Photo by Melody
It's time now to VOTE in our 14th annual photo contest! Voting ends November 7, so be sure to cast your votes for your favorites in each category here. Good luck to all contestants!

Lilies: Fall orders and planting

Communities > Forums > Lilies
bookmark
Forum: LiliesReplies: 117, Views: 1,018
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 3, 2011
7:28 PM

Post #8875482

I have been a member here at DG for several years but I just recently discovered lilies and this wonderful discussion group. What is everyone ordering and/or planting this fall? I have placed some embarrassingly large orders from The Lily Garden, BD, Old House Gardens and Van Engelen and I have been quite busy with planting all these bulbs and learning how to scale. If I had less self restraint and a deeper wallet I might have ordered every single lily offered by The Lily Garden! They are my favorite supplier so far and I really relate to Judith Freeman's breeding aesthetics. I also just joined the NALS to learn as much as possible.

While reading through all of the wonderful posts here (32 pages of them!) it seems this forum is not as active lately as it once used to be. Is there a reason for that, or are folks just busy and caught up in other projects?

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 4, 2011
7:19 AM

Post #8876022

How lovely that you have joined us! I have ordered from every company that you have ordered from except for Van Engelen, and I have ordered many other bulbs from them. They are all excellent. For future referenece, have a peek at Faraway Flowers. You will be very happy.

Ordering and planting this fall (mind you, I have dug dozens old ones up, so many of these are not purchased this year):

Orienpets:
Anastasia
Silk Road

Trumpets:
Amethyst Temple
Emerald Temple
Longidragon clone
Regale
Regale album
Silver Sunburst

Orientals:
Acapulco
Casa Blanca
Crystal Blanca
Halifax
Sorbonne

Longiflorum/Oriental:
Prince Promise

Longiflorum/Asiatic:
Pink Heaven
Red Alert

Candidum:
Candidum Cascade Strain (grown from seed from NALS - you were celever to join)

Asiatic:
Ariadne
August Ruby
Hiawatha
Jubileo
Pearl Loraine
Rosepoint Lace

It is true that this forum is not as busy as it once was. There was an upheaval perhaps a couple of years ago when the original Dave of Dave's Garden allowed himself to be acquired, and a dispute ended up with him leaving. So Dave started Cubits. Some wonderful members left to go to Cubits, some stayed with Dave, and some are on both forums. So it did lessen the number of DG members, and some of them were very active posters. I am on both, and if you like, you can join Cubits, which is free. I must admit, however, that I post primarily on DG.

Welcome! What did you plant? Don't feel the need to categorize and alphabetize. I keep an acquisition list, and I'm anal LOL!

Donna
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

November 4, 2011
4:52 PM

Post #8876807

Ispahan, welcome!

I too am part of both sites. In fact the cubits lily forum has made the move to the allthingsplants site, another of the original Dave's creations. I post there more often, too.

As you've perhaps already discovered, I tend toward the wild species lilies. I seldom buy lily bulbs anymore, and usually obtain seed from plant society seed exchanges or trading. A much longer ordeal, but for me, it is the learning that's important, more so than the flowers themselves.

Rick
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
5:06 AM

Post #8877330

Hi Donna and Rick,

Thank you for your wonderful messages. I just signed up for All Things Plants and have been diligently reading through all of the posts. I had no idea this other forum existed! Now I know where everyone has been posting lately, LOL! I have lots and lots of lily questions so I might start posting them there.

I just moved into a property that has extremely well-drained deep sandy soil with lots of organic matter that I think will be perfect for lilies. If anything it is too well-drained and I will have quite a chore keeping them moist enough during the growing season. It is also on the alkaline side, so that rules out growing many of the Orientals. I do have a large raised bed in which I planted quite a few Lilium speciosum this fall (both rubrum and album) and sprinkled slow release garden sulfur over the surface, so I hope I can at least get them to establish and grow for a few years.

I inherited a huge clump of Asiatics that I dug up and divided this fall. I have no idea what color they are, but the clump yielded about 60 mature huge bulbs and numerous smaller bulblets. I hope I like it because it sure is prolific.

Here are other lilies that I have planted:

Species: L. speciosum (mentioned above), L. henryi, L. pumilum, L. lancifolium 'Splendens', L. regale.

OTs: Anastasia, Alchemy, Silk Road, Scheherazade, Silver Scheherazade, Caravan, Sarabande, Black Beauty, Shocking, Satisfaction, Invasion, Robina, Hacienda, Conca d'Or, Leslie Woodriff, Carte Blanche

Trumpets/Aurelians: African Queen, Pink Perfection, Golden Splendor, White Henryi, Madame Butterfly (Mak)

LOs: Triumphator, El Condor

Asiatics: Ariadne, Eurydice, Eros, Karen North, Antique Lace, Rosepoint Lace, Peach Lace, Yellow Whoppers, Last Dance, Tiger Babies, Red Velvet, Midsummer's Eve

I think I might double post this at ATP as well to start talking lilies! :-)

Cheers,
Corey
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 5, 2011
5:50 AM

Post #8877372

Always glad to welcome a new lily lover, Corey. I hope you'll enjoy it here at the "Original" Dave's Garden.

Rick and Donna have so many beautiful lilies. It's always worth gaining knowledge.from them.

Conca d'Or is one of my favorites and the fragrance is so enticing. Mine came from Faraway Flowers and the owner, Ramona, is DG's own Mainiac.

Arlene

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
6:32 AM

Post #8877411

Corey,

What a great list! I've counted seven that we have in common and I can see our preferences are very similar.

I have been ordering lilies since 2000 or so (started with Casa Blanca and Regale), and I should put in a plug for Faraway Flowers. The beauty of Ramona's lilies is that she has many that I have never seen before. And they are incredibly reasonable in price. She offers a good selection of MAK lilies, amongst other things. I had never HEARD of MAK lilies until last year. I have now ordered from her twice and I think that she and her lilies are wonderful. And yes, she is our own Mainiac - and a delight!

One of the favorites I intend to order again is speciosum Uchida, which I have received from B&D. But the lily I want most again doesn't seem to be available - the screaming red "The Vamp". I had gotten very pastel, so I started introducing intense reds.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
6:34 AM

Post #8877413

Here are Hiawatha and Red Alert, and if you look to the left, you will see Ariadne peeking out.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
7:14 AM

Post #8877449

Pirl, thank you for your message. It is nice to hear that Conca d'Or is a winner with such a nice fragrance. I got most of my bulbs for this one from B-D Lilies. I can't wait to see it sprout and bloom next season, although I know it won't really shine until 2013 or 2014... Does this one multiply for you?

Donna, what beautiful pictures! I also like dark red lilies, which is why I chose Red Velvet. Maybe I am strange but I really prefer lilies with down-facing or out-facing blooms. Is Ariadne really a short lily or is that picture deceiving? How long have you had it and how has it performed for you?

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
8:31 AM

Post #8877549

Hi Corey,

It took me a while to understand the charms of downward-facing blooms, but once I got it, I got it.

To give you some perspective, here are two pics of Ariadne and Rosepoint Lace. Since you have Rosepoint Lace, it will give you a better idea. Mine have grown to multiple heights, as you can see. And they have been in for ten years. Being anal, I record what I plant, and these went in during October of 2001!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
8:36 AM

Post #8877553

I love the interplay of the two. I have White Henryi to the right, and the reds to the left.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
8:39 AM

Post #8877557

Hiawatha, on the other hand, grows both down-facing and out-facing - the best of both worlds! And it's very tough.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
9:13 AM

Post #8877583

Beautiful photos, Donna! Don't apologize for being anal. I even created an Excel spreadsheet to keep track of my new lilies: cultivars, species, type, hybridizer, when planted, quantity planted, fragrance, source, etc. Of course, I can only start to fill in some of this info next year but it gives me something to look forward to.

This will sound horrible and snobby, but I think it was the upright Asiatics that kept me away from lilies for so long. They are so stiff and gaudy (not that anything is wrong with that--I love my gaudy dahlias) that they just never excited me. I thought the only two choices were upright Asiatics or the Orientals which, though lovely and fragrant, can usually be considered very expensive annuals around here. And so I stayed away from them for as long as possible. Now I am a hopeless addict. I had no idea that the world of lilies was so vast and varied.

In the process of discovering lilies, I had two eye-openers: the catalogues of Old House Gardens and The Lily Garden. OHG introduced me to some of the wonderful species lilies and TLG to some of the most beautiful lily hybrids I have ever seen in my life. They made me realize that lilies don't have to be delicate or stiff, but they encompass looks and aesthetics for almost everyone.

