books through the shredder. We’ve started using our shredded paper to smooth out rough spots in the dirt driveway and paths. I wasn’t sure about that at first, but using a micro-fine shredder it is working out well. I was afraid it would blow around and be a huge mess. The finely shredded paper has a tendency to want to cling together and becomes a solid mass after being wet. I think I will extend the experiment to leveling w/c paths. If it doesn’t stick to the wheels. We may be on to something effective and inexpensive. Warning: paper run through the older style strip shredders ABSOLUTELY makes a mess. .Microfine paper shred works best when there isn’t much wind or any kids around. “Look, Grump-pa! It’s snowing!” isn’t something you want to hear on a summer day while spreading micro-fine paper shreds. :-) The powers that be knew what they were doing when they made kids so cute. It has survival value for them. Wasn’t it George Carlin who did a whole routine on the subject when he became a father? Where’s our George Carlin expert? Hey, Katiebear, where are you? (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 17, 2011
12:09 PM

Post #8812343

I'm still alive, but barely... we went to visit our FOUR grandchildren in Utah. The way the flights worked out, as there is no direct flight (except on American), we had to fly Bos-Phx, take the airport shuttle to a Best Western, sleep for four hours or so, get up early and go back to the airport to catch a flight to SLC! We were already exhausted when we got there, 2 days of Grandpa-riding and singing at the top of their lungs and Carrie-reading-books and so on, we were TOTALLY wiped out. Then to get home, we tried to catch a 9 am flight SLC-somewhere (I forget) but there were no free seats so we had to sit around for three hours until the next flight which was SLC-phx which we got on, then rented the same Best Western for a few hours of sleep. My daughter drove down from Prescott AZ (which is 2 hrs away) and we fed her dinner and then went back to sleep. Alarm clock woke us up in time for the red eye flight PHX-boston! We got home at 7 am. 24 hours after we left SLC. Personally, I can't wait until they move to Ft Worth because there are direct flights!!!!

The kids were very different ...clearly worried about this move ...clingier, more affectionate and less independent than usual. They're usually very rugged and ignore me 'cause I can't play BB or catch or soccer with them, but this time they were all happy to give me hugs and kisses! They're going to the first three weeks of UT school then 2 weeks of vacation at Grandma's house then 20 hours of driving east and south then jumping into the middle of TX school which started in the middle of August! There's no way to prepare kids for that kind of move. I changed schools a lot when I was little, and there IS no way to make it easier. At least Ft Worth is farther east than SLC!
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 17, 2011
2:01 PM

Post #8812425

Carrie, have any of them lived or been to this area of Texas for any extended period of time?
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 19, 2011
3:38 AM

Post #8814395

There may be a little culture shock.But ETexans are for the most part friendly,helpful and very nice people.
They better bone up on football,football and football tho.
I remember once long time ago reading a travel suggestion for Texas driving. Whereby you should always follow the flow of traffic and not the speed laws. That nolonger is true.LOL
They'll do fine Carrie.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 19, 2011
4:53 PM

Post #8815435

Debra, I don't think any of them have left Utah for more than a day or two, and then they went west not east! Then they were always with parents 24 hrs.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 19, 2011
6:31 PM

Post #8815578

Summers probably won't be too much of a change. It's hot both places. We might have more humidity, but nothing like the East Coast. Winters will be the most different. Wait until they get here and find it it is fairly common to be in the 60s or 70s and sunshine on Christmas Day. :-) The heavily Latino population, emphasis on football, slew of different Evangelical churches, and ingrained arrogance of native Texans (after all, it DID used to be it's own country :-), will probably be the biggest culture shocks. Routinely violent Spring weather is a little scary. I'm originally from South Bend, IN. Lived seven years in Denver and two on the Space Coast of Florida. All in all, though, I would still choose living here. Give them my contact information, I'll do whatever I can to help them settle in.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 19, 2011
8:40 PM

Post #8815736

Kids are amazingly resilient and adaptable. My older brother and sister tell me I made quite a fuss when we moved from TOWN to the country. I had just started school and didn’t want to move away from all my new friends. After I became accustom to doing farm work and made friends with boys on neighboring farms, I was okay with the move, but it took me a few months to adjust.
I decided to try planting carrots in my newly made rail planter. I think as the season changes the change in the angle of the sun will give the planter enough light. But, I also planted lettuce and curled parsley just in case I’m wrong. The hanging baskets are planted with snow peas. I put new soil in the cocoa fiber lined baskets that has water crystals in it. I’m not happy with the fiber baskets so far because they dry out too quickly. We have begun potting up some things for the winter like the aloe vera and a handful of other marginally hardy things. We aren’t doing nearly as many tropicals and marginally hardy plants as we once did. Yaaaaa! I will be able to get around in the house this winter without needing a machete. (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 20, 2011
7:14 AM

Post #8816046

So I don't need to send that pith helmet I've been saving for you? :-)

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 20, 2011
2:21 PM

Post #8816538

LOL!! Too funny, Deb!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 21, 2011
12:46 PM

Post #8817949

Back here, we are planting cabbages and ornamental Kale. Any day now I expect to see all the lovely beds of ginormous impatiens trashed and replaced with regimental rows of kale. I never dare to take a cutting - I wouldn't be able to give it enough sun or care.

I expect the biggest transition these kids will go through is the culture shock of going from a 99% Mormon culture to a ?% Mormon one. I mean, they offer religion classes in the public schools in UT! The kids will learn how to spell diversity, and how to feel it. My GD used to feel bad because all the Disney princesses had blond hair and hers was brown.auburn. (We don't include Mulan or Jasmine, naturally not.) Now she'll find that princesses come in all colors, shapes and sizes! I think UT is naturally more beautiful, but TX is culturally more interesting by a mile.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 21, 2011
5:08 PM

Post #8818394

Oh well, that’s okay, Debra. Kay would have snagged the pith helmet from me anyway. She has a hat obsession. Never goes out without one. Can’t trust Nadine around pencils. Can’t trust Kay around hats.
Nadine is teasing that I must have been craving fruit when I placed my last daylily order. I received ‘Little Grapette’ and ‘Strawberry Candy” today. The ‘Strawberry Candy’ is for the CanDo Container Garden. I’m not sure yet where the ‘Grapette’ will go. I bought that one just because I liked the look of it. Perhaps, in a raised container on the south side of the workhouse. They are classified an early bloomer, but they rebloom in fall. The purple would be a nice contrast to the oranges and yellows there this time of year. I’ll have to think of some tall spring companions.
Kay did a little work on the ramp this morning, but it has been raining most of the day. Nadine’s been painting and baking. I’ve been very busy snoring. :-) Jim
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 21, 2011
5:45 PM

Post #8818447

I got up and went to Russellville at 4am this morning. Am going to make homemade Butterscotch pies and potato salad for the reunion. Walmarts have some Christmas decorations in. Why was i not surprised?
Am doing the table decorations also. That will be fun and I've accumulated alot of fall decos over the years.
Am glad they allow religion in Ut schools. They outlawed it in Texas While my girls were going to school.
Most of the kids met before school and said prayers anyway.
Wamarts has their spring bulbs out. I'm going to get some hyacinths the 3rd.Most of mine are blue. Need some pink and white ones.I may get some more crocus also. Lowes will probably have their Christmas cactus later in October. Would like more of them too. My red spider lillys are just blooming now.The zennias are putting on a second round of blooms.
I've got Strawberry Candy daylilly.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 21, 2011
6:43 PM

Post #8818571

You are going to have a few more in the next couple of weeks, Vicki. :-)

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 22, 2011
6:00 AM

Post #8819046

MMMM.. i've never had Butterscotch pie. I must be scrumptious!!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2011
10:58 AM

Post #8819484

They don't just permit it, Vicki, they require it, and it has to be that religion, no other. But whatever. I think religion belongs at home andin a church, not in a school, but I'm from Massachusetts.

Our BE Susans are going crazy, the chrysanthemum is getting ready to burst, and the BE Susan vine is finally getting going (along with a morning glory friend).

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 22, 2011
11:11 AM

Post #8819499

Oh how I missed having a BE Susan vine this year. Hope to have one again next year though. The yellow BE Susan vine planted with the Red Cypress (Hummingbird) vine is a stunning look!
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 22, 2011
4:09 PM

Post #8819851

That does sound like a pretty combination, BB.
Nadi has been working her way through old recipes to see what is worth saving. I hope there is a recipe for butterscotch pie among them. I love butterscotch! I wasn’t impressed by the first depression era choc. Cake she made. They must have been desperate for choc. Cake then. The second choc. Cake she made from a Depression era recipe was amazing. One of the best chocolate cakes I’ve ever had despite the fact it had no eggs, butter or shortening and contained vinegar. I was almost afraid to try it, but I’m glad I did.

