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Vegetable Gardening: Starting FALL GARDENS 2011 in Zone 8 - Part 2

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2011
10:30 AM

Post #8837080

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1206730/#new

Old thread getting too long!

Are you challenged with not knowing WHEN to sow or plant your veggies? Well, this is the place for the veggie growers who already know what they'd like to plant for their 2011 Fall/Winter veggie gardens, but don't exactly have the sowing/planting timeframes down!

If you are a veggie grower who's putting your fall/winter garden down NOW, and you have the sowing/planting time frames down to a fine science, please share with us who desperately want to learn from you! Help us by posting WHEN you're doing the next thing toward growing your fall/winter veggies. We're not asking for a minute, day-by-day report, but if you could update us within say a week of each progress activity, we'd only be a week behind you!

Your tutilage would be so appreciated. We look forward to learning from and growing along with you in this Fall/Winter 2011 veggie season!

^^_^^

This message was edited Oct 5, 2011 1:06 PM

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2011
10:36 AM

Post #8837092

To date, the cabbages, cauliflowers, broccoli and Brussels Sprouts that have been outside for about 3 weeks have exhibited very slow growth, while the seedlings remaining inside are getting crazy huge in the cool.

It's a heat issue still going on, and nothing I do is going to change that...

Patience is the only remedy I have right now. So far, have 25 free-draining buckets planted, and am about to construct my very first RAISED BED, finally!

I'm considering pulling the bucket plants again, when the bed is built, and putting them all in there...

Linda
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 5, 2011
11:26 AM

Post #8837151

Congratulations on your upcoming raised bed Linda! Sorry I've lost track of the thread - went out of town, yada.

I am picking beans, beans, and more beans. I seem to have timed my fall bean plantings right this year - put most seed in the ground the third week of August and I have beautiful beans growning - rattlesnakes (pole green snap), fagiolo (gold roma type), hildas (romano), rocdor (yellow bush), bountiful (green bush that thinks it's a runner), provider (green bush), winged beans (wierd bean), and the kentucky wonders I planted way back in April are now producing beans. Also, the limas and black jungle butter beans are growing along. I've been harvesting lots of beans, have nearly filled my freezer.

I planted arugula starts in a half-shady spot in mid August and they're growing along with radicchio. The lettuce and chard are dragging their feet - not sure what's up with them. Peppers are still growing strong and the tomatoes are putting out new fruit, but it's kind of pitiful looking. I think I'll be pulling them this weekend.

A second round of new tomato plants are finally growing - I hope to have some Nov. Cherokee Purples. Cross your fingers! Broc and cabbage are all growing nicely - have to confess that some are from the store - I grew plants, but then they got a bit too leggy. We'll see if the ones I planted produce at all. The carrots and beets are small sprouts - they are still not liking the heat here despite cool nights.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2011
12:52 PM

Post #8837219

Cindy,
Could you post a pic of your "bean" patch, so I can get an idea of how much space they take up? My fence finally is up, and I'm putting the press on to put growing areas into place.

Hugs!

Linda

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JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 5, 2011
5:12 PM

Post #8837526

Linda, are you going to have your beds go right up against the fence? I would advise against it for the simple reason the plants growing too close to the solid fence will be short on both air circulation and sunlight. After having mine that way for 1 year I brought it out and put a 15" space between the soil and the fence- much better this year. You have probably seen my posts showing the walkway behind the beds.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2011
7:46 PM

Post #8837703

No, Joe.
Straight ahead of the tree (toward the top of my pic) is south. The first of two parallel 3x10' beds will run N-S, and sit 3' from the west fence and 14' from that south fence.

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

October 5, 2011
8:08 PM

Post #8837720

Hey, Linda. They need to redo your fence. You forgot to tell them to put the pretty side facing IN. hahaha--just messin' with ya! Your raised bed plans sound great. 3' is a good width--you can reach everything from either side. My first bed is 4' and is a bit harder to reach things in the middle.
As for my winter garden. It does not exist. Unfortunately, I am having major back problems now. Had an MRI and Xray today and need another MRI with contrast tomorrow--NOT GOOD. May have a herniated or bulging disc and I have the pain to go with it.
The good news it that my okra, some eggplant, cucs and peppers are still producing! I'm cooking them (except the cucs) right now, along with bacon, onion, garlic, celery, a bit of green onion. Smells divine!
Cindy, I'd love to try some of those interesting beans you're growing. They sound yummy! I want to see a pic too.
Good luck with the veggie growing. Don't despair if things are slow right now. Every year when I plant in Oct., the beets take till the spring to get going (forEVER). The turnips do great as well as chard, kale, leaf lettuces, snow peas and arugula. That's what I usually plant. I have even more seeds this year but I'll have to see if anything gets in the ground... Janet
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 5, 2011
9:56 PM

Post #8837824

linda, sounds real good- They will be beautiful gardens!
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
7:59 AM

Post #8838196

I have pix! I had to harvest beans this morning, so decided to do a bit of "bean art" with them. The photo is taken in the garden (too bright will try again later) on top of my "work table" which is a kludgy thing made of cinder blocks, a metal bird cage panel and some leftover ceramic tiles. But it works to show off the beans. The lineup:

Bountiful - a bush type, they are small beans, but very productive. Not well behaved tho, they climb any and everything.
Hilda - a pole Romano - my favorite for taste and easy growing. This bean keeps going through the heat and even produces in very early season for me. I have plants I started in March still producing.
Fagiolo - a yellow pole Romano - not as tasty as Hilda, but quite good and pretty. They don't like it hot tho. Spring planted beans never grew until this fall. New plants from August planting are producing sooner than May planting.
Provider - good bush green snap. Tasty and very determined to grow. Still not fond of our hot summer tho.
Black Jungle Butterbeans - Received these from Harry, a gardener in Texas. They're apparently a rare butterbean and lots of folks on GW are growing because of his generosity. Very long season. They don't like it super hot in my garden - perhaps due to raised beds and insufficient rain. But they're producing now. Tasty - but the lima wins the taste test.
Lima? - I think this is Henderson, can't find my seed packet, but will search. Bush Lima that seems to be the favorite of nasty aphids and ants. But the beans are tasty. Still searching for a better lima.
Pinkeye Purple Hull - A cowpea that did much better than my CA Black Eyed pea. Superior in taste. But they are not good eaten as "snaps" the BE'd peas were much better for that.
Rattlesnake - A pole snap bean that is probably our favorite. Easy to grow, reasonably heat tolerant, produces lots of beans when it's happy, they lose their purple streaks when cooked. Much easier to find for picking due to the streaks.
Rocdor - My all time favorite yellow wax bean. It's a bush which makes it a hassle to pick, but it's vigorous, very tender and tasty even when a bit mature. I wish these came in a pole variety.

I'll post some garden bed photos next. :)

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Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
8:16 AM

Post #8838219

For Linda - these are bean plot photos. Keep in mind that I am not as orderly as I should be! I garden like I cook, start with a plan, then edit, tweak, add along the way and it becomes interesting! It also causes problems like having to stand in your raised bed to harvest the beans because I didn't think through the plan of putting the limas in front of the poles...

This photo shows DH picking beans - bush beans are limas. The poles that he is picking are Rattlesnake beans - our best producer. The fence that all are growing on will be abolished next year - it is not tall enough (only about 5 feet nylon) and it's been collapsing through the season. The beans flop over and grow, but they do better on a really tall trellis. In the foreground right is the Black Jungle Butterbeans trellis - a cattle panel bent into an arch and set into the raised bed. A better pix of that to follow...

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Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
8:22 AM

Post #8838229

This is a wide shot of the garden (this morning). On the left is the bean bed shown in the previous photo. The "kudzu" effect on the left is the Black Jungle Butterbeans. They are also on another trellis in the center of the garden. Photos in the early Oct. light are a challenge! The main bean bed on the left is ~28 feet long and 4 feet wide. The jungly beans in the left foreground are limas. On the right next to the flamingo are 5 foot tall eggplants.