Now that all of my bulbs are safely put to bed, I will still be worrying about them all winter. Did I plant them deeply enough? Are they safe from rodents? (I did interplant a lot of them with mini daffodils, though.) Will my soil pH make them rot and decline? LOL, it is just like having a new puppy with all of this constant fussing and worrying! :-)



pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 5, 2011
9:16 AM

Post #8877588

Corey - I'll be lifting the Conca d'Or within the next two weeks to move it to a better place where it can show off so I'll let you know if it has multiplied. I only planted it 4/16/2010.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
9:38 AM

Post #8877605

How funny! I have an excel spreadsheet too! I have one for lilies, one for roses, and one for every plant I ever bought, complete with supplier and installation date.

Frankly, your aversion to upright Asiatics was shared by me. I found them small and uninteresting, lacking scent and being the lilies people just stuck in their yards. And then I discovered that oriental lilies are temperamental. There is actually a thread somewhere on DG about reliable orientals and red orientals. My very first lilies were from Brent and Becky (5 regales for $6.00, if you can imagine) that I still have today, and 5 Montreux, which I drowned. Then White Flower Farm had a special on a dozen Casablancas. I put them almost a foot down, thinking it was necessary, in soil next to the house with lots of gravel in it (didn't realize it, but that provides sharp drainage) and they were unbelievable. Thy were growing from the base of our foundation plants, which were bayberries, and the combo was magical! I was sold. But there are only a handful of reliable orientals (Sorbonne and Acapulco amonst them) so I moved on to trumpets.

I got lilum martagon, White Henryi and Silver Sunburst from OHG. I got Amethyst Temple from White Flower Farm. The last two are very difficult to find in commerce, as are Emerald Temple and Logidragon, which came from B&D. Once I discovered The Lily Garden, and subsequently B&D, I bought exclusively from them for many years. Then a couple of years ago I found Buggy Crazy (sadly, out of business) and Faraway Flowers.

The mini daffs should keep them safe. I discovered it a few years ago and started writing about it everywhere on DG. I kept recommending WP Milner, and was amused to find that it was sold out everywhere. Before that, 50 plus lilies were wiped out by voles one year. Since then - not a one! Is there anything more disappointing than planting these beauties, only to look up in spring and find them gone? Then there the lilies that had their little heads bitten off by rabbits. After at least five years of having the same lilies disappear every year (my rabbits have a favorite spot) I put mini daffs where I though the stems were, and the next year "found" Jubileo, Coral Babies (gifts from TLG) and Longidragon. It was like Christmas. And the most satusfying thing? Because the bulbs hadn't bloomed in 5 years, they were huge, and when they bloomed, they made up for lost time.

Don't worry too much about your bulbs. I noticed this spring that a Silk Road had risen to the surface during the winter. I spotted the yellow in the bulb. Panicking, I pulled it up and put it in a pot. It was one of my best bloomers (go figure).

And wow, I miss Buggy. This is Lilium Champagne.

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 12:54 AM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 5, 2011
10:33 AM

Post #8877645

After the lilies bloom away, what do you do with them. Do you cut them down and plant something else or just leave the leaves till they die?? I am new at the lilies, my order just came in and wonder how to plan out the garden, most of them will be about 4 feet tall. Etelka
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

November 5, 2011
11:09 AM

Post #8877682

You allow them to grow and when they are done blooming just remove the top where the flowers were to prevent them from going to seed. Instead they will direct their energy back to the bulb. Only cut them down when the leaves have dropped and the stem is brown. Enjoy them, Etelka!
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
11:11 AM

Post #8877684

Etelka, once lilies bloom you need to leave them alone until they die back naturally. It is okay to remove the spent flowers to prevent seed formation, but try not to remove any foliage. The need all of their foliage to build up energy in the bulbs for next year's blooms, multiplication, health, etc. If you would like to cut your lilies for the house, try not to remove more than 1/3 of the total foliage to ensure the bulb's health for next year.

Donna, I will have to keep my eye on Faraway Flowers. I already have their site bookmarked. Problem is, I can't afford any more bulbs this year! :-) But there is always next year... And not to mention that I want to buy nearly every single bulb in Judith Freeman's catalogue.

Pirl, can't wait to see the update about Conca d'Or after you move it! :-)
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
11:58 AM

Post #8877724

Donna, more questions. Are you involved with any regional lily societies? I just noticed that there is a Wisconsin-Illinois Lily Society and wondered if it would be worth joining. There was also a recent lily bulb sale at the Chicago Botanic Gardens recently that I missed...
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
3:10 PM

Post #8877913

Hi, just got back.

I am indeed a member of the Wisconsin Illinois Regional Society, but unfortunately their meetings are always in Eau Claire, which is quite a hike. One year they actually sent bulbs to members, but it never happened again. I really joined to give them moral support. They aren't really in a position to provide us with anything tangible (unless you want to drive to Eau Claire - their bulb sales are absolutely wonderful).

There used to be a Wisconsin Illinois Lily Society in the northern suburbs (their bulb sales were the one at The Botanic Garden, and a former member runs them). I enjoyed being a part of it (I was a Member-at-Large) and even enjoyed selling lilies at the Botanic Garden in 2002 (yum, the leftovers were fabulous). Unfortunately when the new president took over the former president was an incredibly disruptive force, and the society imploded. So there is no Illinois based society.

Ah, your problem is just good taste. I think that TLG is wonderful, and buying every one of her bulbs will keep you busy for a while!

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 7:14 PM
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 5, 2011
5:08 PM

Post #8878045

Thanks for the info, Donna! You're correct, Eau Claire is quite a long trek for us. It is a shame that there is not a more local group we can participate in around here. Do you know of any local lily fans? Maybe we should restart our own club?

I did join NALS and enjoyed reading through "Let's Grow Lilies" several times. It is such a fun book. I can't wait to peruse the seed exchange as well. I also just joined (today) the Lily Group of the Hardy Plant Society of Oregon (formerly the Pacific Northwest Lily Society) to take advantage of their biannual bulb sales. I noticed that The Lily Garden was one of the vendors this fall, and Judith was offering all of the bulbs I ordered (or would have ordered anyway) for a discounted price.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
11:37 PM

Post #8878430

You will LOVE the seed exchange. I managed to get my hands on Lilium Candidum Cascade Strain seed collected by the late, great Ed McRae, who was the head of the Species Lily Preservation Group, which has now merged with NALS. He and Judith Freeman were married.

As you probably know, Lilium candidum is usually fiercely expensive and disease prone. The Cascade Strain is an improved, strengthed strain. I have five plants that will bloom in the spring. I can't wait! I have also grown the formosanum/longiflorum strains, because I can start them in January and they will bloom for me in September. Immediate gratification. Then I have the choice of overwintering them indoors in pots with minimal watering, or starting new ones every year. I probably have ten packs of NALS lily seed in my minifridge (great for seed storage and overwintering lily bulbs.)

I'm glad I'm writing to a lily lover. I can't talk about this stuff to the people around me - they think I'm nuts. But when you can produce such beauty with your own hands - AH! But that's the problem. There are no lily fans, and the powers that be (the person who runs the Botanic Garden sales - I won't mention his name - is very controlling).

But maybe we can get together at The Botanic Gardens for their lily sales. Wouldn't that be fun? (I have two reciprocal memberships - we can get in free!)

I was also a member of the Pacific Northwest Lily Society and took advantage of their great sales last year. I should rejoin. It's just that I am a member of the American Rose Society and two peony societies, as well as a sponsor member of the Raulston Arboretum, which ships me the most rocking plants. Between the ARS and Raulston, my memberships are $300 a year. I think I am going to drop ARS (chemical/hybrid tea land) and keep the North American Lily Society and join the Hardy Plant Group.

Buggy also offered Judith's lilies. She was amazing.

I'm so glad you started writing. It is such a pleasure reading your wonderful and enthusiastic postings.

Here is trumpet lily Silver Sunburst from Old House Gardens.

This message was edited Nov 11, 2011 5:12 AM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
11:39 PM

Post #8878432

And Amethyst Temple. I love the contrast between the exterior and interior color. The two lilies appear to me out of commerce, so I treasure them.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 5, 2011
11:41 PM

Post #8878433

And Emerald Temple from B&D. Love those trumpets!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
4:48 AM

Post #8878549

Beautiful trumpets! Do these do well for you and multiply, or do they tend to dwindle after a while? I am curious about these since I think they are wonderful and planted a ton of L. regale and a few select strains this fall. If they do well for me ( I know they may not perform their best next season) I will move on to some of the extraordinary selections from The Lily Garden, tetraploids and color selections and such.

I was also a member of the American Rose Society for many years. I also found them to be very hybrid-tea-and-spray-the-beetles centric, which is not really my taste or style at all, and as such let my membership lapse. Most of the time I have lived in Chicago I was in a condo, so I had no yard space or garden to speak of, other than a back porch that was overflowing with containers in the summer. I just purchased a property with a yard this summer and moved in early this fall. I made sure I planted a few own root heritage rose selections that I had been fond of in the past, like 'Madame Plantier' and Rosa x centifolia 'Muscosa'.

