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Vegetable Gardening: Growing ARTICHOKE in zone 8

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
1:50 PM

Post #8934533

I have started my Artichoke seeds on December 11th, seven days ago and they are starting to sprout.
I am using Root Organics soil and a heating math set at 85 F degrees.

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
3:22 PM

Post #8934652

I am growing two varieties:
Green Globe Artichoke http://rareseeds.com/vegetablesa-c/artichoke/green-globe-artichoke.html
Purple of Romagna Artichoke http://rareseeds.com/vegetablesa-c/artichoke/purple-of-romagna-artichoke.html
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
3:32 PM

Post #8934671

I started Artichoke this summer for the fall. I kept them in the coolest room in the house about 70* no bottom heat. They sprouted in about 2-3 days. I did soak the seeds. I followed the directions in Johnnies catalog. When I potted them up I was shocked that they had such an extensive root system.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
4:13 PM

Post #8934702

Heres a link to the Artichoke Capital of the US. Castorville is zone 8b BUT their climate is way different then ours. Its called cool coastal climate. http://www.artichoke-festival.org/farming.html

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
4:53 PM

Post #8934739

Thanks so much.
I grew up near Venice(Italy) and one of the island is very famous for growing very small purple arichokes (=carciofo). You could buy 10 artichokes for a couple of bucks ... very cheap then.
I love them so much, but here in the USA are very expensive and very hard to eat ... they just don't taste as well as in Italy. I think they harvest them too late to make them bigger ... but they don't taste as good as the smaller ones.
Anyway, I am giving them a try.
1lisac do you have a picture of your artichokes right now?
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 18, 2011
7:07 PM

Post #8934858

No, I grew the plants and Cardoon for an order. I had never grown them so I did a ton of research (ask Shoe). Lol I'm from CA tho and all I could think is it's 113*, this is nothing like Castorville Ca. Lol. I was going to keep a couple of the plants but I didn't have any place to plant them where the deer couldn't get to them. At the time the deer were eating my tomato plants I knew they would eat these plant for sure. It does say to start them in the fall and how to "trick" them into blooming in the Spring. Good luck

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 22, 2011
7:29 PM

Post #8939926

Green Globe Artichoke germinated very quickly. I have at least 7 babies.
None yet from the Purple of Romagna ... but itis ok, because they suppose to germinate in 7-14 days

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 29, 2011
7:35 AM

Post #8946432

Today I have 8 Green Globe Artichoke and only one Purple of Romagna seedlings
The first set of true leaf

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

December 30, 2011
9:58 AM

Post #8947705

They can take forever to germinate and some may germinate long after you have given up on them. Becareful when you pot up as they have an extensive root system that is 3x as large as the plant you see.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 3, 2012
3:23 PM

Post #8953293

Updated picture

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 10, 2012
3:15 PM

Post #8962390

Artichokes growing well

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
4:30 PM

Post #8967818

Five true leaves.
Soon I will start to move them outside during the day.

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Googlie4gardens
Victorville, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 15, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #8968719

So glad I came across this!!! I ordered purple of romagna seeds from rareseeds a couple days ago and know absolutely nothing about artichokes. Do you think I still have time to start them? I'm in zone 8b and unlike that link above about Casterville i'm in the desert not near the coast. Our weather has been all wacked out and its been quite warm. I'm hoping that our winter hasn't started and that I will be able to use my greenhouse. Will you be potting them or putting them in a bed? Also I read on the plantfile page that you should deadhead them bc of selfsowing. Do you know what deadheading is?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
2:13 PM

Post #8968874

I think you can still try to grow them.
In my opinion and from what I have heard in my zone, the first year artichokes will not make fruit ... just like my cardoon plants.
The first year they just seat there ... but after that I had the most amazing blooms ever.
I will plant them at the edge of one of my flower bed and just forget about them ... they should do great.
deadheading= removing the flower/bud
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2012
2:20 PM

Post #8968890

Actually you can get flower buds the first year if you give them the chilling hours they require. I grow Imperial Star (from Johnny's Seeds) and was pleasantly surprised I got artichokes last summer from them (seeds were started in late December and more in January).