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Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
8:27 AM

Post #8838235

This is a shot of the center bed (mentioned above in the center of the wide view). I planted these beans in August (after ripping out my bug-ravaged cukes) and they are producing well now. There's BJBBs on the back side of the trellis (two pieces of a completely rusted out tomato cage that was cut in half and twist tied at the top to make an upside down "V". It's supported by some hunks of bamboo - the beans don't mind that it's ugly). There are Rattlesnake beans on the front of the trellis. I planted some of my fall brassicas and lettuce under the trellis to give them a bit of shade. The red flowers are salvia.

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Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
8:30 AM

Post #8838239

And here's some late bush beans - these are Provider, Rocdor, and Bountiful. This was taken in mid Sept in my first cinder block bed. They are about 3 weeks old in that photo - I think I may have added too much nitrogen in the fertilizer that I used, the leaves are huge. This bed is producing nicely now - been picking beans for about 2 weeks.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 6, 2011
8:57 AM

Post #8838266

Janet,
Several good friends advised me to install the fence "inside out," for security purposes. Anyone who really wants in will get in, but, at least they won't have the rails to help them scale it. By the time it came to installing it, I was so anxious for my fence to just be UP, I'd have let them install it "any which way" they wanted to!

And, I'm really glad I did it this way, this time. There are endless possibilities for utilizing the rails to hang garden art, and other useful, neat stuff!

Cindy_GA
You have got it going on! I would blow that bean grid pic into a poster at Sam's/Costco, shellac and/or seal it somehow, and use it as garden art! It is a beautiful photo you took! Cudos on the growing and the photo-ing!

I love how you've used bricks in your garden. I bought 55 cinder blocks to build my raised beds, but since I've seen how nice my fence turned out, I'm feeling a different direction. I'm a conflicted designer. I think my true style is eclectic/can't-make-up-my-mind. Now, I'm feeling like a New Orleans, courtyard-y, whimsical feel. Which means lots of bricks: cobblestones/brick pavers, wrought iron, lanterns, etc.

Pray I make a move soon, 'cause those Late Dutch Flat cabbages seedlings inside have leaves as big as African Violets, and they need to go into the ground, YESTERDAY!!!

Keep posting your forward progress here, 'cause this is where the folks who are starting fall gardens are sharing information. Again, great stuff you posted. Thanks a bunch!

Linda

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
12:55 PM

Post #8838489

Cindy_GA thanks so much for sharing pictures of yoru amazing garden.
You are doing a great job. Thanks
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 6, 2011
2:23 PM

Post #8838595

Linda - Thank you! I love that idea of the bean photo as a poster. Then my family will really think I'm around the bend. LOL! I would love to put it in the garden tho - have a huge back of shed to cover with something.

The bricks are excellent. I bought two 16x4 beds worth of cinder blocks - a lot. And they were so expensive. Then I lucked into finding a Craigs List ad for the red bricks - they are the size of a cinder block (most anyway) and cost me 50 cents a block. Had to load them myself (with DH) and get them here, but they are so interesting.

You fence is beautiful - in a previous life I had a fence like that at the back of my garden and loved it for the shady space it made right next to the beds and how I could trellis things on it. It's really exciting to watch you pull things together for your garden. I documented our digging, building, fencing, then expanding. Do that for you - you'll love to go back and look when you're feeling exhausted!

Dr_Thor - thank you for the nice words! I really love the garden - it's art for someone who doesn't have time to do regular "art". And I love your photos - so carefully documented - I wish I were as disciplined. :)
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 6, 2011
9:19 PM

Post #8839074

[quote="Gymgirl"]Janet,
Several good friends advised me to install the fence "inside out," for security purposes. {snip} There are endless possibilities for utilizing the rails to hang garden art, and other useful, neat stuff!
[/quote]

Trellises on standoffs! Vertical space rules!

-Rich

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 6, 2011
9:34 PM

Post #8839086

Rich, I just KNOW you're gonna show me how, right?
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 7, 2011
2:40 PM

Post #8839906

[quote="Gymgirl"]Rich, I just KNOW you're gonna show me how, right?[/quote]

It depends a lot on the budget.

Personally, I would buy some thick pieces of treated wood - lumber yards and home improvement centers often have "seconds" (excessively knotty, twisted or split lumber) that they sell for almost nothing. You can also find sections of preformed trellis sections in various lengths - nowadays mostly plastic, which seems to last a very long time. I would cut the lumber into short 3-4 inch sections, then pre-drill the lumber pieces and screw them into the fence at regular intervals - not critical, maybe 6-8 inches apart depending on the weight you expect to support. (The pre-drilling is to keep the pieces from splitting when you put the screws through). Then pre-drill and screw on the trellis pieces. Use deck screws to attach them - they're a little more expensive but will last a LOT longer outside. than anything else except stainless steel screws (which are a LOT more expensive). The stand-off pieces will make it easier to get *behind* the trellis pieces to clean or weed or retrieve fruit or flowers (or dropped tools ;o).

Well, that's the "quick and dirty" approach, minus the precise measurements. Use of a power drill/driver is recommended, and a circular saw (and knowledge of it's proper use) would certainly be helpful.

A less expensive short term approach would be to buy thin strips of lumber and use them (with screws or brads) to hold woven plastic netting in place. The modern plastic net material will last several seasons, especially if it is not in full sun all day. I use it for my snow peas in winter, then use the same net for yard-long pole beans in summer.

-Rich

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 7, 2011
7:42 PM

Post #8840308

Do you know how glad I am that, at the end of each of the 4 days of my new fence installation, after the workers left, I painstakingly collected most all of the various cut off pieces of the pressure-treated lumber, 6 blocks of 6x6, scores of 2x and 4xs of various lengths, and all the extra cedar pickets?

I doled out my Deckmate screws and collected the extra boxes before they tried to load them up.

I fired up my saw and drill Monday, beginning to build a cedar covered raised bed...

Thank you, Bubba_MoCity, for teaching me those surplus chunks of wood would be handy one day...

Thanks for the "down and dirty" Rich!
Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 8, 2011
3:31 PM

Post #8841069

This is from the other thread, but I want to be sure I reply to Podster. :-)

>>>>>Mindyrecycles wrote:Mary Washington asparagus. Started from seed, then I had it outside in a pot for many weeks and I finally transplanted all three. This is the only one that looks like it MIGHT survive this heat.

Mindy ~ tell me about germinating these seed please?

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Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 8, 2011
3:35 PM

Post #8841074

My reply went away, oops! I tried to say:

I started them under a grow light. They aren't the fastest sprouters but they came up as scheduled and did just fine until I put them in the ground. The jury is still out on their long-term survival.

I'm sure I have more seeds left than I could use, if you'd like a few.

The grow light is above; here are the asparagus seedlings. As you can see they make very cute babies.



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Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 8, 2011
4:04 PM

Post #8841113

Cindy -- wonderful! I pinned your green bean art on pinterest. LOL

Mindy
Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 8, 2011
4:08 PM

Post #8841119

Oh yes, as far as my fall garden progress...I'm harvesting cukes and beans so far. Tomatoes haven't flowered yet and I'm still too chicken to pick my biggest watermelon. My only real failure lately is that the black berry bush shriveled up in the heat and is now dead.

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 8, 2011
8:48 PM

Post #8841435

Thanks Mindy ~ I have the same seeds but didn't have a clue as where to start.
I do appreciate your assistance and offer of seed.
I just need to decide if I should start it now or later in spring... and where I am going to plant them.
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 9, 2011
6:06 AM

Post #8841737

Cindy your beans and other things look great! Thanks for posting the pics. I'm also very glad you posted your comments on what performed well for you. I definitely want to try that bush wax bean.
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 9, 2011
8:31 AM

Post #8841927

Mindy and LiseP - thank you for the nice words! I am so in love with my beans... But after picking another 3 and a half pounds this morning, I'm getting really overwhelmed with beans. Trying to find someone to come take some! I'm out of freezer space! LOL!

