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Recipes: What's for dinner? (Part 26)

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Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


December 27, 2011
3:11 PM

Post #8944557

We came from here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1233352/

Tonight we'll resurrect the remaining Christmas prime rib roast in the form of hot sandwiches. The dough for making crusty French rolls is in its final rising - hopefully we'll be ready to pile on thin-sliced beef, sauteed peppers and onions and some melty Provolone cheese on them by 7-ish. A side of warm German potato salad will accompany.

Tomorrow night I'm tentatively planning either chops or chicken enchiladas. Stay tuned :-)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 27, 2011
3:49 PM

Post #8944597

I was hoping some of you would post photos of your holiday dinners to go along with the delicious descriptions. Sigh. Maybe?

Tonight is the last night of Hanukkah. Then on to the New Year's eve/days menus. The later is plural because we go up to Maypop, meet the family there and friends join us for a quiet mountain eve of food, fire and a jigsaw puzzle. We stay for several days to do outdoorsy things, including garden chores, and couch potato by the fire in the evenings. Anyway, back to the menu...it is German Hanukkah tonight. I'll finally break down and make latkes. They will be served with the remaining creme fraiche and cranberries. I assembled beschwipster huhn, which is German for drunken chicken/hen, earlier in the day. This dish is similar to coq au vin. There are carrots, onions, celery and garden turnips under all that boozy chicken goodness.

Here's last night's Spanish Hanukkah table. The Spanish flag is red and yellow and so was the table plus some of our Spanish ceramics. When the kids were here Hanukkah dinners opened the door for conversations about world history, current events, food and other cultures. You can bet our kids know what color the Spanish flag is. :) All three are Spanish fluent.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 27, 2011
3:53 PM

Post #8944605

The salad with artichokes, eggs, olives and Pyrenees cheese was dressed in sherry vinegar from Juarez, Spain and Spanish olive oil.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 27, 2011
3:58 PM

Post #8944614

Papas fritas con huevos (fried potatoes with eggs). This was served with allioli (Spanish aioli).

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 27, 2011
4:00 PM

Post #8944620

The dish plated with albondigas (meatballs).

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darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2011
4:05 PM

Post #8944632

Laurel, I checked and although I thought I had taken photos of a couple if dishes to write about off-site, they are not to be found. Sorry.

Anyway, you have gifted us with enough dinner photos to make up for the rest of us!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 27, 2011
4:07 PM

Post #8944636

I have always been attracted to certain words, just for their sound regardless of their meanings. Albondigas is one if those. Go figure. LOL

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 27, 2011
4:58 PM

Post #8944719

Indeed Laurel! I have so enjoyed the concept of the international days as well as the photos and descriptions of each nights' dinner.
I've been travelling and only helping with the cooking at each place I've visited. I'm home now. I'll see if I can get photo's of the New Years' tappas spread, though I highly doubt they will be as lovely as yours.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 27, 2011
5:50 PM

Post #8944793

Terry Thanks for the new thread.

Laurel Sorry. No photos of our holiday meal either.
The recipe is a throw together. It needs a little tweaking. The black lentils with veggies tasted great but the combination with light quinoa was not as great. I think there was too much quinoa to lentil mixture or maybe should have been another grain. Added too much quinoa and it should have had its own seasoning. Should be more like 1 part quinoa to 5 parts lentil mix.
Recipe is cook lentils. In a separate pan saut onions, leaks, and carrots until onions are translucent. Stir in enough lentils so it is of equal mix as one of the veggies. If you are adding a green like Kale then add it to the pan. Cook until green is slightly wilted. Cook quinoa separately. Put Quinoa on a plate; add lentil & veggie mix on top of quinoa; and serve.

Darius and Celene Ive seen some articles on stuffing collard green leaves so they should also work. Another idea would be to shred the cabbage leaves that have holes and use them to make a make a stuffed cabbage casserole with the extra filling.

Same here on enjoying the photos of the international days and associated feast foods/dcor.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 27, 2011
6:46 PM

Post #8944865

Thanks all for sharing our holiday with us. Will try to post photos tomorrow. A major muffin top is forming above the waistband of my jeans. The range needs to be sent out for pressure washing. Then there is the miracle of Hanukkah...we survived eight days of fried foods! lol Night night.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


December 27, 2011
6:55 PM

Post #8944873

MaypopLaurel wrote: A major muffin top is forming above the waistband of my jeans. The range needs to be sent out for pressure washing.


It must be contagious - my tighter jeans are now uncomfortably tight.

The holidays were bad enough, but our YMCA chose the month of December to do major renovation, which meant we endured yoga in the racquetball court, a scaled-back number of exercise machines in half of the basketball court, etc. Made it difficult to be really motivated to go as often as I usually do. However, they are supposed to be finished on January 1, so I'm planning to take full advantage of the new-and-improved facility come January 2 and most every day thereafter.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2011
4:31 AM

Post #8945145

We said good-bye to Hanukkah last night, too (see photo) but not with an accompanying special meal; it was deer cutting-up and sausage-making day, so for dinner we just had my go-to easy meal - linguine with white clam sauce. Our friends had already cut up our deer, but we helped them with theirs and then made sausage. It wouldn't have been such an ordeal except that our grinder wasn't working properly at first. And our friends do the meat processing in their unheated barn; luckily it was in the fifties today, but it was warmer outside than in there, that's for sure! I thought this would only take a couple hours, but we got there after 10, because the husband had a meeting earlier, and didn't leave until after 5. That's a long day!

We ran out of hog casing for the sausage. I had bought two packs but the guy at the store said each would do about thirty pounds of meat so I only prepped one package. Unfortunately they weren't a very good quality, so I had to discard quite a few because they tore as we were filling them. That seems to be a real problem with those things. As a result we couldn't finish, since I really like my sausage in casings. Our friends don't bother with them, but just put a wodge of ground sausage in each bag and then thaw them and make patties out of them, but they don't do Italian sausage either - just breakfast sausage with salt, pepper and sage, so that works well.

Anyway, we brought the rest of the sausage meat home to process today with the second pack of casings - in the comfort of my heated kitchen, thankyouverymuch. I also like to weigh the packages and mark the weight down, so I know how much I need for the number of people I'm trying to serve; they don't do that. Plus our friend doesn't label the cuts according to standard nomenclature; instead of writing "Bottom Round" or "Sirloin Tip" or "Loin" as we do, he puts "Good Muscle" and "Lesser Muscle," depending on the tenderness of the piece. And this guy is a retired veterinarian. But hey, it was a free deer so I'm not complaining. It will definitely be a challenge to decide what to do with these, though!

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digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 28, 2011
6:18 AM

Post #8945223

I order my casings from Cabella's They have a good selection, but expensive. There is another place much cheaper and wouldn't you know , I can't find it . It's the same place I bought my grinder , on line . What does everyone else use for the grinder ? maybe I'll recognize it and put the address in a file so I'll have it .
Had leftover chicken fried steak , reheated in the skillet,and green beans for D H . I had green beans and clam chowder soup .Made a monkey bread for snack after dinner .

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 28, 2011
6:57 AM

Post #8945252

I have a grinder on my WishList... but don't remember right now what brand it is. I also have a sausage stuffer on the List, a LEM Products 5 lb. Vertical Stainless Steel Sausage Stuffer which runs around $150. Meanwhile I make do with the grinder and stuffer attachments for my KitchenAid mixer.