Once the seeds have declared it is best to alternate the ambient temperature (warm during days, cooler at night). Once potted up or set out time it so they get about 200 chilling hours, if that is possible in Texas where you are, drthor.

And beware, even though the plants are thistle-y, those dang deer LOVE them and will eat 'em up! (Dagnabbit!)

And yes, Googlie, dead heading is simply pulling spent flower heads but I'm surprised it was suggested regarding artichokes; the artichoke (what you eat) is the flower and you'll be picking it anyway at its proper eating time, not letting it come into bloom. But you know what, if you choose to let some flower, go to seed, etc, I can't think of a better volunteer to have growing! Lots of good "free" plants and good eating if that happens, eh?

Shoe

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
2:51 PM

Post #8968956

thanks
Luvv artichokes or CARCIOFO (in Italian)
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2012
3:53 PM

Post #8969021

carciofo...

Kar -see- oh-foe? Just want to get my pronunciation right!

Thanks!
Shoe

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #8969024

no ... just "carciofo" ... giggle
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #8969029

sheesh...It's my Southern accent, ya see... :>)
Googlie4gardens
Victorville, CA
(Zone 8b)

January 15, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #8969280

Haha! You two are funny! Thanks for the responses. Horseshoe, I was a little confused about the deadheading haha. I even thought to myself.. Isn't the artichoke a flower?!

I forgot that artichokes are perennials, so I didn't even think about them not flowering till next season.. About how many years do they live for? How far apart would you plant the purple of romagna? Do you fertilize the seedlings, if so with what? Excuse my million questions :)

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
8:05 AM

Post #8969811

I don't use any fertilizer on my seedling untill they are estabilished outside.
I use a very rich growing medium by ROOTS ORGANICS

Today I have put my transplants outside to start the VERNALIZATION process.

That's is what have read:
"IMPORTANT COLD TREATMENT (VERNALIZATION): Time transplanting so that plants receiveat least 250 hours of temperatures below 50F (10C) to induce budding. Protect from frost.
Vernalization is the technique of making the plants believe that they have undergone a winter season and 'forcing' them into producing flower buds in the same year that they are planted.
In practical terms this means starting the seeds off early in the year in a warm indoor environment and then exposing them to cool spring temperatures to mimic the mild maritime winter they are adapted to. "

This is all new to me ... so i will let y'all know what will happen.
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2012
8:19 AM

Post #8969833

Yep, that info looks like what Johhny's post on their site. I followed it and had great plants.

Here is something to look forward to...a baby bud/flower coming on last June

Have fun!
Shoe

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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #8969837

wow carciooofooo !
Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #8970085

Ohhh, so THAT'S how you pronounce that word! *grin

Happy Gardening!
Shoe

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 19, 2012
4:02 PM

Post #8974719

My artichokes are going to spend the night out.

This message was edited Apr 19, 2012 7:11 AM

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Horseshoe
Efland, NC
(Zone 7a)

January 19, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #8974810

Hokay...

Lookin' Good!

Shoe :>)

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
6:09 PM

Post #8978227

Half of those Purple of Romagna artichoke seeds didn't germinate.
So I gave up and use that soil to pot up my tomatoes seedlings and ... guess what?
Seven artichoke plants germinated inside the tomato pots ... almost after ONE MONTH ... ah ah
So now I have lots of artichokes.

The Green Globe variety is growing very fast. At least four times bigger than the Purple of Romagna variety.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
7:12 PM

Post #8978311

Everything I've read about them says their germination is very erratic I had the same thing happen some germinated 6 wks later then the others. Some I found in the starting mix their roots were everywhere while the leaves were just peeking out of the seed.

I'm reading Johnnys right now and it says to germinate kale/collards at 90* doesn't that seem high?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
8:44 PM

Post #8978396

I thought that the purple one is supposed to be a smaller variety...and more tasy!!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 23, 2012
7:20 AM

Post #8978785

I dunno ... I'll keep posting
90 degrees for collards? huumm doesnt' sound right ...

