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Article: Amaryllis 101: Caring for Amaryllis Plants and Making Your Amaryllis Bloom Again Next Year: Too many bulbs?

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Forum: Article: Amaryllis 101: Caring for Amaryllis Plants and Making Your Amaryllis Bloom Again Next YearReplies: 6, Views: 37
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Indy
Alexandria, IN
(Zone 6a)

October 12, 2011
12:25 PM

Post #8846424

I find that the bulbs make a lot of bulblets. Mine are in the pots all year and are still green. They almost need a light freeze to give them a break in the season. What started out as fun is a bit of a chore after several years due to so many containers!
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

October 12, 2011
12:33 PM

Post #8846432

You don't have to separate out the bulbets if you don't want to, just put the cluster of bulbs into a larger pot (remembering that the pot only needs to be a little bit bigger than the bulb/s). I've seen some big pots crammed with amaryllises that had been growing together for years, and it's quite a display when they start blooming!

I have a bunch also, including quite a few that were neglected for a couple of years and might need another year of good care before they bloom well again. I do let some go dry/dormant so I can repot them at different times to spread out the bloom times... Yes, all those containers can be daunting, but I'm always happy to have those big bright blooms in the middle of winter!
martymar1977
Houston, TX

November 29, 2011
9:37 AM

Post #8910283

Critterologist is absolutely right. I have 4 large pots that are jam packed with bulbs & bulblets.

I planted them about 12 years ago thinking that my mom would really like them (& she loved them), but didn't really know that much about them; I figured the more space they had the happier they'd be.

They took off as the years passed and multiplied like crazy. The mama bulbs are huge and take center stage in the pots and are surrounded by the bulblets. I've never divided or even moved any of them as they have the huge strapping leaves year round here in Houston. When they bloom it's just beautiful, but I will have to finally move two of the "families" out as the tops of two of the pots have cracked and begun to fall apart. It's a job I don't really look forward to, but one I think I can handle every 12 years. :)

This message was edited Nov 29, 2011 3:12 PM
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

November 29, 2011
2:19 PM

Post #8910532

Looking at those thick, strong roots on some of my bulbs, I'm not surprised they started breaking apart your pots! I'm sure those large pots are glorious in bloom!
broadway1
Hamtramck, MI

January 17, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #8971786

I too have had much success and now count among my treasured amaryllises about 30 which bloom most faithfully. However, I am puzzled as to what is the best way to handle the bulblets. Till now I've split them off and throw them away, believing that this action will provide more nourishment and energy for the remaining parent bulb. Is that a correct assumption? And, if I were to put them in their own pot, about how many years before the bulblets are old enough/big enough to bloom? Some of my most prized Amaryllises have separated and this usually confident gardener is perplexed about the best way to approach the offspring. Thanks so much .. and keep up the great work! ...
critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

January 17, 2012
6:17 PM

Post #8972061


With offsets, it doesn't seem to be a matter of age/time as much as it is a matter of size... With good sun/water/fertilizer, they can grow to blooming size in a year or two.

I'm not sure if they continue to "take" from the parent bulb once the little offsets sprout their own little leaves. I usually do separate the bulblets, though, because they seem to grow better for me that way. I just look at the offset and see if it has started to look like its own little separate bulb yet or if it's still very flattened against the mother bulb. Once it has its own "skin" nearly all the way around, it's easy to separate the bulblet by prying gently, just as you'd separate daffodil bulbs. I often pot up several offsets together just so I don't have a tiny bulb in an overly large pot (where it might tend to rot if too moist).
broadway1
Hamtramck, MI

January 18, 2012
12:01 PM

Post #8973040

Ah, thank you so much for the bulblet dilemma advice. I will with more confidence and gusto begin to separate and keep them after the parent's blooming cycle has concluded. These beauties are so deserving of their prominent place in any gardener's home, never ceasing to dazzle and amaze! ...

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Other Article: Amaryllis 101: Caring for Amaryllis Plants and Making Your Amaryllis Bloom Again Next Year Threads you might be interested in:

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