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Vegetable Gardening: It's time to plant garlic

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Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 97, Views: 783
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HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 12, 2011
6:09 AM

Post #8845997

Here's a link that describes how to grow garlic.

http://www.organicgardening.com/learn-and-grow/garlic-growing-guide

I've never tried the soaking method described.

Photo is of the cloves I planted last fall.

Thumbnail by HoneybeeNC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2011
2:52 PM

Post #8847842

I'm not planting for a bit yet - our weather is so unpredictable and it was supposed to be in the 80s today. It's acting more like spring than fall out there!

Beautiful bowl of garlic cloves!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 13, 2011
2:58 PM

Post #8847846

Cindy_GA - this is the time of year I watch the weather forcast carefully for the first fall frost so I can pull the sweet potatoes, and pick the sweet peppers.

Once the cold weather has settled in, I set the garlic cloves - usually around the end of October.

You are correct, this year's weather has been totally unpredictable!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 13, 2011
3:24 PM

Post #8847867

Great harvest HB. I've never gotten cloves that large from my crop. I turned the bed last weekend then ran out of steam. Should get my two beds planted this weekend. Have not checked your link yet, will do later.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8847910

How long are garlic cloves viable for planting?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 13, 2011
4:22 PM

Post #8847938

1lisac - after I dig mine up around the end of June, beginning of July, I sort and keep the largest for the next season's planting. I don't know how long they are actually viable. Last fall I set a little over 100 cloves, and only one died.
mom2goldens
Carmel, IN
(Zone 5b)

October 13, 2011
5:47 PM

Post #8848051

The instructions I've always followed for soaking use the baking soda/seaweed mixture for overnight and then a dip in alcohol for 3-5 minutes right before planting. I've had really good luck with this method, so I"m afraid to NOT try it :)

My instructions came from here:
http://www.gourmetgarlicgardens.com/growing.htm

Got my garlic planted last week...we grow hardneck garlic in this zone, which we'll harvest in about July or August.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 13, 2011
5:50 PM

Post #8848055

Thank you, a friend ask me, and I had no idea what the answer was.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 14, 2011
12:18 PM

Post #8848886

1lisac - I forgot to say: keep the heads of garlic complete. Wait until you are ready to set the cloves before taking them off the mother plant.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 14, 2011
12:45 PM

Post #8848917

I'll be planting this weekend. I did the soaking thing last year and all turned out fine. I thought I'd try it without this year and see what happens. I've noticed that some of you say you just plit the mother/heat apart and plant the cloves. Must work just as well?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 15, 2011
6:50 AM

Post #8849654

terri_emory - all I do is split the heads apart and set the largest cloves. The larger the clove, the larger the resulting heads will be.

I do water the bed well before setting the cloves, so perhaps this takes the place of overnight soaking.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 15, 2011
7:36 AM

Post #8849703

Thanks for that watering well tip HB, I'll water today and plant tomorrow. I've just turned in a wheelbarrow load of home-made compost into the raised bed (it's my 'mixing bowl'), a few weeks ago I bought 1 yard of compost and a sandy loam mix. All this goes into the raised bed, along with a heavy scoop of crushed seashells and several scoops of that volcanic rock dust someone here mentioned. Mix well, then I distribute to other beds, plant the mixing bowl bed last. It will be beets, carrots, brocc, cauliflower...etc. LOVE this time of year here.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 15, 2011
10:24 AM

Post #8849867

MaryMcP - If I were a vegetable plant I would feel really special having all that great stuff to grow in. ☺

I love this time of year, too. Today I finished a raised bed for broccoli transplants. I added lots of finely mulched leaves, and hauled several buckets of compost. I kept going, and going until I felt dizzy and nauseous. When I got into the house, hubby had to give me a couple of figs to raise my blood sugar. Sometimes I forget I'm a type 2 diabetic!

Tomorrow I'll put in the transplants, and try not to let myself pass out in the process - LOL!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 15, 2011
10:37 AM

Post #8849873

Oh dear - you be careful with your health. It's important!

Just came in a little bit ago to get some food together, turkey rueben sandwiches and oven fries.

Beds are all turned and watered, it's still triple digits here so it's too hot to work outside already (10am here). I'll start on a labor intensive dinner idea later this afternoon. Will plant tomorrow.