Most plant societies I tend not to find very useful to me. Most are focused on exhibiting, which I have no interest in. I joined NALS for the seed exchange and cultural support since so few people seem to be interested in lilies and HPSO for the fabled bulb sales. I have been a member of Seed Savers Exchange for many years because I cannot resist seeds with a story or growing unusual vegetables. Other than that, I haven't really found many society memberships to be worth it to me.

I have always been fascinated by Lilium candidum since I was a child and saw pictures in books. Everything I have read about it always points out how fussy and fragile it is and it does cost so much, too. Needless to say, because of all of the above it did not make it on this year's list of "must buy" lilies. But how wonderful that you were able to start them from seed and nurture them successfully. When they bloom next year I can only imagine how proud you will be! And please remember to take lots of photos and post them here :-)

Yes, it seems that I missed out on Buggy as a great lily vendor. The good thing is that I will never know what I am missing since I will never be able to order lilies from her, LOL! However, I do have to say that The Lily Garden has provided very generous and thoughtful help and service to me this fall. Judith's bulbs are not as huge as B&D's, but they are just as healthy and always look beautiful. I also think B&D's selection is much more run-of-the-mill commercial than TLG (with a few exceptions of course) in spite of their huge bulbs. That said, I think both companies are fantastic and both are a great value considering the time and labor it takes to grow great lilies. Maybe next year I can add Faraway Flowers to my list of favorite vendors. I am already eyeing some of her incredible martagons...

I was also pleased and shocked to find that Van Engelen was selling 'Anastasia'. 25 bulbs for $43! Of course I had to order them. They were beautiful healthy bulbs too. I just hope they are correctly labeled and not some Dutch reject or inferior clone since 'Anastasia' is one of my most-wanted lilies.

Definitely we should plan on attending the lily sales at the Botanic Gardens. That would be so fun! My partner and friends have no interest in plants whatsoever so it would be nice to be able to talk plants with someone who understands! :-)
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
5:44 AM

Post #8878630

Ah, trumpets. They last forever. I have had many of them for years. I find them to be THE most reliable lily type. I have put in a couple of orienpets that did not return ($30 lilies, of course) but the trumpets multiply. I have given away almost every one I had because they are becoming rare and lovely people on this forum sent things to me. I think that they are my favorites, with color (all right, a bit mild) scent shape and reliability. White Henryi is amazing for me. I actually end up neglecting them because they never fail!

In terms of roses, I much prefer the old garden ones, especially the Portlands. I have Rose du Rescht and Marchesa Bocchella.The latter blooms continuously, is very disease resistant and has a glorious scent. I have Madame Hardy and Marie Pavie in a white bed with white lilies and white borage. Zephirine Drouhin is divine. But I also have the Austins Tess of the D'urbervilles, Heritage, Glamis Castle and Constance Spry. And a number of others. I do not care for hybrid teas, grandifloras, and the few floribundas I like do not work in my zone.Really, the ARS does not like the kinds of roses I like, but their Roses in Review did direct me to be best old garden roses.

I'm like you, exhibiting is not my bag - unless exhibiting to passersby. Sometimes people will walk by, and they or their child exclaims "ooh!" They are immeddiately invited to have a look around at the roses, lilies, lilacs, peonies
and grasses. Let's convert them all to gardening! And I will definitely post my candidums.

I laugh when I see the price of Anastasia now. I bought it many years ago from The Lily Garden at a price of 3 for $42. I had to have it! It is so eager to reproduce that my three became six and then nine and I transplanted them to two other places and then started gifting them. With such robustness, I do not understand why they were so expensive then. But Judith deserved to recoup the cost of her hybridizing efforts. Now they can be obtained quite inexpensively at Brent and Becky's, for example. But step back - if your experience is like mine, you will have hundreds in a couple of years!

Here they are in two different spots. They go with everything. Grasses.



This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 7:18 PM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
5:46 AM

Post #8878632

Perennials.

Get ready to spread the love!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
6:36 AM

Post #8878690

'Anastasia' is gorgeous! Believe it or not, it was your photos of it posted here on various threads on the DG lily forum that made me want to buy it in the first place. I am surprised at how hardy and robust it is since it is mostly Lilium speciosum by breeding. I hope it does as well for me as it has for you. TLG still sells it 3 bulbs for $35. That is why I am afraid my Van Engelen specimens will be mislabeled. I know that they probably tissue culture a lot of cultivars for mass production, but how can the Dutch produce it so cheaply if it is really 'Anastasia' and TLG still sells it for such a high price? Or maybe I am just paranoid due to price snobbery, LOL! :-) Hopefully I will be pleasantly surprised, And hundreds of lilies can never be a bad thing...

Ack! Orienpets that did not return?! Please tell me which ones they were. I know that it is just the nature of things that some of my lilies are bound to fail, but I will probably be a little sick with my first lily no-shows.

I also have 'Marie Pavie' and 'Rose de Rescht' planted this fall, along with another of my favorites 'Stanwell Perpetual'. I like the older roses the best. There is just nothing in a modern rose that can compare.

You have such beautiful grasses, too! I planted a clump of Panicum virgatum 'Dallas Blues' and Sporobolus wrightii from Plant Delights and I hope to incorporate more grasses in the future. But first I need to remove some scraggly old shrubs, either seriously trim or remove a large tree plaguing me in the back yard and then reevaluate my gardening space before I commit to too many plants. You have such a spacious suburban lot, and I am now working with a cramped city lot. I also tend to have a plant collector's sensibility rather than a garden designer's, so I need to be careful I don't end up with just a hodge podge of muddled weeds. As it is, almost every square inch of suitable garden space is now filled with lily bulbs.


Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 6, 2011
6:41 AM

Post #8878692

Ispahan, welcome to the lilies forum. I too an sort of a newbie to lilies, and only recently started paying attention to varieties. You're going to have a beautiful spring/summer based on the lilies you've ordered. I have a few that I had over the years gotten from the big box store, and then last spring I ordered some named ones from bleek's lily co-op. I got Toronto, Sphinx, Dizzy, Conca d' Or, and Citronella. I also have Belladonna, and one that I believe is Shocking, and another Orientpet that I got from another company. I need to find the order sheet to get those names.

For the fall, I ordered the entire lily collection from GH Wild, as I have two large beds that I put in this spring for peonies, and I wanted lilies, and irises for companions. I just planted the 27 types of lilies this week (81 lily bulbs total). I had gotten Pink Pearl, First Lady, Bernini, and Montenegro from them past and they have done really well here when not eaten by the bunnies. Thanks to DonnaMack's suggestion, I also planted Narcissus Hawera around the new lilies.

Donna, your pictures are gorgeous. Love the companion plants, what's the blue bloom in your last post? I also consider both you and Ispahan enablers, as I've now bookmarked The Lily Garden, B& D, and OHG as suppliers of llilies. LOL Annette

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 10:43 AM
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
7:10 AM

Post #8878734

Annette, it sounds like your garden will be beautiful next year with all of the new (and old) lilies you have planted. I have never been called an enabler before, but I really do recommend The Lily Garden and B&D. Old House Gardens is wonderful too for some of the species and older hybrids, but they are not growers or lily specialists. If I had to choose just one supplier, so far it would be The Lily Garden. Judith Freeman is truly one of the best hybridizers of our time, and she is also accessible and truly generous with her bulbs. With lilies, you usually do get what you pay for. I feel fortunate to have have found these companies for my first lily experiences (although my wallet is not so fortunate, LOL!).
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
8:23 AM

Post #8878839

I LOVE Stanwell Perpetual - it's been on my wish list forever. It is nice having more space but it's really a quarter acre (with the house) but it's CRAMMED! In the city, with a condo, I had 30 plus pots of plants. My "thing" then was heirloom flowers, which really lend themselves to pot growing.

The blue blooms are platycodon grandiflorus - such a beautiful blue. It was installed for me, and I liked it so much that I grew perlemetter and alba as well. Wonderful, deep rooted plants that last forever!

Judith Freeman is such a pioneer, along with all the people from Oregon Bulb Farm (a great place of the past). I love supporting her work.

Orienpet Luminaries was another very expensive bulb for me. Not only did it not come back, it never bloomed!!!

I was given a glorious Rococo in a pot, which I subsequently put into the ground. I do suspect that a heavy male foot is resonsible for its demise.

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 7:20 PM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
8:55 AM

Post #8878870

Well, I didn't plant Luminaries per se, but I did put in three bulbs of 'Quintessence' which is Judith's special selection clone from Luminaries. It is supposed to get very tall once established and the pictures in TLG catalogue look amazing, so I will keep my fingers crossed that it lives and blooms for me.

'Rococo' is another one that was tempting me, but in the end I decided on 'Conca d'Or' instead because of all the glowing reviews and that fact that it was just elevated to the Lily Hall of Fame. The other yellow that I am really curious about is 'Allegretto' in Judith's catalogue. It has a stunning flat-faced flower, medium yellow with green highlights and rumored to be fragrant. However, due to the $70 price tag (for 3 bulbs) and paucity of information online about its health and vigor, I decided on another cultivar (Silver Scheherazade) as my big splurge.

