#13 Practical Matters for Physically Challenged Gardeners

SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL(Zone 8b)

Welcome to the 13th installment of Practical Matters for Physically Challenged Gardeners. Anybody superstitious? On this thread we discuss the day-to-day challenges of gardening and otherwise enjoying the outdoors when there is also some sort of physical limitation to contend with. Contributors here may be anything from mildly mobility challenged due to aging to those gardening from wheelchairs. The visually impaired can range from ďcanít see those little seeds like I once couldĒ to blind. Also, there are those coping with the energy deficits that are a part of Depression, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and heart/lung ailments. we are a diverse group. Feel free to join in. We came from here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1220095/
We decided to compile a list of books and websites that we found useful and keep it in the introduction post of Practical Matters until or unless we decide it warrants its own Sticky. Feel free to add or give your opinion of the sites/books listed.
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Websites:
Thrive: http://www.carryongardening.org.uk/ this is a site in the UK and, other than a few gardening terms being unfamiliar to American readers, excellent.

Modifying Garden Tools
http://agr ability.missouri.edu/gardenweb/modifytools.html

Gardening for VIPs--Visually Impaired Person(s)
http://vipuc.fortunecity.com/bg_news.html

Gardening from a w/c
http://www.mda.org/publications/quest/q31garden.html

BooksóAs far as I know, all of these books are available in audio format from the National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS program). Since this list was compiled by a visually impaired person, there may be print books available that are not on the list. -Garden Unseen by L. Stevens
-Accessible Gardening for People with Physical Disabilities by Janeen R. Adil (I liked the list of recommended plants in this book.)
-The Enabling Garden: A Guide to Lifelong Gardening by Gene Rothert--Written by a horticultural therapist employed at the Chicago Botanic Garden. It should be kept in mind that this book was written 17 years ago. Some of the information on raised bed building materials is outdated, but it is still worth reading since the author gardens from a wheelchair. He possesses both academic and first-hand knowledge.
-Gardening Through Your Golden Years by James W. Wilson
-Accessible Gardening: Tips & Techniques for Seniors by Joann Woy
-The Able Gardener: Overcoming Barriers of Age and Physical Limitations by Kathleen Yeoman
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Things are quiet on the Amargia front. Nadine (Sansai87) continues to seek a perfect Thanksgiving dinner menu that will keep with our Native American theme and satisfy all. Jim (Seacanepain) is working on little home improvement and repair projects and I am continuing with the boring, but necessary, hard-scaping projects like leveling the newly designed Fragrance Garden.
One brave sunflower and the dependable (immortal?) snapdragons are keeping things colorful despite cold snaps. The snapdragons have been in bloom almost year `round. They melted some in high summer, but revived as soon as it cooled down. The ďFlying DragonĒ orange is dropping its fruit and that fruit is twice as large as normal. (We seem to have a dragon theme going.) ĎFlying Dragoní is unique in that it comes true from seed, but the seeds donít remain viable for very long. We are busy trading those. Jim is still limiting me to two trees even though I will be pruning the beasts. Iím slower at it, but donít get clawed as much as the sighted who have attempted the job. Go figure. k*

(Debra) Garland, TX

Thank you, Kay. :-)

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

My chrysanthemums were gorgeous this year! But the same thing happened that ALWAYS happens--they wouldn't sit still for a picture! I guess this time of year is just windy and rainy, and I went out there several different times to get a picture but they wouldn't sit still. Sigh. Well, you'll have to take my word for it.

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

I continue to cook every moment or crochet. Sometimes i get fustrated at having to stop and rest so often but the frustration don't last long.
Not being able to do anything at all would be worse.

(Debra) Garland, TX

On the boat with you on that topic, Vickie. :-)

Midland City, AL

What color of mums were they, Carrie? BTW: Have you ever hear of a scented aster? (Kay has me on the hunt.) We still have quite a bit blooming despite cold snaps, but you have to like yellow. I think I will see what the nursery has in the way of ornamental cabbage to tone it down. It is a balmy 82 at the moment. From now until March, we ride a roller-coaster of temps. From a little below freezing to temps in the 70's. 82 is a bit unusual.
Preparing everything we can in advance for T-Day. Nadine received a beautiful fruit basket today and learned about California avocados. She kept saying she didn't see any avocado at the store, but her experience was limited to the pear-shaped ones. Our grocer carries some unusual tropical fruit and N. dismissed the round avocados as some rare tropical. Kay makes a salad of avocados, wild sunchokes and pecans for her vegetarian daughter that everyone has come to like and I guess that fits in with our indigenous food theme. Now that she realizes no one is going to bite her if the food doesn't HAVE to fit the indigenous theme, she is enjoying the cooking.