I’m old enough to remember when every school day started with a prayer and the pledge of allegiance. The “church ladies” came to the school once a month to tell Bible stories. I looked forward to them because it meant time out of class and you got prizes for memorizing Bible verses. Nadine said they stopped starting the day with the pledge of allegiance when she was in high school. That’s sad. Religion I can understand if you have a diverse group. It causes divisions within a closely packed group, but why dispense with the pledge of allegiance? She has no memory of prayer being allowed in school. Even jewelry or t-shirts that pointed toward a particular faith or group alliance were frowned upon. It makes me think of the line in a country song: “You’ve got to stand for something, or you’ll fall for anything.” You can be too rigid in your beliefs, but there is also the danger of being too wishy-washy. I'm concerned by the large numbers of what I would call hedonistic, fluff-balls among young people. As in most things, I imagine it comes down to finding the proper balance.
K*


This message was edited Sep 22, 2011 5:10 PM
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

September 22, 2011
4:17 PM

Post #8819870

Hi Everyone, Sorry I've not been here in a while. I'm in Ca. for the second time in a month.
Had to get new a/c and computer and other stuff. Am back to get cement supplies from a friend who is being evicted from her property. My right shoulder has been messed up; I'm hoping to get an x-ray done while I'm up here. Saw an orthopedic surgeon about my left knee and will probably have knee replacement surgery in about three months. Know anyone in the San Diego area who would like a paying guest for about a month? If so, Dmail me.

Just adopted dog #6 from a friend who is moving and couldn't take the dog. The friend is having a hard time and I was afraid the dog would end up at the dump so I took him. I had to leave the day after I got him but he'd gone from hiding under the van to allowing himself to be led by his leash to the outdoor room where he and the other dogs can see each other but not get at each other.

The trip up to Chula Vista was long due to road repairs along the way. Was averaging 25 miles an hour over long stretches. It makes a 600 mile trip rather long. However, the scenery is beautiful and it was peaceful, just slow.

hugs, katie

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

September 22, 2011
5:22 PM

Post #8819928

Dog #6???? That's a lot of dogs.

I remember saying the pledge every day,
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 22, 2011
7:17 PM

Post #8820044

"hedonistic fluff-balls"? I resemble that remark. :-)
Did you fall and hurt your shoulder or something, Kb?
I want to pick up some hyacinth bulbs too, Vickie. Something must have eaten ours. I didn't see one this spring. Are there truly red spider lilies? The ones I have are a sort of dusty rose color. I was wondering if nurserymen just call them "red spider lilies" or if there are some that are actually red. And, no, you can't start decorating for Christmas yet, Vickie. lol. ~N~

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 22, 2011
9:13 PM

Post #8820143

KB,

We're probably on the same surgery plan. My Dr says left knee replacement soon!

Sheri
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 23, 2011
4:39 AM

Post #8820284

Too Late! Already have one Christmas angel sitting on a table along with a jack-o-lantern and a ceremic turkey. Also have silk fall leaves everywhere.
I have 3 dogs and 3 cats.The dogs follow me to whatever room I am. The cats have to check out if I am ok but never stay except living room.I would miss them badly if they were'nt here. I'm taking lil cricket wih me to family reunion.I don't usually but she's getting old and gets depressed if I'm not around.
Yes the spider lillys are really red. My neighbor has the pink ones and the flowers are a different shape as well as color.
Hedonistic Fluffball? Don't think so.How about upwardly mobile modern young woman.
HUGS Katiebear and Sheri.
I wish i could have been on your trip to California. I 've never spent much time in a desert and it would have been fun. Do you take emergency supplys with you on your trips? DH and i took a trip into southern west Texas once and i had a trunk full of water and food supplys and sure enough our radiater got a leak and we were stuck out in the middle of nowhere for a day. We ended up using my spare water for radiater.Got some good pictures of desert wildflowers. No cellphones either.LOL We did some crazy things in our life.But we had fun. Guess I still do crazy things.I have to make up for not having a childhood.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 24, 2011
9:15 PM

Post #8822815

Vickie, if your family doesn’t keep you too busy and it is still there, I bet you would enjoy visiting the Gardener mansion. It was once the home of the Choctaw leader, Jefferson Gardener, but was turned into a museum for Native artifacts after his death. I know it is somewhere near Broken Bow. Have youbeen there before?
Many in my mother’s family still live around Chickasha, a little town in Grady County. It is in the southern part of the state, but further west than Broken Bow. (I think I’m remembering the geography right. It has been a long time since I could see a map though.
I haven’t been doing much in the garden. We had heavy rains and it has driven all the ants out of hiding. They are upset about their flooded homes and in a biting mood. Jim and I walked the property scattering ant bait. It takes a few days to do its job and, for me, ant bites turn into painful little blisters. All I can do is hide inside and write a new stanza to add to my “I Hate Ants” song.
People are always worried about me stepping on a snake I can’t see. Stepping into an ant mound is of much greater concern to me. Snakes will get out of your way if they have time and an escape route. Ants go on the offensive!
My driver always complained about "road rapture" when we drove through southwest TX. I guess he meant that hypnotic state you can fall into because of the changing, yet unchanging scenery. I got into the habit of asking how fast we were going. Unless he looked at the speedometer our speed would just keep creeping up. k*
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

September 25, 2011
12:24 PM

Post #8823450

Cyber hugs from all of us here, Debra. I know this has been a rough weekend for you. (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 25, 2011
1:42 PM

Post #8823512

It has, yes. Thank you, Jim and Kay and Nadine.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 25, 2011
7:29 PM

Post #8824024

Debra, you still have Zuzu to keep you company, right? Since Amargia will be open to the public and Fenny and Tater-dog sometimes take it into their minds they don't like someone, and they are frighteningly open about their dislikes, PJ says we are not getting any more dogs once they are gone. We may get some barn cats, but no more dogs or inside cats since so many people are allergic to cats. I will miss having a dog. Maybe, we can find one of those super friendly dogs who like everyone. Fenny is very sexist. PJ is the only guy she likes and I'm not having much luck teaching her to get along with cats either. ~N~ .
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 25, 2011
7:57 PM

Post #8824062

I have Zuzu and Willie. Might get a third dog eventually, but not for awhile. (Hope those aren't 'famous last words'). Russell was the first dog that was all mine. Had a few dogs when we were kids. My former husband had to have a dog and he took her when we divorced (thankfully, because I didn't like that dog much :-). After these three, though, I can't imagine life without at least a couple of pooches running around the house.

Check the breeds, Nadine. Larger dogs are often bred for guarding or watching and you can't train out that territorial or protective instinct. There are a lot of medium sized companion dogs that can get along with everyone. I go for the scruffy mutt look, myself. :-)

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

September 26, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8824667

Check out Carolina Poodle rescue.com...they have about 75% poodles + many many other non-Poo or Poodle mixes (that don't shed!)
That is where I got both Pookie and Harmony..

with adoptions of some distance we usually work out a transport system to get them to their forever homes

Sheri

cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

September 27, 2011
1:57 PM

Post #8826851

Yes, I've been there. There are 3 little museums around there.I've been to.The Red River museum south of Idebel,One in Broken Bow,and one in Boswell. I make it a point to go to everyone i hear about.I love museums.I need a bumper sticker that says "I brake for museums" LOL
Nadene, Could i suggest you guys look into Labs. I've never heard of a mean lab.And the ones I've had were real sweeties. But of course if someone robs your house,They'll help them carry stuff out.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 28, 2011
7:36 PM

Post #8828603

lol. Yes, Labradors are beginning to outnumber German Shepherds as service dogs. If I ever decided to get another guide dog, it would be a lab. Tate and Fenny are both lab crosses. Unfortunately, they are both crossed with more aggressive breeds. Fenny especially has never socialized well. We think she is part Rot.
Parrot tulips came in today so they will be on their way to you soon, Debra and Sheri. k*
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

