Photo by Melody
Guess what time it is? It's time for the DG County Fair! Now in it's sixth year, enter your blue-ribbon photos or mouth-watering recipes for a chance to win a gift subscription! Click here here to get all the details, dates and entry rules.

Container Gardening: How to make papercrete containers #2

Communities > Forums > Container Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Container GardeningReplies: 64, Views: 1,034
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

October 28, 2011
6:06 AM

Post #8866717

Here's a new thread for us to continue sharing ideas and projects. Thanks Tomtom for getting us started on this activity!

And if you want to go back to review something, here is where you go... http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/472203/

This message was edited Oct 28, 2011 8:18 AM
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

October 28, 2011
7:13 AM

Post #8866809

I'm here. Love the things you are making! Definately going to do some of that come spring.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

November 2, 2011
7:07 PM

Post #8873904

Me too , I'm keeping up !
plantsforpeg
Ventress, LA
(Zone 8b)

November 3, 2011
6:13 AM

Post #8874387

I'm hoping TomTom will drop in.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

November 7, 2011
8:31 AM

Post #8880047

I'm following along too!

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 9, 2011
1:01 PM

Post #8883236

Same here. :-)

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 9, 2011
2:13 PM

Post #8883331

Is it spring yet?

Happy_1

Happy_1
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

November 9, 2011
2:23 PM

Post #8883343

It is here!!!

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 9, 2011
2:29 PM

Post #8883351

Some people have all the luck. ;-)

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 9, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8883782

ha ha I do need the seasons and as lovely as the fall has been, not complaining too much. I finally have some flower beds completed so am anxious to do some papercrete containers. I have two great styrofoam containers in the garage I want to use for the forms. Hurry up winter so we can get to spring...

I did a seed swap with Tomtom many years ago and still have some of the seed. She gardens in a small lot and her containers were to die for. She has a very artistic eye and her plant combinations were beautiful.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 10, 2011
3:36 AM

Post #8884279

I enjoy the change of seasons too. Hopefully, TomTom will be back on the thread. I'm anxious to try this either over the winter or next spring. What kind of styrofoam containers are you using?

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 10, 2011
7:56 AM

Post #8884515

A round cylinder one and a rectangular one that I found who knows where. I snagged them thinking they'd be great forms to make a pot around. :) freebies, ya know...

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

November 10, 2011
10:57 AM

Post #8884797

Is the cylinder tall?

Styrofoam has gotten so expensive. I couldn't believe the price of Styrofoam balls at Walmart. Good grief. :( I always scout around for freebies. It's the only way to go, isn't it? :)

This message was edited Nov 10, 2011 3:21 PM

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 10, 2011
12:07 PM

Post #8884886

Without going out to measure it, I'd guess it is 14-15 inches tall and about 10-12 in. in diameter.
JPlunket
Vieques, PR

November 21, 2011
2:36 PM

Post #8900300

I'm aiming to try this technique to produce large pots that fit around the posts holding up our pergola.

That is, matching pots each with one side that looks like, well, a planter, while the other will be "notched" in precisely the same shape as the 8x8 posts but otherwise flat. Put them on opposite sides of the post, so they look like a very large planter, with the post coming up in the center.

Figure they'll need to have a low center of gravity and a fairly wide base, so they'll remain standing up instead of tending to fall away from the post. Alternative will be to provide some sort of connection between the two pots , at the post.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

November 22, 2011
6:30 AM

Post #8901239

That sounds interesting. I would guess using a 'dummy' piece of wood or styrofoam the size of the post and forming the pot around it would work quite well. Remove the 'dummy' piece when dry and voila! a perfect fit around the post! Very good idea JP!

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

November 22, 2011
1:46 PM

Post #8901717

Agreed, two separate pieces fashioned to be put back together around the post to form a single-looking pot is an excellent idea!! That would also help make it much easier to move, or remove, the big pots with plants intact! The weight of pot, plants, and soil make them impossible for me to use... this would help matters considerably.

You could band the two papercrete pot parts together around the post with wire, metal straps, or ropes. Depending if the banding would be seen or not (possibly hidden by plants), would dictate how decorative the fastening material would be. Yep, definitely a good idea to keep in mind.