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SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL(Zone 8b)

Aster oblongifolium is called the aromatic aster, but I think only the crushed foliage is actually aromatic. I'll put an aster with fragrant blooms in my "want" list alongside chocolate basil. ;-)
I've been to sick to do much for the last few days, but I can "organize things" on the computer and call that work. k*

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

Hope you're doing better Kay.(((HUGS)))

SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL(Zone 8b)

Yes, I am. Thanks to beets and, perhaps, garlic. I'm losing weight. but you know how toxins are released back into the system when the fat that imprisoned it melts away. Many people get mild flu-like symptoms when they lose weight. I've had to take some mildly toxic meds in the past so it has been a little worse than that. . Beets and beet juice help de-toxify the body quickly and luckily I like beets. Jim's Dad also recommended taking garlic oil capsules every day. Not sure exactly what that does, but it seems to help. The elder Jim Smith is 80+. Sometimes it is good just to trust to experience. How did your Group gathering go? I wished I had your talent with table decor and such. At our dinner, the presentation was a little lacking, but the food itself was excellent. I think this year's was the best tasting T'day dinner we've had so far.
Did you get your Cornish hen, Debra? Or,a no-stress gardening day?
Did anyone brave the stores today? k*
.
.

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

I think people can be divided in three groups. First are the wisest, like most of us, who think that an extra two bucks off some gizmo is not worth getting up at 3 am or waiting in line or being trampled, Second are the crazed who spend all night/day shopping for suspicious bargains risking life and limb. And third are the poor sales people who have to work OT serving those crazed .If I'm in charge of Macy's, or Target, Kohl's, Kmart Walmart wherever, I'm hiring extra sales people, extra phone answer people, extra parking attendants, extra everybody to handle the crowd, and the new hires don't have seniority so they're ALL working today a 3am-2pm shift or something else lovely like that. Does that leave anybody left to shop?

(Debra) Garland, TX

jess was too tired and full of ham to tackle another new thing, so they went home. i baked them later. :-D

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

If I can get someone to cut them up, I love Cornish watchmacallems. Actually, I would eat more meat if it came pre-cubed. :-D

SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL(Zone 8b)

The Black Friday horror stories get worse every year. The one where bargain shopper #2 attacked bargain shopper #1 with pepper spray in the electronics department so she could take the last of some item out of BS#1's basket was a doozey. But, I think the worst had to be the 80-something year old man who had his face crushed when two young, temp security guards thought he was shoplifting and TACKLED him. Worse yet, it turned out he hadn't stolen anything. That takes it to a new level. It isn't just the other shoppers you have to worry about. Those who do Black Friday must secretly like the frenzied, competitive shopping atmosphere because you can get better deals online.
I'm starting to wish I had stuffed a chicken for Thanksgiving. T. Turkey is still haunting my fridge. I thought a little 8-lb. turkey would do the job without too many leftovers. Nadi did a great job on it, but everyone went for the novelty of venison. I've done Thanksgiving sandwiches and turkey soup. I'm going to have to get more inventive now. :-) One more meal and T. Turkey can rest in peace. I like the idea of cornish hens for Christmas dinner. k*

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

Kay, Chop whats left up add it to hamburger and make meatloaf with lots of tomato sause. But don't tell anyone.
I used to like the crowds but no one got violent about the whole thing. Texans can be very well behaved in a crowd. LOL It's when you get them outside you have to keep an eye on them.
Well nothing beats venison!

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Yuck I'm not a venison fan myself, but I was a perfectly happy vegetarian for years.

I just submitted Ladybird Johnson, scheduled for (her birthday) Dec. 22. That's the second one in a row where there was just TOO MUCH information. Mow I'd like to write about the invention of mittens, or fertilizer, or topsy-turvy tomato planters, or some really tiny topic. The development of the nail clipper. Why gardeners use nylons to tie up tomato vines. Surely I could cover that in 500 words. I get to these INTERESTING topics and just have to report EVERY detail. Annd--there's so much I didn't say. I read pages and pages of her notes from this tour she took with the Cabinet Members wives. (In those days the Cabinet was all men!)