September 29, 2011
6:28 PM

Post #8829866

Busy day. Fall bulbs went in the ground this morning and new daylilies arrived this afternoon. (Thank you very much, Debra!) I had to laugh at what MK did with ‘Brown Witch’. She planted it in a faux caldron. It was originally an oddly wide tire turned inside out. The shaped mimicked the basic shape of a caldron perfectly. After MK attached handles salvaged from an old kettle, it would have even fooled Lady Macbeth.
Loved your plant label solution, Debra. When you mentioned using plastic dinnerware for the purpose, I was imagining white or colored instead of clear. The clear is kinda cool. I’ll have to remember that. We are running out of cut-up blinds and the clear dinnerware isn’t as distracting in the garden. I don’t have enough time to make every label like a piece of artwork that will blend in and sometimes you don’t want to distract from the plant itself. I knew a blind man who used labels made from clear deli containers and clear Braille labeling tape, but I never thought of the clear plastic dinnerware. .
Vickie, did you already snag that catalpa tree? MK put a cutting in the ground when she cut ours down as an experiment to see if it would root and it appears it did. I tugged at it today and there was resistance meaning roots. We don’t want another catalpa, MK was just curious. It is only a few feet tall, but they grow fast. I think the plan was to send you the purple cane in spring. I can put it in that package. BTW, you don’t bring your big containers in for the winter, do you? It took all three of us here to get PJ’s bottle palm inside and it is in a wheeled container. (A former shop vac cut and made into a container.) I will be so-o-o glad when the w/c ramp is finished. It will make a lot of things easier. We had the palm out in the yard and had to get it up stairs. MK made a makeshift ramp out of thick lumber but it was steep. That palm is living on the porch until the ramp is finished!!!
~Nadine~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 30, 2011
7:03 AM

Post #8830299

Nadine, I got confused (no surprise) and sent what I thought was Circle of Life. Still think it is a small separation from it, but I found the original larger fan and will be sending it out Monday. Still have lots and lots to share, so choose away if you all have room for more. Just as easy to mail a full box as it is a singleton. :-)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 30, 2011
11:07 AM

Post #8830561

Ooops! There's a lot of that confusion stuff going around. I was tired and posted under MK's user name. It would be simpler if we had only one user name like "Amargians" that we could all use tacking on our names at the beginning of the post. But PJ says when a company offers something you like, that is not offered elsewhere, such as the Accessible Gardening forum you support it in a way that is very apparent to that company, like it's bottom line. :-) Three separate DG subscriptions are still affordable and it seems only fair.
Don't go to any trouble, Debra. We've never met a daylily we didn't like. Some we just like a little better than others. I even like the one called 'Little Wart'. We have a witch now and I think a witch needs a 'Little Wart." lol.
We've been pushing hard the last few days. We all agree a slow day is in order. Getting the remainder of the daylilies in the ground is all that is on our agenda. MK got her newest Horticulture magazine. She will no doubt spend most of the day reading. PJ is getting drunk with his dwarf friends...on World of Warcraft. After you've drank a few tankards of ale on the game, the designers made it so the screen gets blurry and your response time is slower.. It is wild what game designers can do and the ideas they come up with to keep the game a challenge. ~Nadine~


lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 30, 2011
12:16 PM

Post #8830639

Nadine, are you saying you all would prefer to wait for more daylilies, or saying go on and send more now with the Circle of Life?
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

September 30, 2011
5:57 PM

Post #8830991

We will always welcome more daylilies, Debra. Don't cut yourself or anyone else short because of our daylily greed though. :-) If the one you sent isn't a 'Circle of Life' we will still find a place for it. If it is 'CoL, it will multiply quickly. Even though it isn't scented, MK gave that one prime real estate in the front walkway bed. The color of 'Circle of Life' will blend well with the color of the house so it gets to live among her pampered fragrance plants. It won't be one little plant for long.
PJ is responding well to daylily therapy. He spent much of the day outside painting special pots for his new acquisitions and choosing the right place for each. I can't remember the last time he spent that much time outside and didn't complain about it. It was a gorgeous day. Mid-80's with few pesky bugs. Best of all, since he was painting, I didn't have to. PJ is good at painting. It simply isn't work he normally enjoys.
I ate beet greens from the garden today. That was a first for me. ~N~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

September 30, 2011
8:23 PM

Post #8831177

Nadine, you'd be doing these poor things a favor by taking pity on them and letting them come home to you. The gradually expanding line of containers from either end of the driveway has almost met in the middle. The spreadsheet I sent has daylilies that are extra to what I am keeping fir myself. So please, tell me what you guys like. If already given away, I'll tell you. If not, it will make me happy to share. Already sent boxes to Vicki, Sheri, Barb (mamajack), and Trish Whitinger. Carrie isn't a big daylily person and I can't ship to Katie. Plenty left.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 1, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8832115

I am going to be hurting tomorrow. Finished the Egg Bed. (and i sure wish IB would fix it so we can upload more than one picture per posting. soooo much easier on cubits and atp.)

Thumbnail by lovemyhouse
Click the image for an enlarged view.

lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 1, 2011
5:36 PM

Post #8832118

...and FINALLY. After being in the house seven years. I planted something besides volcanic rock alongside the garage wall in the back yard. Most of the leftover unnamed, lost tag, and "ah heck, what was that one, again?" daylilies have a new home. :-)

Thumbnail by lovemyhouse
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lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 1, 2011
5:37 PM

Post #8832123

...AND. I STILL have all these that need homes, either in my yard or someone else's. Nadine? Jim? Kay? :D

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cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 2, 2011
4:20 AM

Post #8832430

Debra,Now you have a surprise garden.It is totally fun to have something bloom and not have a clue as to what kind it is.
You mentioned having a breakin. We've been having some empty cabins on our road broke into. I'm here most of the time and I've got 3 very noisy dogs and one mean cat.So am not worried.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 2, 2011
10:04 AM

Post #8832846

Yup, Vicki. Lightbulb went off over my head and I said to myself, I said, "Self. Now how about putting all these strangers out by the gayraj. Let them get to know each other and have a big ol' lets-see-what-we-gots party. Dogs wont mind. (or get sick). If it works, then you have lots and lots and lots more room to put the named-ed ones up by the house. Right, Self?" So I did. :D

Vicki, tell me if you got your box. It should have been delivered by now.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 2, 2011
2:10 PM

Post #8833119

Debra,

I recieved my box and am very excited. This was perfect timing for shipment , as the temps have come down to 60's. everything arrived in fabulous shape.

Sheri
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 2, 2011
3:28 PM

Post #8833203

Thanks for letting me know, Sheri. Really hoping the Rosemary standard does well for the church. And Elvis's daylily, of course. :-)

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 2, 2011
4:24 PM

Post #8833254

I'm sure they will. I have tried a number of times to grow and form a standard like that. It is beautiful. Do you happen to know which specific cultivar the Rosemary is? I am wondering if it is winter hardy to zone. I have some winter (z-7) hardy ones at my house and would love to plant your standard in our prayer garden near the cross. Otherwise it will most likely go in our coffee shoppe/ bookstore near the patio windows.

Blessings,
Sheri
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 2, 2011
5:29 PM

Post #8833340

Sheri, I don't. It had been torn off a larger shrub and I stuck it in a pot hoping it would take hold. That was a couple of years ago.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 2, 2011
9:44 PM

Post #8833651

Fall bulbs on their way, Debra and Sheri. I tried for enough of each type for a stand with visual impact, but not so many to be an overwhelming amount of work at one time. Kay laughed and asked if I had ever seen giant purple alliums in bloom. She says one or two of those has high visual impact. Oh well, you can trade what you don’t want. I assume it takes them a few years to hit their impressive size.
We picked up more straw bales than we needed for autumn decoration so I’ve been spending a lot of time researching straw bale gardening the last two days. I know tomatoes, peppers and most summer crops grow great in them. It is an easy maintenance, easy access gardening method we probably should be experimenting with more at Amargia, but I’ve had to really hunt for info about growing winter greens in bales.
I’ve also been looking for ideas on what to do with apple and gooseneck gourds. I like the apple gourd especially. The shape is a perfect imitation of the fruit. Although, I’ve never seen an apple the size of a baby’s head. :-)

You’ve got Labradors well pegged, Vickie, when their protective instincts aren’t triggered. Tate went with me to the nursery. Evidently, she isn’t territorial about my truck. One of the nursery workers pulled the truck around and loaded it with Tate in the passenger seat without a problem. I was almost jealous. Tate was his best buddy by the time he finished loading everything. Good thing he was putting stuff into the truck instead of taking it out. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 3, 2011
9:50 AM

Post #8834268

Lol, Jim, you are right!

Debra, we DO have a lot of daylilies already but they are all NOID and it would be a waste to send us more, as we wouldn't appreciate them properly. I don't think it's fair to say I'm not a daylily person! I drove around all day Saturday with a daylily scape on my van's antenna - didn't notice it until I got out to visit dad at his nursing home. I'm blaming DH! That's his sense of humor - twisted.