My casings came from Butcher & Packer.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 28, 2011
8:23 AM

Post #8945332

I remembered my grinder was here , in Tex . and looked at it . Googled , and recognized the name where I bought it .
Darius , It has the stuffer and power wise , it's more powerful and cheaper than any others I found anywhere for the price . Check out
onestopjerkyshop.com . they have all the casings choices you want and sooo inexpensive . This one does venison without gumming up the cutter with membrane and threads from the meat . Cuts right through them . It's the model TS-108 and I gave my new one to a D-in- L that cost the same but wouldn't do the job ,only good for veggies and light stuff. It runs about 150.00 plus shipping and I promise you , it's worth every dime .Has the stuffer for sausage , does good work . Look at all they have and you'll be pleased . Sally
P S ,The knife was a gift to my son's wife , and she was so pleased that I think she actually likes me after 34 years .She thought her knife was sharp , until she minced with this one .She cooks all the time , from scratch and takes good care of my son , so she deserved it .lol

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 28, 2011
9:20 AM

Post #8945386

I was amazed to find my 23yr old niece is really into hunting, butchering & grinding! She's working on her PhD in Virology and apparently is dating another grad student who is into these things. In my experience, most people who hunt, were taught by their parents. Who would think you'd pick it up in grad school? Anyway, she bought him a grinder and helped him butcher a deer. She bought a compound bow and plans to get her own deer next.

Tam
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

December 28, 2011
9:41 AM

Post #8945396

Been away form the 'puter for a few days - got the most awful PC virus - "XP Internet Security -2012".
Now fixed, but what an ordeal. Looks like a virus removal service, but is instead the bug" itself. Plants pieces all over your hard drive, so is nearly impossible to remove by yourself. AND it has been around since 2008 at least, so not new and may have been planting the "seeds of destruction" for a long time before "pulling the trigger".

Loved making butter as a boy - nothing tastes like homemade - especially when you can get cream form the first green grass in the spring - color is almost orange, not washed out (almost white) yellow.

Albondigas soup was a discovery for us when we lived in LA.CA - many Mexican restaurants would serve a complementary cup with each meal. It is not common here in Texas, and the only commercial version (Jaunita's) we can find occasionally, is not near as good as the fresh we had out there. Bet your version was even better.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 28, 2011
10:43 AM

Post #8945431

Thanks Sally, I'll check out that site and bookmark it for when I have money. Glad your DIL likes the knife!!

I just won a 2 DVD set on gourmet butchering, from http://www.thegourmetbutcher.com/ The only thing I have butchered before has been deer, but next year I hope to buy quarters or sides of beef and pork and butcher them myself.

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digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 28, 2011
11:26 AM

Post #8945482

In our weekly farm bulletin , grass fed , no hormone beef , hanging weight is advertised for $ 2.25 a lb .That's a steal .

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2011
11:36 AM

Post #8945492

The grinder I have is a Tasin TS-108; sounds like the same thing you have, Sally. I bought it several years ago from a site that sold equipment for feeding dogs raw food; it looked like the best deal and we really like it. Before that I used the grinder attachment for my ancient Mixmaster; that's fine for making chopped liver but it's not happy with big chunks of meat. The Tasin comes with several different plates and also a sausage stuffer. I discovered that it's a lot easier to get the first casing on if you use a bit of olive oil on the sausage stuffer before you try easing the casing on.

We had gotten really nice casings from a local butcher shop, and then I bought some at the supermarket which were awful. Our friend got some from Cabela's and they were excellent the first time, but the next time he ordered them they were terrible. This time the first packet (from the butcher's) had a lot of problems - holes and thin places that burst - and the second was perfect. I don't know if that's because I soaked them longer the second time, though. Finishing up the sausage was a breeze today.

Sally, I wish I lived near enough to take advantage of that beef!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2011
1:40 PM

Post #8945571

Dinner is meatballs and spaghetti sauce.

BTW - This has nothing to do with dinner but I need to say to someone I'm annoyed with Sears Parts Direct. They are shipping a $32 part to home address with $11 shipping charge.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 28, 2011
1:47 PM

Post #8945578

Well, Sears never was in the "business of selling products"... instead they were in the business of selling "credit at 21% interest" to buy their products. Sounds like nothing has changed.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


December 28, 2011
1:56 PM

Post #8945596

Sorry for the aggravation Susan - that is irritating, to be sure! I want to like Sears for their commitment to quality hand tools and what they do for their employees in the military, but they fall short in certain areas - as do most companies.

Tonight's dinner is chicken and cheese enchiladas with a side of homemade refried beans. Molten brownies for dessert, if my kitchen sink is functioning by then. (A drippy faucet is being replaced by the plumbing fairy/aka my dad :-)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2011
2:06 PM

Post #8945617

I worked for Sears (repair side) in college and so am familar with their "normal" issues. They seem to have aquired a few additional ones in the last couple of years. I think I'm mostly annoyed by having to order via chat because of an intentional redirect on the web site and getting mislead by the chat person so they could get the order finished.

As a last throw in for tonight I'm making a pumpkin pie with a spelt/pumpkin seed crust. I'll let you know how it turns out.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2011
2:10 PM

Post #8945621

GG, What a pretty menorah! Sounds like you had a busy day. How much venison did you end up with? DD mentioned she had some to bring. Hope she remembers.

Tam, our 25 y.o. daughter learned slaughtering and butchering while in grad school and her SO is vegetarian. She is open to hunting but has not had the opportunity. She does it because she believes people should know and understand the process of taking a life, even an animal's.

Bubba, the albondigas we had were in the Spanish style with a slightly spicy, smoked tomato sauce. That style, like many foods in Spain, originated from Moorish cuisine. The Moors occupied Spain for about eight hundred years. Aside from the history factoid, I also make the Mexican soup version which we love. I'm very surprised to hear this is not popular in your area. We have the largest Mexican population of any non-border state and it's in most restaurants here.

Good going on the CDs, Darius. I can see you outside with a carcass on the picnic table and laptop on a tree stump going, "Step #1".

We enjoyed the last night of Hanukkah. I was more cautious knowing I'd face the scales this morning. I started by frying a batch of latkes. Two big russets made twenty four pancakes.

Sorry about the aggravation, Susan.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2011
2:12 PM

Post #8945625

Here they are waiting patiently on the plate.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2011
2:14 PM

Post #8945628

This is beschwipster chicken and veggies. It's pretty rustic but the wine sauce puts it up there.

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MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2011
2:21 PM

Post #8945643

And this is the table on the last night.

I spent the day running around the city delivering food from Costco to area shelters and pantries. Managed to stop in at the international market and do our shopping for New Year's weekend. The phone rang coming in and it seems we have out of town company arriving the day we get back with the kids. I told them they could pick up dinner for all of us. Such a hostess.

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SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2011
2:26 PM

Post #8945649

Very pretty dinner and table setting.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2011
3:04 PM

Post #8945684

Thanks Susan. It's been lots of fun, even romantic (can we say that here?), though the truth is it's most fun when family can be together. Okay, the truth is it was very romantic but we missed the kids bunches. :) Now I feel guilty about pining for those romantic dinners with SO when the pile of kids were here and the house was like a train station. We'll make up for that during the next week.

As for what's for dinner, Bubba, you are an inspiration. Several varieties of greens are hanging out in the fridge and the leftover meatballs. I feel a sopa de albondigas coming. In fact, SO jumped at the suggestion and has already prepped the other veggies. I'm cooking!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2011
4:59 PM

Post #8945809

Your tables are always so gorgeous, Laurel!

I think we ended up with about 15 pounds of sausage; I don't know about the other cuts because our friends don't weigh them and yesterday I just wanted to get them home and in the freezer. It's hard to write on cold packages anyway, so I didn't bother trying to figure out how heavy they were. It was a fairly small deer, though, so the roasts weren't that large.

Do you have any tricks for getting wax off menorahs? We don't clean ours of drips until the end, but then it's a bit of a hassle. One year I tried putting the whole menorah in the wood stove briefly, but that made a mess! This year I picked most of it off and then we used a brass brush to get the rest.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 28, 2011
5:24 PM

Post #8945841

You or Bubba have a preferred sopa de albondigas recipe. Looks interesting. A friend once told me "there was something sweet in the missing". It took me a while to figure out what she meant and it's true. It's another phase of life moving through and a missing of what was good about the most recent.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 28, 2011
5:43 PM

Post #8945867

GG, if you soak them in a pan of hot tap water for several minutes the wax will soften and peel off easily. We light candles every Friday night. I've got lots of candle holder cleaning experience. I leave about a month's worth on because the wax icicles look pretty. The menorahs stay out all year and get cleaned after Hanukkah.

