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Heirloom Vegetables: Rare Hickory Cane Corn Available

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VGMKY
Louisville, KY

November 14, 2011
3:24 AM

Post #8889391

I discovered a source for Hickory Cane Corn and have volunteered to post the availability on my Garden Links.
Gary


Hickory Cane Corn
For those interested in growing a rare old corn variety called Hickory Cane Corn, I have seed available. I understand that it was grown in the mountain regions of Kentucky. Tennessee, Georgia, North Carolina, Virgina and West Virgina and possibly other locations.

Description of Hickory Cane Corn.
Hickory Cane (not Hickory King) corn was a favorite of old timers and was prized as a sweet corn, creamed corn, grits, hominy and particularly for white corn meal. It makes outstanding Cornbread! Hickory Cane produces a very tall (sometimes up to 12' or more) stalk which supports the height well. It produces very large ears with large white kernels in eight rows. It is fairly drought resistant and stays green much longer than today's sweet corn. It is open pollinated and should not be planted near other varieties (at least one mile isolation). Grown for Fodder originally on the farm for feed and used in cooking Corn Meal, Hominy, and Grits

Hickory Cane Corn $5.00 Per Pound and $5.00 Shipping
email Robert rollersrule@cs.com with inquires.
VGMKY
Louisville, KY

November 17, 2011
2:04 PM

Post #8894513

Rare Hickory Cane Corn Available

Everyone I have talked with who grew up growing/eating this variety have the best of memories! I have been searching for the Hickory Cane Corn for more than three years. You should see faces light up while talking about the good foods this corn made. An example: We were invited to our friend's son's Eagle Scout Awards. There was another young man also getting the award. His father grew up in the mountains of Georgia and I asked if they had grown the Hickory Cane Corn. He excitedly said yes they did and was surprised that I had asked that! Families grew it, saved the seed for the next year, and shared it with family and friends. The "tradition" in the old days was the sharing of seed with newly wed couples. Two good examples are Kentucky Heirloom Viva: It is sometimes listed as Viva or as Viva Lindsey's Kentucky Wedding and Nebraska Wedding Tomato


Kentucky Heirloom Viva: It is sometimes listed as Viva or as Viva Lindsey's Kentucky Wedding. Listed in the 1991 SSE by Harold Martin of Hopkinsville, KY says he's the original source and describes it as an excellent late Fall tomatoIt was a wedding present from the Martin family in 1904; this was a tradition often used with newly weds at that time. It produces fruit that is a pale yellow/ivory to white type fruit with pink blush on the bottom portion, flavor is mild/light sweet, and fruit can grow to more than a pound. It is Ponderosa shaped, to 4 inches, does not keep well. Grown by Viva Lindsey's family for 100 years. Indeterminate, regular leaf, a little known tomato variety and difficult to find.

Nebraska Wedding Tomato
Mrs. Beiswenger of Crookston, MN, is credited for introducing this tomato to the Seed Savers Network. She received the tomato seeds from Mrs. Englert of Sandpoint, ID in 1980. Mrs. Englert was 72 at the time and said "Nebraskan brides were given seeds of this tomato as a wedding gift. It was said to have been brought from MN by pioneers in the late 1800s via covered wagons. And it thrived in cold, windy Nebraska."
Nebraska Wedding has apricot-orange skin and flesh. 3-4" globes are juicy with a well balanced acid-sweet flavor and can weight up to a pound. Determinate vines, 90 Days.
__________________
"We believe we mere debtors to God in relation to each other and all men, to improve our Time and Talents in this Life, in that manner in which we might be most useful." Shaker Covenant 1795
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 17, 2011
7:05 PM

Post #8894931

Well, after reading your description of Nebraska Wedding I think I know why it hasn't done well here. Lol may give it one more try. You may post this topic on the veggie forum. I don't know how much traffic this forum gets. : )
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2011
7:56 AM

Post #8895453

Nebraska Wedding grew very well for me in my northern garden and it was a favorite of my DH's. I grew it this past spring here in Texas and it did produce a few tomatoes and then the heat and drought struck. I guess I also know why now. I'll make a note and try it again in the fall and see if it does better. As a side note, I would call Nebraska Wedding a tall determinate. Maybe I give too much fertilizer, but it usually grows about up to my chest. I am five feet tall so that would put it at around three and a half to four feet.

Thanks for the info!
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2011
12:35 PM

Post #8895808

I've always seen NW refered to as a determinate that needs to be staked. Many determinates don't need extra support.

The plant did ok here but I judge how well a plant does by how much fruit it produces, NW wasn't very high on the list.
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2011
1:24 PM

Post #8895947

1lisac, I remember that NW produced about average in my Chicago area garden, not overboard but not stingy either. I don't think that this was a good year to judge any tomato in Texas. I grow NW because DH really likes it. But I'm moving it to my fall line-up based on the above information. We'll see if it does any better then. I will say that all the determinates I grew did well until the heat moved in. I managed to freeze quite a bit of sauce, and that was what I wanted.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 18, 2011
7:11 PM

Post #8896292

I don't think it was a good year either. Jeez... This year I planted a larger variety of plants then I ever have before. Some of the plants died before they could even produce fruit. Even my old standards didn't do well, I'm not writing off any of this year's varieties. I really hope none of us have to go through another summer like this last one.

Terri-I didn't realize what you meant by your northern garden. That's really northern!
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2011
8:41 AM

Post #8899848

1lisac, yeah! I loved my house up there, but there wasn't much space between the houses and I was cold almost all the time. When DH suggested we sell and move the business to a more small-business- friendly state I said I wanted someplace warm but still with fall and winter. Just not as long or cold winter. And someplace where we could afford to have some land out in the country so my neighbors would not be leaning over the fence and telling me whatever I was doing was wrong or whatever. So we moved to Texas!
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2011
9:34 AM

Post #8899901

Well, you definately got warm! This is your second summer here, right?
Lisa
terri_emory
Alba, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 21, 2011
10:17 AM

Post #8899948

Fourth actually. I didn't start trying to garden the first year, though. Too much going on.
Kristee
Las Lomas, CA

January 14, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #8968074

Smart Gardener is a free online service we just launched last May that makes planning a garden really easy and convenient. You drag and drop garden beds to layout your garden and it helps you find plants (from the vendors mentioned) perfect for your location, growing conditions and time of year. Then it generates an intelligent plan based on the size of your household and even sends you weekly To Dos created just for your garden. It also has Garden Journal that can keep track for you! Check it out and give us feedback! http://www.smartgardener.com

BTW We offer over 700 heirloom, non-GMO seeds too. We've partnered with Peaceful Valley (groworganic.com), Baker Creek Heirlooms (Rareseeds.com) and Southern Exposure Seed Exchange (southernexposure.com).
Thanks much!
VGMKY
Louisville, KY

January 15, 2012
7:47 AM

Post #8968442

Thanks, Kristee, for sharing your Smart Gardener Link. I will check it out. I have long standing friends with several of the Baker Creek folks and Ira Wallace is my dear friend at Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. I see her each Fall when she visits us in Kentucky at our October Seed Swap! You are more than welcome to come!
Gary.

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