The tomatoes already growing in that mix are very happy...if I don't forget to water them. Funny that.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 15, 2011
10:47 AM

Post #8849886

MaryMcP - I love rueben sandwishes, but can never get the sauce right. Would you care to share the recipe?

It's 72F and sunny here today, and the forcast is for more of the same tomorrow.

Don't worry about me, I refuse to let the T2 get me down. I do follow the guidlines when it comes to my diet, but it was such a glorious morning, I forgot what time it was!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 15, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8849934

Sauce? Maybe what I make is not really a rueben. Basically it's a grilled cheese sandwich with sliced turkey and saurekraut. I thought the saurekraut made it a rueben. I better go Google. :-|
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 15, 2011
12:33 PM

Post #8849966

HB - when I make reuben (with corned beef, swiss, sauerkraut, rye or pumpernickel) - I use thousand island dressing on them and then grill/toast them. The cheapest one is usually Kraft. Hmm. Now I'm hungry. Be safe!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 15, 2011
1:04 PM

Post #8850009

Yup, looks like I've got it all wrong...next time there will be some thousand island dressing in the mix. A Rachel sandwich substitutes cole slaw for the saurekraut. That sounds interesting too.

errr, back to planting garlic, we got a bit side tracked here.
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

October 15, 2011
1:56 PM

Post #8850067

LOL! Rachel sounds good too! I may pick up some corned beef tonight. Hmmm...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 16, 2011
6:20 AM

Post #8850739

Thanks for the reuben sandwich recipes. I'll have to check the label on Thousand Island Dressing to see if it's on my "can have" list.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 17, 2011
2:19 PM

Post #8852955

Ohhhhhhh! I love reuben sanwiches! I have one at Crackerbarrel while on vacation and it was great!

Thanks for the info on not soaking. I have lots of goodies in the soil. Still very dry here, though.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 17, 2011
9:38 PM

Post #8853514

I can finally get my garlic planted - I got the last three varieties I was waiting for today. I'm trying to switch to creoles, since that's the type that seems to be though best adapted to this area. Of the creoles, I managed to snag small quantities of Aglio Rosso, Ajo Rojo, Native Creole, and Spanish Benitee. I'm hoping to add some more creoles to the list next season.

I'm also planting Chinese Pink, Corsican Red, Early Red Italian, Inchelium Red, Italian Late, Lorz Italian, Siciliano, Viola Francese, and Shantung Purple, all reportedly softnecks.

There's only 4-8 oz of each variety, but that should be plenty for my trial garden. I'll probably plant the largest cloves and try cooking with the smaller ones to sample the differences in flavor.

I can hardly wait for spring!

-Rich
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 17, 2011
10:16 PM

Post #8853542

I planted my garlic a couple of days ago, and I hope that it was not too soon, as the weather has warmed up again. I suppose I should have waited for November, but last year I got caught and then planted everything too late, as there were many rain and snow storms. The first snow was November 20th. There is just no predicting thr weather.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 18, 2011
5:06 AM

Post #8853702

I've been waiting too, we are still in triple digit temps [low 100's but still 100 days]...the summer that never ends. I expect when it does cool down, the temps will plummet! There is just no predicting the weather - that's for sure.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 18, 2011
5:21 AM

Post #8853723

An odd observation here... it doesn't seem to matter regarding temps. My notes indicate that my garlic sprouts at the same time of year here regardless of temperature. I noticed yesterday that the perennial garlic bed is sprouting, as are the garlic chives and some of my ornamental alliums.

And yes,the summer that never seems to end will be coming to a screeching halt here by Wed night in the high 30s! What a switch from the one hundred degree temps. Not quite ready for that drastic a change.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 18, 2011
10:29 PM

Post #8854907

My garlic is already sprouting!
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

October 19, 2011
5:29 AM

Post #8855163

rjogden:

where do you get your garlic?