I read all about Oregon Bulb Farms in Ed McRae's book. What a fascinating piece of horticultural history! One of the most tragic things that I read somewhere is that when the banks took over OBF after bankruptcy, they destroyed acres and acres worth of valuable lily breeding germplasm that was the culmination of decades of work by people like de Graaf, McRae and Freeman. No one knows what could have resulted from the countless lilies that were destroyed in terms of breeding advances and garden worth. But at least we have people like Judith who continue to persevere in their quest for excellence and provide a way to offer their extraordinary goods to the public. I only hope she is doing well enough in this horrid economy to continue to support her breeding and propagation efforts. I know a lot of heirloom rose nurseries are really struggling right now, and now Vintage Gardens will be closing in 2013.



Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

November 6, 2011
8:58 AM

Post #8878873

Regarding use of a spread sheet, I don't know what I would do without it!!!

I keep one that catalogs everything I have in my 4 tenths of an acre yard. It has about 1050 entries, and over 200 of them are Lilium species and cultivars and crosses. At least half of those are still yet to bloom seedlings.

Over the years, I have found one thing extremely advantageous that I don't think most people do:
As certain entries become obsolete (plant dies, is removed or given away), I don't just deleted the line. Make a new spread sheet for "past plant materials" and move them there so you will always have a record. I can't tell you how many times I have asked myself (or someone has asked me) "What was that plant I used to have?". Without that archive, I would be lost.

Rick
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 6, 2011
9:07 AM

Post #8878880

I have mine in an Access database, and like you, when one stops performing or dies, I change the location code to one called "dead". So I can run a report by location 'dead' and get all the ones that for whatever reason didn't make it. Hate to do it as it also totals cost. ouch.

My orienpets all do very well. Conc d'Or in particular is gorgeous and huge. It has little babies coming up from around the 1" origiinal stem. Don't know if these are from bulbets or just more from the original bulb. I have had no luck with Album specioso.(?). Grows, has buds, never flowers. Same with Miss Lucy. I wonder if I move them to pots and start them indoors in say February if that would give them time enough to bloom.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
9:08 AM

Post #8878882

Isn't Ed McRae's book wonderful? The economics of the lily business are difficult, but not nearly as bad as roses. Were you on the rose thread, reading about the problems and the closures? Happily my favorite Pickering seems to be doing very well. I do love Antique Rose Emporium and ordered many of my roses from them but they are gotten quite expensive because the shipping on two gallon containers is very high. I'm getting myself into real trouble now because I read Peter Beal's book and am getting emails from his nursery. That amazing man is hybridizing antique roses! Be still my heart.

It's always bad when corporations and hedge funds get involved in horticulture. They don't understand the business, and they see plants as commerce (don't get me started on Knockouts - as others on the rose thread know they make me seethe) and that is why some wonderful plants aren't being produced anymore. And then there are the vagaries of nature. B&D's fields were raided by voles a few year back, and they lost some plants altogether, and had to pull some bulbs from sale in order to rebuild their stocks. Yet they persevere. I have such admiration from these small companies. It's from them I find the best goodies.

Donna

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 11:10 AM
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
9:11 AM

Post #8878887

Rick, you are so right about keeping records of past purchases and things that fail. It saves many a bad purchase.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
9:12 AM

Post #8878891

Bless you Ispahan. The lily forum is no longer quiet!!!!
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
9:25 AM

Post #8878901

I agree with all of you. Spreadsheets are wonderful garden tools, perhaps just as essential as a good shovel and garden hose.

Oberon, is your lack of success with Lilium speciosum 'Album' and 'Miss Lucy' due to short seasons, early frost, disease, failure to thrive, or...? Does it form buds which then abort, or just gets frozen out before it blooms? By the way, I was in Anchorage this past June. I loved it, and all the other parts of Alaska I saw, too.

Donna, have you had a frost yet out in the burbs? Here close to the lake the coldest we have gotten is around 35-36 degrees F. Still no frost and many plants in my yard are still up and growing. A lot of trees are still losing leaves and some are still green(ish) but beginning to change.

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 12:08 PM
fleur_guy
Parma, OH
(Zone 5b)

November 6, 2011
9:39 AM

Post #8878915

DonnaMack I had similar experience with 'Luminaries'. Out of three, only two came up and have remained scrawny for a few years. I purchase by pictures and descriptions and so far they just haven't lived up to their billing. As far as down facing lilies go I can't quite wrap my heart around them yet. Maybe I just need more time although 'White Henryi' sure has my interest.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 6, 2011
10:36 AM

Post #8878958

I have recieved my order of bulbs, I am planing to put them in flowerpots. Should I keep them inside and let them sprout and maybe in March put them outside to bloom, this is my first year of planting lilies.
I got Corina, Sunset, Loreto, Mango and Lollipop. They came 3 in the pack, can I put all three in one 2 gal. pot, or should I put them one at the time in smaller pot. Thanks a bunch for your advice. Etelka
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 6, 2011
10:44 AM

Post #8878962

Miss Lucy forms buds and alllllmmmmoooosst opens. then nothing. They push well into the fall to even begin opening. The other forms small buds that go nowhere. I had them in a bed overwhelmed with dahlias and snaps and have moved them to the front of a bed warmed by brick rim and in full sun. Will see if that helps next year. But the Miss Lucy have been in the same bed, full sun almost all spring, summer, fall for three years. No change in results. I thought maybe last years rains affected them as the beginning of the flowers turn brownish. but it happened this year also. Course, we had some long stretches of rain, but they lilies only had buds at that point.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
11:50 AM

Post #8879011

No frost yet for us - it gets close, say, 34 degrees. This is unheard of. In 90% of the years we have had a plant destructive frost by October 15. My annuals and tender perennial and tomatoes are just fine.

I have lost several speciosum and I think the problem is soil that is too alkaline. I am going to order Uchida next year fromB&D and treat them properly - perhaps in pots.

Oh, fleur guy, thank you regarding Luminaries. I always wondered if that was my fault! And White Henryi you might want to think about. I always ignore it till it blooms. So unfussy I do not worry. Then it takes my breath away.

This message was edited Nov 6, 2011 7:11 PM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
11:51 AM

Post #8879013

They are as tough as they are beautiful and scented.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
11:54 AM

Post #8879019

These came from Old House Gardens in 2001. My Anastasias were bought the same year. Maybe this is why they are in the NALS Hall of Fame!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 6, 2011
1:22 PM

Post #8879101

'White Henryi' looks spectacular and exactly matches the image I have in my mind of what an ideal garden lily should look like: elegant, refined, graceful, understated and yet amazingly beautiful. I planted 3 bulbs last week from TLG so I can't wait to see how they perform in the future. I heard that this one can sometimes take a few years to settle in and show what it is capable of, along with its seedlings 'Leslie Woodriff' and 'Sarabande'. I just noticed that OHG now has them at 25% off with their end-of-season sale.

It is sad to hear that Luminaries might be one of the weaker OT strains, at least in the Midwest/Great Lakes regions. I have read other posts about washed out color in intense summer heat and sunlight. I will keep my fingers crossed that 'Quintessence' will be a good performer. The bulbs I planted of it were not huge but seemed very solid and healthy, just like all my new children from TLG.

What does everyone think of LOs? I am trying two: Triumphator and El Condor, both from B&D. It seems like they were very trendy only 2-3 years ago and now they are much more difficult to find. As far as I know, B&D is the only source I could find. The bulbs of these cultivars they sent were HUGE. El Condor was so large that a couple of the bulbs even had a few walnut-sized bulblets attached.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 6, 2011
4:05 PM

Post #8879305

I only have one LO, Prince Promise, but it has been excellent under very bad conditions. I forgot it was there, and did not take care of it. It is now on its third year. And honestly, it was a gift from a friend, and the source was B&D a couple of years ago. I alerted her that they were having a sale, and they deluged her with extras (what a lovely problem) and she gifted me with it. I never would have bought it, because there are lots of trendy lily types that fail. But this is a winner.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

November 6, 2011
5:06 PM

Post #8879387

I don't know about the northern regions, but Triumphator does great here in So. Cal., where few lilies thrive. I planted three bulbs in a pot the first year, and they performed well. Last year I put them in the ground and they reached 7' tall! They are also increasing like bunnies. They have a nice scent, and hold their color well for me. I got them from B&D.
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
6:33 AM

Post #8879911

Good to hear that 'Triumphator' is a winner. Most reports I have read about it online are glowing. 'Prince Promise' also seems like a winner. How interesting though that a lot of LO hybrids seem to be garden worthy and rapid increasers and now they so hard to find. Is fashion in the lily world really so fickle?

