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Herbs: Can this rosemary plant be saved?

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JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 9, 2011
5:33 PM

Post #8923226

Here it is...I thought this plant was a goner over this past disastrous 2011 summer here on the gulfcoast, but it somehow survived. Is this worth keeping?

Thumbnail by JohnCrichton75
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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 9, 2011
6:17 PM

Post #8923258

I have two different rosemary plants that are planted in ground and overwinter outdoors.
They require very little water at all so the drought hasn't hurt them. In fact I didn't water them at all this past summer.
When planted in the ground, rosemary prefers being planted high and dry.

Why would it not be worth keeping?
JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 9, 2011
6:53 PM

Post #8923297

Podster!

When I said "worth keeping" I was questioning whether the plant would survive at all. I am not sure if I am wasting my time trying to resuscitate that plant (knowing how fragile herbs are). I am trying to guage my expectations.

It is potted, too. I moved it into my garage just yesterday, repotted it, and placed it under lights. It doesn't look like much so I am trying to get a feel for how/if it will survive

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 9, 2011
9:08 PM

Post #8923432

I would find a spot in the ground and plant it outdoors. Plant it in well draining soil or a raised bed and ignore it. No water other than what the weather should deliver. After all, it sounds as though you don't expect it to survive anyway. Freezes will not hurt it.

I planted mine on the sheltered east side of the house. Then, visited a friend that had a huge and magnificent rosemary shrub planted where it received sweltering evening sun and also the harsh cold north winter winds. It did not seem to mind.

As long as rosemary is hardy in our zone, do not feel the need to baby it. It will surprise you. I don't think you will find it fragile. When kept inside. it tends to drop foliage or mildew and is very difficult to grow. Best wishes with it... Kristi
JohnCrichton75
League City, TX
(Zone 9a)

December 10, 2011
7:00 AM

Post #8923709

I did not realize rosemary was so resilient. Actually, it should have dawned on me because this plant was nothing more than a bunch of sticks and dead leaves by the end of the summer. I left it for dead but then noticed green leaves on it a few weeks ago and said (words to the effect of) "Holy cow, it's still alive!" Thanks for the advice and insight, Pod- I know of a great place in our front yard. It faces the south and gets lots of sun. Should be a happy spot for it.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 10, 2011
6:16 PM

Post #8924417

Best wishes with it! It was a tough summer past and it made me really like some of these Texas tough plants even more.
cornish2175
Charleston, SC
(Zone 8b)

January 7, 2012
3:47 AM

Post #8957744

Rosemary likes dry rocky soil like the mediteranian area it comes from. I had mine in a pot outside my door but had it in rich potting soil, watered it to much and it got infected with spider mites. After doing research I put a new one in the ground in a high dry area and worked pea gravel into the soil before planting. I am learning (sometimes the hard way) to research where plants originate from and try to give them the same conditions. There are plants that just don't like tender loving care.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
9:30 PM

Post #8997494

I water my rosemary plants that are in the ground once or twice during the hottest part of the summer, and that is only because I am watering some other things near them. Otherwise they get trimmed twice a year, if that, and that is all the care they require.

One plant is over 25 years old now. I remember planting it from a one gallon size container and now it need severe trimming every year. It has never failed on me.
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2012
3:59 AM

Post #8997575

Hi Evelyn ~ thanks for reviving this thread. I'd be curious to hear how Johns' rosemary is doing.
growers1
Charles City, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 8, 2012
7:36 AM

Post #8998997

My potted Prostrate Rosemary is doing fantastic after a good pruning. I'm keeping it indoors where it gets good sunlight and water it about once a week. After pruning the longer stems to use for cooking, it flushed out beautifully and began to flower continuously. It's an aromatic joy to have inside during the dreary winter months- I encourage everyone to have a potted garden inside if they can afford the room!

Thumbnail by growers1
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 23, 2012
7:47 AM

Post #9177070

I keep having to warn my daughter it needs abused, trim it or the middle dies back, she's learning herb plants are different than lawn plants, but I love the aroma better than she does- I think it will grow on her tho!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 26, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9181752

Late to the thread but that's what I would have said to you. We had one that I was throwing away. Cut it back to the soil, left it outside over an unusually warm plus drought prone winter, and it's huge this spring.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 29, 2012
10:12 PM

Post #9187067

Gotta love our Rosemarys...mine's been outside since bought 5+ years ago. Give it at least 3 heavy 'haircuts' a year - she does just fine!! May not be the prettiest gal out there but you gotta love the green year round and that scent!! Not to mention Rosemary Olive Oil is to die for yummy!!