Susan, albondigas soup is a pretty creative affair. I like to toast coriander for the lemony aromatic and mine has lots of cumin. There's a little heat but it is not spicy. The veggies for my soup must include any greens, carrots and onions. I add squashes if they are around. I happened to have a couple tonight that needed soup resuscitation. If you like a sweet note add cubed winter squash. Some have potatoes, but not a lot, and others have none. I use potatoes if there are some leftovers that will work. Otherwise I omit them. Either a beef or a veggie broth works. I like to use greens that have been precooked and the potliker becomes part of the base. Some soups have tomato and some have none. I do it both ways. It's really flexible. We eat the soup topped with tortilla chips. It's an all in one dinner.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

December 28, 2011
6:47 PM

Post #8945928

We often light candles on Friday night, too, but I have candle holders that fit into those candlesticks, and I can lift them up and melt the remaining wax over the gas stove so that the wax plug drops out when I turn the holders upside down. So that's never a problem.

We put our menorah away after Hanukkah is over, and I wanted it clean so it wasn't shedding wax in the closet!

I was tired from food shopping and sausage making, so for dinner I got out a frozen container of agneau aux haricots that I made a couple of months ago, and we had that with half a baguette that DH baked this week. Anyone have any good baguette tricks? We use the Artisan Bread in Five Minutes method, and the texture is very uneven; this time it was lighter than it's been, which was good because sometimes the crumb is too dense, but then we can't get the crust crisp enough even at a high heat. Maybe that recipe just doesn't make ideal baguettes, though.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 29, 2011
5:25 AM

Post #8946321

G G , use the money you save on meat and apply it to gas to come down and get it . Nice little vacation .
I have put candle sticks in the freezer , then chipped it off . Gotta be fast and keep them cold .
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

December 30, 2011
6:39 AM

Post #8947439

Sorry, Susan. I never got a recipe from any of the restaurants we frequented in LA County.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

December 30, 2011
7:52 AM

Post #8947537

I was going to make onion soup, but my husband drank the beer I was going to use for the soup. lol It's not so good without it, so I'll make it tomorrow.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

December 30, 2011
8:55 AM

Post #8947626

We are on our way to the mountains shortly. I assembled a cheese grits and veggie casserole last evening that will be baked tonight. I'm going to make a chuck roast and homemade sausage ragu as a gravy for the meat eaters. Daughter will be in charge of salad fixins or maybe we'll gather greens from the garden.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

December 30, 2011
9:06 AM

Post #8947640

Tonight for dinner, homemade cheese bread with Italian herbs, roasted chicken breast, brown rice, and broccoli. Haven't figured out dessert yet.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 30, 2011
11:03 AM

Post #8947775

I almost forgot to photograph my dessert last night. I just had a few minutes so just took a picture of the table. I made mini-pavlova's with lemon flavored whipped cream and an assortment of berries: blueberry, red raspberries, blackberries & pomegranate seeds. They were very good.

Tam

edited to fix a typo

This message was edited Dec 30, 2011 2:19 PM

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darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2011
11:11 AM

Post #8947782

Oh how fun, Tam!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

December 30, 2011
11:39 AM

Post #8947824

20 th anniversary today .The seafood at Chinese buffet tonight .Was my choice .
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

December 30, 2011
12:00 PM

Post #8947874

Happy Anniversary Digger! 20 years is a good thing.:-)

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


December 30, 2011
12:17 PM

Post #8947890

Happy 20th!

I'm still recuperating from an attack of the Christmas crud (the sore throat started Christmas Eve...now it's down to the rib-wracking hacking cough stage). We have a fridge full of leftovers, so I'm thinking it's last-call for them, and hopefully I'll be up to cooking by tomorrow night!

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 30, 2011
12:42 PM

Post #8947910

I'm busy prepping collard greens and black-eyed peas for New Year's Eve/Day, and late tomorrow I will make some corn bread to sop up the "pot likker".

Tonight I'm having part of a center-cut ham steak with brown butter pineapple sauce, baked sweet potato, and steamed haricot verts I froze this summer.

This message was edited Dec 31, 2011 10:08 AM

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 30, 2011
6:03 PM

Post #8948364

Any of you have ideas for ways to use the egg yolks left over from cooking? Some sort of custard perhaps?

Feel better Terry! I felt that crud coming on a week before Christmas and managed to nip it in the bud.

Darius - I had sweet potato with dinner too. was dessert. :-) I found out that they aren't right if you freeze them so I baked the one left in my car a few nights and gave it to the chickens. They were very happy.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2011
5:15 AM

Post #8948642

digger Happy 20th Anniversary!

Extra egg yolks. http://www.fortysomething.ca/2010/04/recipes_to_use_up_extra_egg_yo.php

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 31, 2011
6:51 AM

Post #8948709

Thanks Susan!

Digger - sorry I didn't say Happy Anniversary yesterday! So easy to get wrapped up in my own little world.
Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

December 31, 2011
7:10 AM

Post #8948725

Ack, I neglected to say Happy Anniversary myself. Where are my manners for good wishes and congratulations?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2011
7:22 AM

Post #8948738

BTW - I forgot to say an early Happy New Years Eve to everyone!

Tam - I thought you would find it useful as it has listings of recipes for up to eight egg yolks with URL links to most recipies.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

December 31, 2011
3:06 PM

Post #8949236

Happy Anniversary, Digger9083. And, Happy New Year to everyone!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


December 31, 2011
3:52 PM

Post #8949279

I'll add my wishes and hopes for everyone to enjoy a safe and happy night of welcoming in the New Year!

Our dinner tonight is pretty simple: a loaf of French bread is going in the oven ASAP so we can smear chunks with hummus (from the deli - I'm still not quite up to full cooking speed yet.) Then we'll tuck into some spicy shrimp over buttery fettuccine noodles and a fresh tossed salad.

Tomorrow's menu is all hands-on food suitable for football viewing. I'll whip up a batch of hot Hawaiian ham sandwiches, set out raw veggies and chips with an assortment of dips, and try my hand at making baked "fried" pickle chips.

In other news, I've got a stock pot of roasted beef bones simmering; I'm planning to pair the stock with caramelized onions for some French onion soup later in the week.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

December 31, 2011
4:45 PM

Post #8949334

French onion sounds like it will be good.

Dinner was chicken cooked with salsa, beans, lentils, and corn.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

December 31, 2011
4:51 PM

Post #8949348

I had to work today, so no big production dinner. Grilled steak, rotini with some thrown-together pesto and diced tomatoes, edamame and a spinach salad with red onions, strawberries, almonds, and goat cheese with poppyseed dressing.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

December 31, 2011
10:00 PM

Post #8949585

We had a splendid spread of food for our NYE get together.

Happy New Year! Here's to another year of wonderful menus!!!

Tam
Cindy_GA
Eatonton, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 1, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #8949715

Happy New Year! Last night was leftovers, then a party at the neighbors' where everyone brought a snack. I brought a selection of good cheeses. Tonight we're eating alone and having the traditional collards, black eyed peas, and a ham. Can't wait!

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 1, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #8949749

Last night we had lobsters at a friend's house. DH and I split a three-pounder - messy but delicious! I brought pt de campagne, lots of neat cheeses, a baguette, some Blanquette de Limoux (a lovely fruity sparkling wine) and some Svres et Maines muscadet, which goes well with lobster. All of it was very good. Off to a party this afternoon.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 1, 2012
6:48 AM

Post #8949760

Everyone is so sweet . Thank you all .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 1, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #8949827

Happy New Year to all!

A belated anniversary hug from us, Sally. Hope you enjoyed the Chinese buffet.

We had a tapas dinner last evening that included cheeses too, steamed shrimp with chipotle aioli, olives, smoked fish, cranberry salsa, zucchini fritters with creme fresh and dill, etc..