A lot of OT hybrids seem to come and go, too. I have already seen several names of cultivars that were apparently popular only 2-3 years ago that are now nowhere to be seen in commercial catalogues: Montego Bay, the American series, Golden Stargazer, etc.

I suppose I shouldn't complain though. Lily fashion seems to be much more tasteful in general than rose fashion. I understand and echo Donna's dislike of the scentless, plastic-looking 'Knockout' series. What a disservice to the grace and beauty of the rose!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 7, 2011
8:01 AM

Post #8880013

I tried the Knockout's up here in a hedge. They lasted one winter and one summer and all died.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 7, 2011
8:48 AM

Post #8880076

It is interesting, isn't it? The American series and Golden Stargazer were advertised everywhere. I didn't like them. I realize that my tastes are on the cooler side but I wasn't crazy about the combination of red, yellow, and huge.

I had to laugh, Ispahan, at your noting my dislike of Knockouts. I vented at length on another forum about those things. I was pretty outspoken. Word must have spread.

And I agree - no matter how questionable lilies can be, there is no way in which their flaws can come close to what I think is the worst - double Knockouts. Twice the horror LOL! (Donna, don't start!!!)
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
11:42 AM

Post #8880275

LOL, Donna! You mentioned your dislike of the Knockouts on this thread already above, which is where I first saw it. There is an Aldi store about half a mile from me that has a horrid mass planting of about 200 original Knockouts planted in front. Not only is the planting naturally hideous, but almost every bush planted there has been severely infected with Rose Rosette disease. I have never seen so much witch's broom in my life!

Golden Stargazer really doesn't intrigue me at all, but I have to say that some of the photos I have seen people posting of mature specimens of the American series do look look very nice. I bet the late Christopher Lloyd would have loved them with their vibrant color combinations and boldness.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 7, 2011
1:29 PM

Post #8880391

Oh, no, there is a thread on which I vent at length! The reference above is nothing compared to it.

Aren't KO's supposed to be wonderful because of their disease resistance? WOW!

I guess I learned, after a bit of trial and error, to stay away from the heavily promoted or new. Except for Anastasia - and of course we are talking about Judith!

Remember when Silk Road came out? It cost a great deal - $14.95 each at Wayside. And I saw it in lots of peoples' garden, and most of them were not lily lovers, so they could have been better placed. But a few years back Wayside couldn't sell them at that price, so they sold them for $12.95 - for THREE. That's when I jumped, because I knew they came from TLG. Then , when I bought some lilies from TLG that fall, Silk Riad was the complimentary bulb. So I got 4 of them for $12.95.

Is it just me, or does Silk Road not branch much? The stems get taller and produce more flowers, but for me they have never produced more stems. I put in four, and many years later I have four stems. Is that odd? Is anyone else experiencing that?

Donna
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 7, 2011
1:56 PM

Post #8880449

Funny that you mention that. I noticed from reading through all of these lily posts that a lot of people have had identical experiences to yours with 'Silk Road', saying that every year the stem gets larger with more buds, but it never or only very rarely seems to multiply. I received two bonus bulbs of 'Silk Road' from my TLG orders so I am using them to practice scaling. I thought this would be a great one to practice on since it is not rare and seems to multiply only very slowly on its own. I now have two whole bulbs scaled and tucked away in a warm, dark cupboard for now.

I wonder how big your mother bulbs are now after all these years. They must be honkers!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 7, 2011
4:40 PM

Post #8880674

Kiseta, forgive me for missing your question about lilies in a two gallon pot. You can indeed plant three in one of them, and indeed you will get a bouquet effect - I've grown one to a pot and there is no comparison. You may have to repot them sooner than if you have one to a pot, but repotting the little darlings is easy to do. And it gives you a good chance to refresh the soil. I am going to do just that!

Corey, the mother bulbs are absolutely enormous. I noticed when one pushed itself to the surface. Literally. I looked down at the ground and saw this yellow thing. Since I had buried it several inches down it was quite a shock.

I love growing Silk Road with grasses, to hide the somewhat in your face stem.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 7, 2011
4:43 PM

Post #8880679

Baptisia australis is a champ for hiding the stems, too. In covering it's feet, it also makes the lily stem grow a bit shorter, which is an effect I like.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 7, 2011
5:01 PM

Post #8880707

Thank you Donna, I was preparing my pots today and figured I can plant the bulbs 3 together the first year and next year I can figure it out where I wanted to plant them. Today I also planted my 2 new red Astilbe and put it in front of my 3 Black and blue salvia. Sun in the morning and shade in the afternoon. This is the South, you can hardly plant anything in full sun.Looks like my garden will look totaly different next Spring then this year. I planted this year a lot of new flowers that I got to collect. Agastaches, Coreopsis, Veronicas they are all new.Now the lilies and iris, I will dream about them tonight.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 7, 2011
5:09 PM

Post #8880725

Kiseta,

I'm so glad you could go forward with your plans. The dreaming is half the fun. And better yet, when the sun is too scorching in one spot, you can move your potted lilies. We had a string of days in the high 90's this year, and when I realized that some of the lilies were really going to struggle, I pulled them up in a near bloom state and put them in pots so I could move them and water them. They didn't miss a beat, and it was lovely bringing them in for an evening when I had guests and using them as a centerpiece on my table.

Agastaches are in the same family as salvias, are they not? I love them with lilies. Veronicas too!
OCCAROL
Santa Ana, CA
(Zone 10b)

November 7, 2011
7:52 PM

Post #8880930

Ispahan, I also have Montego Bay, purshased from Costco. It has done well here (not as well as Triumphator but in a different bed). I love the colors, and it does have some scent.
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 8, 2011
8:54 AM

Post #8881486

Carol, thank you for the information about Montego Bay. It is always good to hear input from those who actually grow these lilies.

Can anyone tell me more about the fragrance of OT lilies? I know many are *supposed* to be fragrant, but does that mean a faint scent that requires to stick your nose deep in the blossom and use some imagination, or does it mean strong scent that wafts pleasantly around the garden without having to seek it out?

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 9, 2011
7:06 AM

Post #8882808

Corey, I only have one LO as you know, and I can't remember how strong the scent was, making me think that it is moderate at best. Not strong like some others I associate with scent. I just looked up an article and it describes the scent as subtle or mild - which is why I don't remember, but sitting here I can remember the scent of all my trumpets - one of their charms. B&B's catalogue describes the scent as mild.

I do love the look of the one LO I have (Prince Promise) and would like to acquire more. TLG had Queen's Promise (it's weird, the two are from the same grouping but the registered name of one has a comma and the other does not) but it is a smaller version of Prince Promise.

Donna
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2011
11:58 AM

Post #8884879

Donna,

I don't remember where I just saw it but somewhere on this forum you posted a photo of lilies growing with what looks like a double Bouncing Bet (Saponaria officinalis). Do you still grow this plant? I have been searching for it forever! I just transplanted a bunch of the single-flowered version into my garden. In spite of its thuggish ways, I love its modest looks, nocturnal habit and sweet fragrance. Please let me know where you got it. I think a company called Flower Scent Gardens offered a version of it several years ago, but I missed that boat long ago since they went out of business. Sigh. I have never seen anyone else offer it.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 10, 2011
12:10 PM

Post #8884891

Shoot. For a minute I thought I had read a 'bouncing betty!" lol. A term for WWII land mines also used by the French in Viet Nam.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 10, 2011
6:27 PM

Post #8885357

I actually ordered the white from Glenn Varner of Flower Scent Gardens in his last year. I have four plants in front of the house we are selling but I actually dug some up for a neat person several years ago. I have potted up a lot of my perennials for movement to the new house but didn't take that.

Tell you what - I'll drive to the house tomorrow and dig some up, if I can, for both of us. There's nothing like it. I controlled it by shoving a spade around it twice a year. And you do have to control it, but it's worth it. I have the white and pink, and the white is just glorious.

I'll see what I can do! It's hard to get out of the ground intact, but I'll try. I seem to have a lot of plants that are out of commerce.

Donna

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 10, 2011
6:29 PM

Post #8885359

The pink is nice too, but it's easier to find and harder to control. I mass it in my peony beds.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 10, 2011
6:38 PM

Post #8885373

OMG, Donna, what amazing photos! The white version is gorgeous. Please let me know if you are able to dig any up. How is the fragrance?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 10, 2011
7:12 PM

Post #8885426

The scent is soft and sweet. Absolutely delightful. I'm so glad you brought this up. How could I possible leave this behind? It's a lovely mixer in a border.

First thing tomorrow (cause wow, it's getting cold here!)