Midland City, AL

The Ladybird Johnson Wildflower Center website is a great resource for native, naturalized gardens and I believe that is a good style of gardening for challenged gardeners. It requires more knowledge, but less physical labor. Pity some communities still have a problem with things like naturalized front yards. I guess that is because so many people can't see the difference between a neglected yard and a naturalized one. Tall grass is tall grass to them whether that grass is bahiagrass or the native wiregrass this area was named after. SW Georgia, NW Florida and SE Alabama is still known as The Wiregrass Area though the wiregrass prairies are long gone.
If there is that much interesting stuff, maybe it wants to be more than one article that could be published on other significant days. Like the anniversary of the day she became First Lady. Or, the founding of the Ladybird Wildflower Center. (Jim)

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

I love LadyBird. She did so much to keep the beautiful roadsides of Texas. I'm for the more than one article also.
Jim you are right about naturalized yards. Thats one thing I love about living in the country. I'm free to fix my yard like I want,be it trashy wild stuff or formal, or like I have it,A hodgepodge mixture.
Carrie,I love food!!! Am usually happy with whatever comes my way.
It is good to be back on line. I really missed you guys. It snowed today(about 2 inches)

Midland City, AL

Iíve been busy hammering away on Christmas projects like an over-grown elf. Today I spent a lot of time on a diabetic recipe site trying to come up with a Christmas dinner menu. We try to make it more elegant than our rustic Thanksgiving feast. That is doable at Christmas since there is rarely more than 6 people at the table.
MK had a doctorís appointment this morning. Sheís lost 16 lbs. in the last two weeks. PJ and I havenít weighed in, but I know neither of us has lost that much. Since MK is a borderline Type 2 diabetic, and since the doctors have warned PJ that he will develop diabetes in the future if he doesnít get his eating under control, and, I have a family history of Type 1 diabetes. I think adopting a Type 2 diabetic diet is the way for the whole household to go. It isnít going to be anywhere near as bad as I imagined. Some of those recipes look scrumptious and there are thousands of them. Iím not going to bake bíday cakes and the like to supplement my income anymore. I will miss the extra money, but good health is priceless. I know I canít resist sampling what I make and that is keeping me from losing weight.
Will power can be a shared resource. MK is determined to regain her health and is dragging PJ and me along. Lol. We are finally getting some use out of the recumbent bike. It is one of those with all the computerized bells and whistles. It even tells you how many calories youíve burned in a session.
Since I had the paints out for Christmas projects, I decided to start on the signs for the different garden areas. We had some old ceiling fan blades around. There is a streetlight in the Bee Corner. I thought I would hang the sign on the light post. The shape of the fan blades works out perfectly. ~N~

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(Debra) Garland, TX

Nadine, what about making sugar free specialty and birthday cakes? There is a bigger market than you might think at first glance.

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Nadine I DARE you to make gluten-free birthday cakes or gravy or banana bread etc.!

Midland City, AL

Have you eaten those things, Carrie? Do they tend to taste bad? I have almond and soy flour in the fridge I need to do something with. It shouldn't be necessary to have a deadened palate to be healthy. A gluten-free CAKE does sound like a challenge though.
That's an idea I will give some serious consideration, Debra. ~N~

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Almond is yummy, soy can be nasty if you don't cook it enough. Even a GF loaf of yeast bread is a big challenge--that I've tried and failed. Gluten is the stretchy elastic stuff in bread that 'Better for Bread' flour has more of!

I've eaten GF cake from an expensive specialty bakery--tasted like eating a Frisbee, but I know a professional baker who made one as a challenge and it was luscious. We usually use GF cake mix when that DD is home. Gravy is actually easy, you just use cornstarch instead of flour. Banana bread I haven't tried (except with store-bought GF flour, which to me is cheating). But it's a dense enough loaf that I bet it would be ok with almond and corn or rice and potato or ... in my experience (very limited) you can't just use potato flour instead of wheat flour but you can use a blend, rice and cassava, somehow having two different non-wheats cancels out the flavors? Pancakes are really easy cause they're just baking powder and eggs, rice and buckwheat flour equal parts made fabulous pancakes and everyone was astounded.

http://davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/659/

Midland City, AL

Awesome article, Carrie!