I'm putting together the traditional southern New Year's day menu too except substituting our home smoked chicken thighs for hocks. There will be a nice big skillet bread. The greens are chillin' out in the garden and need to be picked. We've got lots of produce out there. It's about to turn very cold (low twenties). WE had a soapstone liner installed when we built our new fireplace a few years ago. It's not an insert, just a regular stone fireplace with a lining. The soapstone throws out so much heat that the heat pump has yet to go on and we haven't fired up the woodstove.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 1, 2012
9:13 AM

Post #8949934

We went out contra dancing last night. Came home around 11:30pm, had sparkling cider, and watched the ball drop in NY. A very nice evening for us.

Dinner tonight is a pot roast with veggies.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 1, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #8949998

My "traditional Southern dinner" came off without a hitch at midnight, and everyone behaved... which us a rarity, and why I usually do not share holiday meals with my sis and her kid.

This time I made the collards by cooking them a bit, changing out the water, cooking them again a bit and changing the water again, and then adding all the seasonings to the final water. (Used bottled water, our town water is getting more chlorine-tasting all the time and it doesn't seem to dissipate in cooking.) They came out great. Could have used a bit more hot sauce but I didn't because of The Kid, but a bottle of Tabasco and a bottle of Louisiana Gold were on the table. Followed the cornbread recipe on the bag of Bob's Red Mill corn meal... big mistake, but maybe the birds will love it.

Next year I hope to have my own homegrown collards, the yellow cabbage collards... if my seed is still good.

Wishing Happy Dinners in 2012 for all my food friends!
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 1, 2012
10:48 AM

Post #8950060

We came in a short while ago from picking yellow collards. They seem to get thicker and more succulent as they go up. The last batch was super sweet. They are starting to head. I've got huge rutabagas and great looking turnips out there but how many greens can I cook in one day? I should harvest to process them at home.

Darius, maybe try growing tobasco peppers next summer and making your own sauce. We love ours and so do our friends.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 1, 2012
10:52 AM

Post #8950070

Happy New Years!!!

Our tappas type party was wonderful. We had some old stand-by's & some new dishes. Pigs in a blanket (made with lard - oh so good!), deviled eggs (from my girls), shrimp cocktail, homemade chocolate candies, wine-poached pears, meringue cookies, pavlova with lemoned whipped cream and an assortment of berries & cherries, a lucious vanilla pudding (made with the leftover egg yolks) and a breakfast-pastry made with ground almonds, corn meal, butter, and more egg yolks. I'm sure there was more I'm forgetting now. We had a nice selection of wines, including chocolate wine.

Photo of the house as I was starting to put out the food & DH reading while he's waiting for our guests to arrive

Tam

Thumbnail by Tammy
Click the image for an enlarged view.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 1, 2012
11:44 AM

Post #8950144

Tam the tapas sound great, and I love your kitchen!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 1, 2012
12:52 PM

Post #8950218

Darius - Glad to hear that the dinner and company turned out well. What change do you get by dumping out the water on the collards?

Tammy - Nice to hear you had a great time last night. House looks nice and lots of room in the kitchen.

We had a run to the emergency vet this morning followed by a household nap. The potroast did not get started so dinner is something else tonight.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 1, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #8950370

I had to run to the vet yesterday when they opened . Thank goodness it wasn't bad , as I had been up and awake all night with my Gracie . She had strained her back . All's well today .
Sorry about the cornbread , Darius . I left collards in the freezer back home .Tonight is reheated T-bone and baked sweet potatoes . When we eat red meat , we don't have much for sides as we just make a meal out of the meat . (Our Bad )

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 1, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #8950389

Susan, I think the collards were sweeter, although still only average quality. Home grown organic would have been much better.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 1, 2012
3:29 PM

Post #8950395

Thanks for the comments on the kitchen. Its basically a walk through in the middle of the house. But we love how open it is. And the counter space can't be beat!

We're having lentils w/rice tonight.

Susan - hope all is well from the vet visit?

Sally - glad to hear Gracie is better. Not a great time to have to see a vet.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 1, 2012
5:27 PM

Post #8950531

Organic and fresh always seems to taste better.

Good news is no scratch or ulcer on the eye. Bad news is Jessie is back in the ecolar with eye and allergy meds for the next week. We're not sure what she did to it but she scratching it a lot.

We talking about planting collards next fall. Any comments on what type or kind to plant?

Dinner was left over chicken in homemade tortillas. Thank you for the recipe Laurel! BTW - Do you use wheat or corn flour with the recipe?


MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 2, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #8951129

Tam, the pavlovas and table look fantastic! What's your SO reading? I'm always looking to add to the book list.

Hope everyone's pets are on the mend.

Susan, I had always grown Vates collards until two years ago because they don't head. It was pointed out to me that heading types are considered better tasting. I have since started growing Georgia Southern collards. They are both heat and cold tolerant and slow to bolt. A DG friend gave me some yellow cabbage collard seed, which is what Darius is referring to, and they are the best I've grown. They too are a heading type. I think it's because they are more similar to cabbage that the leaves are so tender and sweet. Even in the dead of summer they were fair eating. As for the tortillas, I make both flour and corn but mostly corn because they are fat free (fresh masa, a pinch of salt and water), faster to make and much tidier. Since the dough balls are placed in a press lined with two sheets of plastic (I cut a storage bag in two and use it over and over) or waxed paper there is no floured board or rolling pin to clean up.

We are going to a tasting with the kids tonight. The chef is presenting eleven items for the reception evening here in the mountains. I can't remember them all but there will be vegetable napoleans with basil pesto, five spice duck and asian slaw wraps, house smoked trout on foccacia, seared beef carpaccio on flatbreads, veggie eggrolls with ponzu sauce and spanakopita. We'll choose eight.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 2, 2012
6:55 AM

Post #8951144

Sounds like a yummy "tasting", Laurel. Might be hard to choose just eight!
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 2, 2012
8:28 AM

Post #8951287

Had bacon wrapped filet with fresh from the garden steamed broccoli, and blackeye peas with some garden greens and a handful of fresh cilantro.

Got a plesant supprise at Kroger - whole cooked lobsters $5 each - so that will be tonight's dinner.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 2, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #8951291

Laurel inspired me. With the cold temps moving in, tonight is sopa de albondigas :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 2, 2012
10:15 AM

Post #8951396

Laurel - He's probably reading Science Fiction (or fantasy). I'm reading World War Z - the oral history of the zombie war. What do you enjoy - I have been reading a wide range of fiction lately.

We're having cabbage & ground beef for dinner. Need to use the head I bought last week.

Tam

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2012
10:41 AM

Post #8951426

I'm making Hachis Parmentier tonight - a French version of shepherd's pie, with Gruyre cheese - since it's something both DS and two DGDs will eat happily.

Yesterday a friend had Connie Willis's Doomsday Book on her coffee table; her husband had read it on the Kindle and had gotten it in hard copy for her. I told her I preferred her To Say Nothing of the Dog, and Bellwether, because Doomsday Book was rather dark, although well-written. I don't care for her later books, though. Maybe we should start a book thread?

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 2, 2012
11:07 AM

Post #8951470

I'm reading a treatise on starting a part-time home-based food business. Mostly daydreaming, no serious plans yet - and maybe never. But my husband keeps insisting there's a market for my baked goods.

(Pssst...there's a whole forum just for books and movies :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 2, 2012
11:13 AM

Post #8951477

I'd love a book thread!

And DH said he loves Connie Willis and Doomsday as well as To Say Nothing of the Dog. Another Science Fiction fan? I read exclusively Sci Fi for 20yrs and then just horticultural books for the next 15yrs. Now I'm sampling a bit of everything. Sci Fi & Mysteries are probably my favorite.

Tam

edited to add: I didn't know there was a books & movie forum. Will browse over there Terry

This message was edited Jan 2, 2012 2:22 PM

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2012
11:26 AM

Post #8951495

I know there's a movies and books forum, but it's not US! I used to read a lot of science fiction but then got tired of it and have been reading mysteries for years. Tell your DH that I didn't think Willis's later books, Passages and the next two, were any good at all.