This message was edited Nov 11, 2011 5:07 AM

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 11, 2011
6:13 AM

Post #8885731

Corey,

You mentioned above your scaling of Silk Road, and that you had scaled two whole bulbs. I have never done this. Would you please tell me about your scaling experiences and techniques? I would love to use it to scale my Prince Promise!
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2011
7:25 AM

Post #8885815

Hi Donna,

Of course I would be happy to talk about my scaling experiences. My bulbs have now been scaled for a little over a week (maybe 8 days total) so I really have nothing to report yet. This is also my first scaling attempt. I first read as much as possible about scaling, both in lily books and on lily forums. I found some great posts by Pardalinum online that detailed some of the steps. I was happy about this since a lot of instructions given in lily books are quite vague at best. Here is what I did:

1. I washed the bulbs as much as I could to get rid of dirt, decayed plant tissue, grit, grime, etc. It is impossible to clean between all the scales at this point, but you just need the bulb to be clean enough so you can see what you are working with.
2. Peel or snap off the scales as close to the base (basal plate) as possible. You will have to slowly pull back the scale and work your thumb in slowly close to the base to prevent the scales from breaking at the midpoint. In spite of what books say, it is nearly impossible to actually include a piece of basal plate on every scale. You just need to be as close as possible. I peeled off scales all the way to the tiny center of the bulb.
3. I rinsed off the scales to get rid of any remaining dirt and grit. I then soaked them for 20 minutes in a 10% household bleach solution (1 part bleach to 9 parts water).
4. Rinse of the scales thoroughly with water and air dry on paper towels for several hours in good air circulation.
5. Place in a ziploc bag with *barely damp* peat moss or vermiculite (I used peat moss since I already had it on hand). Barely damp means it shouldn't actually feel wet, just slightly cool to the touch. You should use enough peat moss/vermiculite so all scales are covered and separated when the bag is shaken gently. I placed about a teaspoon of fungicide powder (Captan) in the bag before I shook it up. This is supposed to prevent a lot of mold/fusarium growth later on.
6. Take out most of the air, seal the bag, place in a warmish dark place (about 65-70 degrees F) and place a weight on top. A book is perfect.
7. Depending on the species or hybrid being scaled, you should see bulblets after four weeks and the whole process should be completed within 8 to 12 weeks. The bulblets are then ready for vernalization, etc.

I am keeping my fingers crossed that this process works for me. Are you interested in any bulblets of 'Silk Road' in the future? :-)
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 11, 2011
8:27 AM

Post #8885868

Corey,

What a fascinating process - and what great instructions. And yes, indeed, I would love bulblets of Silk Road. You've done the hard part. You are really a very sophisticated plantsperson. I am very impressed. You have so much to contribute.

I'm thinking of scaling because I only have one Longidragon. It is one of the bulbs that was decimated in the B&D vole invasion. Dianna was kind enough to tell me about it. It was pretty devastating. The lily itself cannot be captured in a picture. It is very dramatic. And it appears to be completely out of commerce.

Donna
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 11, 2011
2:39 PM

Post #8886290

Wow, Donna, no one has ever called me a "sophisticated plantsman" before, but I'll take it! :-) My problem is that I am very fond of (and good at) research and plant collecting, but quite weak in the garden design area. When I see the pictures you post of your gardens and beds, it is obvious how much thought you put into your combinations. You definitely have an artistic sensibility that I lack.

I will be happy to share any future 'Silk Road' bulblets with you. Please let me know if you decide to scale your Longidragon so we can compare our results. If you just want to experiment, you can easily take off 3-4 scales from the mother bulb without hurting it or affecting its vigor. I only scaled two entire bulbs because they were bonus bulbs and I had already planted two big clumps of 'Silk Road' in my garden anyway. And I was curious to see the inside structure of a lily bulb with my own eyes. Otherwise I would have only removed 3-4 scales from each bulb.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 11, 2011
8:48 PM

Post #8886642

I think I must scale longidragon, or no one will ever see it again. I think that I will let it safely bloom and then give it a try. Thank you for the lovely compliments. they mean a lot coming from you, yes, you sophisticated person. I grew up in beautiful treed environments but no one actually gardened. They though that gardening is putting in tulips in spring - nice, but not enough. I love Pam Duthie's idea of "Continual Bloom" so I designed my garden for fall, because if your yard is pretty in fall it's pretty all year. I love texture and color, and I like to blend plants together, which is good because while much larger than an urban lot, by suburban standards my yard is quite small. I am fortunate enough to have a ten foot easement, and when I asked whether I could put things on it, they said, certainly - so three President Lincoln lilacs, four hydrangea querquefolia Snowflake, ten peonies, tons of perennials and dozens of bulbs.

I went today and ripped out some quite dormant white saponaria. I'm going to put it in pots. It looked awful, but I have learned that means nothing. Let's see what happens next spring, and when it happens, I'll pass some on to you.. Also took a bunch of Heuchera Firefly and bergenia winterglut I I had grown from seed, and some Anemone x Hybrida Honorine Jobert.

The season of planning and dreaming has begun, but for me it's still the season of transplanting!

Donna
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2011
1:46 PM

Post #8890175

I have a simple question... I just finished planting my lily bulbs in flowerpots, should I keep watering them all Winter when we don't have rain for long time. Or just let the Good Lord take care of them in the Winter??? Thanks for the answer, I am new at lillies. Etelka
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 14, 2011
2:18 PM

Post #8890215

Are your bulbs outside? I have some in my garage, and once a month I give them about a tablespoon of water. If they seem very dry (test the pot once a month by digging down in it) a little bit of water won't hurt and may help. I lost bulbs in pots in the garage because they got no water over the winter.

Donna
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 14, 2011
4:37 PM

Post #8890375

They are going to stay outside , it never goes under 20 degr. in Augusta, plus I don't have a garage. Thanks. I will be watering the pansies all Winter, I did't know if I should include the lilieas too.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 14, 2011
7:08 PM

Post #8890592

Oh, I wish I lived in a place where it never goes under 20! I have a sister who lives in Savannah. Sometimes I think I've missed the boat.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 15, 2011
10:05 AM

Post #8891274

Ditto!!
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2011
12:59 PM

Post #8891502

But we have nets, waterbugs and fireants. I lived in lots of places, but Augusta is the one more to my liking. No huricans, earthquaake or flooding. Here at my house, the soil is very good, I have earthwors all over the place. Only thing is I live under a 100 year old water oak that is loosing it leaves and it is a mess this time of the year.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 15, 2011
1:27 PM

Post #8891529

Yeah... could live without the waterbugs and fireants. Or snakes!! I think Oregon or Washington are more my speed. Maybe high country Arizona or Colorado.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 15, 2011
3:06 PM

Post #8891644

I've been to northern California, the Colorado springs area and Seattle. Pretty special places. That's why everyone has beaten us there and prices are so high!!!

I haven't seen a waterbug since I was a child. They are GROSS!!!!!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 15, 2011
3:20 PM

Post #8891660

Never seen one at all that wasn't teeny tiny little water skimmers. Guess that doesn't count. Yeah, the prices are way high although some people here have found places not entirely exorbitant. beeHive found a neat place in the Dells in Oregon. I actually looked there online. Interesting places
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 15, 2011
3:53 PM

Post #8891704

They were huge and fat.

The other place that looks cool is North Carolina. I've been to Chapel Hill, Raleigh, Durham, Charlotte and Asheville. LOVED Asheville, and it's a lot cheaper than Chapel Hill, much to my shock.

It's just that I DO NOT livein a "temperate climate". What's temperate about lots of 90 degree days in the summer and below-20 in the winter? One good thing though - everythings dies off. You have less plant disease when the cold renders them at least dormant.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 15, 2011
5:15 PM

Post #8891856

I find that also. Lots of the stuff that afflicts your plants down south isn't a problem up here. You temp is like Fairbanks, except the 90 is not too common, and the lows are closer to -25 to -30 on average.

I have been to Paris Tenn in Western Tenn on the kentucky border almost. Pretty 'Southern' in all ways. "Ya'll come see us, ya hear". Except of course if your a yankee. lol. No, they aren't all that way. some awfully nice people down there. but way to hot and humid. I would think NC would be the same. I wonder how Asheville compares to places in Washington or Oregon. Including state tax, sales tax, property tax. We don't have state or sales so it's a hard pill to swallow. Heck, we don't even care much for federal tax. LOL.
Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

November 15, 2011
7:03 PM

Post #8891993

Unfortunately, GA does have snakes. I was putting down pine straw and mini pine bark nuggets today, walked away for a sec to get the broom. Came back to clean up the walk way, and started sweeping, turned around and WHOA, Snaaakkkeeeeee!!!!!. I walked away again to get the rake, and took care of it. We seem to have them in our garden beds around my house, which doesn't make me happy. I was just telling my neighbor today( who was working in her yard, and who is very afraid of snakes) that the snakes should be hibernating for the winter since we've had several hard freezes. Well, guess that theory got proven wrong today.

DonnaMack, I agree that North Carolina is a beautiful state. My SIL and her family live in Charotte now and previously in Raleigh. I had a chance to visit Wilson and Asheville last fall, and the drive to Asheville was breathtaking, and the weather gorgeous.