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #8982810

Artichokes are outside day and night.
The Green Globes are the bigger ones in this picture.

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #8982814

Here a close-up of Green Globe

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:46 AM

Post #9007582

I have transplanted out my Artichokes outside.
You can see the "forgotten" bed in the back of the house.
I have removed the Monky Grass, put down some soil and compost ... and this will be my artichoke bed (full sun) and not "forgotten" anymore ...

Green Globe was double of the size of the Purple Artichoke.

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
8:47 AM

Post #9007587

Green Globe mulched with pine needles

Thumbnail by drthor
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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
9:48 AM

Post #9007663

Werent you amazed at their roots?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
9:58 AM

Post #9007678

not really ... why ?

I was amazed on how SLOW they grew ...

I am not expecting them to flower this year.
Because it was not really cold to do the "VERNALIZATION process" ... I will be just happy if they can survive their first year ...
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 15, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9007774

When I started Artichoke the root system was 4x as big as the plant. I was surrrised at how vast their root system was. There would be this little pant on the top of the starting mix but when I took it out to up pot it the roots went on forever.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9024366

My artichoke plants are growing fantastic.
I have lost none so far.

Instead I think the Sparrows are stealing my PINE NEEDLES I have used to mulch my artichokes. aaaahhhh
I think they are using them to make their nest.

Could you think of anybody else that would still pine needles?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2012
2:45 PM

Post #9024913

I think mine will be vernalized by the snow now. We have had spring-like weather for the last 2 months. Very unusual to last as long as we frequently have warm weather for short bursts during winter, but not for such long periods. Now the snow is coming down more heavily with not so much wind. Last night it was so noisy, with snow being blown off the branches of tall trees.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9024915

wow ... it is amazing we are in the same zone !
Today was 76 and sunny and blue sky ... so beautiful ...
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2012
3:17 PM

Post #9024953

I am in the Sierra foothills at about 3500' in elevation...you are in Texas...flat land?

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 29, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #9024982

That's what we've been trying to say! The zones are very different and not a very good guide for planting.

Evelyn-the picture is beautiful. Drthor is in the Dallas, Ft. Worth area. I'm north west of Austin in the Hill Country South of drthor. What's strange is we are usually cooler in the winter here, today was cooler also, but we are South of Dallas

I think winter is just late. Lol It's supposed to get colder this weekend

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
4:43 PM

Post #9028725

Artichokes are growing really good.
Look at the picture with all the artichoke plants ... can you see that the pine needles around the second artichoke are missing ? It looks like one of those "crop circle" ...
Who is stealing my pine needles???

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

beebonnet

beebonnet
Coos Bay, OR
(Zone 9a)

March 3, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #9028771

Wow! Looks kind of like when I let my chickens roam the yard. They pick a plant and scratch all the way around it. A wild bird that scratches a lot is what we call the Winter Robin. Actually a thrush, as is a robin, but the color is much more vivid. My mother used to call them Scratchers. She was always making up names for whatever. The perfectly even circle makes me think of chickens or something like that?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
6:37 PM

Post #9028853

I have seen Robins around my yard ... we also have Brown Trashier ... but I have not seen it yet this year.
I have no chickens ... I wish ...
The soil is not scratched ... just the pine needles missing in a perfect circle ...

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 29, 2012
6:29 AM

Post #9061591

Artichokes are growing well.
I don't even look at them. They are getting water once a week ... that's all.
In this area the wind is also very high ...

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2012
2:43 PM

Post #9087921

Artichokes growing like monsters.
Only Green Globe survived. None of the Purple of Romagna.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2012
9:38 PM

Post #9088384

Looking good, drthor!

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 20, 2012
9:05 AM

Post #9090136

At the beginning of this thread I said that I could grow Cardoon ... so I'd try to grow Artichokes too ...
The previous winters my Cardoon died down to the ground and grew back again in the spring ... but not last winter, it stayed green all the time (which it was stunning)

Now look !!!
It is almost as tall as my Crepe Myrtles ... but full of blooms !!!!