Mindy - what is the purple bean? That is beautiful!
Mindyrecycles
Tucson, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 10, 2011
1:34 PM

Post #8843720

Thanks Cindy, it's Royal Burgundy. It is definitely beautiful on the bush but upon cooking it turns green.

http://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.2234546710185.2133060.1443475978&l=7ff203096e&type=1

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 19, 2011
8:56 PM

Post #8856545

Here's my fall-wtr veggie garden update. This is one-half of my free-draining bucket garden. There are broccolis, Brussels sprouts, and cabbages.

I still have to plant out some cauliflower plants I cut back to only one leaf each. They took a beating in a rainstorm after I had just set the community tray out to start hardening them off.

Then they sat in the flooded tray til I rescued them and attempted to untangle and pot them up. A total mess! And, they looked horrible. I managed to save 30 plants from that tray.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 19, 2011
9:01 PM

Post #8856556

Here are the pitiful cauliflowers after the storm.

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LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 20, 2011
7:27 AM

Post #8856909

Poor cauliflowers! And a downer for you, after you've put such loving care into them. But hey, the rest of your bucket garden plants look fabulous.
I'm headed out of town for 4 days -- hoping hubby will water my newly planted beds and a few other things. If not, I get a re-do on Monday. I'm glad temps have cooled, it will help keep my garden hydrated and happy.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 20, 2011
8:07 AM

Post #8856969

Uh, LiseP, by the time you get back, I'll have posted the REST of the drowned cauliflowers story!

Stay tuned!

P.S. Have a great time! ^^_^^
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 25, 2011
10:24 AM

Post #8863147

Thanks, Linda, I'm back now and I did have an awesome time. So what happened to your cauliflowers?

Me, I was happy to see that hubby did a fine job on the garden in my absence and left the picking for me, so I came back to two large zucchini, a handful of beans and radishes and a little leafy stuff. And, the seeds in the new boxes are now sprouting. Seems I should go away more often, lol.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 25, 2011
7:57 PM

Post #8863846

LiseP,
Out of the approximately 30 cauliflowers I managed to rescue from the drowned tray, I gave 8 away. These are the 8 I kept for myself.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 25, 2011
8:09 PM

Post #8863855

Here are 7 more I'm nursing along under lights. There are about 4 still in that tray that need to be potted up. Therein lies the challenge. Will continue updates on those.

Linda

This message was edited Oct 26, 2011 9:04 AM

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 25, 2011
9:10 PM

Post #8863939

Oops! Those are the same set of seedlings. Here are the other 7 refugees.

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 26, 2011
7:03 AM

Post #8864271

And, here are the ones left in the tray. They refuse to die!

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 26, 2011
7:16 AM

Post #8864282

Here's a one-week growth comparison. This pic is the same as in this post (7 days later):
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=8856545

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LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

October 26, 2011
7:22 AM

Post #8864289

My goodness. You know, I have a couple cauliflowers in buckets too, but they don't look as healthy as yours. I'm thinking mine need some more fertilizer. Yours look great!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 26, 2011
9:21 AM

Post #8864422

LiseP,
The bottom-most row #1 is three Arcadia Broccoli.
Row #2, (L-R) is: a Brussels Sprout, and 2 cabbages.
Row #3 is more cabbages
Row #4 is (L-R) 2 okra drying out, and a cabbage
The top-most row #5 (orange buckets out of view) are three Calabrese broccoli

I haven't planted out any cauliflowers yet. They're still in the cups and the drowned tray!

That's the weekend goal...

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 30, 2011
1:00 PM

Post #8869369

Ouch ... I posted lots of pictures on the previous thread .. go have a look:http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1206730/#new
I will post on part #2 from now on ... sorry
below is a picture of my fist Broccoli head forming

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

October 30, 2011
5:39 PM

Post #8869680

Here're some pic updates.

Arcadia Broccoli.

This message was edited Oct 30, 2011 7:55 PM

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LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 1, 2011
6:33 PM

Post #8872597

Oh, sorry, misunderstood what I was looking at. All the broc looks beautiful, Linda (and drthor!). My plants are lagging, but gaining. My cauliflower are getting pretty big but they've got some holes. I sprayed BT today. Will try to remember to take a photo tomorrow.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 2, 2011
9:32 AM

Post #8873244

Well, I'm not doing much gardening this fall. I did get my garlic planted, though!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 2, 2011
11:26 AM

Post #8873362

LiseP,
I broke down Sunday and sprayed for wormies. I used Bayer Complete Spray in a 24 oz. bottle, and, when I ran out of that I mixed up some Garden Dust into a liquid form and sprayed it on. One benefit of the buckets is portability, so I moved the two most-chewed-on plants out and away from the general population. That way, I can continue to ferret out that worm, without him crawling from plant to plant!

"I'll get you yet, you Wiley Worm!"

Girl, you have got to see those cauliflowers I saved! They've made me realize I should've continued to start seedlings for the veggie growers who didn't realize what they could grow in the fall/winter. Next year, I think I'll continue with my idea of selling seedlings at the Farmer's Market. I probably would 'a made a killing!

This weekend, God sparing, I hope to sow lettuce and carrot seeds.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 2, 2011
2:47 PM

Post #8873570

Is Bayer Complete for edibles or am I thinking of something else?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 2, 2011
5:16 PM

Post #8873773

Hi!

I just found this thread. It might snow tomorrow, but I have planted most of my fall-winter garden; broccoli, cabbage, garlic, various kinds of lettuce and spinach. I have yet to plant/sow the following: peas, carrots, onions, swiss chard and beets. If there is a hard freeze, I will put the row cover on as they are planted in 4'X4' Square Foot Gardens.

Good luck everyone. I am pulling out the rest of tomatoes today as they won't be good tomorrow. There were a lot of green tomatoes as it has been a very cold spring and they did not start growing for quite some time. Then it turned hot, well not as hot as you have it there in Texas, but in the 80's for most days. Now it has cooled off considerably so the remainder of the tomatoes will have to ripen indoors. So the tomato crops did worse than the previous year.

Does anyone here grow potatoes in the fall, or just in the spring? I am thinking of putting in a few, but they like warm weather, and we won't be getting any 'til probably next June. (Maybe May...) This year it hailed on June 1st! But there were a few warm days before that.

Here are some Sun Golds...

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2011
12:43 PM

Post #8881745

I have harvested my first BROCCOLI today.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2011
12:44 PM

Post #8881746

Also, everyday I harvest a bucket of greens

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 8, 2011
1:47 PM

Post #8881831

Very nice greens, Drthor. Yah done good!
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2011
9:25 AM

Post #8882980

Woohoo! Dr. Thor! Love that broccoli! And the greens!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2011
7:24 PM

Post #8890611

I am in Hilo - Hawaii ...
Looking forward to come home to lots of more broccoli ... but having lots of fun here too ...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 14, 2011
7:48 PM

Post #8890638

Here's my stuff.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 19, 2011
1:19 PM

Post #8897215

Beautiful, Linda! Your hard work really shows!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2011
7:33 AM

Post #8902566

I apparently am growing potatoes.

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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 23, 2011
9:54 AM

Post #8902711

Woo-hoo! I finally found a local business that delivers composted wood waste at a reasonable price. This morning there are 15 cubic yards of beautiful very dark brown crumbly material sitting on a tarp in the gravel parking area next to my driveway - enough to experiment with some of the no-till techniques I've been aching (literally, from tilling) to try for years. Now I just have to scrounge up some more newspaper and corrugated cardboard to lay down for the foundation layer. Not a moment too soon - the first onion plants have arrived and are telling me they want to be in the ground, and my own transplants are almost ready to set out.

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8902854

Isn't it funny what gardeners have to be Thankful for. One year I asked for dirt for my birthday, my kids thought I was nuts.