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 29, 2012
10:24 PM

Post #9187071

Hi Susan!!
I have a rosemary that's in a pot, and there it will stay... As I'm in Canada, it surely won't over-winter. Although my mint sure does, and grows wild! Do you think my rosemary will overwinter? I also have some garlic chives that come back, and they're in a hanging basket!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2012
4:15 AM

Post #9187151

Chantell ~ tips on making rosemary olive oil ~ pretty please?

TallulahB ~ I would try overwintering it in a cooler area with reduced moisture.

And if you are successful, post your success as many have struggled with it.

I don't think rosemary will overwinter outdoors for you any more than I would... lol former Minnesotan here. Kristi
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2012
4:38 AM

Post #9187163

SusanT - Proably not. Last time I checked the hardiest rosemary was only good to zone 5. I've still lost the ones outside because either they aren't hardy to zone 5 or the weather went to colder than zone 5. I agree with podster that one way to winter over is to reduce the amount of water and place a cooler area like a garage or basement. I usually winter ours in the main part of the house. The reason is that we have large south facing windows with a lot of sun. It seems to do fine there.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 30, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9187410

reduced moisture? That's one of the reason plants die here - very very very very dry in the winter... 3 hours from a drought at any point in time...think of the Arizona dessert.

SusanK - I know we're Zone 3b, but sometimes it's like zone 5 - I grow Daturas here, and they're native to Texas...
We don't have a basement - we're in a mobile.
I have south facing windows, and am able to grow high zone plants in our front flower garden.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2012
10:48 AM

Post #9187525

Reduce water as in don't water them very often. Once or twice a month.

What's the highest zone plant you've been able to winter over outside?

We grow higher zone plants here alot of them are considered tender perinnials here. We either let them die, dig the tubers up, or move them inside.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 30, 2012
12:25 PM

Post #9187626

zone 4 - Datura's actually re-seed the 1st couple of years, then need to replant.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2012
12:47 PM

Post #9187662

Generally when people are talking about hardiness it's about the plant and not the seed. I have a number of plants in the yard that seed every year but the plant it's self is not hardy. Four-o-clocks and Morning Glories grow ebery spring from seeds produced/dropped the previous year. I have both of those in my yard. The seeds germinate every spring but the plants always die off every fall.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 30, 2012
1:08 PM

Post #9187689

Yes, Susan - as soon as I put 4/5 zone, I realized the only Zone 5 I have is a self-seeding, and that's NOT overwintering. I only mentioned it cuz...well, I don't know why lol
I can overwinter zone 5s here, in Some winters - can be very warm - temperate Canadian zone
and sometimes it's so dry that it seems nothing will survive - even hardy to zone 3...
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

June 30, 2012
3:21 PM

Post #9187879

We have some drought. Like right now with not much rain for a while. The back of the lot is xeroscape plants that do well in our region. I've odered a number of things from High Country Gardens. http://www.highcountrygardens.com/
They used to have a plant finder on their site which was handy but I had problems finding it. They are listed in the Garden Watch section of DG.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 30, 2012
4:37 PM

Post #9187964

Rosemary Oil - snip off fresh stems (preferably prior to afternoon time's high heat) - the very soft ends can be put in mason jar - snip rest of rosemary off stem into jar (1/2 + way up). Fill with gold quality olive oil to the top - place in cooler darker area of house (i.e. not in direct sunlight) - give a gentle shake every day - after 4 weeks put in fridge. Strain when the mood hits you any time after the 4 weeks. I let might sit longer.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 30, 2012
6:19 PM

Post #9188093

gold quality, or good quality olive oil?
You just reminded me - I'm almost out of olive oil... gotta get some more.
Why strain - to remove the rosemary? And why not strain all at once?
oh wait - think I've got it - obviously one of my DUH! to DOH! moments lol
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 30, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9188229

Chantell ~ thanks for sharing your method to the rosemary madness! LOL It sounds wonderful. I use olive oil when I roast root vegetables and think I will use this seasoned oil for that. Now it just has to cool down before I want to turn on the oven. Kristi