I told you all that we're going to Europe, right? Oct 8-25, and I'm already focussing less on everything else and more on making lists of what to bring and what-if-I-get-a-pressure-sore supplies and we need SIX pair of glasses, sunglasses for me, reading and distance for DH, non-Rx reading for me, then emergency reading and distance for me if I lose my contacts. Plus of course all the contact lens stuff.

So don't be too surprised if if I disappear for a while. I'll have to find internet cafes and so forth b/c cell phones won't work. Ciao! (Do I sound European?)
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 3, 2011
9:01 PM

Post #8835160

Awesome, Carrie! What country are you headed for? Italy? Spain?
It sounds like I need to add "good advance planning" and "well organized" to my list of needed skills for w/c travel. (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 3, 2011
11:28 PM

Post #8835253

Carrie, That is so exciting!Have fun! Don't behave! Stay out of jail! Tell us all when you get back. LOL
I got my flowers today.I was excited too. They are now planted in their permanent home.Thank you Debra.
Jim, My fairybells are still blooming.They have outdone themselves.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 4, 2011
10:27 AM

Post #8835744

I promise not to behave. I lost 136 euros already!!!! Grrrrrr. You know those sites and you put in the dates you want and it finds you a hotel? Well this one particular site (spainbookers.com) kept reverting to 17.10.2011 - 18.10.2011, no matter how many times I changed it to 15.10 to 16.10! Still, you figure that when you actually book it, it'll keep the dates you put in. So I finally made up my mind that for the last day, before we get on the boat at some early hour, we should have a hotel that's close to where we need to be (which is a more expensive part of Barcelona), even if it meant spending a little more. But the stupid site switched it back to 17-18 (I should have suspected as much). And it's non-refundable. Ah well, so I got another cheap hotel that's ten miles away as penance. Who knows how we'll get from there to the pier. On a Sunday.
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 4, 2011
9:32 PM

Post #8836536

Are you hurting from all the work, Debra?
Everyone here, but me, has been grumpy today. Papa Bear is growly because he had to spend four hours in lines at the county courthouse getting the tags renewed for the truck. (He has stopped going to church because sitting for an hour is too painful. You can imagine how he felt about 4 hours in a place he didn’t want to be.) The courthouse is too small for current needs. They have a two hour maximum parking time in the courthouse parking lot and to top it all off, he got a parking ticket. He had someone hold his place in line and moved the truck before the two hours were up, but the police said moving to another parking space in the court’s lot didn’t count. A lot of people got parking tickets. Suspicions are it is a money-making scheme.
The paperwork requirements have become ridiculous. They don’t accept military ID’s anymore. Why on earth would you need a birth certificate to renew a vehicle title! So, if you hear about a revolt in S. Alabama. You know what happened. :-) People here don’t do complacent sheep very well. I know things are tight for many city governments, but they’ve forgotten where they are if they think they can raise extra funds by taking little financial bites out of people. People do notice what’s happening and people here won’t tolerate it for long. If the county seat needs a new building or newer computer equipment to process things faster, they way to get that is by taking the problem to the community and getting community support. That is how things have always gotten done around here. When city officials get into an “us” and “them” mentality, things are bound to go awry. Isn’t ours supposed to be “a government of the people, by the people, for the people?” Okay, got that off my chest. Putting away the soapbox. (I've always wondered where that one came from. What do soapboxes have to do with stating one's political opinions? Somehow I don't think it refers to a box of Tide.)
The cooler temps have caused MK's arthritis to flare and that makes it hard for her to sleep. She’s a grump if she doesn’t get her 8 hours. Even Fenny came to me in the office grumbling. At first I didn’t see what her problem was. Then, she touched her nose to her tail to show me. Fenny likes music and has good rhythm. She will drum her powerful, whip-like tail in time with music she likes. Evidently, she had been drumming her tail on the north kitchen wall which also happens to be MK’s south bedroom wall. Nobody is claiming responsibility, but somebody had put a piece of foam pipe insulation around her tail. You know the pipe shape foam that is slit up one side so you can slip it over a pipe in winter. It must have been meant for 1” pipe because it fit Fenny’s tail perfectly. Fenny was grumbling because her “tail protector” didn’t allow for that base drum sound she likes. :-0 ~N~

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 5, 2011
12:33 PM

Post #8837207

I couldn't sleep last night either -- my computer (which we were planning to bring with us as a link to the outside world) stopped working!!!! I'm on DH's which doesn't know me, and I'm on IE not FF which I don't know anymore. Sorry if I speak Greek. Anyway I kept converting euros to dollars and back in my head every time I lay down.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 5, 2011
5:18 PM

Post #8837532

I gots me some bulbs today! Planted 'em and watered 'em in. Thank you. :-)

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 5, 2011
6:31 PM

Post #8837629

I too.received some lovely bulbs today I think I'm gonna get some hardware cloth to lightly wrap them for protection from voles and other bulb eaters.
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 6, 2011
11:48 AM

Post #8838412

lol. Welcome to daylily radio. All daylilies. All the time.
There are aps on SmartPhones that do currency conversion. I blessed whoever came up with that the last time I was on the road. Apple has just unveiled the Iphone 4S with speech recognition that will answer any question you ask it. People have tried to stump it by asking questions in a way computers haven't been able to comprehend in the past Like, "Will I need my raincoat today?" instead of "Give me the weather forecast for such-n-such a place." It is intuitive enough to figure out what information is actually being requested. It even has a camera. If they can make this one affordable, I might bother to carry a cell phone again.
We hope to make Amargia's new website useful to local people. Reporting on agricultural and horticultural related events in the Wiregrass area. I didn't realize there were so many such events. I'm ashamed to admit I'd never even been to the local farmer's markets up until now.
Nadine, the young Kitchen Queen is on a power trip. She has compiled a list of foods that allegedly support joint health and has made them the basis of Kay's diet. She has designed a diet for me as well. She claims it will provide the vitamins and minerals I need while losing weight. A banana, cake and hot tea for breakfast. Fish for lunch. I can deal with it so far. Any diet that allows me to eat cake for breakfast is my kind of diet. (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 6, 2011
2:41 PM

Post #8838623

ever listened to bill cosby's routine on chocolate cake? :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 6, 2011
3:51 PM

Post #8838716

It's just tough when everyone is eating something different.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 6, 2011
4:23 PM

Post #8838759

Ah, but when the Young Kitchen Queen has made her royal decrees...
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 6, 2011
9:02 PM

Post #8839061

Yep, individualized service is the advantage of knuckling one’s brow to Her Highness of the Copper Pots.
The downside is she locks the peanut butter in the royal pantry. (I admit I have a weakness for peanut butter. It’s kept in the house for Kay. Her Grace says it supports the joint health of our Garden Goddess. (You didn't think Kay would let herself be outranked, did you? LOL) It just wasn't fair. Kay got PB as an afternoon snack while I got sugar-free pudding. I would revolt, but then I would have to cook and clean the kitchen myself.
I thought I was getting away with something because I got cake for breakfast. Only to discover tonight it was sugar-free. Sugar-free cake is a crime against humanity! Make sure to eat some patatas bravas for me, Carrie. I already miss potatoes.
Sheri, I can't guarantee there are't some daffy's mixed in with the Lycoris radiata. I dug them up after the foliage disappeared. Bulbs all look a lot alike to me. Burrowing things here don't appear to find spider lilies tasty. I'll have to try some sort of protection for the hyacinths. I think those are mole candy. (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 7, 2011
6:19 AM

Post #8839330

Jim, what colors are broadcast on Daylily Radio? I think you guys don't care for the light petal/dark eye combo. How did you refer to it--as a black eye or monster eye or something looking back at you? I'd like to send another box next week. If you don't have time to get back on here before I ship, then give away the ones I send you don't really like. One of the many beauties of the things is the good feeling when you get to share. :-)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 7, 2011
11:36 AM

