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need two most compact but spectacular hydrangeas

(Zone 4b)

luis et al I need your advice:

I made a grievous error and planted two "Annabelle" in the small garden shown below

I will replace these 2 Annabelles with I am hoping are two other hydrangeas. Of course these replacement 'drangeas must be much more compact (4 feet tall max and more importantly of minimal width). They must not flop, have spectacular flowers and able to flourish in a location which is under a roof eave and face north....so not much direct sun.

I know of "Little Lime" (I did plant one of these in early August in another location so it is much too soon for me to say how nice this plant is or may be)..

And I have heard that "White Diamonds" is also compact.

What do you all think?

(Zone 4b)

I am not sure why the picture did not appear in the post as I saw it in the preview. Here it is....I hope:

Thumbnail by rouge21
Hurst, TX(Zone 7b)

After seeing the picture and your seating area, I would recommend a shorter shrub because it seems even a 4 feet plant may be too tall and would not let you see towards the front of the house. These would be the tallest ones that I would consider for Zone 3: Bombshell and Little Lime. Or some daylilies or rhododendrons.

(Zone 4b)

Thanks for the input "luis" but I did do some measuring and 4 feet high will not be an issue in this location.

And as we are zone 5b *and* given that the spot is close to the house *and* partly under the roof eave there will be no issue re the survival of most any hydrangea that is listed as zone 5 or maybe even zone 6!

Hurst, TX(Zone 7b)

Then consider the compact paniculatas Bombshell and Little Lime; the compact oakleafs Sikes Dwarf , Munchkin and Ruby Slippers; serratas like Beni Gaku, Blue Billow, Blue Bird, Diadem, Miyama Yae Murasaki; H. arborescens Ryan Gainey; and compact macrophyllas like Pia (sometimes called Pink Dwarf), the Cityline Series' Paris or the Let's Dance Series Moonlight.

(Zone 4b)

Thanks Luis for your help. I will keep my eye out in spring 2012 for some of these varieties.

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