I purchased just two bulbs of California White from gurney's and plan to plant most of them in the holes of a concrete block raised bed I have. The rest I'm planting throughout the garden to see where it grows best. I realize it's not a lot of garlic I've purchased, but since this is my first year, thought I'd go small. I was actually going to purchase the Corsican Red, but that extra $3/bulb had to go to gas, LOL!

thanks for your help, everyone.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 19, 2011
6:54 AM

Post #8855258

SoFlaCommercial - I purchased mine from the supermarket. Be sure it has a root base - those from China have had the roots removed and I'm not sure they will grow.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 19, 2011
10:35 AM

Post #8855585

[quote="SoFlaCommercial"]rjogden:

where do you get your garlic?[/quote]

Aglio Rosso, Native Creole and Spanish Benitee from Filaree Garlic Farm ( http://www.filareefarm.com/ ).

Ajo Rojo from Gourmet Garlic Gardens ( http://www.gourmetgarlicgardens.com/ ).

Chinese Pink, Early Red Italian, Italian Late, and Lorz Italian from Territorial Seed Company ( http://www.territorialseed.com/ ).

Corsican Red, Inchelium Red, Siciliano and Shantung Purple from The Garlic Store ( http://www.thegarlicstore.com/ ).

Viola Francese from Seeds From Italy ( http://www.growitalian.com/ ).

There are some other sources I found too late to order from this year. One that carries Creole varieties is http://www.wegrowgarlic.com/.

Hope this helps.

-Rich
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

October 19, 2011
10:40 AM

Post #8855604

omg! i'm in heaven! thanks, rich
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 19, 2011
11:51 AM

Post #8855696

Thanks from me too! I was aware of all the others you posted, rjogden, but not The Garlic Store. All the rest are great! I'll have to save The Garlic Store link for next year. I just went shopping at the Legg Creek Farm website to replace some of my fruit trees that got fried this summer.
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

October 20, 2011
6:55 AM

Post #8856880

I have another question regarding garlic - I want to plant in the little holes of the concrete raised bed I have, but a worker at the nursery said that I need to be concerned with lime wash from the concrete, that it'd leach into the soil from the concrete.

how to i combat this?

thanks.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 20, 2011
7:16 AM

Post #8856900

I'm not sure that's a problem, some plants like lime. Lavendar is one. I took an idea from DG'er JoParrott and bordered one of my beds with cinder blocks. I painted them first with white roofing insulation stuff...it's kind of rubbery...but you don't really have to. Last year I grew broccoli, carrots and garlic in them. This year I'll do the same and also some radish.

I can't find the pictures with the veggies actually growing in the cinder blocks, but this gives you an idea of what's happening.

Thumbnail by MaryMcP
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 20, 2011
7:16 AM

Post #8856901

A closer look

Thumbnail by MaryMcP
Click the image for an enlarged view.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

October 20, 2011
7:19 AM

Post #8856902

[quote="SoFlaCommercial"]I have another question regarding garlic - I want to plant in the little holes of the concrete raised bed I have, but a worker at the nursery said that I need to be concerned with lime wash from the concrete, that it'd leach into the soil from the concrete.

how to i combat this?[/quote]

The cement in the concrete reacts with dissolved carbon dioxide in water and other organic acids created by living plant roots and the breakdown of organic material in the media. It's simple soil chemistry.

I don't know of any way to prevent leaching from concrete short of using a sealer, and that may cause other problems because they're intended to be used on floors and pads, not planters.

-Rich
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

October 20, 2011
9:10 AM

Post #8857049

I have been growing in cinder blocks for years and have never had any problems. Everything from cabbage,lettuce,strawberries,chives,parsley, cutting celery,cilantro,mint-you name it-
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

October 20, 2011
3:05 PM

Post #8857380

thanks, everyone; appreciated. now not so worried. :)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 20, 2011
3:13 PM

Post #8857392

The only issue Ive come across (not personally) is that the cinderblocks get hot, which you can work around. May just want to keep it in mind.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

October 23, 2011
9:06 PM

Post #8861004

I planted commercial grocery store garlic (from China) about 2-3 weeks ago and is has sprouted. I was planning to use garlic bought at the farmers market, thus locally grown, but DS ate it...
I read that my area should plant a Rocambole type.
I just planted what I had when I had time to do it...

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 24, 2011
9:05 AM

Post #8861488

sallyg - I hide the garlic I plan to grow, otherwise my DH would eat it. He doesn't like to peel the smaller cloves!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 24, 2011
9:45 AM

Post #8861548

Years ago on the east end of LI, Zone 7, I planted garlic from the grocery store some time in October. I didn't pre-soak or do anything special. I also didn't pay attention to the weather, just broke up the heads and put them in whenever I had time and always had good results. I'm about to do the same thing today in Zone 5b, except that I added some dehydrated manure to my raised bed first. Wish me luck!