Post #8839656

MK says she is in the same situation as Carrie. Carrie writes in her author’s intro that she is striving to be more humble as she ages. MK has bucked herself down from “Garden Goddess” to “Green Queen.” Of course, she reminds me her Queendom is much larger than mine. :-)
PJ is the reigning Office Oman and Potentate of the Porch. If he doesn’t get his weight under control, however, he is going to look more like Jabba, the Hutt. His doctor tells him to stop trying to eat the pain away. It only makes things worse. But, the temptation to try is still there. I’m just the voice of his better judgment. Like Jiminy Cricket with a big wooden spoon.
Carrie, you should check out Barcelona’s botanical garden, if you have time and it is accessible. I’ve read it is stunning, but the totally awesome thing is that it was developed on the site of the city’s former rubbish heap. Well, I think that’s way cool. The city has many gardens that were the creations of the city’s past rulers, but it is Jardí Botànic de Barcelona that leaves a lasting impression. That is the public garden in Barcelona visitors most often post about anyway.I’m a desk chair tourist. Have fun.That’s the important thing to do.
Debra, I know MK would like ‘Candle in the Wind’, ‘Easy Ned’ or ‘Hyperion’, if any of those are still available. All are yellow and, at least, slightly fragrant. ‘Stars Over Alabama” is a given. (That’s the title of an old song, isn’t it?) PJ is going through your daylily spreadsheet again as I write. I guess he is planning to re-send the spread sheet with some notes. Sorry, this is a busy time of year for us. All the fall bulbs are in now, except for my hyacinths. There are some scraps of screen in the salvage pile leftover from when we walled in the back porch. Maybe, that would work to protect them. As an insurance policy, I could put some in a raised, sniff level bed in the Fragrance Garden. Our local botanical garden will have its plant sale later this month. Things will begin quieting down after that until Feb.
The lantana/butterfly love story continues. ~Nadine~

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lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 7, 2011
4:04 PM

Post #8839980

Nadine, got the spreadsheet. Packing Sunday, shipping Monday. Having muchly fun with it both days. :-)
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 9, 2011
10:14 PM

Post #8842867

Since leaf peeping in the deep south can be a little disappointing, I've decided to take up butterfly chasing as an autumn pasttime instead. The lantana still have most of the flutterby's votes as favorite bloom, but my vote is for this mum. (Jim)

Thumbnail by seacanepain
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lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 10, 2011
8:20 AM

Post #8843346

Like the color combination.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 10, 2011
12:18 PM

Post #8843649

Sheesh, what is it with men and tools. Jim has fallen hard for a new pole grabber tool he bought. He is wheeling around testing it out on everything. Grabbing pinecones, stones, scraps of paper, coins…my hair! :-( I wonder how old males have to be before they start behaving like real grownups? lol.
Harvested several kinds of radishes from Jim’s deck farm. French Breakfast and what appears to be a white Daikon. He planted from a packet of mixed varieties so we never know what we will get. There are even some rattail types, the ones grown for their edible pods rather than their roots. This is our first experience growing those. k*
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 10, 2011
8:09 PM

Post #8844277


Just for the record, I was NOT pulling my beloved wife’s hair with my new reaching tool. I was conducting and experiment. I was considering recommending this better made tool to someone who just started a thread on this forum. I had to put the tool through its paces before I could honestly recommend it. Kay had her hair pulled back with one of those things women call butterfly clips. Seeing if I could open it seemed like a perfect way to test the tools control. It worked well, but I guess I should have told her what I was doing first. You think? I’m convinced she wasn’t as startled as she pretended to be. I think it was a ploy to make me feel guilty so I would go ahead and build some shelves she’s been wanting. I finished the shelves so I should be out of the doghouse now. I wonder if Ralph Nader ever had days like this? (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 11, 2011
7:01 PM

Post #8845643

Jim, I know Kay is very thankful that you have such a curious inventive mind. I also know you are very thankful she does too. LOL
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 12, 2011
1:02 PM

Post #8846472

Yesterday I had one of those “duh” moments. I’ve decided to cut myself some slack and say it is just because I’m a beginning gardener. A wild daisy I planted grew to outlandish proportions and that made me think. (Something I should try more often, I guess.) I am keeping my Bee Corner from eroding by creating a terraced rise every 12'. I make the terrace walls with tires. (That comes as a surprise to all of you, I’m sure. ;-) PJ jokes that we misunderstood him. When he talked about retiring he didn’t mean making all these “whatzits” from old tires for Amargia.) But, since he’s such a nice old Papa Bear, he still cut off one sidewall of each tire I use in my terrace project. They make good planters that way. If you don’t take off one side wall they get too hot in summer and, besides, it gives more growing space and looks better minus the side wall on top. I line the painted tires up touching one another across the face of the slope and fill the tire planters with amended soil. Therein lies my “duh.” I stopped to ask myself why I’ve been putting native plants in well amended soil. The joy of native plants is they grow in native soil. If my daisy is any indication, they don’t benefit from highly fertile soil. It was so big it was gawky. My defensive self reminded me I did it so I could keep up with what was where, but had to admit that was just as easily done by putting the natives behind the tire planters. That still gives me a landmark. I could just as easily log the solidago odora as being BEHIND tire #5 in row #3 as IN tire #5 in row #3. The tires have to be backfilled with native soil anyway.
I was lucky. Yesterday was an overcast day with an occasional soft drizzle making it perfect for transplanting. I was able to correct my blunder in a single day. There is room on the bees slope for more garden variety plants now…backed up by the natives.
PJ spent yesterday setting up a new television he got as an early anniversary gift. (He is recovering from the lifting, bending and stretching and enjoying his new toy today.) I think it was a fantastic gift since I got his old TV for my room.
MK is rearranging the w/c garden AGAIN. Tabletop planters are the hands down favorites of w/c gardeners so she is moving the raised planter we made from the old fridge. Visitors love that planter even though it isn’t the easiest planter to work in. There were objections to getting rid of it. It will be given yet another incarnation as part of a retaining wall by the road. The side with the more elaborate concrete and tactile paint work will be facing the road. With the promise of a new tabletop planter taking its place in the w/c garden, everyone is satisfied with the new arrangement. ~N~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2011
8:56 PM

Post #8847009

One of my neighbors planted potatoes in old tires. As the potato grew he'd add another tire and dirt on top.worked good.
Congrats on your own TV.
I completely cleaned my craft closet in the computer room. Came across all kinds of goodies I forgot I had. I'll be in seventh heaven making Christmas decorations.
It was very cool and damp today.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 13, 2011
7:28 AM

Post #8847303

yea, vicki! :-)
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 13, 2011
6:23 PM

Post #8848088

Thank you, Debra! I haven't open it yet, but the package you sent arrived late this evening. Took the new FedEx driver two passes before she found the road. I've really got to talk to the city about getting a street sign.
Way to go, Vickie. Will you come organize my craft supplies now? :-) They've changed things around on me again. Nadi is taking over the artroom as her space and the baby barn is now a sitting area and craft room. We discovered it isn't advisable to have things like sewing machines and brightly colored paints where curious little boys can get to them. I don't mind working out there as long as I have a heater in the winter and a little window unit air conditioner by the time summer rolls around. I can organize things the way I like with some expectation they will stay that way awhile. Nadine and I decided the paints needed to be in a separate place and she has claimed a coner of my workroom. The mess in the barn is all mine. It is mostly sewing and jewelry making supplies. My mother insisted my brothers and I learn to sew. I asked Kay once if she wanted to darn a sock from a pair she was especially fond of. She took it,. looked at it, said, "You darn sock!" and tossed it in the garbage. lol. I tried something similar once with my Grandma Knaub when I was young. She paddled me for being a "smarty pants" and stood over me while I darned my sock. (Jim)
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 13, 2011
7:12 PM

Post #8848119

Oh, WOW, Debra!!! I know now what I will be doing tomorrow. ROFL (Jim)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 14, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8848632

yep. sent all but about four from the list. :-)
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 14, 2011
8:45 PM

Post #8849393

...ad the next day too. :-)
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 14, 2011
9:10 PM

Post #8849401

i gave two sacks full away today and STILL have plenty for myself. I looooov-v-v-vee daylilies. :D
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 15, 2011
10:39 AM

Post #8849877

Thanks, Debra. We have daylilies in every garden now, even the veggie garden. . The first few raised planters we built were too wide. It is hard to reach the center. An island of low-care daylilies in the middle takes care of that problem. I planted the daylily in a 5-gal. pot and sank it, pot and all, in the middle of the bed. . We can adapt the surrounding soil to the needs of the lettuces (hot peppers, come summer) and not adversely affect the daylily. I chose ones I thought of as harvest colored, like ‘Spiced Custard’ to hang with the veggies. I know if I have a pretty to look at while I’m tending the veggies, I will be more likely to work in the vegetable garden. ~N~
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 15, 2011
1:49 PM

Post #8850060

That makes me very happy, Nadine. :-)
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 16, 2011
8:25 PM