Laurel, you'll have to let us know how the tasting went tonight!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 2, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #8951560

Chuckle..."us" is in the recipes forum. It's how we've gotten serial cooking threads in regional gardening forums, joke and word game threads in brugs, etc. If someone wants to start a thread over there, and link to it from here, I imagine most of us will start following it too. Maybe we can breathe some garlicky-breathed life into the books forum :-)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 2, 2012
12:45 PM

Post #8951621

TVP tacos with roasted vegetables, refried beans, and cabbage/cilantro slaw.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 2, 2012
12:57 PM

Post #8951641

That is a pleasant surprise, Bubba.

We are in after spending several hours in the garden. Beautiful day but it is windy and nippy. I've got the mother lode of turnips, rutabagas, arugula, mustard and lettuces. There would be tons more veggies if that dang rabbit hadn't grazed out the broccoli, kale and Brussels sprouts. I'm so mad! Well, now I'm cleaned up and arranging my taste buds for the evening.

I usually read two books at a time, one fiction and one nonfiction. Not at the same time though. lol I'm halfway through Mark Kurlansky's "Salt" http://www.amazon.com/Salt-World-History-Mark-Kurlansky/dp/0142001619 and started "Help" but put it down. It's seeming like it might be a little like the way I grew up. I'll read it later. In any case, I read Kurlansk's book "Cod" and loved it. I like history and historical fiction best. Mysteries based on historical fiction are good too.

I'll be sure to share the results of the tasting. First we're going over to Smithgall Woods State Park where we blocked all the lodges and guest cottages for our weekend.

Terry, let me know how your soup turns out. Are you going to use a recipe? I'm still thinking about that pot of roasted bones and the French onion soup.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 2, 2012
12:58 PM

Post #8951642

Don't know what I'll make. Leftovers of some sort.

I have frozen packages of chicken, pork, venison and fatback strung out everywhere thawing for a heavy day of sausage-making tomorrow.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 2, 2012
12:59 PM

Post #8951646

"Salt" has been on my list for a while...

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 2, 2012
2:00 PM

Post #8951728

I'm assuming (hoping) I'll get to the soup...right now the bonus room looks like Christmas threw up all over again. I've got 15 or 20 large tubs sprawled out and my husband is starting to get a nervous tic.

However, despite his unspoken concerns, I think I've turned the corner and I'm ready for the majority of it to go back in the attic so I can move on to other stuff - like dinner. (I'll probably send him to the store for a few ingredients - save me a trip and take his mind off the state of his man cave.) I just wish I could whittle my posterior away as efficiently as I skinnied down the decorations that just aren't cutting it any more.

The albondigas soup attempt is from a recipe. Stay tuned...

I saw The Help but have not yet read the book yet. Wish I had read it first, but then I'd probably have nitpicked the movie to pieces.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 2, 2012
2:17 PM

Post #8951752

I've got my potatoes cooking for Hachis Parmentier; the quick version wasn't as flavorful so I've been adding herbs and such to the meat.

I have read Salt, and liked it; also The Help, and liked that, too. We had live-in help even though we were northerners, so some of it did resonate. I just finished PD James's Death Comes to Pemberley, but since I'm a staunch Austen fan I was disappointed in it, although I won't go into details on a What's for Dinner thread!

Terry, you really made me laugh about your Christmas decorations. We don't take ours down until the week after New Year's; the tree goes up the week prior to Christmas so I like to let it linger a bit.

I did check the books forum but there were no familiar faces. I used to post there a while ago but no one seemed to share my tastes.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 2, 2012
3:11 PM

Post #8951843

I'm an Austen fan too. If you start a thread I'll chime in there, also :-)

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 2, 2012
3:32 PM

Post #8951875

What are TVP taco's Leslie?

I found the Help interesting but had absolutely no resonance to anything in my history.

Tam
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #8951947

Laurel - Thanks for the tips on the tortillas and collards. I look around and see if I can find a press and the types of collards you mentioned. Any recommendations on what to look for in a tortilla press? Agree that the tasting list sounds very diverse and good. The lodging looks like a nice place.

Terry - I didnt know there was a book and movie thread either. Will have to go out and look for it.

Bubba Dinner sounds good. How do you cook your black-eyed peas and greens?

Tam Is that a kitchen or halloween witch hanging off the ceiling?

Sci Fi, mystery, gardening books, and some technical books depending on what has caught my interest lately.

Dinner was pot roast with roasted veggies (butternut squash, brussel sprouts, sweet potatoes, parsley, onions, apples, beets, and carrots)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 2, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #8952003

TVP = texturized vegetable protein, those soy crumbles. I soak them in hot veggie broth, then fry up some onions, peppers, tomatoes, mushrooms and season it. I also sometimes use seitan instead of TVP. I've tried to make tofu work in tacos, but it sucks no matter what I do. It's just the wrong texture. Not bad in fajitas, though.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 2, 2012
5:12 PM

Post #8952004

TVP and seitan would be better than tofu in a taco. We used to use seitan in stirfry. Have you made any yogurt cheese?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 2, 2012
5:46 PM

Post #8952056

I make yogurt and yogurt cheese frequently. Paneer, too.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 2, 2012
6:20 PM

Post #8952103

Ahh.. thanks. I haven't ventured too far into the tofu relm. Just extra firm tofu & once tried tempeh.

Susan - that's a kitchen witch. Was my Christmas present from DH.

Tam
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 2, 2012
7:19 PM

Post #8952185

The visit to Smithgall was wonderful. It's a five thousand acre gated preserve and lodgings donated to the state and available for private rental. We are very happy to have been able to block the park for our weekend. Thrilled, actually.

The tasting was only fair. The chef prepared eight of the eleven dishes, excusing the abbreviated presentation, because the food order was not delivered in full and he had no time to make the Asian slaw for the duck wrap. He also had no time to make the veggie egg rolls with ponzu and admitted he had only made spanokopita twice before so he didn't have time to conquer that one either. (

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 3, 2012
2:45 AM

Post #8952411

Well pooh to the chef, Laurel. You'll need to post some photos of Smithgall.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 3, 2012
3:41 AM

Post #8952425

So what does that leave you with in terms of choices? And how were the dishes that he did prepare? And does he know you're a professional? Maybe he had stage fright?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 3, 2012
5:50 AM

Post #8952516

The only way Ive found that I like tempeh is when someone pan fries it and the oven cooks it in BBQ sauce. It's not exactly healthy and is also too labor intensive to cook it that way. Its another fermented product so its now on the list of things I cant eat anyway. Cute kitchen witch.

Glad the park is working well. Too bad the cook promised more than he delivered. Are you stuck with that chef or do you have another choice?
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 3, 2012
8:30 AM

Post #8952683

The chef was very receptive to working with me. I do think he was anxious because the general manager had let him know the scoop. I'll go into the kitchen and teach him how to prepare the menu he was left with by the former chef. He's only been there three months. I'm going to be positive. They have fifteen different kinds of chicken wings that are wood fired. He can do a few choices of those. The carpaccio was good except he needs to sear it less. He can use less salt in the smoked trout spread and the portobello mushrooms stuffed with spinach cream. He has very limited experience with ingredients but seems eager to try and learn. There were wilted micro radish sprouts on almost everything. I'm sure things will get worked out.

Darius, we are hoping to return and check out the lodgings again. They were occupied. I'll take photos. The property has beautiful trout streams running through as it's on Duke's Creek and backs up to Duke's Falls.

We are dividing and conquering today. DD and I are going off wedding shopping and the boys are left to pack up and clean. That works for me. :) A new house guest is arriving for dinner in Atlanta. She's the guest I told to pick up dinner. It will probably be the great sushi she gets near her office.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 3, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #8952697

Part of that area was given to D H 's great , great ? grandfather in the land lottery . He was a preacher and didn't look for any gold , so sold it later . We could have all been RICH because Dukes Creek has one of the largest harvest of huge nuggets in the state along with Cane Creek.
Just useless information
Will grill chicken tonight .
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 3, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #8952753

Chef change explains part of what happened. I'm sure that you will work out with the new chef and the manager what has to happen. It is nice of you to work with the new chef to help him get up to speed on the dishes. And his being enthusiastic is a good sign. It might be good to figure out what he's good at and weight the dishes you want more heavily that way.