JPlunket, keep us posted on your progress and show pics along the way please!!
cathy4
St. Louis County, MO
(Zone 5a)

November 23, 2011
3:16 PM

Post #8903166

JPlunket, just today I was trying to find a way to add a large pot near an entrance to our church. Your idea would be perfect, and by putting two parts together around a post I might be able to keep them from being "borrowed" by friendly neighborhood hoodlums. :D
plantsforpeg
Ventress, LA
(Zone 8b)

November 24, 2011
4:29 PM

Post #8904196

Would you be able to plant the same plant all around. I am thinking part of the inside planter may have some shade.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 26, 2011
3:51 AM

Post #8942899

I'm back.I was cruising around and found this again.Sooooo glad its carried over.
I confess to fast reading for pix of finished projects and saw some suggestions for removing paper from outside of planters.
Had anyone thought of "burning out" just an idea.It might not work in some neighborhoods.
I was thinking a blowtorch or grill lighter.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
5:28 AM

Post #8947351

I tried the twisted newspaper trick again that TomTom posted originally. This time on a rectangular pot. It's still drying, but has a lot of promise. The papercrete is easy to manipulate (carve, file, smooth down) while its drying and even after its cured. I always seem to break a corner or something on every piece, so I'm trying to be more patient and careful, but keep the mortar mix handy, lol.

Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
5:43 AM

Post #8947367

I used a stick blender with this last batch of papercrete and it made the mixing easier and a finer texture of the 'crete (no big clumps of paper). It seemed easier to form, smoother surfaces, too. I burned up the mixer, but it was old so I don't know if that was more the issue than my abuse.

This batch of 'buff'-colored papercrete was the biggest yet and I got to make several pieces from it. I wanted to make a alpine/succulents planter table top for my grandmother's porch. I formed it into three separate pieces. It was a pain, but I liked how it turned out. I also got three fairy houses and two troughs/pots.

I'm still learning with each new batch of papercrete. I believe this is my new hobby/passion. Thanks again TomTom, where ever you are!!

Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 30, 2011
5:49 AM

Post #8947385

Looking good .

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2011
7:03 AM

Post #8947467

wow, great work! did you make a mold for these first?

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
7:31 AM

Post #8947511

I wonder if letting the paper soak longer if it would disolve faster in the mix. I can see the advantage of the mixer tho.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8947557

ge1836, I've let the paper soak longer in previous pours, but the paper still wants to clump together. Next time I plan to use shredded office paper to cut down on prep time (sore fingers after shredding by hand for large batches) and see how the papercrete turns out. I also plan on using a paint mixer blade in my drill (can afford another stick blender). Mechanical mixing does create a fine smooth texture of papercrete and a nicer finish. The rough texture has a definite application with the primitive pots though, so I'll continue to use it for smaller batches . . . I'm still experimenting.

kooger, I used plastic storage baskets lined with plastic bags for molding the rectangular troughs. The fairy houses were free-form with papercrete applied to the outside of inverted clay pots also covered with plastic bags. I made the table (from scrap metal) and used a cardboard template to determine the fit for the top. I cut the template up into three pieces to keep it from being too heavy or awkward to handle, plus, if I messed up a section it wouldn't be too much trouble to replace it. Here is a pic of the cardboard layout before I cut it into sections.

Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
8:05 AM

Post #8947558

Here is a picture of the cardboard templates and the start of the Styrofoam molds for the planting areas of the table top.

Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2011
8:09 AM

Post #8947564

Wow!!! How cool is that.

Debbie

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
8:09 AM

Post #8947566

This pic shows the 1" cardboard sides glued and taped to the templates with the papercrete already formed around the Styrofoam. The small red things are drinking straws for drainage holes and cut to the thickness I needed for the papercrete to use as a guide.

Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
8:14 AM

Post #8947570

Here's the table top sections in place in the table frame. The pieces are still drying, but fit perfectly! I was worried the slurry was too wet and possibly forced the cardboard out some, but it didn't. One of the fairy houses will sit in the back corner and have a patio in front of it.

Note the difference in color as the pieces dry. the fairy house is almost completely dry and was made at the same time . . . it was thinner than the table top.



Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
8:22 AM

Post #8947581

Oh, the circular cutouts in the middle of each of the side sections are to allow placement of seasonal flower pots (3"). This is to be a planter for succulents which have different soil and water requirements than the flowers my grandmother likes, and they'll add color, too.