Post #8851860

Debra, I’ll have to get Nadine to post a pic tomorrow of the special planter Jim made for ‘Dixieland Band’. I think you’ll get a kick out of it knowing the bloom color and pattern.
Vickie, there is a bud on the ‘Spiced Custard’ DL I received, as well. If we don't have any more weird weather surprises, it should be fine. Normally, I would try to get newly transplanted perennials to focus on developing a root system, but it is so healthy I don’t think it would hurt anything to let it do its thing. All the DLs Debra sent were healthier than the ones Jim purchased online. You can tell they were loved.
All of my poor plants seem a little confused about what season it is. There are blooms on one of the peach trees!
Nadine has been taking advantage of my GS’s slip-up with the craft paints. She thought it was a good excuse to paint the artroom again. She confessed to hating the ‘Chutney’ (muted orange) color of the walls. Even Jim, whose idea it was, had to admit it was too much. Well, he admitted it after Nadi offered to do the re-painting. When he was the one who would have been doing the re-painting, he said it was “an interesting look.” lol. k*
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 17, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8853257

This is the 'Dixieland Band' planter. It is a very wide ATV tire with one side wall removed and painted. I did one something like this in pastels for the CanDo Container Garden, but thought the painting was to painstaking to do more than a couple. PJ used a mini paint roller to do the white accent part. Duh. Why didn't I think of that. It's quick and easy done that way. Can wait to see it when the daylily blooms and it all comes together. ~N~

Thumbnail by Sansai87
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lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 17, 2011
5:43 PM

Post #8853278

That looks great!! Thank you for posting it.

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 21, 2011
11:06 AM

Post #8858242

That is one very cool planter!!
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 21, 2011
11:25 AM

Post #8858270

Nadine, what kind of paint was used for the red base?
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 21, 2011
7:24 PM

Post #8858746

I used spray paint, Debra. But, Nadine has used latex paint on the ones she has made.
I harvested the first of the spinach and the last of the basil today. There was lots of basil so I’ve been making pesto. I think I will freeze the remainder. The leaves are limp when you thaw them, but the flavor is unaffected. Kay makes a carrot-ginger soup she is convinced helps keep winter colds at bay. It contains lots of basil. The soup is pureed so the texture of the basil leaves doesn’t matter. I like having basil frozen for use in this soup. The fresh basil available in the grocery stores during winter is not that good and usually beyond our budget.
Nadine will be traveling back in time tomorrow. She will be spending the morning learning how small farmers dug peanuts and processed sugar cane in the late 1800’s. Kay and I are both tired and achy. October is a busy time here. She and I will stay in the comforts of this century and enjoy time travel vicariously through Nadine and her pictures. (Jim
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

October 22, 2011
7:02 AM

Post #8859028

I like the tire planter. Nice job and good idea about using the small roller.

I haven't posted here for a while but I've been following through lurking. Had a bad experience in another forum and have been licking my wounds.

My right shoulder has been sore for several months. I'll be going to Ca. to get a shoulder harness and to see my doctor if I can get through the Kaiser crap.

Lots of work to do and I'm seriously slowed by a bad arm. My left knee is still shot and I may get knee replacement surgery next year.

Tony and I (mostly Tony) have been clearing aspace in the fron for a garden. It will be flat and ther's good soil as it's had leaf drop for sweveral years. It will be a place where we can display some of our garden art and maybe get some business going. I have lots of concrete molds.

Of course, we're still working on the house.

If anyone is interested a new solar light I got at Walmart stayed on all night. They usually last only a few hours. Don't know how many weeks or months it will last but it's nice and bright this morning. It's the one with the crackly-looking plastic bulb. Very pretty and should be good for lighting paths. It will also work as the center of a flower made from and old washing machine agitator.

Lost one of my dogs, Amber, the other day. I'd found her alsmost dead about a hundred miles north of here seven or eight years ago. She was very tiny and very sick. The American vet who was here then performed miracles with her. She got big and healthy and had a good life here.

hugs, katie
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 22, 2011
3:39 PM

Post #8859471

Katie, I am very sorry about Amber. I still can't believe my Russell isn't here anymore. Glad you had her as long as you did and glad you are back. :-)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 22, 2011
4:16 PM

Post #8859520

Well, I’m back in this century. I discovered the food was good back then. I had fresh cow’s milk, sweet potato pancakes with preserves, a strawberry malt, roasted corn-on-the-cob, samples of flavored honey and, of course, cane syrup. I learned that a malt is different from a milkshake. Draft horses are HUGE and it’s a little scary when they like you. Pigs don’t like paparazzi. And, never get into a staring contest with a ram. They WILL win.
I stopped by the Botanical Garden on my way home where I learned MK’s scarecrow creations aren’t as weird as I thought they were. I saw giant scarecrow ladies, zombie scarecrows, scarecrows picnicking and that scarecrows are at their scariest first thing in the morning.

Picture: Huge Horsie

Thumbnail by Sansai87
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Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 22, 2011
4:17 PM

Post #8859523

Here's the pretty, giant, scarecrow lady

This message was edited Oct 22, 2011 6:19 PM

Thumbnail by Sansai87
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Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 22, 2011
4:20 PM

Post #8859527

But here's what she looks like in the morning

Thumbnail by Sansai87
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Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 22, 2011
4:35 PM

Post #8859535

Sad to hear you lost one of your fur-buddies, Kb, but glad you are posting again. ~N~

Thumbnail by Sansai87
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BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 23, 2011
9:23 AM

Post #8860227

Katie you are in my prayers. Losing a furbie BFF is not easy. Remember the good times. Do ya think we could meet somewhere in the middle between us/ I too have been seriously advised to have a knee replacement soon, and even as much as I hate hospitalizations do know that I can't make it like this
much longer. It's more the post op rehab that I dread than the actual surgery.

Sheri
katiebear
mulege
Mexico

October 23, 2011
9:40 AM

Post #8860246

Sheri - Wish you had Kaiser coverage. We could recuperate together. As it is, I'm looking for someone in So. Ca. who might like a recuperating (and paying) room mate for a month or so after the surgery, which will probably be in January.

katie

BirdieBlue

BirdieBlue
Winston Salem, NC
(Zone 7a)

October 23, 2011
10:09 AM

Post #8860276

No Kaiser. Just Medicare, AARP & VA (if I ever get down right desperate). Mine will probably be in January also. I can dream of recovery in San Diego though ;-)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 23, 2011
6:58 PM

Post #8860882

Well good luck to you two. You both may as well come have it in Arkansas and stay with me.I'm about in the middle between you. The U of Arkansas had a commercial today saying they would gladly take medicare patients. So I'll be going to Fort Smith for my medical care from now on.Probably pretty soon.
That will have to include a trip to Michaels.
Sorry about the furbaby Katie.I know he had a good life with you.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 27, 2011
2:25 PM

Post #8866104

Where was Nadine that she had so many cross-cultural experiences? That was my mantra crossing Spain with DH. He would say "I'm home sick, I want a hamburger and a Coke" and I would say think of it as a cross- cultural experience.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 27, 2011
4:57 PM

Post #8866255

I craved nachos when in England, Ireland, and Wales. :-)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

October 27, 2011
6:50 PM

Post #8866401

I just traveled 120 years or so back in time. Only about 30 miles in space. There was an agricultural heritage festival at a nearby park
So. Other than missing hamburgers, the trip was fun? ~N~

Photo: Turn of the last century drugstore. They make an epic malt there.

Thumbnail by Sansai87
Click the image for an enlarged view.

cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 27, 2011
9:41 PM

Post #8866541

OH yes, We had one of those drugstores in Arkansas in the 50,s They served luscious purple cows and cherry cokes as well as malts (with lots of malt.)
I love traveling back in time once in awhile.
When we lived in Turkey, I never really craved anything. I had too much fun sampling native stuff.Afraid I was always impolite. You are supposed to leave a bite or two on your plate to show you were eating because it was good not just hungry. I would look at that last bite and smile saying this is so good and eat the last morsel.I tried hard to follow good muslum manners, but not when it came to leaving food.LOL
Debra, The Brits have got to have something crunchy and cheesy.
Alas, I can't think of a single spanish replacement for hamburgers and coke. How about a roast beef sandwich with tomatoes,olives,garlic and wine.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 28, 2011
7:18 AM

Post #8866812

Ooh, that last sounds good. Put a little tapenade on roast beef with good chewy bread and some red juice of the grape. yum

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

October 28, 2011
10:33 AM

Post #8867029

Vickie, I never knew you lived in Turkey!!! When was this? I went to Istanbul in 1981. I loved it. I only wish I had known a little more about Islam manners and Turkish history and so forth THEN that I know NOW. I think I wanted to go because I had read about it in some Agatha Christie mystery. Of course, in Agatha Christie, the sun never sets on the British Empire, tea is served the world around, nobody ever gets dysentery from eating local food, or maybe nobody eats local food.