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Thanks--that's one of those that should have been split into a few shorter easier-to-digest (heh heh) segments, I think. And then I get paid twice for doing the research once!

Midland City, AL

I am still struggling with sugar-free baking. My last two attempts at chocolate cake have cracked. Today's just had a shallow crater on the surface so, maybe, I'm getting better. I'll still be able to make it look good just by shaving a little extra off the top. I think chocolate covered nuts and pretzels are still going to be my favorite ways of getting a sugar-free chocolate fix.
MK managed to stay awake a whole six hours straight today. That's good for her lately. The doctor has her on Prednasone and a high dose of hydroxine until a skin rash heals. She was a gardening zombie though. She started some St. Thomas tree seeds soaking and planted some giant red mustard as an experiment. The mustard should have been started in Oct. We will try starting the seeds indoors and put the small transplants out when a warm spell is expected. A mustard plant isn't bothered much by our excuse for winter. I like the color more than the ornamental cabbages. And, unlike the cabbages, they stay pretty. the hungry bunnies don't share my love for mustard greens. ~N~

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

My sympathys to you guys. At my age I refuse to diet in any way shape or form. But my heart is with you.
I've been on a crochet binge.Want to get this stuff done and out to where it goes. So I also get to watch all the Christmas specials.Have decided there can be t-o-o-o much of a good thing.The only two shows left I want to see is Snow Dogs and It's a Good Life.
We got some snow.Was able to get out after a couple of days tho.None of my cats like the snow.
Have been going thru some serious depression. Am staying busy anyway.Just can't sleep. Kay and I need to trade some sleep times.
Have you tried a few mustard leaves in a salad?

Midland City, AL

Young mustard greens sound like they would be good in a salad. I'll try that. Iím with you, Vickie. I feel so much better today after a good nightís sleep, but I cheated. I got that slumber out of a glass. A Mudslide to be precise. Well, I went to the trouble of finding a sugar-free drink mix anyway. I think I should get points for that. I know that is not a good method to use very often since alcohol is itself a depressant. But it is nice to feel well rested for a change. Sometimes, one good nightís sleep can break the vicious cycle for a time. I have more mental clarity than Iíve had in a while.
Kay is obviously drugged, but she is healing well. Something about out-of-control diabetes causes the normal yeast in the skin to multiply like mad. This was one time the heightened sensitivity experienced by long-time blind people worked against Kay. The sensation on her skin was driving her up the wall. She looked like someone going through DTís before they put her on the med. They are easing her off the Hydroxine as the yeast is killed off and her skin heals. I think Hydroxine literally short-circuits the brain to accomplish its goal, but she was a peace, love and sisterhood hippie so she doesnít require much monitoring when the normal mental restraints are removed. She can get lost a long time watching the fire in the fireplace or twinkling Christmas lights, but I guess there is nothing really wrong with that. .
Nadine is at a food drive. They decorated a local park in Victorian Christmas splendor and are charging cans of food as admission for a tour. Hope it goes well. She will probably post pictures later today.
Old Tater-dog rescued a raccoon plushy toy from the garbage and it is her new best buddy and pillow. I thought she was far beyond puppy toys. It seems dogís do the full circle thing too.
Not much going on in the garden. Iím looking at next seasonís new introductions and deciding what Amargia will try. Dan Hinckley selected a new-to-American gardenerís hydrangea. It is being marketed by Monrovia as ĎGolden Craneí. (Hydrangea angustipetala 'MonLongShouí) I donít even have to ask Kay. That is a must-have for Amargia. It is highly fragrant and, in general, this is hydrangea country.
How are you doing, Debra? "All clear" on the neurological test? (Jim)

(Debra) Garland, TX

Vickie, always been knee-jerk averse to trying mustard greens. Dunno why. Too citified, maybe, or maybe I'm just a Yankee at heart and they don't eat Suthrun foods. LOL

I am glad you got some rest. Broken sleep all by itself is as bad as being really ill with the flu or sumpin.

Better for Kay to be Timothy-Learyied than to suffer through that. :(

Yea, Nadine!

Don't know about the MRIs yet, guess only the techs work on Saturdays. :-) CT scan, carotid doppler, and echocardiogram all clear. Should hear something by mid-week.