Pam

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

October 24, 2011
1:48 PM

Post #8861886

HoneyBee, I know that feeling-the stealing and the peeling. LOL Its kind of hard to put the nicest looking cloves in the dirt instead of your food.
Pam, I'll wish YOU luck as that might help me too ? tee hee!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 24, 2011
2:10 PM

Post #8861909

OK, first round of potato onion (multipliers) and garlic went in Sunday. I forgot to check the calendar for the moon phase, but that is when I had time to plant. Did not soak this year, just planted in a good bed. I have more garlic to plant and it is supposed to rain (knock wood) tomorrow. Maybe. So if I have any light left tonight after supper, the rest of the garlic is going in. At the rate things are going, the moon should probably call me in the morning to see what phase I have time for LOL!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 25, 2011
6:40 AM

Post #8862816

My problem is the weather - we haven't had our first frost yet, and the forcast is for it to get into the upper 70's this week. The sweet pepper plants are loaded, so I don't want to pull them while they are still producing fruit - BUT - I need the space to plant garlic!

We usually get frost between Oct 1st and 15th.

As I type this, the leaves are falling like rain.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2011
2:34 PM

Post #8863409

Sounds kind of pretty!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

October 25, 2011
2:49 PM

Post #8863427

OK, ya' gotta' rake??

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

October 25, 2011
5:32 PM

Post #8863639

We don't rake-up the leaves from our own trees, rather we leave them to replenish the earth. We do gather leaves from around the neighborhood and add them to the garden. The earthworms change them into usable soil.
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

October 27, 2011
3:06 PM

Post #8866145

whoo-hoo! Garlic finally arrived.

now to read up and find out what to do with it, LOL!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 28, 2011
7:53 AM

Post #8866849

My GARLIC is up already !!
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

October 28, 2011
11:50 AM

Post #8867073

We have snow on the ground, waaaaay early. What's going on here?! We had snow April 1, and now this. No spring, no fall. Bummer!

Pam
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

October 28, 2011
12:32 PM

Post #8867095

Bummer Pfg!

My garlic finally got planted this morning. I'm a little late getting it in but should be okay.
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

November 8, 2011
2:31 PM

Post #8881891

okay, so FINALLY got my cinder block raised bed completed. going to soak tonight.

from what i've read on some of these sites that you all were so nice to leave the links for, i take a gallon of water, mix it with heaping tablespoon of baking soda and 1 tablespoon of seaweed, soak the cloves in there NOT peeled, then plant flat side down/pointed end up two inches below the top of the soil, cap it with copious amounts of mulch (i'm using natural cypress mulch), keep watered, but for the most part leave alone.

is that all correct?


u think i could soak my bulls blood seeds in that solution as well? or should I just put those in the jiffy pots to start out? hate to waste all that water on such a small amount of garlic...
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

November 8, 2011
4:03 PM

Post #8882029

Thanks for boiling it down, SFla. If mine don't come up I'll do that next time. Always nice to know what to do if the simple thing doesn't work... and who ever knows when the luck is about to run out and you suddenly realize that you have to do more than the little you've been getting away with?!

Pam
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

November 8, 2011
7:25 PM

Post #8882323

well, i didn't peel anything. in fact, I plopped them in solution as entire bulbs, with the covering keeping everything connected. I do believe that the covering has to come off before I plant though, right?
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

November 8, 2011
8:03 PM

Post #8882370

"I do believe that the covering has to come off before I plant though, right?"

Not necessarily, SFC. I've planted garlic for more years than I care to admit, setting out cloves of peeled vs unpeeled and never noticed a difference in the two. I'm also among the ranks of those who've never soaked/pre-soaked and have had bumper crops of garlic. I'm of the mind that often times, especially since the Internet, we often get swayed into thinking we must do this, do that, buy all the latest gadgets and try all the "newest" ways (which often-times are just "recycled" and not necessarily new). It seems common to invest more money and time than is really needed to grow a garden, be it food or flowers.