Ok ya'll ;-), i know what knats and fireants are. Still trying to get over the fireant bites from >2 weeks ago, but what the heck is a waterbug? And, will it eat my lilies?
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

November 15, 2011
9:02 PM

Post #8892152

Waterbugs are those large roaches, or in S. Caroline they call them Palmeto bugs. They live under the pine straw and in the trees.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 16, 2011
6:30 AM

Post #8892478

I'm looking seriously at Asheville, so I've done research. It is not the least expensive place in North Carolina, but in terms of housing it is less expensive than Chapel Hill or Charlotte, much to my surprise. One can do even better in Raleigh-Durham.

Of course, I'm living in one of the most expensive states. The sales tax in Cook County is 10.25%, which is why I never buy anything there, and am moving to Kane (7.25%). And our real estate taxes are obscene. $11,000 per annum for 2,000 square feet in Lake County. Very powerful unions that generate lot of pensions. 87% of the tax bill goes for schools. I'm sure you all have heard about the fiscal irresponsibility.

Chicago, when I lived there in the 70's, was a great city. Much less crowded, far more safe, and the people were nicer. You could live within a block of the lakefront for very little money. I did on my first job and could still buy a condo within 3 years.

Asheville, by contrast, is very reasonable if you are coming from this environment. And wow, people all over NC (I pretty much covered the state for both business and pleasure) are the kindest, most gracious people. I've started taking a trip there every year. That drive to Asheville! Yes, glorious!

This message was edited Nov 16, 2011 12:13 PM
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 16, 2011
7:47 AM

Post #8892590

We have a 1900sf ranch, 1980 vintage and pay about 5200 a year in tax. And of course I think pretty much everyone knows we live from oil primarily, with help from tourism and the military so no state tax or sales tax. My husband is firmly in favor of a reasonable sales tax. As it is, property owners pretty much bear the major burden in Anchorage.

My FIL is from Chicago. Marco Antonio Stello, later anglisized to Marc Anthony Stella. Rumor has it there were mafioso connections. My pediatrition went to medical school in Chicago and some of the tales he tells me about Mayor Daly and his ilk were hair raising. Unbelievable. Definitely not a place I would want to live in the 30-50's.
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 16, 2011
10:43 AM

Post #8892820

Of course I am completely biased, but I don't think Chicago is *that* bad. It is very expensive (though not as expensive as anywhere on the east coast) and some areas are dirty and crime-ridden for sure, but the city still has a lot of charm. You can still find neighborhoods filled with friendly people and safe streets. Now, the public schools here are horrid, the taxes (both sales tax and property tax) are horrid and the lots are tiny, but it is still a much more livable area than, say, New York City.

I recently moved from a condo in a somewhat shady area very close to the lake to a home in a fabulous residential area about a mile away from the lake. However, in order to be able to afford a property with a yard we had to buy a fixer-upper that will eventually need a renovation to make it into what we really want. The yard was also a completely overgrown, weedy, brambly, unplanned mess and I have already spent countless hours cleaning it up, pruning and removing unwanted shrubs and other vegetation. It is amazing what it looks like now compared to before we moved in in September.

That said, even though I am very happy here, I sometimes long for something simpler and quieter. I was raised on a farm and I very much miss life in a rural area and being so close to nature.

I toured Alaska earlier this past summer and I fell in love with it. It is such a special place. I also know Asheville and think it is a wonderful town.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 16, 2011
4:02 PM

Post #8893295

Ah, then these locations will mean something to you.

When I lived on Wrightwood I loved it!

Then I bought on Gordon Terrace, half a block from the park, and that was great.

Then I was in a four unit condo in Sheridan Park on a wide one way street lined with trees - the 4500 block of Dover Street., in a four flat condo that was a gut rehab, and that was great too, except that the people changed, and that was the hardest part. People next door wouldn't speak to you when you greeted them. They threw loud screaming parties till 4 in the morning. They didn't want to hire maintenance staff but they didn't want to perform maintenance duties. My husband and I ended up doing much of the work although we had the smallest unit. Our neighbors were all newcomers to the city.

It is much more livable than NYC, but I think NYC is unlivable. And it concerns me that neighborhoods that were once very safe (I grew up a block from Obama's home) now have problems with muggings, vandalism and other woes, in a place with $1,000,000 plus homes. Senator Carol Moseley Braun was mugged and punched there. My sister was struck in the face emerging from lovely Madison Park - the man wanted her purse, and he couldn't just snatch it and go. The neighbors responded to her screams. She was traumatized by the experience, since we had lived there safely since the end of 1959. The glorious neighborhood of my childhood. People are being attacked in areas where I once got off the 22 Clark bus at 1:00 a.m. and walked safely down the street.

It's sad.
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 16, 2011
7:38 PM

Post #8893526

It is sad, Donna. I have only been in the city for about 9 years having moved here from Michigan. But even in that short time period I have seen a lot of changes. Some areas have declined and are now ridden with crime, while others are becoming progressively more elevated and hoity-toity highbrow. My older brother also lives in the city and he was mugged and attacked several years ago in his neighborhood (Edgewater). It is a truly scary experience.

I was living in Uptown before now, an area frequently viewed as up and coming but it never really seems to go up except in noise pollution and amount of litter and trash found on the streets. Before that I was in Bucktown and before that I started out in Hyde Park. Now I am in Graceland West and I have to say it is the friendliest area of any I have lived in here in the city. It is probably the closest to a small town feeling I have had in Chicago, with a very active crime watch and lots of community involvement and participation.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 17, 2011
3:56 AM

Post #8893824

Oh, you chose well!

Uptown has been up and coming FOREVER, at least since the 70's, but it never seems to get there. One problem was the former alderman, Helen Schiller, who littered it with a large concentration of SRO's. We went to look at a spectacular condo, and when we looked out the back porch, we could see the eyes of people staring back at us from a single room occupancy a couple of blocks away. It was unnerving. It also made you realize that dozens of people could watch your comings and goings.

The hilarious thing about Chicago is that they keep renaming areas to encourage development. Without moving, I lived in Uptown (which used to start at Irving Park) to Lakeview. Sheridan Park used to be in Uptown. The great thing about Sheridan Park is that older buildings were renovated, so we lived in an incredible brick building that had been four units when built, had gotten divided into 32 units (Uptown syndrome) and was restored to four units. All that fabulous brick on the outside, gut rehabbed. Top price for the largest 1,600 square foot unit - $134,000. But Clark Street, not that far away, was still dicey. You could see evidence of, shall we say, sexual activity in and near our carport.

One funny sad thing is that I went out one morning to find a quite thin man in the carport sleeping between the cars. I tried to rouse him, and he appeared dead. I ran inside and called 911, and the police and ambulance came. It turned out that he was just sleeping. VERY deeply. Everyone was so kind and gentle to him - it was uplifting. I apologized for calling the police. He was actually very sweet. They got juice and a little breakfast for him, and made sure he could stand up with no difficulty. And you know what he said? It seemed like a quiet place to sleep! And you wake up to six people standing over you. We all laughed. Funny, but also quite sad.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 22, 2011
8:03 AM

Post #8901364

He was fortunate Donna that it was your car port. And it is nice to know that the first responders were caring not horribly jaded by where they live.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 29, 2011
11:42 AM

Post #8910405

I didn't plant hardly any lilies this fall. I did plant about a dozen Lady Alice, and some nice ones from a friend. But what I did do was plant daffodils all around my lilies.

Back in 1994 I got the book Tasha Tudors Garden, written by Tovah Martin. In it, Tasha describes how she plants daffs and crocuses around everything to repel the 'chipee hackies', speaking of chipmunks. But since then I have read how it repels moles and voles. I tried it and it worked great. So this year I did a big planting of daffs.

On to more lilies in the spring!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 4b)

November 29, 2011
1:07 PM

Post #8910470

Guess I better take stock next spring of where the daffy's are and plant more in the back yard. I will be going out soon with a shovel to dig some test ditches in the snow to see if I have any mouse tunnels like last year. Never occurred to me that they tunnel in the snow to get to trees, bushes and plants to eat all winter. I will set traps at junctures of the tunnels, or at least bait. Hope my squirrels stay clear. They don't hurt my plants, just bury peanuts and such in my pots and garden for winter storage.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 29, 2011
4:07 PM

Post #8910638

I think the daffodils are a great idea. Easy to plant, they look good, and what could be more environmentally correct.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 29, 2011
4:31 PM

Post #8910663

I haven't lost a single lily or tulip since I started doing this. I recommended WP Milner because it is small, and was amused to find that this year, for the first time, it's sold out everywhere. It's particularly good for people who don't care for daffs (yes, they do exist!!)

I no longer use Volblok/Permatil, Milorganite for this purpose.

I do use freshly ground black pepper to keep squirrels out of my pots. Squirrels, in my experience, are much tougher than voles or rabbits. I just stand over the pots and operate the pepper grinder. I used to use cayenne pepper but it didn't work, which seems odd to me. The black pepper is great because it is invisible to the eye and does not form a crust the way cayenne pepper does.. I just reapply it every few days.