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

Speaking of spirits. It's time for my annual trip to Fort Smith to get some Brandy.I seldom drink anything. But like to keep some around. DD swiped what I had left in September.
We have someone intrested in buying the 10 acres we have for sale.That sure would be nice to sell it. I can think of several projects that cost money.LOL
That Golden Crane hydrangia sounds like something I'd about kill for.
Jim you hve given me an idea for Scoot. Maybe he'd like his own toys instead of Dillens hand me downs.I'll find him a teddy bear.
Fingers crossed for you Debra.

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

OK, final final FINALdecision: we're not movin g to D/FW. I'm just so sick of being in this one room all the time! Arrrggggh! I fantasize that if we moved it wou;d be different, flatter. I would have more friends. I have a friend in IN who has PPS and she tutors kids who are trying to pass the GRE. Now that's a JOB.

SE/Gulf Coast Plains, AL(Zone 8b)

PPS? Post-Polio Syndrome?
One room?! Are you feeling too bad to stray far from your bed or is there a PCA problem again? Good grief, Iím climbing the walls because Iím confined to 7 rooms. I got so bored I re-arranged the kitchen and the office. Jim is being patient, but I believe he is more than ready for me to be able to go outside again. I wasnít smart enough to be bored when I was taking the mind-numbing anti-itch medication, but Iíve passed the point where I need it.
There hasnít been enough cold weather yet to cause any significant die off in the micro-flora and fauna outside. I really clawed myself up before I went to the doctor. Not all my scratches have healed. Meaning I would risk a secondary infection if I spent time out there. The over-abundance of microorganisms is one of the downsides of living in the humid south.
I would have to become a complete and total cyber-head and net addict to survive in a limited space with my mental faculties intact. Can you imagine what it would have been like before there was a cyber-window to look out of and wave at the world. It would have been worse yet before television and radio. Even if those are passive forms of entertainment, they can still engage the mind on occasion. I understand now why, in Victorian novels, the good nurse or loving caregiver was frequently shown reading to their patient. It might also explain the large numbers of crazy relatives hidden in attics in Victorian novels. I bet those were the formerly bedridden relatives that didnít get read to enough. ;-)
Debra, it sounds like you might have a high sensitivity to PTC (Phenylthiocarbamide). Do you dislike other cruciferous vegetables? When cruciferous vegetables taste very sharp and bitter to a person that is usually the case. I donít think PTC itself occurs naturally in food. The link between PCT and similar compounds found in cruciferous vegetables was discovered in a lab accident. People who can taste/smell PTC almost always dislike cabbage, brussel sprouts, collards, mustard greens, etc. Not everyone can detect the PTC-like compound in food. Itís a genetic trait. (It was even used to determine paternity before blood typing.) Many northern and eastern Europeans canít detect the taste/smell at all. The sensitivity is highest among those with Native American ancestors. Among indigenous peoples the brassica vegetables have never been more than survival food. I eat cruciferous veggies for their anti-cancer, anti-inflammatory properties, but I canít say I really enjoy them. Iím aware of a sulfur-y taste, but donít find it too bad. I guess Iím not terribly sensitive to the compound because my father was Danish. Crusiferous veggies are a food staple in that part of the world. Jim. on the other hand, is blissfully unaware of any bitterness. Brussel sprouts are one of his favorite vegetables.
LOL. You would think, looking at this post, I was getting paid by the word. Have a good day, All. k*


This message was edited Dec 13, 2011 10:59 AM

(Debra) Garland, TX

I really like broccoli, cauliflower, and brussell sprouts. It is just the idea of 'greens' that causes a psychological aversion. Nasty slimy stuff is what the brain is saying. LOL Although I have gotten to the point I will eat cooked spinach if it is mixed in a sauce or with noodles or something.

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Yes, post polio syndrome. I'm not feeling bad, it's just that nobody is paid to help me have fun. Some PCAs like to sew or garden or wrap Christmas presents or cook or whatever but unless they do, we don't. They do my laundry feed me tv dinners yogurt and granola for breakfast keep track of my meds do ROM stretches showers toilet prn but other than that .... it's nobody's job to do everyone else's laundry, or dishes, or cooking. Sometimes it gets done....other times not.

I love cruciferous veggies! Nobody in my immediate family does.