Shoe (low-maintenance preferred)

This message was edited Nov 11, 2011 4:25 PM

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 8, 2011
8:48 PM

Post #8882443

I also do nothing ... just plant the garlic cloves and wait ...
I always been sucessfull ... but sure I enjoyed reading about y'all hard work
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 9, 2011
5:20 AM

Post #8882670

I planted some garlic saved from what I grew last year and it sprouted in less than a week! The white bunching onions are also very quick to sprout. I separated the tiny Egyptian onion bulbils that I had and those have sprouted as well - looks like a very good year for onions and garlic! Hope to get my purchased garlic planted in about 10 days - still have to finish taking out the tomatoes from that bed.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 9, 2011
9:53 AM

Post #8883005

Well, I finally pulled out the sweet pepper plants and set the garlic on Monday.

I chose 100 of the largest and best-looking cloves, and when I was done planting, I had 12 left! So... 88 will be the count for this year. I'm holding onto the leftovers incase some don't sprout.
mauryhillfarm
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8b)

November 11, 2011
1:17 PM

Post #8886162

When I saw this thread on planting garlic, I had to read it because I love garlic and like to hear what varieties other people like and grow. I had just one variety for 10 years that I got from a friend who had purchased it at the local co-op store, so I don't know what it is specifically except that it is a softneck. Then I discovered there were lots more kinds and I went kind of crazy planting more than 12 different varieties, both hardneck and softneck, about 800 plants in a year and selling at the farmer's market. After 5 years living and breathing garlic all year long, my field got hit with a garlic fungus so I scaled way back and don't sell any, only grow for my family.

I had never soaked my garlic cloves prior to planting and all my plants sprouted and grew just fine. However, because of the fungus, I looked into ways of ameliorating the problem. One thing I found was that soaking the garlic in baking soda water allows you to remove the outer coating of a clove easily and you can then see if there are any visible spores on the individual clove. Now I do this before planting my garlic, just to make sure I'm not planting any infected stock.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 11, 2011
2:20 PM

Post #8886271

Good info, thanks for posting that. Quite often what we *think* is the reason for doing something is completely off-base. The old story about the grandaughter that always cut the roast because mom and gram did it that way. Gram didn't have a pan big enough!!!

I always thought soaking first had to do with germination. Thanks for another angle and it makes perfect sense!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 11, 2011
4:49 PM

Post #8886436

I never even thought to soak the cloves. I just watered them after I planted them. Most of them are up already.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 12, 2011
8:36 AM

Post #8886972

What does garlic fungus look like? I Googled it, but could not find a reference.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2011
10:28 AM

Post #8889872

My garlic and onions are coming up as we speak. We had a cold snap, then rain, and now a warm snap! Bizzare, but I think the garlic likes the weather?!? Oh well, just happy to see something growing after the drought. Even my pasture is green now.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2011
8:17 AM

Post #8895464

This morning I have garlic sprouting! YAY! Eleven days from setting the cloves.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2011
8:20 AM

Post #8895467

Very cool! =D
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2011
8:31 AM

Post #8895477

Mine is sprouting too, but took a bit longer than yours honeybee. And one variety is coming in faster than the other.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 18, 2011
8:46 AM

Post #8895506

Mary, I looked up the date I set out cloves last year and it was November 11th - they didn't sprout until January 3rd 2011!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2011
8:59 AM

Post #8895519

Weather or different starters do you think?
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

November 18, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8896022

Okay, I planted mine November 9th. I was told they're a long season crop (takes a long time to get ripe?), but here it is 9 days later, and 3 of the 17 cloves I put out are already sprouting...what do I do? Do I cover them with mulch now, or what? How long before it's ripe?

I'm so excited!!!!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 18, 2011
3:23 PM

Post #8896063

Just wait for summer! ;-) They are a cool season crop so I would not worry too much about mulching, although it certainly can't hurt anything.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2011
4:32 PM

Post #8896145

SoFla ~ don't worry. Let them grow and don't mulch or cover. They will be fine as an overwinter crop. Even hard freezes will not harm them. In the spring or early summer, when the tops fold over, you can harvest the bulbs. In this area, mine are ready to harvest in May or June.