No more fear in the spring! No more losing 50 lilies, 75 tulips! I've been there.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 29, 2011
5:02 PM

Post #8910692

There are people who don't care for daffs!!! How can that be?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 29, 2011
6:25 PM

Post #8910792

I must admit that King Alfred daffs don't appeal to me, and that is the image of the daffodil, which is why I didn't have them for many years. I think they look great naturalized and from a distance, but I am not a person who likes a lot of bright yellow.

I adore Mrs. Backhouse.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 29, 2011
6:43 PM

Post #8910814

Vie en Rose (a much bigger pink and white) Mrs. Backhouse, to the right of the picture, is tiny by comparison.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 29, 2011
6:46 PM

Post #8910817

And Mount Hood. Of course I am sure there are people who find my choices bland. I rarely see white daffs, and that's probably the reason. They certainly are not as cheerful as the yellows.

Isn't it great that there is something for every one?!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 29, 2011
6:50 PM

Post #8910823

Donna, beautiful photo as always. Mrs. Backhouse looks so refined and delicate. Isn't she considered to be the first of the "pink" daffodils? I was eyeing this one earlier this fall in the Old House Gardens catalogue, but my budget ran out before I had the chance to order it.

I used to not like bright yellow in the garden either, but I find lately that sometimes I am drawn to it. Two of my favorite garden daffodils are the miniature cyclamineus hybrid 'Tete-a-tete', though it be but a commoner, as well as the very rare and expensive but common-looking species Narcissus pseudonarcissus, which reminds me of a more wildflowery version of Kind Alfred (which it is). And I love the bright yellow flowers of winter aconite, Eranthis hyemalis. If a more perfect late winter-early spring flower exists (other than snowdrops), I would eat my hat.

I suppose I could generalize my overall garden aesthetic as "gaudy bulbs and somewhat more refined perennials", LOL!
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

November 29, 2011
6:52 PM

Post #8910824

Oh my, I love that photo of the 'Mount Hood' daffs! The white ones truly make my heart flutter.
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 29, 2011
6:55 PM

Post #8910829

Beautiful daffs, Donna! Not bland at all. I don't think I even have a King Alfred, and it probably wouldn't be my favorite, but it would be nice in the house in spring.

I've been buying daffs in bulk for years, but I just started getting a collection of some of the fancier ones. Did you know some of those new ones can go upwards of 70.00 each!!! I don't like them that much.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 30, 2011
3:38 AM

Post #8911162

And here I was expecting to be chastised. Thank you!

Mrs. Backhouse is indeed the first "pink". It's more like apricot. A lot of the "pinks" are orange.I got it from Old House Gardens, in a clump of five. I just love this tough old girl.

I also got Mt Hood from OHG. What you can't see from the photos is how much these two have multiplied.The original 5 Mt. Hoods must be 30. Wonderfil daff!

Funny what you say, Polly. Vie on Rose cost several times what the others did, but it doesn't stick around. I purchased it because I love trumpets and it was supposedly the first new pink and white trumpet in years, at least according to White Flower Farm (it;s a Grant Mitsch creation). Not only does it not persist, but it's not a trumpet! Brent and Becky's bulb catalogue says it was "reclassified". And they stopped carrying it years ago. So I bought 5 more Mrs. B and filled in the space.

The expensive new hybrids don't do much for me either. They seem a little too elaborate. And will they persist? Fool me once, shame on you, fool me twice...

Funny, in Plant Files there are only two pictures of Vie en Rose. Think I'll skedaddle over there, load some pics and let people know it doesn't persist.

I bought 2 sets of them - one to replace the other. Each set $19 for 10, They look phenomenal for about three years, then POOF! Gone!
pollyk
Hannibal, NY
(Zone 6a)

November 30, 2011
4:53 AM

Post #8911197

Do you divide your daffs, Donna? I think next year I may divide some. I need to keep better track of where they are. I seem to occasionally plant on top of others.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

November 30, 2011
3:56 PM

Post #8911782

My heirloom ones reproduce so quickly that I dug them up and spread them around, rather than dividing them. The missing Vie en Roses were filled in with the rather promiscuous Mrs. Backhouses. And the Mount Hoods (which multiply even faster) were moved to the other side of the bed. I find that by spreading them out I don't have to divide them. I don't think I started out with as many as most people. My 5 Mt. Hood's became 30, but I only started with 15 daffs.

Oh, just a note. I started out trying to plant Triandrus daffodils. I started with Thalia. They didn't come back. Then Tresamble. They didn't come back. Then Silk Shot. Ditto. I got them all from OHG. I think that it is just possible that triandrus daffs don't do well in my zone. All 20 are gone (I put in Thalia twice). Silk Shot never came up.

I mentioned this in another thread and people kept insisting to me that Thalia did well for them. If I were an inexperienced gardener I would just accept that I did something wrong. But 20?

I'd steer clear in zone 5a (I should add that some purveryers recommend Thalia for zones no colder than 5b).
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

January 6, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #8956926

I have a question. I found some oriental lilies that I didn't get planted in the fall. They were bare and in a paper sack. They look to have dried out, but wondered if they would sprout or if they are dead? I went ahead and put them in the ground yesterday when it was 70* here, figured might as well try, eh???

Can anyone answer this question? I look forward to this thread heating up and joining in.

Thanks!
Patti
Leftwood
Saint Bonifacius, MN
(Zone 4a)

January 6, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #8957392

[quote="Crit"]They look to have dried out,
Patti[/quote]

but how did they feel? Was there any weight to them or were they light as a feather? A hydrated lily bulb will be nearly as heavy as a potato of the same size. If I have a lily bulb that is shriveled or soft, not due to disease, I will soak them in water for a day, then dry them completely for another day (or two), then plant.

Although that is what I would have done, you did the next best thing. The only difference is that now yours will take longer to rebound if it is going to. Good Luck.

Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

January 10, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #8962152

Thanks. The dirt was pretty moist, then I watered them well. Some were pretty light, but the interior of them looked like they were not dry, just the outside scales. Guess I'll just have to wait until spring and see.
Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 20, 2012
7:13 PM

Post #8975984

bleek has started his lily co-op. Yippee!!!! I got great lily bulbs from him last year. I'm placing my order now.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 21, 2012
3:52 AM

Post #8976155

Love this time of year.
dmac085
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #9130584

I happened to run across Brent and Becky's Summer Clearance sale (50% off all summer stuff) this weekend. Catalog lists items at full price but discount is shown when your cart shows up on the screen.

I'm just getting back into lilies and want some of the things I don't see offered much. I'm hoping that will keep me from buying volume when I don't really have the space--I'll spend more on one bulb but know that I really want that one and I do have space for a single:lol: Yeah, I know...probably won't work:)

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2012
12:00 PM

Post #9130720

Its amazing how crazy lilies cam make you. I went nuts 3 years ago when I realized how small a hole will hold 3 bulbs and they look great in part shade with hostas.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2012
12:37 PM

Post #9130739

LOL! I realized the same thing when I had to put in 71 lilies in the last three weeks. I went nuts too. I didn't realize that you can get instant bouquets. It's funny when you somehow go from having so few that you spread them out to having so many that you put 3-4 in a hole.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2012
4:30 PM

Post #9130959

I had so many bulbs ordered 3 years ago I had to do somethin,
By the way. Everyone knows about the wierd spring we have had. I noticed many of my lilies arent as tall as last year. Martagons are half the height as last year.2 have no buds,
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9130962

Mine are mostly short with just a few exceptions. I've never bought any small or tiny lilies but spotted one today at just a few inches tall. Should be some sight when it blooms.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

May 21, 2012
10:24 AM

Post #9132005

I lost a lot of my lilies in last years heat (one day was 114* in the shade!) and need to replace them! Does anyone know of a coop or discount ordering that I could contact?

I don't have time to read through all the posts right now.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2012
11:11 AM

Post #9132057

What do you do after the lillies bloom away, do you cut them down . Thanks. Etelka

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

May 21, 2012
11:18 AM

Post #9132060

Crit: If you are interested in many bulbs in one variety try Van Engelen

kiseta: DONT cut down the lilies. I remove the tops where the blooms are gone.
The stalk and leaves need to remaine in order to make food for the bulb for the next season. Give a bit of fert ( BulbTone ) after the blooms are gone.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

May 21, 2012
11:30 AM

Post #9132071

Thank you very much. Etelka

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Lilies Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
lilium White Henryi lincolnitess 55 Jan 1, 2008 4:30 PM
The sickness continues... ivory 268 Oct 23, 2007 9:34 PM
Lily Germination Leftwood 8 Apr 21, 2007 7:20 PM
Fasciated Lilys menkids 108 Dec 6, 2007 2:20 PM
my Lilium seeds germinated bloomoon 10 May 8, 2008 3:34 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America