OMG !!

This message was edited Apr 20, 2012 10:21 AM

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
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drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 20, 2012
9:07 AM

Post #9090140

The bees are going to go crazy over those buds real soon !

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 20, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9090145

Those are pictures from last year. Bees and butterflies madness ...

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 24, 2012
8:59 PM

Post #9096632

[quote="drthor"]At the beginning of this thread I said that I could grow Cardoon ... so I'd try to grow Artichokes too ...
The previous winters my Cardoon died down to the ground and grew back again in the spring ... but not last winter, it stayed green all the time (which it was stunning)

Now look !!!
It is almost as tall as my Crepe Myrtles ... but full of blooms !!!![/quote]
You've about convinced me to try some of each here in Florida. I've always been told artichokes and cardoons don't do well in very hot areas - but obviously that isn't quite correct. Beautiful plants!

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 25, 2012
12:00 PM

Post #9097423

They may grow fine it's the production that could be an issue. But your in the same zone so you might get enough cool weather to get them to produce. Just make sure you put them where you really want them, their root system is something else...Cardoon shouldn't be an issue since it's grown for it's edible foliage.
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 6, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #9112594

I am delighted to find old friends and familiar names on this thread. My Artichoke plants are some of the most beautiful things in my yard, and productive, but I am having my first experience with slugs in them. It does seem like a perfect habitat, and so far, I am finding them even harder to get rid of than the gophers and squirrels were.

I have applied slug pellets and cut off the lower branches to dry off the ground, but still finding baby slugs around the fruits. Any comments will be appreciated, just as the tomato teaching has been.

Thanks,
Ernie
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 8, 2012
8:42 PM

Post #9116631

[quote="ERNIECOPP"]My Artichoke plants are some of the most beautiful things in my yard, and productive, but I am having my first experience with slugs in them...I have applied slug pellets and cut off the lower branches to dry off the ground, but still finding baby slugs around the fruits.
Ernie[/quote]
I am confused. Artichoke fruits?

-Rich
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 8, 2012
9:10 PM

Post #9116651

Rich,
Sorry i confused you. You cannot very well call the part you cut off and a cook a "Choke" as that is the name of the interior part that we eat. I guess i just assumed that every one old enough to read would understand that i was talking about the fruit of the Artichoke plant. Or maybe i should have said the artichoke on the artichoke plant. If you are still confused, i am talking about the spiny thing that turns in to a blossom if you do not pick it in time.

Ernie
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 9, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #9116962

Ernie-I get it! The part you eat. : )
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 9, 2012
7:37 AM

Post #9117051

Lisa,

Yes, one of the definitions for the word "FRUIT" is "The edible part of a Plant", so while fruits and vegetables are considered to be different, the artichoke that we eat is also the "fruit" of the artichoke plant.

If i had used the work Artichoke in that instance, instead of Fruit, it could have been understood to mean the slugs were found around the plant, not on the fruit of the plant.

But, after cutting off the lower fronds, and keeping the area underneath dryer, along with the poison i am not seeing slug damage now.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 9, 2012
8:32 AM

Post #9117148

Im actually seeing snails for the 1st time in 20 yrs (I dd see a few last year). Jillions of them, but Im not seeing any Fire Ants, or Pill Bugs, for that matter. Strange.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 9, 2012
9:59 AM

Post #9117246

[quote="ERNIECOPP"]Yes, one of the definitions for the word "FRUIT" is "The edible part of a Plant", so while fruits and vegetables are considered to be different, the artichoke that we eat is also the "fruit" of the artichoke plant.[/quote]
WHOSE definition?

"Pardon me, I need to go pull up some garlic fruit for dinner. We'll be having that with asparagus fruit, beet fruit and spinach fruit."

Sorry, I'm a purist.

-Rich

ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 9, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9117271

Rich,
That is one of several definitions in the dictionary. If you are going to be a nit picker, you should know your nits.

I am a purist, too, when it comes to words. If you do not have your dictionary handy, check the reference icon at the top of your computer screen.