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2011
8:57 AM

Post #8947628

Thanks so much for the pics and explanations. I really appreciate it! Next summer... :)

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
9:04 AM

Post #8947637

You're welcome. I'm doing this in my dirty little basement because I want to be able to use them when warm weather gets here. The hardest part of all of this for me is the waiting! It does seem to take longer for the papercrete to cure out in the cooler conditions.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
3:18 PM

Post #8948158

Sundowner. I agree ,just wondered if more saturation would make the job easier.The paint stirrer sounde like a great idea, or a bulb auger and a drill.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 30, 2011
3:50 PM

Post #8948197

I'll let you know how the paint blade works when I mix another batch. I want to wait until the current project pieces are dried out a little more so I'll have room to spread out the new ones.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2011
1:31 AM

Post #8948566

Keep us posted.
Happy New Year.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2011
6:59 AM

Post #8948714

Happy New Year to you too!
granitegneiss
Norridgewock, ME
(Zone 5a)

January 2, 2012
3:52 AM

Post #8950998

I like the shredded office paper idea, but wondered how you will know how much to use. The original recipe was very specific about number of newsprint pages--how will you measure that as shredded paper? I've only tried this once, and I loved how the pots look, but agree it was a hand-killer for the steps of ripping the paper and mixing the concrete, and I had lumps of paper that didn't mix in and I had to pull out with tweazers after it was semi-hardened.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #8951222

granitegneiss, I have the same thoughts about the shredded paper quantities. In looking over other papercrete recipes found on the Internet, I think I'll have to start from scratch and experiment using what little bit of experience I've gained from using TomTom's recipe, mostly on the quantity of wet shredded paper and how the mix is supposed to look and feel.

I've done more research on papercrete and hypertufa and think TomTom's recipe and technique is to get the specific results of lumps and cool textures to mimic the primitive tufa troughs made in the old days. I now think I should have posted most of what I've done on another thread since the results are much different than what was originally intended.

My apologizes for steering this thread to other uses and technique.
--
Bev

kooger

kooger
Oostburg, WI
(Zone 5b)

January 2, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #8951378

It's all good, no worries. I like it on one thread. :)

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2012
11:39 AM

Post #8951513

kooger, I started a thread on the Hypertufa and Concrete forum: "Papercrete-containers, fairy houses and other uses". http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1235636/
It's loaded with some of the same pics that I've posted here and other individual pieces, along with some info about how I made them.

I feel rather guilty about posting so much here, but I was excited, lol. I still am!
annabell52
Edmonton, AB
(Zone 3a)

January 2, 2012
3:42 PM

Post #8951893

Sundownr, I too have been reading your info with interest. Thanks for sharing as I want to give this a try this year.
Alberta Ann

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2012
5:02 PM

Post #8951989

Alberta Ann, Thank you for watching and I hope you jump over to the Hypertufa & Concrete forum to see more. I didn't post TomTom's recipe there, but did post a link back to the original thread on this forum.

Thanks again,
Bev
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 11, 2012
3:06 AM

Post #8963038

Wonder why my puter keeps sending me to the old thread ?
plantsforpeg
Ventress, LA
(Zone 8b)

January 11, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #8963137

Digger, click on the top "unwatch thread".
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 11, 2012
3:53 PM

Post #8963849

Ok will try that .
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2012
8:29 AM

Post #8971246

WOW ... I JUST LOVE this thread!!!! So many talented people and so many great idea's I want to try this spring!!!!!!!!!!!!
jab91864
Northern Michigan, MI
(Zone 5a)

January 30, 2012
3:00 AM

Post #8987583

This is a great thread, will have to go back and re-read on sealing to waterproof but this sounds great. Thank you so much for sharing!!
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

January 31, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #8989861

I have printed instructions and plan to do this in the spring

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

June 21, 2012
10:05 PM

Post #9175309

I posted this on the Hypertufa and Concrete forum with my papercrete pots, but wanted TomTom to see what her instructions helped me to create. Thank you TomTom, I love the twisted newspaper technique!!!!

Thumbnail by Sundownr
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Happy_1

Happy_1
Fort Lauderdale, FL
(Zone 10b)

June 22, 2012
5:25 AM

Post #9175530

That's outstanding Sun. love it!

Hap
joycet
Franklin, OH
(Zone 6a)

June 22, 2012
5:31 AM

Post #9175538

Looks like rock! Just like it's supposed to! Beautiful!