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

June 30, 2012
7:56 PM

Post #9188231

LOL...I'd go with good unless there's 'gold'... Wow...I must have been affected by the heat...that SO made no sense. Good quality Olive Oil - I used extra virgin - cold pressed. And honestly I let it sit for some time before straining. My friend (the herbalist) says that if you leave the oil out at room temp for more than 4 weeks it can start to get rancid. Obviously the oil will harden in the fridge so you'll need to warm it up to strain it if you haven't prior to putting in the fridge. Rosemary honey is actually good as well (no need to refrigerate) - all kinds of good stuff it can be used for. You can also put it in a cotton (or like) sack and let your hot bath water run over it when filling the tub. According to the book Homegrown Remedies by Anne McIntyre - 'The leaves and flowers have a relaxing, stimulating effect on the central nervous system, reducing anxiety ad depression while enhancing energy and concentration mental alertness, and equanimity. Rosemary is excellent for headaches and migraines when taken on a regular basis. Rosemary contains volatile oils, which are highly antiseptic, with antibacterial, antiviral and anti-fungal properties enhancing the function of the immune system.' I haven't tried the following recipe (by HerbWorld) but came upon it when looking up particulars for this thread. Guess it depends HOW much you like the taste of Rosemary...LOL

Rosemary Pesto
1/3 cup fresh rosemary leaves
1 cup fresh parsley leaves
2 large garlic cloves
cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese
cup walnuts
cup olive oil
salt and freshly ground pepper
Combine the rosemary, parsley, garlic, cheese, and walnuts in a food processor or blender. Process to mix. With the machine running, slowly add the olive oil. Season to taste with salt and freshly ground pepper and process to the desired consistency. Let stand 5 minutes before serving.

HerbWorld also states the following:
'Constitutents: essential oils include cineole, borneol, camphene, camphor, linalool, verbenol; flavonoids (diosmin, apigenin, diosmetin, luteolin), rosemarinic acids, tannins,
diterpenes (picrosalvin), rosmaricine, bornylacetat, dipenten, eucalyptol, D-a-pinen, camphor, L-a-thujon
Energetics: warming, dry, pungent, bitter
Properties: astringent, tonic, antiinflammatory, digestive remedy, nervine, carminative, antiseptic, diuretic, promote sweating, promote bile flow, antidepressant, circulatory stimulant, antispasmodic, restorative tonic for nervous system, cardiac tonic'

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

June 30, 2012
8:26 PM

Post #9188254

Herbworld says WHAT? never heard of most of those ... but, this is for rosemary, right?

I priced fresh parm yesterday - OUCH on the price! almost $8 for a wedge of it. I know it doesn't "smell" like the "dirty socks" my DH hates... so thought I'd try it, until I saw the cost...
I like the properties of Rosemary that Herbworld lists. sounds so good

I was given some organic honey, and usually put honey in my tea, along with ginger, and it's really good with any type of tea. I don't use it with my infused mint tea though. Doesn't sound like the two would go together somehow...
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

July 1, 2012
5:11 AM

Post #9188464

Susan - Nuts can be used instead of cheese. Google vegan pesto recipes.

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 1, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #9188792

Yes many folks use pine nuts in their pesto recipes but I find those to be rather costly as well...I'm just as happy w/o the nuts and cheese - mix and taste it till YOU like it...that's whats important!!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

July 1, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #9188826

Nuts as in walnuts, cashews, almonds, pecans etc.

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 1, 2012
6:06 PM

Post #9189163

I have pine nuts, and walnuts, so can use those. Nuts are so healthy for you!

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 1, 2012
7:03 PM

Post #9189246

Again, it's what your pref is. Pesto recipes typically call for pine nuts but many folks enjoy the pecans, slivered almonds or walnuts
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

July 2, 2012
6:56 AM

Post #9189705

They are healthy. Chantell is right about it's whatever is your preference. We also make a vegan version of pistou which is a sort of pesto made for use with soup. We made a version this weekend with mint.

There are also a number of pesto recipes on Saveur magazine web site. There was also a article in the last year that had recipes for pesto made out of different types of herbs and greens. It can also be made with oils other than olive oil.

Wikipedia has a section on pesto and pistou. It includes some descriptions of traditional ingredients for both types.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1233095/
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pistou

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 3, 2012
7:13 PM

Post #9192033

What zone is Rosemary hardy to?

Chantell

Chantell
Middle of, VA
(Zone 7a)

July 3, 2012
7:15 PM

Post #9192042

Susan - here's the link to the DG PlantFiles on various types of Rosemary http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/b/Lamiaceae/Rosmarinus/none/cultivar/0/

Tallulah_B

Tallulah_B
(Susan) Calgary, AB
(Zone 3b)

July 3, 2012
7:25 PM

Post #9192055

I read, on Garden Web, where someone had theirs growing for 4 years, in zone 5...
I'll check out the DG link - thanks Chantell

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