Fruit is the product of many different things. Even a brand of underwear is called Fruit of the Loom.

Ernie
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 9, 2012
11:32 AM

Post #9117386

[quote="ERNIECOPP"]I am a purist, too, when it comes to words. If you do not have your dictionary handy, check the reference icon at the top of your computer screen.

Fruit is the product of many different things. Even a brand of underwear is called Fruit of the Loom.

Ernie[/quote]
Ernie,

Ack! Here we go. There is no "reference icon" at the top of my screen. I'm pretty sure that depends on the computer/operating system/browser you're using. I've got a "Virtual Keyboard" icon and a "URL Advisor" icon at the top of my screen...do you?

I'm pretty sure most people refer to the largest edible part of an artichoke as a "heart". The leaf bases and the interiors of the stems are also "edible parts".

I can't control what some company decides to call their underwear.

-Rich
ERNIECOPP
Vista, CA

May 9, 2012
12:28 PM

Post #9117435

Rich, You are arguing with the wrong person here as i did not write the definition, i just used it. It was necessary for me to diffentiate between the Artichoke plant and what is commonly called the Artichoke, that we eat, so in order to explain where the slugs were, I had to use a synonym for the edible part.
I hope this helps you understand the usage of this word, as well as the reason i used it. In ordinary circumstances i call them Artichokes, too.

Ernie

Below is the list of definitions for the word Fruit, from the Bing DICTIONARY

fruit
Definition
fruit[ froot ]NOUN
fruits plural

1. edible part of plant: an edible part of a plant, usually fleshy and containing seeds
2. ovary of plant: the ripened seed-bearing ovary of a plant. It is usually considered to be sweet and fleshy, as in plums, but may be dry, as in poppies, or be a simple edible supporting structure, as in strawberries.
3. produce: the produce of any plant grown or harvested by humans
"the fruits of the field"
4. product of something: the product or consequence of something done
"We are now seeing the fruits of our efforts."
5. offspring: the offspring of humans or animals ( dated )
6. spore-producing part: a spore-producing part of a plant
7. NOTE. I DELETED THIS DEFINITION AS IT IS A DEROGATORY TERM FOR SOME PEOPLE.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 8, 2012
9:54 PM

Post #9198471

So Rich, I'm wondering how you growing of Artichokes has gone? I know you are 4 hours north of me, and do get cooler temps, but I want to try growing some so bad.

Jan
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 11, 2012
9:27 PM

Post #9202291

[quote="meadowyck"]So Rich, I'm wondering how you growing of Artichokes has gone? I know you are 4 hours north of me, and do get cooler temps, but I want to try growing some so bad.

Jan[/quote]
Hi Jan, never got to it. I helped with some professional fireworks shows and then had to go in for surgery. Still planning some for the future but will most likely be next Spring - right now I am slowed down by not being allowed to lift more than 20 pounds. At least I can get back in the shower, and next week back in the pool.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 12, 2012
5:24 AM

Post #9202421

My artichoke plants are "alive".
I think their growth slowed down due to the heat !!
I am not really babying them. They are planted on a forgotten part of my garden in full sun and not so much water.
They are alive !

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 18, 2012
1:14 PM

Post #9210360

Here is a picture of the artichokes. So far so good.

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 18, 2012
8:54 PM

Post #9210869

is it me or does anyone else think the artichokes look like thistles????LOLOLOLO

Jan
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

July 18, 2012
9:29 PM

Post #9210895

[quote="meadowyck"]is it me or does anyone else think the artichokes look like thistles????LOLOLOLO

Jan[/quote]
Well, technically they are...

-Rich

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 19, 2012
6:27 AM

Post #9211145

I was going to do some research today to see, so thanks.

Well off to sams before the humidity gets too bad.