Midland City, AL

Sorry, there are no pictures from the Victorian Christmas event. I forgot to check the batteries in the camera before I left. Iím going to have to start packing extra batteries. It was successful as a way to re-stock the food bank. It isnít often one can enjoy an all-day outing and spend less than $10. I exchanged money for lunch and a carriage ride. Everything else was paid for with canned food. It was overcast and just chilly enough that the warm apple cider and hot cocoa went over well. I plead the 5th on whether or not I ate the free fudge and gingerbread available. I admit to enjoying Satsuma oranges from a local grove and I learned oranges were an authentic part of a Victorian Christmas as a rare treat good children found in their stockings.
I think you had to grow up eating mustard, turnip and collard greens to have any appreciation for them. (I ate a lot of turnip greens growing up.) I donít know if I will ever learn to appreciate the more northerly greens like kale, beet and Swiss chard. Making winter greens palatable is what Tabasco sauce and Soul seasoning is for, isnít it? :-) :-) My theory is our ancestors found ways to choke down winter greens solely for their nutritional value and now eating them is an entrenched habit. I have noticed the people who claim they enjoy winter greens go heavy on the Tabasco and Soul seasoning. I suspect the greens are really just a vehicle for the seasonings. But, who knows, , I occasionally have cravings for a can of what MK calls ďPopeye slimeĒ, canned spinach and only the Popeye brand will soothe the craving.
Carrie, every high summer we inevitably start talking about packing up and moving to a cooler, less humid environment. In the end we always come to the conclusion we would just be exchanging one set of challenges for a different, unfamiliar set of challenges, and moving would not make things easier. For some reason we have to go through the process and refresh the knowledge every year, however. Iím not sure why. Maybe, on the off chance that one year we will decide differently and end up as Vickieís neighbors. Maybe, dreaming of living in less sweaty, buggy realms just gets us through. I think your brutal winters might be the equivalent of our miserable summers. Hang in! You will like Massachusetts better come April. ~N~

Ozone, AR(Zone 6a)

Oh Dear!! Nadene, I'm one of those rare humans that loves the taste of "Greens". I use a little bacon or fat and salt and pepper. But thats all I season with.The only one I don't like is asperagus(Is that a green).
I'd love to have you as neighbors. A favorite saying up here is "If you don't like the weather wait a minute. It'll change." Today we've had peasoup fog and rain. Guess we have the best or worst of both worlds. Hot and muggy in summer and cold and colder in winter.Also something we never seem to be able to quit talking about.
Wish I could've seen pictures Nadene. But we'll forgive you this time.
Have any of you ever made Yorkshire Pudding?
Watched the Morman Tabernacle Choir last night and thought of Carrie,
Am working on ideas for scrapbooking for our group.Maybe starting seeds and recording the process with pictures.We've all got pets....Maybe a book about our pets.

(Debra) Garland, TX

:-)

Midland City, AL

We would have to get Carrie a pet rock or a Chia pet, perhaps. Oh, I know, one of the new robo pets. Kay was listening to Christmas music while finishing up the decorating and mailing out the last of the holiday cards. I can't help grinning when I hear the Nutcracker. I keep trying to envision the SugarPRUNE fairy. lol. I know it was a reprint, but I had never read the sugarplum mystery article.
Our local Michael's is having a 1/2 off Christmas craft sale. Couldn't keep Nadine away from that. Kay has re-arranged everything inside the house and has gone on to the front porch. She'll be off the Prednisone in a few days and can work outside again. Thank goodness! She is beginning to eye my messy desk. I LIKE my desk messy! Got to go put on my "Sasquatch for President" bumper stickers. :-) (Jim)

(Debra) Garland, TX

Do they look as good as we thought they would, Jim? Sometimes hard to tell on a computer monitor.

Milton, MA(Zone 6a)

Oh Jim, I'm glad you mentioned that it made you smile to think of the sugarprune fairy!!! Do you guys notice that the pictures are back on the home page? I've noticed VICKIE commenting every day.

Midland City, AL

Yeah, it is good to have you back on regularly, Vickie! Travis took one of the white quartz looking rocks you sent to be his pet rock. He gave it a name and everything. Maybe, we should send Carrie one too? :-) I kinda like the intricately marked gray one best. The one that has the perfect hole in it. PJ snagged that one to use as a pen holder,) But, it is the white quartz that catch most people's eyes. Rocks with bling! Do you remember where those came from?
I think the bumper stickers came out cool, Debra, and I'm going to order another Green Amber Project t-shirt. One for Papa Jim this time. ~N~.

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