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

June 22, 2012
6:50 AM

Post #9175605

Thanks y'all.

joycet, I think it looks like a chunk out of a cave, or off a narly cliff too, lol. I love the technique and plan to make a bunch more.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

June 25, 2012
10:39 AM

Post #9180175

That's beautiful Sun. You are inspiring me to give it a try. I had forgotten about it but your post got me fired up again. :-)

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

June 25, 2012
11:14 AM

Post #9180242

Crit, It's much easier than you might think. Just jump in and give it a try!
dggardenerguy
Staten Island, NY

March 26, 2013
9:10 AM

Post #9462554

Just read this for the first time.
The containers are really great looking.
How durable are they outside in winter freeze.
Guess I am missing something but don't see reason for the stick at bottom of the bowl.
Any answer appreciated.
Thanks

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 26, 2013
12:37 PM

Post #9462753

Thanks Jim. I answered your Dmail, but for those who may have the same questions, I'll answer here, too.

I used some of these papercrete pots outdoors in freezing temps for a couple winters now without problems.

The stick creates a channel, or two feet to elevate the pot a little, for the drained water to escape.
dggardenerguy
Staten Island, NY

March 28, 2013
5:54 PM

Post #9465334

Sundowner,
Thanks for you response.
Another question thinking about using newsprint with color - (funny paper section / color adds in newsprint - not the glossy part) anybody done that - if so how does it affect the result.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2013
8:19 AM

Post #9465775

Jim,
I stay away from too much color in the papers for fear the ink's affect on the cement as well as the plants. I may be overly-cautious tho.
--
Bev

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 1, 2013
4:17 PM

Post #9469050

The inks made today are mostly soy-based, and perfectly safe for use near your plants/veggies...

But, I'd think the glossy colored paper would be too stiff to properly break down into the consistency of slurry you're going for, to make papercrete. The softer colored funnies and ad paper should be OK to break down into an oatmeal consistency.

Linda

This message was edited Apr 1, 2013 11:30 PM
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

April 1, 2013
4:22 PM

Post #9469059

Women used to have babies on thick layers of news paper and that was 80/100 years ago . Dr's said it was most sanitary , even back then

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 1, 2013
6:37 PM

Post #9469205

Thanks for your input on the newspaper ink folks! I've not heard either of those points discussed before now!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 1, 2013
10:33 PM

Post #9469370

Sundownr,
Please see my edited reply.

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

April 2, 2013
4:53 AM

Post #9469460

Linda,
Your comments, as well as Digger's, prompted me to do some research that I've put off for a while. As an old-time organic gardener, I was cautioned years ago about using anything other black & white newsprint in composting and garden mulch. Times have changed and soy-based inks became much cheaper to use than petroleum-based inks, as you stated. But not all print media companies use soy ink! The colored slicks or glossies may still be produced with petroleum-based inks, as well as, heavy metals needed to make them more colorful and opaque. Additionally, clay, paraffin, and various chemical and metal components (in the color pigments) may be used to make the pages glossy and less degradable, thus slow to compost and more toxic if used in concentrated doses.

The last sentence confirms observations I've read by other papercrete crafters about the adverse effects of using colored print papers (excluding the funny pages). The key in obtaining consistent results is using consistent materials. The type of water (well vs. tap), humidity, temperature, time, and aggregates can all play a part in the success or failure of concrete products. I've had failures that took a while in determining cause. So experimenting with one component at a time helps to understand what works and what doesn't. I'll continue to avoid the use of heavily colored papers, and definitely not use the slick and glossy advertisements.

I truly appreciate the input and the nudge to research more into the colored paper use!
Thanks,
--
Bev
JPlunket
Vieques, PR

April 2, 2013
9:41 PM

Post #9470357

The vast portion of mass is uniform in all cases, relative to ink character, and the approach tends to lock in undesired chemical effects from ink.

This message was edited Apr 3, 2013 12:41 AM

You cannot post until you register and login.


Other Container Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Growing tomatoes upside down BittysGarden 112 Jul 19, 2009 5:51 AM
Raspberry Plants in Containers MummyOF4dolls 23 Mar 27, 2012 4:00 PM
Flower Pouches? nathalyn 80 Sep 11, 2008 10:49 PM
Growin' bags kwells 53 Aug 24, 2008 3:12 PM
How to make papercrete containers. Tomtom 423 May 5, 2013 3:52 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America