Jan
LhasaLover
(Tammie) Odessa, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2012
12:59 PM

Post #9213491

I have been thinking of growing an artichoke plant. A neighbor of my parents have 3 in their front flower bed that have grown there for several years as ornamentals. I don't think they even know what they are! They just come back every year, grow and bloom. The only reason I know what they were was because a friend near San Diego grew them in her garden years ago.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #9213528

LhasaLover
Could you be talking about CARDOON?
Cardoon looks just like an artichoke, but you eat the stalks and not the flower.
They are gorgeous. This year mine were as tall as my Crepe Myrtle, also they are a magnet for butterflies and bees.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 21, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #9213588

drthor

I grew cardoon when we lived up north, but the next door neighbor keep coming over and cutting it down, thinking I didn't know I had a weed growing, only one time did I get to see it blooming (they went on vacation)...LOL

I think the blooms are incredible, and the black bumble bees that it would be covered with was incredible, if you pair it with cat nip, you won't believe the drunk bees you will have...LOL, they fly off in a zig zag pattern as there is so much pollen from the two of them...

Jan
LhasaLover
(Tammie) Odessa, TX
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2012
3:39 PM

Post #9213659

I honestly don't know... it has grown there through two owners. I would like to grow SOMETHING I can eat! LOL I have never grown anything I could actually eat before. That would be fun. ... but if it just looks pretty, that would be nice too. My center front flower bed is just about completely dead because of the drought. I think I could grow them there because I could carry a bucket of water out there daily for a plant or two. Where do I find seeds?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2012
4:48 PM

Post #9213703

LhasaLover
I suggest that you don't grow the Cardoon in an area that you pass by constantly (like your front door), because they will go dormant in the winter (unless it is mild like 2012) and right now I trimmed them down to the ground because they were too tall and flipping over.
You can buy the seeds here: http://www.gourmetseed.com/c=LUxdfQ9OFq3Ag5polHYmAjOZj/category/gourmet_seed.vegetable_seed.cardoon/

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

July 21, 2012
5:27 PM

Post #9213742

How do you artichoke growers feel about their drought tolerance? If you look online, everyone insists they need lots of water, but I know for a fact they grow along railroad tracks in Australia where it gets way less rainfall than Alabama. I'm in need of a perennial or fruit for a dry partial shade and I'm wondering of artichokes will fit the bill. Part shade here is a lot more sun than many places get.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

July 21, 2012
7:33 PM

Post #9213879

The artichokes you see in my pictures are planted in a "forgotten" area of my garden, by the garage.
Not much water there and full sun. So far they are alive.
My Cardoons lived after snow an cold weather. I hope the artichokes will do the same !
Still ... this is my first year trying.

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 22, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #9214179

here is a blog of a lady who is growing in your front landscaping. This might give you some ideas. http://www.outlawgarden.com/

Jan

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

November 23, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9340418

Updated pictures of my artichokes.
They are growing very healthy after surviving a crazy hot summer.
We are not having any rain yet ... and I think they would be much bigger.
But they look good right now.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2013
2:50 PM

Post #9430213

Updated pictures of my artichokes.
I planted them in a "forgotten" part of my garden ... and I keep forgetting about them !
But they don't mind me ... or the weather ... heat and cold ... they are growing really well.
I should have artichokes this year !!

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2013
3:16 PM

Post #9430236

I grew artichokes for so long without ever producing an artichoke that I finally decided that either they must be chardoon, not artichokes, or that I was a real lousy artichoke grower..

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2013
3:20 PM

Post #9430243

Ah ah ... this is so funny !!!
I am sure I am growing artichokes. I DID start them myself from seeds.
A few months ago I was in Chile and I saw artichokes for sale at their local market: five artichokes for $1 !!!
Here in Dallas: one artichoke for $5 !

I grew up in Italy, near Venice. We have lots of artichoke. Especially the small artichoke that is purple typical from one of the islands near Venice.
hrp50
Carrollton, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2013
3:32 PM

Post #9430256

I agree that artichokes are one of those vegetables that cost so much to buy in a store that you are better off growing your own, except for me because I'm "artichoke challenged". Things like home grown carrots don't taste much if any better than store bought ones so I would rather save bed space and buy them in a store. Asparagus is another relatively expensive vegetable to buy that I would like to grow my own but haven't yet.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2013
3:48 PM

Post #9430264

I absolutely agree with you ... carrots take forever!!!
I also wish to have a bed dedicated to asparagus !!