Stephanie, since you haven't had time to garden you sure have been growing a lot of stuff. Lol
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

November 23, 2011
1:26 PM

Post #8903019

Me, too, stephanietx! Is all the green in the photo potatoes? If so, you may be growing a few. I've just got one potato plant, but it's one more than I planted, lol. I don't know if it has a prayer of making it through the winter though. Comments, anyone?

Linda, your hoop house is FULL of garden goodness. How nice! My plans for the hoop houses are put on a week's hold due to family comings and goings. Just hope the weather continues to cooperate.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8903102

Lise, the rest of the green stuff in the pic are weeds! LOL

Lisa, I guess when I harvested potatoes the last time I missed a few! I have a total of 3 potato plants. I have no idea if they'll survive a freeze but I'll let them be until it either freezes and dies or it's time to harvest.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 23, 2011
2:30 PM

Post #8903104

Hey, Ya'll!

Happy Thanksgiving to all!

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 23, 2011
2:32 PM

Post #8903108

[quote="Gymgirl"]Hey, Ya'll!

Happy Thanksgiving to all![/quote]

You to and to everyone else! I have a lot to feel blessed for this year.

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2011
4:43 PM

Post #8903322

Stephanie-the top will freeze and die back but since they're tubers they should grow back.

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

November 24, 2011
9:10 PM

Post #8904558

Stephanie, that's the best way to garden! At my SIL's house today, she had a "weed" in a pot and I told her it is a beautiful kale plant!
I'd love to try potatoes one day. They are SO MUCH BETTER when fresh and organic.
Hope you all had a blessed Thanksgiving today. I am thankful for all of you!! Janet

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8904998

I am back in town after being gone for two weeks and more.
Here what is happening in my fall garden:
I have lots of BROCCOLI HEADS ready (some bolted)

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:47 AM

Post #8904999

CAULIFLOWER is starting to form (this is maybe 4" diameter)

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:49 AM

Post #8905001

Lots of LETTUCE GREENS

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:50 AM

Post #8905003

from the bottom:
KOHLRABI
FAVA BEANS
CAULIFLOWERS

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:50 AM

Post #8905005

KALES, which I did harvest down to the ground two weeks ago and it grew so fast

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:51 AM

Post #8905006

PARTHENON ZUCCHINI is still producing fruit

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:52 AM

Post #8905007

ZUCCHINI TROMBETTA also producing moster fruits !! ahhh
This must be 5 lbs heavy

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:53 AM

Post #8905009

SWISS CHARD growing around my flower beds

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
8:54 AM

Post #8905013

ARUGULA is growing between my Lycoris

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evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 25, 2011
10:14 AM

Post #8905093

Wonderfull veggies, drthor!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 25, 2011
11:33 PM

Post #8906067

I see BOTH threads have now turned into pretty pictures...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

November 26, 2011
7:58 AM

Post #8906305

Uh, yeah, RJ.
I was hoping for shared details on:
>specific veggie types growing,
>sowing/planting and fertilizing,
>growing observations,
>weather related protection ideas,
>Pesticide/miticide/fungicides, with an accompanying pic or two,
and far less "show and tell" pics on this thread...

Those go on the thread dedicated to "show and tell"...

Hang in there. I have quite a few observations I've made this season. Will post soonest!

Linda

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2011
2:13 PM

Post #8906744

rjogden
thanks for your nice comments.
You can view all the information on when I started my seeds, growing observation, varieties at the beginning of this thread - just for ZONE 8 (like the title of this forum)
You need to go to part 1 to see the beginning.
As far as pesticide .. bla bla ... and fertilizing I use none on my greens ... so yes I have holes ...
I just apply a layer of Cottonburr compost when I change the beds and I plant by the "moon calendar by Maria Thun"

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 26, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8906912

Surprise !!
I found 3 tomato plants on the opposite side of my vegetable garden and growing in the shade.
This morning I just realized that the plant has tomatoes !!
I didn't plant them ... funny ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

November 29, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8910688

>> One year I asked for dirt for my birthday, my kids thought I was nuts.

I had 4 yards of topsoil delived, and the guy came to the door to pick up the check. Just to tease me and give the driver something to laugh about after he got away from the door, my SO put on a horrified face and dismayed voice :
"You piad $100 for DIRT!!!???!!! What were you THINKING???!!!???"

We both figured the driver got a good laugh with his buddies about how much trouble I must be in.

But she was only 20% serious.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:49 AM

Post #8924854

My fall garden is going beautiful. I love this time of the year.
I have put my PVC pipes inplace, just in case I will need to cover my vegetables, so far I didn't cover them yet.
On the bottom right you can see Broccoli.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:50 AM

Post #8924856

Swiss Chard is growing fantastic.
In my opinio Swiss Chard is the best steamed gren leaf I grow ... yummy ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:51 AM

Post #8924858

Cauliflower heads are starting to form.
This is Snowball about 6" ... I hope it will be ready for Christmas

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:52 AM

Post #8924861

Fava Beans are also growing strong. I keep pinching the tips to use in salads.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:54 AM

Post #8924863

Kohlrabi are just 1" at the base.
They love the cold. I discovered this vegetable when I went to Norway, where it is very popular in all their dishes.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8924864

Kales keep growing no stop.
On the left "Lacinato Toscano Kale" and on the top "Curled Kale Vates" (my favorite)

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:57 AM

Post #8924869

The FENNEL I started from seeds in September is slowly growing.
This is a mistery vegetable to grow to me.
It doesn't like the heat ... but last year it got killed in february ... like everything else ... so I am giving another try.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
7:58 AM

Post #8924871

The bulb is forming

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
8:06 AM

Post #8924891

Today (FLOWER DAY by Maria Thun moon calendar) I am going to start some ARTICHOKES from seeds, to put out in the spring.
If I am growing CARDON I think I can also grow ARTICHOKES (which I luuuv)
malorymug
Burleson, TX

December 11, 2011
8:39 AM

Post #8924974

Drthor, thank you so much for posting pictures of your wonderful garden. I just moved to Burleson TX a month ago from San Diego CA and I'm itching to get gardening. This was always my favorite time to garden and with the cold weather I was losing hope that I could do it out here.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 11, 2011
11:14 AM

Post #8925159

Welcome to TX malorymug.
Yes you can grow all year around in Dallas
I love it !!

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 16, 2011
5:13 PM

Post #8932547

I see you like broccoli, kale and chard. Have you ever tried "Gai Lan", which is a leafy Asian leaf-broccoli / kale Brassica? Gai Lan and Bok Choy both have leaves like chard but, to my taste, sweeter and tender enough for salad.

Or the Italian heirloom Spigariello Liscia, Broccolo Spigariello, Brassica oleracea var. 'Spigariello'? This one is hardy down to 25F, once you have the seedlings established. And I've seen it do that in my garden: keeps growing after the snow melts off!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 16, 2011
6:25 PM

Post #8932606

Yes I am growing Gai Lan or Chinese kale and I love them very much. Actually they just finished a few weeks ago.
Spigariello Liscia is broccoli raab ... puhh puhh puhh .. OMG too spicy ... I have tried and it made my mouth burst in flame .. yuk ... not my taste .. yuk ...

But thanks for the suggestion.

My really favorite kales are the KALE VATES .. they are just very tasty and very hardy.

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 17, 2011
3:15 PM

Post #8933416

I'm growing bok choy for the first time and it is going to town! A great grower. I thinned them the other day and plan to just chop and saute in a little olive oil and garlic. Mmm mmm good! I also have a mixture of greens, including kale which I love, growing like crazy too. Gotta thin those also. Think I'll add them to the bok choy saute...

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
1:44 PM

Post #8934527

Today I have noticed that the Brussel Sprouts are starting to form.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
1:45 PM

Post #8934528

Lots of deliscious lettuce

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
1:45 PM

Post #8934529

and Kale Curled Vates (my favorite)

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
1:46 PM

Post #8934530

Fava Beans are growing wonderful too. At this time of the year I am harvesting the tender tips.