This message was edited Nov 18, 2011 6:33 PM
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

November 18, 2011
4:36 PM

Post #8896153

thanks, podster.

have a nice weekend.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 19, 2011
10:48 AM

Post #8896945

MaryMcP - [quote]Weather or different starters do you think?[/quote]

I've been saving my own garlic cloves for five seasons now, so I think it must be the weather. It has been quite mild these past couple of months. If I remember correctly, it was really cold this time last year.

This message was edited Nov 20, 2011 11:48 AM
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 19, 2011
11:02 AM

Post #8896979

That makes sense. My second bed is finally starting to pop, both planted the same day, one is way ahead of the other. Different varieties.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2011
5:32 PM

Post #8897685

My garlic came up this week!! I counted 45 sprouts, but more coming up!

Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click the image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 19, 2011
6:05 PM

Post #8897731

Now we are going to need lot of recipes to utilize all the garlic we are planting.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

November 19, 2011
10:45 PM

Post #8898229

[quote="evelyn_inthegarden"]Now we are going to need lot of recipes to utilize all the garlic we are planting.[/quote]

I can think of MANY worse problems to have ;o).

-Rich
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 20, 2011
4:29 AM

Post #8898284

Problem? What problem? I don't put garlic in oatmeal but that's about it. ;-)))

Have you seen this really cool garlic smasher? It's been out of stock at the mfg for months but I finally found it at another site and it arrived yesterday. A truly awesome tool.

http://www.uncommongoods.com/product/garlic-rocker

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 20, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8898472

Mary - what a neat gadget!

I Googled "garlic rocker" and found that Amazon (and a few other places) carry this as well.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
10:34 AM

Post #8898632

you can freeze your individual garlic cloves and then defrost when you need them.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
12:14 PM

Post #8898723

We're in garlic heaven... ^-^
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
12:17 PM

Post #8898727

Happy Birthday Evelyn
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

November 20, 2011
12:27 PM

Post #8898742

Yes, Happy Happy Birthday Evelyn.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
12:39 PM

Post #8898751

Thank you! ^_^
SoFlaCommercial
West Palm Beach, FL
(Zone 10b)

November 20, 2011
1:56 PM

Post #8898807

♪♫♪♫♪☼♫♪♫♪☼♪♪♫♪♫

HAPPY BIRTHDAY!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
2:10 PM

Post #8898827

(BIG BLUSH!) Thanks! ^_^

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

November 20, 2011
5:15 PM

Post #8899134

I'm a little late, but I hope you have had a wonderful birthday!
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

November 20, 2011
6:55 PM

Post #8899245

Thanks, so much. It is never too late for good wishes.

Evelyn

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
5:51 AM

Post #9163282

The cloves I set Novemeber 7th 2011 have reaped a wonderful harvest! I dug the rest of them this morning

Thumbnail by HoneybeeNC   Thumbnail by HoneybeeNC
Click an image for an enlarged view.

sallyg

sallyg
Anne Arundel,, MD
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #9163373

Nice!
Looking back, I planted mine early October and the tops all fell a few weeks ago- I guess that adds up to the same growing time. I pulled mine then. I'll def plant garlic again this fall! The empty garlic patch was the right timing for some beans.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2012
7:38 AM

Post #9163395

Nice going, Honeybee!

Mine have finished drying and I broke apart the cloves. This is what I ended up with.

Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click the image for an enlarged view.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2012
7:44 AM

Post #9163406

I'm thinking of branching out in the garlic world this year. I'd like to add to my elephant garlic. I'll have to do some research and see what I can find.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

June 13, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9163409

Nice haul steph, my garlic under performed - really small bulbs.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #9163429

Stephanie - I've always kept my garlic whole until I use it. Do the cloves keep well once they have been pulled apart?

Mary - the larger the clove planted, the larger the resulting bulb will be. I save fifty of the very largest bulbs each year, then break off the largest cloves from those bulbs and plant them. I set the cloves about six inches apart.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
8:12 AM

Post #9163452

I would think garlic would keep better if left whole until it is used.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 13, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #9163460

Most of them were already separating, so I just pulled them apart. You can freeze them, too. They do fine separated.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
8:23 AM

Post #9163463

I'm glad to learn that garlic can be frozen. Although the ones I grow last several months, they don't last a full year.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

June 13, 2012
8:56 AM

Post #9163510

Frozen garlic turns to mush for me. Fine for cooking with, but it doesn't sprout.

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