I probably didn't know it was a Muslim country before I went. If I had, I wouldn't have known what that meant. Etc. Etc. I was full of energy but SO DUMB!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

October 29, 2011
3:17 PM

Post #8868313

I would like to go to the Middle East as a tourist in peace time. My last oversea assignments took me to Saudi and Kuwait, but my cross cultural experiences were limited to blowing sand, staggering heat and, let us not forget, those lovely camel spiders. Military personnel were kept sequestered on the air bases. The only nice thing about that trip was that I was laid over in Germany for a few days. Some of the locals kept buying me beers because they got a kick out of hearing me speak my Amish variation of German. I got the impression it was rather like meeting someone in a pub in NYC who ordered drinks and spoke to the barkeep in Shakespearean English. lol. My attempts at German kept me supplied in lager and good food though.
That sounds like a great tour, Debra. I guess I would have to add Scotland to the list of destinations to get Nadine to go as Kay's sighted guide. Kay says traveling with a male sighted guide has limitations. Did you run into any major accessibility problems, Carrie? (Jim)
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

October 30, 2011
3:12 AM

Post #8868783

LOL! I never meet a stranger and I'll talk to anyone that'll listen.(Or not sometimes) Was there in 60 to 63. We lived in town rather then on base. In our apt building we had Brits,Scots and of course Turks.Next door was a Turkish family that was pro communist and across the hall was a family that was pro american.Even tho it is a muslem country. They are much less strict religious than most muslem countrys.Womens vails were outlawed years ago. The Brits and Scots were teachers in a nearby college.I loved Turkey and the people and the food. Course we were told not to eat the local food but we did. Never had any problems.
Carrie, I was a big Agatha Christie fan too. It's been a long time since I've read one of her books. Will have to check one out again. The first one of hers I read, I had to reread again cause i was so surprised.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 30, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8869022

Jim, I didn't write that clearly, sorry. Was in the Republic of Ireland for seven days in 1992, eight days in Wales/England in 2002, and five days in London in 2007. Guess I've lived in Texas so long even that little bit of cultural difference was too great for my Tex-Mex palate to endure for more than a day or two each time. LOL
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

October 30, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8869391

That is probably a better way to enjoy western Europe. A bite at a time. Those Grand European Tours travel agents push sound exhausting to me. Well, when I was younger it might have had appeal.
Carrie, what you describe sounds like typical under 35 behavior to me. I think only a lucky few get a strong, young body and a discerning mind simultaneously.
k*
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

October 30, 2011
1:43 PM

Post #8869413

Ain't that the truth!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 1, 2011
6:13 PM

Post #8872549

Which what I describe, the trip we just took or the trip i took in 1981 when I was 20 y.o.? Probably both were under 35-type - this European adventure totally exhausted both of us!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2011
2:24 AM

Post #8874229

Carrie, Is'nt that what adventures are supposed to do to one?
Wait untill you are 70. Just going to the grocery store can be an adventure.LOL
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 3, 2011
7:23 AM

Post #8874504

I was referring to the earlier trip, Carrie.
:-) How true, Vickie. And, I’m not even 70 yet. The older you get the more of an adventure daily life becomes.
I’m like that character in The Last Hero by Terry Pratchett who doesn’t want to go on any more heroic quest because you never know about the restroom facilities on quest. :-) k*
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
12:36 AM

Post #8877206

Could'nt agree more Kay!!!! But of course wait till January. I'll be wanting to go anywhere and everywhere that has green stuff growing.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
10:38 AM

Post #8877650

Ha ha Vickie sometimes it is: if my WC breaks or someone is blocking my return to the van or the ramp doesn't work or one of the 6 ways of my 6-way power seat gets stuck or ... the adventures in Spain were at least fun to think back on, even though we feel like crazy old coots. I guess there's adventures w/DH = fun and silly, or misadventures with a PCA = hazardous w/ no combat pay. PCA's don't get the underlying silliness in every awkward situation.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 5, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8877660

carrie, how many of the pcas are young? i remember only feeling awkward and not understanding the silly part. thankfully, MOST of the time, i can now find the funnies. :-)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
9:38 AM

Post #8878913

You're right. They're probably all under 35. Except Tania who is my favorite of ALL my PCAs, she's been with me for 5 years!
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

November 6, 2011
7:09 PM

Post #8879565

I considered becoming a PCA, but a nurse told me she didn't think I was strong enough to do the lifting required.
Vickie, would you do me a favor and keep an eye out for wild egg gourds in your area? Cucurbita pepo var. Ozarkana, if you want to get technical about it. I’ve been doing a lot of research on Native American food for my Thanksgiving dinner project. I had this idea of going absolutely authentic and making it so every dish on one table would be something a Creek woman living in 1491 would recognize. MK teased me saying I needed to take it back even further if I was going for truly authentic Creek food. All the way back to before the Creek were introduced to corn by the Meso-American tribes. (It was a joke because I’ve been complaining about all the corn-y recipes. It seems every recipe I get from a Muskogee or Porch Creek has corn in it in some form. I know Europeans have the same relationship with wheat, but I think wheat is more versatile.) Anyway, this all led me to investigate what foods the SE tribes did eat before corn made its way north and east. It’s known the egg gourd or egg melon is one of the indigenous plants the Creek learned to cultivate. As its name implies, it can still be found growing wild in the Ozarks.
There will be three tables this year. The drummers table is just what it sounds like, the drummers favorite foods. (The dancers get the “ooohs” and “aaahs” from the crowd. The drummers get more concrete rewards.) Second are the post-Columbian foods that incorporate ingredients African and European Americans introduced, but dishes the Creek put a unique twist on. Things like fry bread and berry wojapi. Lastly, there will be the pre-Columbian traditional foods which are where the wild game and all the corn come in. By next year, I would like to add a fourth table with samples of the truly ancient foodstuffs I am learning about.
I take on the task of turning nopales into nopalitos tomorrow from our local variety of prickly pear. Kay says you can find them already cleaned in the produce department of grocery stores in Texas. I will clean and prep them once from scratch just so I can say I did, but if I discover I want nopalitos more than once a year, I am going to find a Hispanic grocery store nearby. :-) ~N~
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
4:31 AM

Post #8879790

I've not seen any egg gourds around here. I did find some dried ones several years ago in southeast Okla. I brought some of them home and made christmas ornaments with them.No! I'm a dummy and did'nt save the seeds.I don't suppose you have any seeds? I do have a prickly pear plant,that I guard.and a spanish needle plant along the road to the hwy.I don't have a clue how they got started growing here. My mexican market don't carry prickly pears. I feel neglected. Do you have to do anything to them besides burn the needles off of them?
I think it's wonderful that you are going to fix some traditional foods. I get a bee in my bonnet and want to fix other foods than what I always eat. My family are not in the least adventurous tho. Thats sad.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 7, 2011
2:52 PM

Post #8880545

Nadine, you are going to be one busy woman. :-)
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

November 7, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8880709

I was hoping to talk some friends into joining me in my madness, but I have quickly learned that football fans of either gender or any ethnic group are a lost cause. They are convinced that eating large amounts of a traditional list of foods and watching football is the meaning of Thanksgiving. :-) The idea of fry bread and blueberry wojapi dip is going over well with this group though. I'm told the combination has many years of tradition behind it as a football watching snack. Wojapi can be made from any berry, but my expert insist for Thanksgiving football it has to be blueberry. Thanksgiving has got to be the most tradition bound holiday there is!
I learned Papa Jim's blow torch method of cleaning nopales. There were no injuries and nothing was burnt down. Only after I had finished did he tell me nopalitos are available cleaned, cooked and processed in jars at the local Wal-Mart superstore. You can grill the pads over coals or boil the de-prickled pads, peel them and cut them up to be used in recipes.
Yes, Vickie, it is the seeds of Ozarkana egg gourds I am after. It is certain they were cultivated by the SE and Mississippi river valley tribes and not just gathered from the wild. To get a taste of the past, I will need to grow them the way I would any cucumber. Archeologist believe they were used for bowls and the like, as well as their edible seeds. What was found in ruins was much larger than what is seen in the wild. That is how they know agriculture evolved independently in North America. The Meso-tribes just introduced new crops into an already established agricultural system. Can you tell I'm having fun? I just have a unique concept of fun. I love history! ~N~.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 7, 2011
5:06 PM