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2013
4:17 PM

Post #9430285

I want artichokes but they are very marginal here and take up so much room. I have that much room in the shade, but not enough to dedicate in the sun, although I keep thinking about where they could go.

I remember the first time I ate an artichoke and someone showed me how... it looked so strange I was sure that I'd hate it!
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

March 23, 2013
4:48 PM

Post #9459461

I LOVE my artichokes (carciofi)! I have a friend who planted them in her front yard, in a flower bed, and they look lovely. They stay green in our mild winters and have beautiful foliage.
drthor- Dedicate a bed to asparagus (asparagi), you will not regret it. I had my first serious crop this year, on two year old plants, and they are sooo much better than store bought. Isn't everything?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2013
6:49 AM

Post #9459898

Does your friend also have carciofi or just leaves?
I was born in Padova, which is just 30 minutes away from Venezia with the train.
There I had the luxury to eat artichokes all the time and very cheap.
30 minutes from Venice there is the Island of San Erasmo, where they have been grown a variety of artichoke for centuries called "Violetto di San Erasmo". It is a small purple artichoke and it is so good. Here a very interesting article:
http://theartichokeblog.com/the-artichokes-of-san-erasmo/

sweetmommy
I'd love to have a bed of asparagi one day.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2013
7:18 AM

Post #9459916

Have you ever been to Venice or like we call it in Italian: Venezia?
It is hard to explain how transportation work there and it is even harden to see how everything get moved around that beautiful place.
There are no cars, so you need to transport everything by boat.
In this picture you can see how the new vegetables arrived by boat from the near by islands.
The vegetables are loaded in a little trolley operated by "one" man. He has to push that trolly up and down bridges and stairs .. and yes that it is also the way that and UPS delivery does work.

Thumbnail by drthor
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2013
7:23 AM

Post #9459919

After the vegetables arrived from the nearby islands, they are beautifully display in the every-day farmers market.
The 4th picture has "fondi di carciofo" = artichokes bottoms.
The seller removed all the artichokes leaves and only the bottom is left. 10 bottoms for Euro 7 = $9 !!
This is an expensive price because this market was by Saint Marco Square ... but still good compare to the $5 they charge for ONE artichoke at my local store in Dallas.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   
Click an image for an enlarged view.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2013
10:15 AM

Post #9460130

dthor, those pictures are making me hungry. I haven't seen such lovely produce outside of my own garden since I lived in California. What we get here is a lot older and less attractive.

Part of the appeal, I think, is the reusable wood crates instead of the beds of green plastic.
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

March 24, 2013
11:10 AM

Post #9460189

drthor- I grew up in Paris and had an Italian boyfriend (Torino) for 10 years so I spent lots of time all over Italy, Venezia & Padova also. These photos bring back very fond memories. Thank you for posting them!

My friend has carciofi also but I'm not sure which type.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 24, 2013
11:24 AM

Post #9460212

sweetmommy
you must be an amazing "chef" ! French and Italian cooking ... yummy !

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2013
2:11 PM

Post #9482699

yes ... I just checked the plants today and I have artichokes forming !!!
Now I know I can grow artichokes in Dallas yeeeeessss

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor      
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Moodene
(Nadine) Devers, TX
(Zone 9b)

April 14, 2013
6:56 AM

Post #9483381

Oh so cool...beening watching to see if you had any forming this year..

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 14, 2013
7:07 AM

Post #9483388

I am so excited !!
I don't even look at these plants ... so far they only got rain water. My sprinklers are still off since last November. They are very hardy plants !!!
Moodene
(Nadine) Devers, TX
(Zone 9b)

April 16, 2013
7:58 AM

Post #9485890

My son wants to start a bed of them but I will have to do the upkeep on it..He is in the US Army in Maryland and comes home 3 or 4 times a year..he is the only one who eats them..lol..