Dinner tonight is left over pot roast possible as BBQ style sandwiches.
Debsroots
Northwest, MO
(Zone 5a)

January 3, 2012
10:25 AM

Post #8952834

Herb roasted pork roast with potatoes, carrots, celery and onion. Peach pie for dessert.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 3, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #8953261

Short ribs in gravy over Haiga rice (medium grain, not the short grain var.), and oven-roasted Brussels sprouts.

Only managed about 4+ pounds of venison sausage today before pulling a muscle in my lower back. Pffftttt... Tomorrow I must make the chicken/spinach/feta sausage because the chicken defrosted overnight last night in the refrigerator. I just took out 2 more pork shoulders to defrost, but that might be a Thursday project. They'll barely defrost in the fridge by then anyway.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 3, 2012
3:07 PM

Post #8953267

We're back in Atlanta after a successful shopping trip. She found a dress. Our guest has called in and is picking up a Thai feast on the way. There will be beef, shrimp, and tofu dishes for dinner. I think the tofu one is a curry.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 3, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #8953426

Darius, I hope your back feels better!

I made deer stew tonight, with carrots, potatoes, turnips and peas. It was good, especially for a cold night like this one. It's going down to 16!

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 3, 2012
4:54 PM

Post #8953432

We just had leftovers tonight. I did make another big pot of cabbage, onion & beef w/roasted tomato sauce to freeze for my dad.

Congrats to DD on finding the dress Laurel!

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 3, 2012
5:01 PM

Post #8953440

I made my first ever batch of shortbread cookies tonight, cardamom shortbread. Interesting. Since they don't brown, I don't know if they over-baked or not. I'll have to try another one when lingering tastes of supper are not paramount... maybe with morning coffee.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 3, 2012
5:07 PM

Post #8953450

My DH loves shortbread cookies. I made them before dashing out of town to visit family for the holidays. I hadn't thought of adding cardamom. I bet that would be a nice flavoring.

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 3, 2012
8:27 PM

Post #8953712

Fettuccine alla vodka with homemade French bread split open and smeared with garlic butter and cheese then toasted. Not a low-carb night, but I was happy with my results on the vodka sauce. My family approved, even though it was meatless (virtually unheard of around here.)
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 3, 2012
9:11 PM

Post #8953756

Laurel, So what is the dress like? I'll bet that it's beautiful! What a fun time in life to be picking out wedding dresses.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 4, 2012
10:34 AM

Post #8954283

I cheated on the peas & greens.

We were out of dried black-eye peas, so got a can of Ranch Style w/bacon, the cut a couple leaves of mustard & collard with some cilantro from the garden, and heated it all together.

A little more bacon would have made it better, but was wonderful anyway.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 4, 2012
12:07 PM

Post #8954377

Sally, so you know how beautiful the spot is.

Bubba, your Southern Card is going to be revoked and we'll have to start calling you "Brother" if you eat canned beans.

GG, the venison came with DD. There's one tenderloin and a package of steaks in the freezer. Happy camper here.

Terry, is that a straight vodka sauce or lemon vodka sauce? Congrats on pulling the veggie wool over their eyes.

Doss, the dress is a simple tone on tone ivory jacquard. I'd say a la Jackie Kennedy style. It's knee length with a slightly raised, wide band waist and a deep v-neck ruffled in the same jacquard. I like the fabric design and texture a lot. She will most likely wear a shawl and hat. DD had the option of a formal affair in either my dress, which is floor length with a short train that goes up into a bustle, antique white satin and lace, or one of her choosing. Instead she opted for a weekend in the mountains with lots of friends and extended family and a simple ceremony with a family luncheon beforehand in Atlanta. She has thirty days to change her mind. We may go out shopping once again before she returns to D.C. this weekend.

I am pulling out the Odz & Enz for dinner and adding a tortilla stack to the mix. The later is what I do with leftover beans, meat, cheese and salsa. I stack corn tortillas with the ingredients real high, bake it for about thirty minutes and cut it like pie wedges. Everyone can top their own with avocado slices, Greek yogurt, hot sauce and more salsa. It's a great tapa.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #8954408

Dress sounds lovely as does your wedding dress.

Dinner is left overs. I'm going over to google to see if I can find a recipe I saw earlier that makes soup out of the roasted vegetables. That with some kind of grain/bread sounds like it will work.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 4, 2012
1:41 PM

Post #8954470

Sometimes a man's gotta do what a man's gotta do, Laurel. Wish DW had warned me a few hours before anouncing that we were out when I started supper.

BTW: Think I got real lucky - got the license plates for the new car - DG1-L010. Way easy to remember - DG1 - LOL - OH.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #8954473

Terry - There is a program that started in KC with the Kauffman Foundation called "FastTrac New Venture" and is designed specifically for people who are in the early stages of business developement specifically idea developement, business plan, etc. I've had a number of freinds take it. They've all had very good thngs to say about it. They have either starting up a business or made a decision about it's feasibility. Here is a description. http://fasttrac.org/entrepreneurs/programs/FastTrac-NewVenture.aspx

If you are interested in it then there looks like there is something in Nashville. http://fasttrac.org/program-locator/results.aspx?state=TN&city=Murfreesboro&range=100&ctry=United States
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 4, 2012
4:09 PM

Post #8954624

Bubba, it would be interesting if a woman could apply that same logic to having babies and just open a can or two. Maybe that's why the C-section rate is so high these days. lol
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 4, 2012
4:10 PM

Post #8954627

Dinner was a green salad, roast beef, roasted veggie soup, and pueblo seed bread (whole wheat flour and pumpkin seeds). Soup and bread turned out very well.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #8954650

Love the license number Bubba!

I added kale w/onions & mushrooms as a side to warmed leftover lentils & rice. I really liked the combo & will try it again.

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #8954658

Tam, I made up some Duxelles (cooked down mushrooms in a shallot/butter sauce) to keep in the refrigerator. A little added to a dish does wonders.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 4, 2012
4:46 PM

Post #8954668

Ooooo... I was close to using shallots instead of the onions but didn't have many left. I'll have to use that term now - Duxelles. I am learning a whole new language here! I seasoned the kale w/duxelles w/cumin, salt, black & cayenne peppers

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 4, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #8954681

Well, check out this: http://bijouxs.com/2011/04/10/bijouxs-basics-duxelles/

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 4, 2012
5:07 PM

Post #8954699

Lots of good information, but it drives me nuts that he or she adds an "s" to "bijoux"! The singular is "bijou;" the plural is "bijoux." Makes me wonder what other mistakes there are on that website.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 4, 2012
7:07 PM

Post #8954825

Thanks Susan - I'll check it out if I get that far. Right now, it's only at the "browse a few books" stage.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 4, 2012
7:10 PM

Post #8954833

I still have most of a block of tofu, and some holy basil my husband bought by accident. I see some roasted tofu and Asian kinda noodles in our future.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 4, 2012
7:23 PM

Post #8954869

Have you used holy basil before, Celene? I thought you were supposed to make a tea or smoke it or something. One of the boys gave me a bunch of seeds several years ago. I couldn't figure out what to do with it. I def. don't smoke. lol
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2012
3:51 AM

Post #8955068

Enjoy the browse a few books stage. Do keep the class in mind as it is suppose to help people get through the first five year stage when a lot of startup companies fail. There is also another class that follows that covers how to grow a business beyond the startup stage.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2012
5:54 AM

Post #8955126

I don't smoke it, as in light the dried leaves and inhale, nor do I smoke it in a smoker, but I'd probably give it a try if someone told me it worked, lol. It is less sweet and has more clove and anise notes than regular sweet basil. I also use it with cashews (I would use peanuts if I were not allergic) to make an Asian-style pesto with sesame seed, sesame oil, garlic and ginger, and I fork it through steamed rice, use as a sauce for tofu, or to season bland noodles that I'm serving with some Asian kind of entree. Also good as a chiffonade on any Asian-style soup, or mixed with some cilantro and sprinkled over sliced tomatoes, cucumber, onions and dressed with a soy/ginger/lime dressing. Oh, and good in Asian slaw.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 5, 2012
7:00 AM

Post #8955159

I have half a huge tub (from Sam's) of fresh spinach left over from making the chicken sausage. I'm thinking maybe a spinach, mushroom and cheese galette...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #8955163

I make spinach pesto with leftover spinach, esp. if it's getting iffy. I like the tubs, because they're so good for rooting cuttings. hahahaha
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 5, 2012
1:18 PM

Post #8955586

We are back from Canoe, the restaurant where we are holding the after ceremony luncheon. We met with the catering manager and ate lunch. I had a roasted Colorado lamb sandwich with minted green apple mustard. We decided to split two desserts and ordered a popcorn ice cream sundae with house made cracker jacks and a chocolate grotto with salted caramel and pretzel dust. The ice cream is house made and swirled with house caramel. The chocolate grotto is a chocolate shell in the shape of a bombe with a thick lining of chocolate mousse and a salted caramel center. It's the size of a tennis ball. You break the shell, dive through the mousse and out oozes the caramel. I might never eat again I'm so stuffed. We have used this restaurant for several special events and always been pleased.