Post #8880718

It DOES sound like fun. Learning about something in which we have interest IS fun, don't you think? [hug]
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 7, 2011
8:09 PM

Post #8880947

ROFL. I just turned Nadi’s brain upside-down to see what will fall out. I posed a question Jacqueline Keeler asked in her classic Thanksgiving article on why she, as a Native American, celebrates Thanksgiving. Many don't because they feel it commemorates the beginning of a disaster for Native Americans.
At one point in the article, Keeler ponders on what the Europeans ate before they came to this country. What did Italians put on their spaghetti before they had tomatoes? We say ‘Irish potato” as though potatoes were indigenous to Ireland and not an adopted plant. (It might have been better for the Irish living in 1845 if they hadn’t so completely embraced the potato.) This project appears to be expanding young minds as well as culinary talents. (Not to mention, stretching mental muscles I haven't used in a while.)I guess I can give up an hour or so of football. :-) k*
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
10:18 PM

Post #8881027

Kay, You have made the ultimate sacrifice for Thanksgiving. LOL
My guess for the Italians spegetti before tomatoes would be lots of garlic.I think it kinda flowed over to the french too.I always have some garlic around.
Tomatoes are truely wonderful. I think it was once thought that they were poisonous.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 8, 2011
8:49 AM

Post #8881481

The other parts of the plant were poisonous, why not the tomato itself? Kids think they're poisonous unless sterilized!!!

Kay, which article by who are you talking about? I've long wanted to an article about where we would be w/out the Columbian exchange.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 8, 2011
12:05 PM

Post #8881695

http://www.alternet.org/story/4391/
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 8, 2011
12:35 PM

Post #8881729

Thanks, Debra. I think I first saw the article in the Pure Water Gazette.

I remember when I was very small and my father had a craving for the Potato Soup of his own childhood. My mother made a disgusted face when he described what he wanted her to cook. Potatoes were on the table almost every day, but making a soup of them that included milk and celery was foreign to her. By the time I was a teenager, Sunday evening had become synonymous with Potato soup and being able to eat in the living room while watching “Lassie” on a B&W television. (I don’t know that my mother ever became accustomed to potato soup, but it was an easy way to feed a large family.) The television is an LCD flat-screen with HD now, but my GCs take it for granted there will be Potato Soup Sunday evening and they can eat it in front of the television. Strange how food traditions get started and how quickly they become traditions.
Vickie, our native prickly pear is very small compared to what I remember from Texas and OK. The pads aren’t much larger than a hand. The ones I remember seeing in the produce department of grocery stores in TX were huge in comparison. The “pears” of our native species are smaller and have more seeds, as well. No doubt, Nadi will try domesticating them also to see if they will grow larger when tended. That’s find with me as long as I don’t have to weed them. ;-) I don’t remember eating the cactus pads except as a novelty on camping trips, but my grandmother made syrup from prickly pears and maypop fruits that was delicious. I’m hoping Nadi can rediscover that recipe. k*
Sansai87
Midland City, AL

November 8, 2011
8:50 PM

Post #8882449

I may do more than just domesticate our handful of native Opuntia. I’m considering turning one of each type into a houseplant where it will be safe from both cactus moths and the people who want to destroy them to keep cactus moths from spreading. Our native prickly pears are being systematically eradicated to prevent the spread of cactus moths. I guess I understand the reasoning, but it bites! We only have 5 or 6 types of native Opuntia whereas the SW has 80 vulnerable species. Our prickly pears aren’t major players in the lives of animals or humans. In Mexico and the SW US, they are major parts of the ecosystem and they rank third as subsistence food among Mexico’s rural poor. They are hoping the Louisiana swamps will be a barrier to the cactus moth’s westward spread. The moths have so far made about 75 miles a year in their westward trek, but if they get to prickly pear rich Texas the spread will probably be faster. What ticks me off is the moths were brought intentionally from South America to the Islands to avoid having to do manual removal of prickly pears there. That was back in the 60’s, I think.) What no one seems to have anticipated is that they would make the short hop to Florida. The Mexican government is proactive in helping to “sterilize” a boundary in Louisiana and I can’t blame them for wanting to protect a major food source and a local agri-business, but, as I said, it still bites because it never should have happened in the first place. Okay, off my soapbox. ~Nadine, Prickly Guardian of the Eastern Prickly Pear~
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 9, 2011
1:09 PM

Post #8883242

Ahhhhh, the passion of youth. Lol. Prickly pears in the house? I don’t think so!!! I’m fairly sure Opuntia humifusa, the common eastern prickly pear, can hold its own against the cactus moth. It is only endangered in its northern range which is all the way into southern Massachusetts and into some parts of Canada. (The moth is making its way up the Atlantic coast also.) Individual stands will be taken out by both the moths and those battling the moth’S spread, but, as a species, I don’t have much fear for the common prickly pear. More geographically limited species like Opuntia corallcola (the semaphore cactus) is a different matter. If she can get her hands on a semaphore prickly pear, she is welcome to bring it inside. :-)
Guard that yucca, Vickie. Curly yucca fries and venison steak are my favorite dishes from the pre-Columbian table. There will be pumpkin cheesecake on the drummer’s table. My favorite Thanksgiving dessert. k*

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 9, 2011
1:53 PM

Post #8883310

There was cooked cactus at our hotel in Cancun -- tasted like canned green beans. Was that prickly pear? And what an interesting idea for an article--is it seasonal, or is it a year-round problem?
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

November 9, 2011
7:06 PM

Post #8883849


Sounds like napalitos to me, Carrie. My first MIL grew up in Mexico and used them often in her cooking. That is where I learned the easy way to get off the thorns and prickles.
I got a laugh one day watching a turtle picking and eating the fruit off our little eastern variety. Yeah, I know. I’m easily amused. But, I never knew turtles had such long necks. Prickly pears here may not play the role in nature they do out west, but the animals still use them.
If you want to check it for potential article fodder, I think the easiest way to get an overview of the cactus moth problem is the Wikipedia entry on the critter. Its official name is Cactoblastis cactorum. Wiki goes into the North American invasion. I think it is an ongoing problem in the south. Kay says the cold will protect the eastern prickly pear in more northern places. Hope she is right. I believe that is just her opinion though. (Jim)

cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2011
2:51 AM

Post #8884265

Jim, Well I'm glad to hear you are a nature observer.I thinK it's sad how unobservent most of us are anymore.Course have to admit a good deal of my observing is just watching for snakes. UGH!!!!
Will keep an eye out for the cactus moth.
The rain has put a stop to my cooking out.Guess I'll have to concentrate on baking goodies.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Milton, MA
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2011
11:44 AM

Post #8884848

Thanks, Jim!
cando1
Ozone, AR
(Zone 6a)

November 15, 2011
11:50 PM

Post #8892265

I've been cleaning my kitchen, so I CAN cook. Should never have taken microbiology. LOL Also the living room so i can put my tree up. If it sounds like I'm a very clean person I definately am not.I just let things go and suddenly wake up and realize I'm in a pigpen.
Whats everyone doing for Thanksgiving? We'll go to DD,s and have turkey and venison and the trimmings. I wish we could go get my Texas DD. But Money is just too tight. We're also having dinner for group. I am decorating the tables. Love doing stuff like that.
Am also crocheting a lot. Which is good cause that is a sitting down job.
lovemyhouse
(Debra) Garland, TX

November 16, 2011
10:45 AM

Post #8892823

Three of my sister's four grandkids are going to be gone. She is thinking about coming to my house with the 15 year old (who wants to be a chef). We will make Cornish hens and such. Or she might decide to just stay home and play computer bingo. :-) I have yard work if weather is good.
Amargia
SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL
(Zone 8b)

November 18, 2011
9:53 PM

Post #8896436

Open house on Thanksgiving. Nadine has been trying out potential dishes on Jim and I. We have been eating very well, but I'm certainly glad Jim hasn't replaced the batteries in the bathroom scale yet. :-) Today it was a different verson of Pink Fluffy Salad that used cottage cheese instead of the sweetened condensed milk we usually use. Jim and I loved it, but we have a cottage cheese hater among the guest. I think Nadi is setting her sites a bit high if she thinks she can please everyone with every dish, but she is sure trying. What kind of goodies have you been making, Vickie? I'm looking forward to the quieter Christmas Day dinner. When we don't have kids around, everything is make ahead and it is a total sofa spud day.
I started the new thread Nadine has been so occupied. Hope I got it right. k*
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1230532/

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