Thumbnail by drthor
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RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 19, 2011
4:43 PM

Post #8936101

>> Spigariello Liscia is broccoli raab ... puhh puhh puhh .. OMG too spicy ... I have tried and it made my mouth burst in flame .. yuk ... not my taste .. yuk ...

Wow, sometimes I felt that way about Gai Lan that grew under odd conditions, or Komatsuna ("Spinach Mustard"). That was the first year I grew them (last spring)

But the Spigariello Liscia I got from Hazzards was not at all mustardy or hot. Maybe strongly flavored, like "brocolli but darker" but not hot or zingy. In my case, maybe I grew the Spigariello under more favorable conditions (cooler? wetter? cloudier?).

Or maybe we have different varieties. This Broccolo Spigariello is the only kind of leaf broccoli or broccoli raab or rapini I've ever tried.



rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

December 19, 2011
9:15 PM

Post #8936477

[quote="RickCorey_WA"] the Spigariello Liscia I got from Hazzards was not at all mustardy or hot. Maybe strongly flavored, like "brocolli but darker" but not hot or zingy. In my case, maybe I grew the Spigariello under more favorable conditions (cooler? wetter? cloudier?).

Or maybe we have different varieties.[/quote]

I would put my money on different growing conditions. Cooler, wetter and cloudier seems to sum it up nicely, especially cooler, though consistently moist soil would also help.

-Rich

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 22, 2011
5:11 PM

Post #8939751

Sounds logicazl to me - we SPECIALIZE in cool, wet and cloudy.

Yet the "cloudy" part doesn;t have to be true for their whoel lifespan: we have a clear dry summer. I kept their soil moist because I was also trying to grow some semi-aquatic, sub-tropical "water spinach" a.k.a
Ipomoea aquatica
"Water Morning Glory"
"Water Convolvulus"
"Swamp Cabbage"
"Chinese Spinach"
Thai: "phakbung"
Indonesia: "kangkung" or Kang Kong
Mandarin: "kong syin tsai" = hollow heart vegetable

No way I could get thast past a few inches! Too cool and dry. Yet it is said to be invasive in sub-tropical wet areas.

I never got the Red Amaranth even to sprout. It was described as a hot-season crop, preferring well drained, light,
sandy, fertile soil. That makes 3-4 strikes against it in my garden!



evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 22, 2011
9:34 PM

Post #8940098

Corey ~ Have you tried to start the amaranth indoors? I think it likes warm conditions.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

December 23, 2011
9:49 AM

Post #8940535

[quote="RickCorey_WA"]
Yet the "cloudy" part doesn;t have to be true for their whoel lifespan: we have a clear dry summer. I kept their soil moist because I was also trying to grow some semi-aquatic, sub-tropical "water spinach" a.k.a Ipomoea aquatica

No way I could get thast past a few inches! Too cool and dry. Yet it is said to be invasive in sub-tropical wet areas.[/quote]

I got pieces of this from a local Asian market to root some years ago, but I haven't seen it for a while. I know it's not supposed to be sold for propagation down here - it has been said to get loose in the canals down south. Come to that, there are a LOT of perfectly good plants that are restricted throughout the entire state because of a very small area in the furthest south corner of the state that (almost) never freezes. The water convolvulus is pretty tender (first cousin to sweet potatoes that it is) and won't make it through the winter here in north Florida. It didn't have time to bloom here for me before frost cut it down, so I think its not invasive here in zone 8b.

I've read there are a number of varieties that can be broken down into two major types: one likes growing in water, and the other prefers damp soil. Any idea which yours was?

-Rich

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 23, 2011
11:32 AM

Post #8940632

It makes sense that, if they are invasivd anywhere on this continent, it would be in Southern Florida next to a stream!

>> two major types: one likes growing in water, and the other prefers damp soil.

No Idea, though he does mention "hydroponics".

http://ethaigrocer.ecrater.com/p/9641684/400-seeds-water-spinanch-glory-morning

400 Seeds Water Spinach
Or called it as Glory Morning

It's great for cooking. Just stir-fried in a hot chinese pot pan with a little vegetable oil, then you can eat.

Usage as A medicinal Uses:
Spinach is thought to be native to Southwest Asia and unknown to the Greeks and Romans. First cultivated by the Persians, it is now cultivated throughout the world, with the exception of the tropics. Although grown in China for centuries, it did not reach Europe until about 1100 CE after an introduction to Spain by the Moors. In the 16th century, it was still a novelty to Italy, but was becoming an established vegetable in Britain.

As with many foods, it began as a medicinal used for its mildly laxative effects, likely because of the oxalic acid. Although much lauded as a nutritional vegetable, spinach has a drawback in that, while containing high levels of iron and calcium, the rate of absorption is almost nil. The oxalic acid binds calcium into an insoluble salt (calcium oxalate), which cannot be absorbed by the body. The same applies to the iron, as it is bound, leaving only 2-5% of the seemingly plentiful supply actually available for absorption. The idea that spinach contained exceptional levels of iron originated in 1870 with Dr. E. von Wolf whose figures remained unchallenged until 1937, when it was discovered that the content was 1/10th the claim. The oversight resulted from a misplaced decimal point.

Extraordinarily high in vitamin C and rich in riboflavin, one cup of cooked spinach also contains a very high level of vitamin A, folate, magnesium, potassium, as well as vitamins E, B6, and thiamin. Like other leafy greens, spinach has a high water content meaning, that when it is cooked, it shrinks considerably. One pound of leaves can be reduced to about one cup of the cooked product. Since the iron in spinach is in soluble form, the water left from cooking will contain that element, as well as other water-soluble nutrients that should be used instead of thrown away. Despite its unusable iron and calcium content, it is still rich in other important minerals, proteins, and vitamins; and, of all the vegetable juices, spinach juice is said to be the most potent for the prevention of cancer cell formation. Research has shown that those who eat spinach daily are less likely to develop lung cancer. For those less inclined to value the spinach water, it is said to make good matchpaper. During the 18th and 19th centuries, spinach water was used as touchpaper for fireworks since paper soaked in it would smolder well.

Be great to plant for your back-yard garden or hydroponics.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

December 23, 2011
8:54 PM

Post #8941165

[quote="RickCorey_WA"]
>> two major types: one likes growing in water, and the other prefers damp soil.

No Idea, though he does mention "hydroponics".

http://ethaigrocer.ecrater.com/p/9641684/400-seeds-water-spinanch-glory-morning

400 Seeds Water Spinach
Or called it as Glory Morning

It's great for cooking. Just stir-fried in a hot chinese pot pan with a little vegetable oil, then you can eat.

Usage as A medicinal Uses: ...snip...[/quote]

Unfortunately, all of the information from "Usage" on is incorrect. It applies instead to "real" spinach (Spinacea oleracia), which is actually in the same family as amaranth, beets and Swiss chard. It is not true of water spinach, which is in the morning glory family. They have an entirely different chemistry.

It is true that spinach (S. oleracea) generally contains some potassium nitrate if it is well-fertilized, which is what causes the dried leaves to smoulder. I've even read cautions about feeding too much to young children. The oxalate content of spinach is generally higher in the heavily savoyed types then in the flat leaf spinach varieties. That may be detected as a lower "bite" to the taste, especially in the raw leaves.

But none of that has anything to do with water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica).

Incidentally, reportedly some varieties of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas) are used as a leafy vegetable, though I've never tried it. There is even at least one variety sold specifically to be grown for the leaves.

-Rich

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

December 24, 2011
1:54 PM

Post #8941747

Thanks, I didn't know any of that.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2011
7:54 AM

Post #8946462

Do y'all think this cauliflower is ready?

