climbing aroids, Chiapas rainforest - id please

victoria, Canada

All these are called oochin, or nukuch oochin, in the Lacandon Maya language. It seems to me that the word covers a variety of species and perhaps two genera of aroids. Can someone help me with an identification, please?

The first lot are called nukuch oochin. They look like different species to me.

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victoria, Canada

more nukuch oochin

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victoria, Canada

another nukuch oochin

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victoria, Canada

these are called hach oochin 'authentic oochin'.

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victoria, Canada

the underside of the immediately precing hach oochin leaf

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victoria, Canada

wide shot of hach oochin

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victoria, Canada

This is just called oochin

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victoria, Canada

This is just called oochin, too.

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victoria, Canada

This is called mehen oochin 'little oochin'. It could be just the juvenile form of the immediately preceeding oochin, but the Lacandones say that this kind never climbs.

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victoria, Canada

This is also called mehen oochin. It looks different than the other one by the same name.

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Here are my thoughts.

The first one is Philodendron erubescens which has already been identified for you along with the Syngonium in photo number 3, which is most likely S. podophyllum.

Photo number 2 looks like another Synogonium and may be S. chiapense.

Photo number 4,5 and 6 are of a Philodendron. I'm not sure which one.

Photo number 7 and 8 are both most likely to be Syngonium podophyllum.

The last plant photo is of a Philodendron.

This message was edited Oct 25, 2011 9:20 PM

victoria, Canada

Thank you, again Rachel. With regard to the species in the first photo, Tom Croat informed me that it P. sagittifolium. Is P. erubescens another name for it?, or a red variety? With regard to the Syngonium in #3, according to my Lacandon consultant, there is (what appears to me) an identical plant that bears an inflorescence that stays green, even when ripe. Do you have nay knowledge of this?

Hi Suzanne. P. sagittifolium and P. erubescens are two different species. The Philodendron you showed in photo number one appears to have reddish to purplish stems(am I seeing this correctly) also there is a leaf lower to the ground in behind the one farthest to left that also shows the same coloration. None of which is a trait in Philodendron sagittifolium.

Tom Croat is an authority figure on Aroids and I would never go against or question an I.D. from him but I have to ask, are you sure he identified this particular Philo. (photo number one) as saggitfolium and not the other Philo. in photos 4,5 and 6? If so, then would you mind if I borrowed this particular photo from you and questioned him about it myself?

Rachel

victoria, Canada

Yes, I'm sure. And sure, you can borrow the photo and ask hiom. It's OK by me. Let me know what he says, OK?

Hi Suzanne,

Tom Croat needs more information from you in order to hopefully give you an identification for the Philodendron in photo number one. He needs to know where you took the photo and the exact location if possible. Also, if you have ever viewed or captured a photo of a flower.

If you need his email address or want to view what he wrote to me, just send me a dmail.

cayenne, French Guyana

Hi Suzanne,

The last plant photo is most likely to be of a Philodendron hederaceum.

victoria, Canada

Thanks petitbon

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