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 16, 2013
9:36 AM

Post #9486013

Moodene
there is actually not to much to do, but to let them grow.
if you scroll the pictures I took since I started, the artichoke plants are kind of messy and they take a lot of space. That's why I planted all the way in the back ... also poor soil and not much watering ... go figure !!
I think from now on, the plants will multiply and make more artichokes year after year ... I hope

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 14, 2013
8:06 PM

Post #9520958

Finally I did harvest my artichokes and we ate them last night.
Sooooo good !

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 17, 2013
10:09 AM

Post #9523883

Mine died over the winter...possibly too soggy?? Not sure. Glad you enjoyed them. Is your native soil sandy? Or were your beds "well raised"?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 17, 2013
11:35 AM

Post #9523965

The soil here in my garden is clay.
The artichokes were planted in a "forgotten" side of the house ... no care at all ...
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 17, 2013
12:06 PM

Post #9523994

Which side? The south side?

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 17, 2013
3:08 PM

Post #9524149

yes
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

May 17, 2013
9:07 PM

Post #9524472

Maybe I should plant some near the house. I wonder if deer like them...probably...

w_r_ranch

w_r_ranch
Colorado County, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2013
7:56 AM

Post #9528267

Very nice, dr!!!
PamelaQ
Navarre, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2013
10:22 AM

Post #9547317

Those look amazing! If you keep getting more each year, that will be great. I enjoyed your journey with the artichokes! I first ate these in the early 60s. We were shown how to boil them in water with a couple tablespoons of vinegar for about 1/2 hour or so. Then butter was melted and some lemon juice mixed with that. We broke off the leaves and dipped them in the butter and yummmm...I have loved eating them since...

My father was military and we were living in Germany at the time. How did you prepare them to eat?

This message was edited Jun 5, 2013 12:28 PM

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 5, 2013
10:47 AM

Post #9547345

I boil the artichokes in salted water until tender.
Discard the outer leaves if they are too hard.
In a deep dish prepare olive oil, balsamic vinegar, salt & pepper and dip the bottom part of the artichoke.
Sometimes I also smash a boiled egg on the oil mix and yummy !!
I hope I will have more artichokes each year !
PamelaQ
Navarre, FL
(Zone 8b)

June 5, 2013
12:05 PM

Post #9547469

That sounds good, too!! I just had to order me some artichoke seeds to see what I can do... :)
sweetmommy
Fulshear, TX
(Zone 9b)

June 16, 2013
9:20 PM

Post #9561713

DrThor- My asparagi are multiplying. I can send you some tubers if you'd like. I think the best time to plant them is in the Fall though.

For the baby carciofi that form on the sides after you cut the big ones off, there is a delicious Roman salad. Pull the tough leaves off of the baby carciofi and slice the rest thinly. Slice some celery and mushrooms in with the artichokes. Shave some GOOD Parmigiana over the top. Dress with olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Divino!

meadowyck

meadowyck
Brooksville, FL
(Zone 9a)

July 15, 2013
6:59 AM

Post #9599565

Oh those were incredible, but just like your garden every year, you are truly a blessed gardener who knows how to take care of the plants.

Love seeing whats going on in your garden.

Jan
Moodene
(Nadine) Devers, TX
(Zone 9b)

March 15, 2014
12:52 AM

Post #9789912

I was able to buy 5 Plants and I am ready to start them soon as I plant them.
happygirl345
Pleasant Hill, CA
(Zone 9b)

March 24, 2014
8:22 PM

Post #9797430

Artichokes are a perennial where I live... and they are the WORST magnet for aphids I've ever seen.

I've tried blasting them with water, soap, etc.

The aphids are being farmed by ants... so I've got an ant problem as well.

Anyone have a good ant-fighting idea? I've tried cinnamon, mustard, orange oil...

Organic remedies?

Any help would be GREATLY appreciated.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 22, 2014
4:16 AM

Post #9818508

My artichokes are coming back easily every year.
They are soo hardy !
They were outside uncovered and unprotected all winter. We did dropped down to 15F.
They are in a part of my garden that I don't even look at ... and my sprinkler system had been off for 6 months now !
It is a dream plant. I don't have any problem with aphids either.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

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