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2011
7:55 AM

Post #8946464

Everything is growing so well here: Fava Beans, Cauliflowers and Broccoli

Thumbnail by drthor
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evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2011
9:05 PM

Post #8947208

drthor ~ When did you start your seeds for your fall crops?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2011
7:01 AM

Post #8947464

evelyn_inthegarden
I have posted all the dates I started my seedlings on this post:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1206730/

I love Fall garden here in my zone 8.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2011
3:38 PM

Post #8948181

Good job, drthor!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:39 PM

Post #8964354

Cauliflower Snow Crown Self blanching

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:40 PM

Post #8964355

Cauliflower Violetto di Sicilia

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:42 PM

Post #8964357

This year I have lots of little broccoli shoots and not so many big heads ...
I planted a lot of "Waltham 29" broccoli ... maybe I got the wrong variety this year ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:42 PM

Post #8964358

My Brussels Sprouts are slowly forming

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:43 PM

Post #8964359

Still lots of yummy salad greens

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:44 PM

Post #8964361

My favorite is always SWISS CHARD.
This year I am growing on the edges of my regular flower garden.

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:45 PM

Post #8964362

KALES still growing strong.
I swear: I cut almost half of the entire plant to steam the leaves and it keeps growing and growing.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
9:46 PM

Post #8964363

My FAVA BEANS this year are just fantastic.
I hope no "Superbowl" crazy freeze this year

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #8964820

drthor ~ I take it that you started all of these plants in summer. I did not realize that they would do well in the heat of summer. That is my problem as I started all my fall veggies quite late, but so far, our winter has been mild. Still, they look nothing like yours. Did you cover them in summer?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2012
12:01 PM

Post #8964964

I started my fall garden in August indoor.
You can have a look at the dates I started and transpanted them out at the first part of this thread:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1206730/

I love to grow the fall garden veggies. So much easy and no problem with pests.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 12, 2012
12:28 PM

Post #8964989

I will have to do that this coming summer. If I can keep up with the weeding, as that is what I am usually doing. Possibly I may not have as many, as I have been able to do quite a bit during the unusual winter we have been having lately.

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 14, 2012
1:26 PM

Post #8967593

I started using the black fabric weed cover over my prepared soil and it has been fantastic at stopping 98% of the weeds! I highly recommend some type of physical weed blocker. I also put mulch over that. If I'm planting rows, I cut strips and tuck them into the edges of my bed, leaving gaps to fill in with the seeds. If I'm sticking transplants in, I just cover the whole bed, tuck it in on all sides and cut a big X to sink the plant in the ground. It has made gardening so much easier for me. I get the rolls at big box. And most of the time, I reuse them.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
2:48 PM

Post #8967683

What about when it rains?
With the plastic the water goes only on the section that has the plant, right?
or did you perforate the plastic?
I am creating this week a new bed ... weee and I was thinking to warm the soil using the red plastic that I bought for the tomatoes ...and never used

This message was edited Jan 14, 2012 5:45 PM

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #8967755

Kohlrabi getting bigger

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
3:47 PM

Post #8967757

Radicchio also growing and turning deep red

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #8967758

Cauliflower really turning Violetto

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #8967829

Today I found the TEXAS WORM RANCH lady at the Coppell Farmers market.
http://www.txwormranch.com/About_us.html

I bought one gallon of "just made" worm tea for $7.
I had to apply it to the garden on a 48 hours time ... or the organism on the tea will dye. I also had to keep the lid open of the jar for the same reason.

I have used worm casting before in my garden and they work like magic.
This worm tea is also suppose to work great.

I didn't mind spending the $7 to support a nice lady that try to do a good job for the enviroment, plus the worm tea was just made the day before and not shipped and stored in a retailer shelf.
Check her out on the website, but I think she comes to Coppell market once a month.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
6:10 PM

Post #8967952

Thanks for the worm info dr!

bariolio

bariolio
Houston, TX
(Zone 9a)

January 14, 2012
10:38 PM

Post #8968146

The weed cover is a type of fabric material, not plastic, so water gets through. Your plants are beautiful :)
This evening I cut various herbs to use for dinner. One of the parsley sprigs had a monarch chrysalis on it! We just put it back in the garden. So glad it didn't end up in our dinner!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
8:24 AM

Post #8968472

thanks
By the way PARSLEY is a hosting plant for the Black Swallowtail Butterfly.
Here is what the caterpillar should look like

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #8968475

and here is the butterfly Black Swallowtail
If you look close you can still see the cocoon on the left side.
It is very easy to take pictures of baby butterfly in the garden ... because they stay still to dry their wings

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #8982780

My fall garden is doing excellent this year.
I have not covered yet once to protect from the cold.
Here some beautiful lettuce.

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:44 AM

Post #8982781

Swiss chard growing in the regular flower bed, you can see all the daffodils in the back

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #8982782

Fennel is making the bulb and growing well

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:49 AM

Post #8982786

kales are producing no-stop

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #8982790

Brussel Sprouts and Fava Beans, which this year are just so beautiful.
I am eating the flowers and the tender shoots.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:51 AM

Post #8982791

Brussel Sprouts making nice little balls

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #8982793

Kohlrabi growing also, but still too small to harvest.

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:53 AM

Post #8982796

Cauliflower Purple of Sicily is ready to harvest

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #8982797

Fava Beans better picture

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #8982799

Lots of broccoli shoots after using the Worm Wine

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:56 AM

Post #8982801

This is my new vegetable garden ...almost finished.
I removed some shrubs that I really didn't need and create this beauty

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:57 AM

Post #8982804

The new bed seat in a "L" shape with the old vegetable garden.
I luuuvvv it !

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 26, 2012
9:48 AM

Post #8982941

Nice bed drthor! How deep and wide is it? And what did you fill it with? I notice you don't seem to have trouble with pillbugs or slugs, either.

Discovered yesterday that my yard is FILLED with pillbugs. Will break out the Sluggo Plus, real soon!!!

Linda

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #8983556

The new bed is 3'x20'
I bought 60 cbft of vegetable garden mix from our local garden store (www.nhg.com) + 5 bags of expanded shales.
This was the same soil I have used on my other beds and it works fantastic.

I did have a lot of problem with pillbugs in the past three years untill I found out that the reason was the compost I was using ...
I was using the Cottonburr Compost not the fine one, it had some chunk of cotton hulls ... and that's where the pill bugs were looking for ... and also my new shooting.

I solved the problem with the fine compost. duhhh

Pillbugs will always be there. I just plant more seeds for sacrificial purpose ... I don't believe in Sluggo or other chemicals, even if the label says "organic' ... that's why I grow my own vegetables ...

Good luck to you !

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #8990704

Parsley growing fantastic as a ground cover around my fountain ... isn't this beautiful ?

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:09 AM

Post #8990705

Arugula growing in between my flowers

Thumbnail by drthor
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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2012
9:11 AM

Post #8990708

Hmmmmmmmmm...Parsley as a ground cover...amazing! Great work, drthor!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #8990711

Brussels Sprouts

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:14 AM

Post #8990713

Radish

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #8990715

Cauliflower Purple of Sicily still coming up ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #8990717

Finally Broccoli Calabrese

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:17 AM

Post #8990718

By the way, I have used again the "WORM WINE" from Texas Worm Ranch and it really works great and it is hard to belive that just after 2 days I have millions of new shoots on my broccolis !!
You can find it at the Coppell farmer's market

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2012
9:18 AM

Post #8990719

I went ahead and starting ripping my BS, cause they just wouldn't stay tight. I planted in Tapla's famously wonderful pine bark fines container mix, which is just too loose for the BS.

Almost cut off my left index finger in the process...

But, I discovered an interesting thing cutting down those thick stalks. On the Broccoli stalks, if you chop them into manageable pieces about 3-4" long, and boil them for awhile, you can then cut off those woody outter stems and inside is pure Broccoli "meat". Almost like "Hearts of palm!" It reminds me of a mild squash. Would be great for a cassarole!