There's a made salad in the fridge and two griddled chicken breasts. I've got everything needed to make a Cobb salad with homemade croutons. I'll use Stilton instead of Gorgonzola.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 5, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #8955640

Balsamic glazed pork chops tonight. Sides TBD.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2012
3:04 PM

Post #8955739

Salad with chicken also. I just picked mache out of the garden. It looks very healthy for January. There is already lettuce and spinach in the fridge. Left over pueblo bread tonight with the salad.

Thumbnail by SusanKC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 5, 2012
3:23 PM

Post #8955756

Venison chili tonight . Love my slow cooker for easy dinners
Celene , Everything sounds wonderful but can't stand anise .
doss
Stanford, CA
(Zone 9b)

January 5, 2012
4:23 PM

Post #8955836

Laurel, thanks for the description of the dress. Sounds lovely and the desserts from the restaurant are so creative. If all of their food is that inventive then I think that you will have a very interesting dinner indeed!
Tonight chicken posole soup from the freezer.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2012
4:42 PM

Post #8955880

I forgot to say that the foods from the resturant sounds wonderful including both deserts.

Poached the chicken for the salad in a lemon ginger tea. First time for poaching chicken and also cooking it in a tea. It turned out very nicely.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 5, 2012
6:10 PM

Post #8956042

Thanks, Doss.

That sounds delicious, Susan. Was it a certain brand of tea?

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 5, 2012
6:55 PM

Post #8956091

Laurel, I was trying hard to not envision those luscious desserts..I think my hips could stretch just by reading the descriptions! It does sound wonderful - how much fun you must be having (hectic, but good memories!)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 5, 2012
7:08 PM

Post #8956111

Stash Tea. Any ideas on what to use the poaching liquid for?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2012
7:08 PM

Post #8956112

Digger, it's more herbaceous, like fennel, than anise. But it does have those notes, and I know a lot of people who'd never eat anise, who like holy basil. You may want to at least try it.

I did make sauteed tofu in gochujang over noodles with slivered zucchini, carrot, and spinach. Side of bok choy with sweet chili sauce, I love that so much it's ridiculous.
Pennzer
Midland, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 5, 2012
8:01 PM

Post #8956178

Celene, tell us more about the chili sauce. Commercial product or do you make it?

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 5, 2012
8:09 PM

Post #8956185

It's a commercial product, so it's super-easy. Saute the bok choy in some sesame oil with garlic, ginger and mushrooms if you like, and then toss with the sweet chili sauce and sesame seed.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 6, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #8956600

I can do that Celene , love new stuff to try . When I do run into it in a Chinese buffet , I have to push it aside . I like to clean my plate so always feel guilty . We have people that go into a buffet and continue to fill a new plate and leave everything except a few bites , fill another plate . It's disgustingly wasteful
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 6, 2012
1:27 PM

Post #8957047

Susan, that leftover tea stock would be good for making basmati rice. I'd zest a lemon at the end and add a little. Coconut milk would be a good add along with raisins or currents or cranraisins.

We are going out for seafood paella and then to the evening service with the kids. They leave tomorrow.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 6, 2012
2:32 PM

Post #8957115

I'll admit-I haven't looked, but in my admittedly limited experience in Asian buffets, I've never seen sweet chili sauce or bok choy cooked that way. Certainly doesn't mean you never would.

I'm with you on the buffets. Ditto for people who heap their plate to the ceiling and have food falling off everywhere...good grief, make two trips! If you don't know if you like something, don't plop half the tub on your plate and then throw it out.

I generally avoid buffets unless I know they're good, I've had bad experiences. Weirdest one ever, at a steak house hot food/salad bar: Everything was crazy sweet; I thought I put vanilla pudding or some desserty stuff on my baked potato, nope--sour cream, it was just shockingly sweet. No problem, I write off the potato and make a salad. The blue cheese dressing was as sweet as a dessert. So was the mac and cheese. And the scalloped potatoes. Italian dressing, balsamic dressing, sugar sprinkled on chunked tomatoes (what??) I don't know whether they confused the sugar canister with something else that day while cooking, but holy cow...it was just shocking.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 6, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #8957161

Maybe a possible mix-up between the salt and sugar container?

I've been looking for the yellow cabbage collard seeds and have not been able to find them on-line. Any idea if they are called by another name?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 6, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #8957208

Susan, as far as I know only one guy sells them, near the intersection of SC, and GA, or maybe NC... Google NPR for their story on them, I think there's info in their story...

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 6, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #8957303

Today was a repeat of the other day, with small variation. I did a duxelles with red pepper & kale to go with another portion of lentils & rice. I squeezed some fresh lemon on everything, which added a nice zest.

I notice that I don't need any sugar on berries now but used to have a hard time with tartness when I was not eating so well (i.e. eating lots of sweets). Your taste buds definitely get used to eating sweet stuff. Though that buffet sounds over the top. I find macaroni salad & potato salad from the pre-made section of the supermarket are always sickeningly sweet.

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 6, 2012
4:54 PM

Post #8957311

Celene , we got caught in a small village in Nebraska years ago . We were pulling a wide load and it was Christmas eve . 40 miles to a city Altho we didn't have reservations , the Holiday Inn let us eat with them , after explaining our plight . CHERRY sauce on Everything , ham, turkey , sweet potatoes , in the salad , dressing . Ugh , altho I am happy with the hospitality , that is one place I never have to go back to .
Grilled chicken and mixed veggies tonight .

This message was edited Jan 6, 2012 7:56 PM

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 6, 2012
5:09 PM

Post #8957334

My native-Nebraskan DH has to have gravy or sauce on everything. And it isn't "moist" if its too lean. :-)

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 6, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #8957362

I love sauce on about everything too . Just not the whole meal with cherry . Ask him if cherry sauce on the plate with cranberry would be a good combination . LOL

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 6, 2012
5:48 PM

Post #8957367

I think that hot sauce is appropriate on most foods, so I might fall into that category.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 6, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #8957368

lol Oh but Leslie hot sauce has no fat in it so it wouldn't count. And OK... cherry sauce is not at the top of his list Digger.

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 6, 2012
6:15 PM

Post #8957393

See, that fat-free and low-cal point adds just another virtue to make hot sauce more appealing. I'm in a Green Ghost phase at the moment.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 7, 2012
6:25 AM

Post #8957873

Speaking of points , does anyone have the booklet from Weight watchers that gives the points on different foods ?And if you no longer use it , I would like to buy it .Had one from my D I L several years ago , loaned it to my brother and never saw it again . It wasn't among his things when he passed away .I went online , but too much hassle and one review said what they got wasn't what they wanted .
Right, too much cherry is too much . Cherry is better left to pies , but what do you expect from a Holiday Inn ?
D H thinks hot sauce should be on everything , but too much vinegary for my taste . I like the hot oil from Chinese Buffet drizzled over my whole plate . Also mix a bit of sweet & sour sauce with hot mustard to dip most bites in .
Dinner tonight is in limbo .Maybe breakfast for dinner with the topping of toms , onions , grated jalapeno . Re fried beans , of course ,and flour tortillas . Maybe go all Texan and top with leftover venison chili instead .Hmmm , megas sounds good too .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 7, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #8957899

My very slim and very fit DH thinks every sauce must have mayonaise or heavy cream as the base ingredient.