Linda

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:23 AM

Post #8990730

I agree. I sue the inside of the Broccoli stalks for soup.
This will be the last year that I am growing Brussels Sprouts.
I think they need cooler weather than I have, plus it takes too long and they produce just too little ...
I rather invest my space on something I can harvest more often ...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2012
9:59 AM

Post #8990765

Agreed. You'll have to send me your broccoli soup recipe. I'm a newbie at cooking!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
11:51 AM

Post #8990869

What I meant I use the broccoli stalks to make chicken or vegetable broth.
But here how to quickly make a broccoli soup:

Soffritto = 1 onion, 2 stalks of celery, 1 carrot = cut all in very small pieces = heat olive oil or lard (I love to use lard because I make my own with the pork fat from a farmer that doesn't use any bad stuff)
Sautee' vegetables
Add some sea salt (I don't use kosher)
If you want add a spring of rosemary (this herb is full of oil and it is perfect to use when you are sautee' your veggies and not later) - Sautee' untill translucent.
Add broccoli
Add some water to cover all the vegetable and if you want some chicken broth (I only use mine)
Add 1 bay leaf

Bring to a boil and reduce heat for maybe 1 hour.

I normally puree the soup at the end.

If you want you can add a 1/2 cup of milk or cream.

Add parsley, or thyme or green onion at the end and serve.

Note: i also love to add Swiss Chard leaves all chopped with the broccoli

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #8990901

Thanks, Drthor!

I will try this with the next batch of broccoli I cut down. I have about 10 broccoli plants still going, depending on the heat. Taking them down slowly, one by one.

Now, tell me about using the broccoli stalks to make the chicken/vegetable broth.

You know, I have a friend who recommended I could use my small hole drill to get the pulp from the broccoli stalk. If I cut it into short pieces, the drill would bore right down the middle and I'd have a chunk of the broccoli pulp without killing my hands or cutting off any fingers!

Also, I have to remember to buy a small hatchet to chop up those stalks!

Thanks!

I'm sending you a dmail...

Linda

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
5:22 PM

Post #8991270

to make chicken stoch.
add to cold water: one all non cooked chicken, one onion, one carot, 2 stalks of celery, one potato (do not cut any of these vegetables)
bring to a boil, add sea salt and one bay leaf ... lower to a simmer and cook for one hour or more.

That's all

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 1, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #8991289

Thanks!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:07 AM

Post #8996649

Lettuce is growing great.
I keep harvesting the outside leaves ... that's why it is always small in the picture.

I have not covered my veggie garden once this year

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #8996650

FENNEL is also growing well.
I have added lot of compost to hide the bulbs ... I have read that in this way the bulb will be sweeater ... I will let ya know

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #8996658

Kales

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:18 AM

Post #8996661

FAVA BEAVS ... I keep cutting them down because my DH tortoises really love them ... and they keep growing ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #8996663

Fava Beans flowers

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #8996666

I still have some CAULIFLOWERS to harvest ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #8996668

this BROCCOLO CALABRESE seems like it wants to bolt ...

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #8996670

KOHLRABI growing slowly.
I gave the bottom leaves to my DH pets ... I hope it will encourage the Kolrabi to grow faster

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 6, 2012
7:38 PM

Post #8997395

[quote="drthor"]KOHLRABI growing slowly.
I gave the bottom leaves to my DH pets ... I hope it will encourage the Kolrabi to grow faster[/quote]
Do you think so? The leaves are what create the actual "food" (energy compounds from photosynthesis) for the rest of the plant. In some vegetables (e.g. tomatoes), leaves and shoots are removed to redirect energy (stems can only bring up so much water & dissolved nutrients) or to open up the plant for ventilation and light penetration. I've never heard that about kohlrabi.

-Rich

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2012
6:30 AM

Post #8997725

oh oh ... I hope so.
I will let you know.

On my Broccoli I kept removing the bottom larger leaves to feed the tortoises and I had a millions of shootings.

I will keep posting

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 7, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #8997805

I have millions of broccoli shoots without removing any leaves.

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 7, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #8998582

[quote="drthor"]On my Broccoli I kept removing the bottom larger leaves to feed the tortoises and I had a millions of shootings.[/quote]

On broccoli, though, the parts we eat form at the actively growing and elongating tops, not at the base of the stem. Removing lower leaves allows more nutrients to be carried upwards - where we want them.

I am interested to know how they fare. I've only grown kohlrabi a couple of times, never having developed a liking for it. Maybe I just need some good recipes.

-Rich


drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:50 AM

Post #9007589

On the left you can see my veggie garedn (in between the rocks).
OMG this year everything is so lush.
Look at my LETTUCE, the first crop on the left ... wow

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:51 AM

Post #9007590

LETTUCE growing here

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:52 AM

Post #9007591

This year FAVA BEANS are just so beautiful and decorative.
Right now so many flowers, which they smell so good and they taste delish

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:54 AM

Post #9007594

CAULIFLOWER VERONICA

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:55 AM

Post #9007596

FAVA BEANS delish flowers

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9007598

These are Chicory and White Clover growing in my DH pets area.
I just trew the seeds ... and off course they are growig in poor soil ... grrrrrr
Sometimes my seeds will not germinate in my precious soil in my veggie garden ... go figure ...

Thumbnail by drthor
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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
9:53 AM

Post #9007672

Temps and light have to do with seed germination not soil quality. Thats why I had Swiss Chard germinating on the tile in my bathroom this summer. In paper towels in plastic bags, it was the coolest place I could find.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 15, 2012
11:11 AM

Post #9007739

That is pretty cool thinking, Lisa!
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #9007769

Pun intended?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 15, 2012
11:52 AM

Post #9007781

Yep.
LiseP
San Antonio, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 18, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9011138

Your fava beans and lettuce are lovely, drthor. I'm impressed at how closely planted they are.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 18, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9011301

Thanks
I am very excited about Fava Feans this year.
I have started them very early and they are doing fantastic.
You are missing out if you have never had Fava Beans ... delish !!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2012
8:34 AM

Post #9023224

Fava Bean pods are starting to form

Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #9023227

Arugula is bolting

Thumbnail by drthor
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Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2012
12:15 PM

Post #9025992

Your arugula photo looks like mine! 8-0

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
4:25 PM

Post #9028686

Look how gorgeous is this little Arugula bed !
All my friends are asking what flowers are those ...

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
6:02 PM

Post #9028827

Mine is also in bloom and I wonder how freely it will re-seed. Any thoughts?

Thumbnail by podster
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
6:33 PM

Post #9028849

yes it will reseed ... weeee
free food !
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
7:29 PM

Post #9028913

I know it will develop seed but I don't want it to stay in the same bed so will cut it back then. Thanks.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2012
7:37 AM

Post #9030599

Is anyone still stating their Fall 2011 Garden? ;o)

-Rich
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2012
8:09 AM

Post #9030630

Time for an updated thread?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #9030999

Maybe we should start a new thread for the new year that's open to all zones.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2012
1:41 PM

Post #9031098

I'll vote for that!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 5, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #9031298

There are at least four threads currently going, all with the same relative theme. I hate monitoring them all. Should've been only one from the start.

So, what're we calling the NEW new thread?
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2012
6:32 PM

Post #9031556

[quote="1lisac"]Maybe we should start a new thread for the new year that's open to all zones.[/quote]

I don't think anyone is specifically excluded for NOT being in zone 8, are they? And I think it's already been pretty well established that the actual growing season for all the areas of the country that are technically within zone 8 varies tremendously. Zones were, after all, intended primarily as a guide for woody plant hardiness, right?

That said, I appreciate the value of getting information that is applicable to local growing conditions. Hearing that people in Mn are still browsing their seed catalogs or what they are planning to plant is always interesting at some level of curiosity, but it just isn't generally very useful to me here in Florida.

I would even consider starting a separate group for Southeast US edible plant gardeners - but I'm afraid it would only attract a few people. IMHO I still think the best alternative is starting specific threads within the existing groups. That's the reason for having separate threads instead of one single long rambling thread, isn't it?

(Or maybe I'm just jealous reading the Summer 2012 thread about some Vt gardener's beautiful beefsteak tomatoes when I'm lucky

-Rich
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9031559

[quote="rjogden"]
(Or maybe I'm just jealous reading the Summer 2012 thread about some Vt gardener's beautiful beefsteak tomatoes when I'm lucky[/quote] to have a few lonely grape tomatoes that haven't split yet. ;o)


1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2012
7:13 PM

Post #9031597

In all the time I've been with DG we never had threads that said "only". I guess it's clear if you read the whole thread but if you read the title many people wouldn't even bother reading the whole thread. Tomatoes are pretty much grown the same no matter where you live, and the zone maps only say how cold an area gets not for how long or when. DG has done fine for years without titles that exclude individuals. If the zones are for "woody plants" then they don't pertain to veggies, anyway. There may be a regional forum for your area, I know there is one for Texas.

There is at least one DGer in MN that grows tomatoes on a huge scale, I'm sure he could share information even if he's not at that stage yet.

Linda's right tho there are other threads on this forum and the tomato forum
(others I'm sure) that are already going with 2012 so maybe we just need to start posting there. Linda, why do you have to monitor them?

The only thing I'm sure about is that I don't want another thread named zone-only.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2012
10:11 PM

Post #9031722

And around and around it goes!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
5:53 AM

Post #9031913

The lettuce I seeded in September is still going strong

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Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 6, 2012
10:00 AM

Post #9032158

1lisac,
The COMMON theme on all those threads seems to be the "2012 Growing Season," and what people are doing now. But, because the threads got split up with that "ONLY" designation, the conversations became fragmented all over the place...

I just don't want to miss any of the conversation, cause they're all relatively pertinent. They're just ALL OVER the place...

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
10:12 AM

Post #9032165

The Swiss Chard I seeded on the edges of my beds is fantastic and very decorative

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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 6, 2012
3:57 PM

Post #9032542

[quote="1lisac"]In all the time I've been with DG we never had threads that said "only". I guess it's clear if you read the whole thread but if you read the title many people wouldn't even bother reading the whole thread. Tomatoes are pretty much grown the same no matter where you live, and the zone maps only say how cold an area gets not for how long or when. DG has done fine for years without titles that exclude individuals.[/quote]
I'm not quite clear why you're getting so upset about this. I didn't start the "only" thread, but I can certainly understand why someone who wants specific information on when and how to start tomatoes in their zone might want to attract the attention of gardeners growing tomatoes in the same zone.

FWIW, tomatoes are NOT grown the same everywhere. The season for starting full-sized tomatoes for growing outdoors in the hotter areas of the Deep South is very limited (they don't tend to set in hot weather, and the ones that do are prone to a variety of physiological disorders). The prevalent pests and diseases are different, the soils are different, the available organic amendments are different, the variety selection is different...

And please correct me if I'm wrong, but AFAIK there is no way to exclude any member from any of the threads. I am "watching" several threads that mainly concern gardens in other areas or plants I can't grow outdoors here.

[quote="1lisac"]If the zones are for "woody plants" then they don't pertain to veggies, anyway. There may be a regional forum for your area, I know there is one for Texas.[/quote]

There is a Florida group, which is dominated by people interested in ornamentals that grow well in the warmer areas of the state, things that are unique to Florida. Asking questions about tomatoes there might get you one or two responses. It makes far more sense to start a specific thread on the "Tomato" or "Vegetable" groups to ask questions about tomatoes or vegetables.

[quote="1lisac"]There is at least one DGer in MN that grows tomatoes on a huge scale, I'm sure he could share information even if he's not at that stage yet.[/quote]

I certainly hope he does. All he would need to do is go to the Tomato group and start a new topic thread, something like "Large-scale Tomato Growing in MN". It's really very easy. And I would certainly check it out for any information I could apply here. I don't think they would kick you out of a thread on tomato growing in MN.

[quote="1lisac"]The only thing I'm sure about is that I don't want another thread named zone-only.[/quote]

I am still completely missing your point. Why would you mind if someone is looking for information appropriate to their growing conditions? Why restrict someone's right to ask specific questions?

-Rich

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9032551

Going back to fun gardening.
My fennel started in September is almost ready to harvest.
Finally I found the correct time of the year I can grow fennel ...

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9032552

Broccoli keeps producing side shoots

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9032554

I am harvesting Kohlrabi almost every day ...

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9032556

Fava bean pods are about 5" long ... weeee
They are ready at least two months in advance

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
5:42 PM

Post #9032635

Still a few days before SPRING will be here ... I can really say that my 2011-2012 FALL garden has been a success !
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
6:16 PM

Post #9032683

Rich
Ditto the points you made today, and much more nicely said than I ever could.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
6:25 PM

Post #9032688

I'm not the least bit upset. I've got much bigger fish to fry. We have never had "only" on DG and we have never had this much discussion about threads either. I'd much prefer to discuss growing then all this.

I'm not the one who brought it up and I'm not the only one who hasn't liked it. Thanks, I'm off this thread,I want to go where I can learn about growing veggies in a less hostile, and limited environment.

I'm confused as to why I'm the only one that is confronted when Im not the only one who has said this? On the Tomato Forum it was called. "silly" not by me, but neither one of you said anything.

If you want a new thread start a new thread nobody is stopping you.

This message was edited Mar 6, 2012 8:30 PM
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9032726

1lisac
Where do you see the word "only" in the title of this thread?

I feel like I'm speaking for a lot of people on this thread, GOOD BYE!

This message was edited Mar 6, 2012 8:55 PM
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 6, 2012
6:55 PM

Post #9032728

hrp, you don't speak for me. I think the whole thing has become ridiculous, and we should get back to sharing information instead of berating anyone.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 7, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9033230

This is truly a tragedy.

In case we ALL haven't noticed, we lost a LOT of DGers two years ago when Dave left a sea of divided camps here.

Since that time, I have missed a LOT of those who left. A huge void was created. Camaraderies were broken. Valuable input and feedback was diverted elsewhere. I have yet to figure out where all those people who left this website went off to.

And it was over fractures like what is going on now...

I would ask that whether or not we agree or disagree at all, that we consider the impact on the larger body before we post our "God-given right to speak." I'm in no way challenging anyone's right to say whatever they want to on these posts. I'm just asking that you consider the potential consequences when you do...

There are those here who take the negative and the positive with a grain of salt. I'm one of them. There has been only one time something was said directly to me that made me strongly consider leaving Dave's Garden. But, I took a time out to consider what the consequence of my leaving would mean to me, and to others who, for some reason unknown to me, feel that I know what I'm talking about! LOL! In any event, I chose to stay -- for the value that belonging here brings to my goal of becoming the best gardener I can be, and for what I have to offer to others.

There have been times I myself have posted and someone has taken issue with my comments. And, because my intent has always been to help and not to harm, and because I wouldn't want someone to leave because of some misunderstanding of my intent, I spoke with these individuals offline and worked it out so we were all good to come back and play in the garden again. And, yeah, people DO apologize offline, to make things right...

But, there are also those here who are sensitive to the sometimes negative tones and undertones conveyed. And, some of them chose to leave -- and they don't come back...

I don't like when people leave...

Linda
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2012
6:01 PM

Post #9033909

And some watch the exclusion of these threads and the sniping and simply chose not to participate which is a major loss to everyone.



Well said Linda. I too remember those days and also miss the good information and camaraderie.

As the group of participants whittles down, it reminds me of the statement ~ 'and then there was one'.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 13, 2012
11:25 AM

Post #9041196

My fall garden needs to come to an end ... but it still going
KOHLRABI forming a nice ball ...

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 13, 2012
11:26 AM

Post #9041200

SWISS CHARD is growing on the bottom of the flowers beds .. so beautiful and so delish ...

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 13, 2012
11:27 AM

Post #9041203

I had a very successful Fennel season

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 13, 2012
11:28 AM

Post #9041204

My KALE are starting to bolt ... finally ... I need room for my summer veggies

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stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 14, 2012
8:34 PM

Post #9043183

LOVE to see the cactus in the midst of your veggies!

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