Digger - I used to have a WW booklet. I'll look around to see if I still have it and let you know. It would be about 10yrs old now.

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 7, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #8958016

Hate skinny women . LOL I would be very grateful for the book . Name your price and it's done .

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 7, 2012
3:48 PM

Post #8958423

Ah but he's a slim man. :-) We went to the movies instead of looking for that WW book. I don't want to raise your hopes... I have no idea if I kept it.

Dinner was homemade egg noodles w/ a vegetable medly of onion, red pepper, green beans & brocoli, mushrooms & turkey in a pesto sauce. Wow did it turn out well. Thank fully its a big batch so I'll freeze some of it for my dad and we'll have plenty for ourselves too.

Tam

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 7, 2012
4:09 PM

Post #8958446

I'm lame. Spaghettini aglio e olio. I put some aleppo pepper in there, too.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 8, 2012
3:44 AM

Post #8958898

Roasted veggie soup from the freezer.

Tam and Celene - Dinner sounds like it was good!

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 8, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #8958952

Swimmer girl had a meet yesterday morning, and I encouraged my husband to go solo to watch her. (I've been at every meet she's been in for the last 9 years and he rarely gets to go.)

While they were gone, I dove headfirst into deep house cleaning. When he got back, he tackled 1/3 of the garage. We can now theoretically get my car in the garage, but getting my wide-hipped SUV through a single door opening is a mental challenge I have to gear up for. The other 2/3 of the garage is (still) housing his boat. We gotta figure out something to get the boat into its own shed or garage so we can use the garage bays.

Anyhoo.

Around supper time, I did a quick store run for next week's groceries and to restock all the household and personal items we were running low on. But by then, we were both tuckered out so I snagged some curbside dinners on my way home. Either Outback has changed or my tastes have - everything was way too salty.

Today's menu is just some chips and sandwiches for lunch (hot shaved ham and Swiss on Hawaiian bread); then I'll start a crockpot of loaded baked potato soup for supper. I'm going to sub cauliflower for some of the potatoes in the soup - here's hoping no one notices :-)
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 8, 2012
6:10 AM

Post #8958959

I understand Tammy , but if you do run across it , the offer stands , or copy would work .
Went to buy goodies yesterday and ended up buying two dips, and the rest of the 105.63 went on real food . Did not need more groceries .
Had a What a Burger for dinner
Guess I'll have to cook tonight . Probably cabbage rolls with a side .
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2012
11:28 AM

Post #8959276

There is too much perishable produce hanging around from Maypop and the market that we never got around to eating. I'm sharing a photo of some of this past week's garden greens. SO grilled half the yellow and red peppers in the fridge, a large eggplant and sweet onions. He also made a big salad. I turned leftover smoked white fish into a smoked fish salad with multigrain crackers for lunch. We will have salad with grilled veggies and topped with mixed red beans and black eye peas. I got rid of my three pound Hanukkah present. I'm so tired from running to Miami, TG, Hanukkah and all the out of town company since before New Years. The last company left late yesterday morning and we were at a funeral on the other side of the city by four in the afternoon. By the time we returned from the house reception it was almost eight. I skipped dinner and went to bed. Reading Terry's accomplishments made me want to take a long nap.

Thumbnail by MaypopLaurel
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2012
11:39 AM

Post #8959283

Laurel, have you heard about roasted pepper and eggplant spread called "Ajvar" We used to make that when we had our own red peppers, not 4 doll. a lb of them here. You roast both of them, then take the skin off , deseed the peppers and grind both the pappers and eggplants.In a shallow pan use some olive oil and sautee the mix till it thinckens, add chopped garlic in the last 10 minutes. We used it as spread or just as cold salad. you can add some apple cider vinegar too.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #8959293

I'm making a small shepards' pie, only with beef and sweet potatoes, from a Fine Cooking daily email recipe. Should make 3 main meals for me as I'm using a pound of beef.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 8, 2012
12:35 PM

Post #8959338

Terry Sounds like a lot of work to get things cleaned up.

Keiseta - The spread sounds like it would taste good and sounds like something I used to get at a Turkish restaurant. What are the quantities of items that you use when making the dish?

Laurel - Sounds like a busy last couple of months. No wonder you are feeling tired. Nice looking greens.

Darius Thanks for the help. I found a place called the Collard Shack in Ayden, NC. No web site listing. Ill see if I can find someone locally around KC that might have seeds. I did find the Georgia Southern Collard seeds in one of the seed catalogs and plan to order those.

Ive been working on the gardening planning and seed order the last couple of days. Hopefully well be ready to order sometime the next couple of days.
Good news today is that DH likes Brussels sprouts if they are chiffoned raw on a salad. So weve added yet another veggie to his list of what he will eat. :-)

Dinner is either stir-fry or another mixed salad.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 8, 2012
12:37 PM

Post #8959346

I think I might want to try a tvp shepherd's pie with sweet potato, TVP, and kale.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2012
12:48 PM

Post #8959366

Susan, the Collard Shack in Ayden, NC sounds familiar!

Celene, I just cannot do TVP no matter what. Might be the goitrogen content. Otherwise, sounds like a good sub. for ground beef in the pie.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2012
12:53 PM

Post #8959378

Sometime in the last year or so, I read a really cool trick for breaking up ground beef when cooking a package of it. Do I remember? Nooooo. Did I write it down? Nooooo... Does anyone have a clue?

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 8, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #8959438

No, I just keep mashing it and breaking it up with my spatula. Did that just this morning for the chili I'm making. If you think of the trick, please pass it on!!!
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 8, 2012
1:45 PM

Post #8959457

Don't know either Darius , I use the back of a fork to smush it up , like I'm mashing potatoes .

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 8, 2012
1:46 PM

Post #8959461

If I didn't do TVP, I would probably just sub a large cooked bean, like soy.

I am making sauteed tofu Korean style, sauteed bok choy with sweet chili sauce, sauteed zucchini, and brown rice. Buchujeon (garlic chive pancakes) if I'm feeling ambitious.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 8, 2012
1:47 PM

Post #8959463

Change of plans , due to hard work outside today . Ham and eggs with biscuits .
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #8959466

I usualy cook about 40 lb of ground beef for spagettie or lasagna, I cook for 80 people. I use about a 2 cups of water on the bottom of pan, it helps to break up the lumps, and on the end I drain the fat and left over water from it. It works for me. For a 1 lb ground beef, maybe 1/2 cup of water.


SusannKC, the Ajvar is a middleeastern food, but the Greeks, Hungarians,Serbs and Turks use it, claim it is they original.
I would use half as much of eggplant as peppers, garlic on the end so it wont burn and taste bitter. You can order some in a fairley large bottle from Otto's Hungarian deli from Ca. but the shipping cost more then the jar.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #8959472

Mrs Digger, when my husband was alive, we had lot's of time Salmon patties and gritz for dinner, I liked that.Have you ever heard of putting syrup on the salmon pattie, he liked it that way. Etelka

Larkie

Larkie
Camilla, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2012
2:03 PM

Post #8959482

Salmon, syrup and grits are delicious..

Darius, I use a good potato masher to break up ground meats.

larkie

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2012
2:09 PM

Post #8959494

Thanks for the responses to breaking up ground meat... those are all things I do or have done, but none are the tip I read. It was so simple that I was SURE I'd remember it, LOL.

My Cottage Pie is in the oven, smells great.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 8, 2012
2:10 PM

Post #8959496

Darius I use a whip or spatula.

Thanks for the pepper to eggplant ratio.

I've been pulling together growing information (tired of looking it up) for the garden. Came across a Wikipedia entry on eggplant that said it had as much nicotine in it as a person would get from second hand smoke and also has histamine in it. Go figure on both of those.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2012
2:14 PM

Post #8959503

If that is true of the eggplants, then all the Italians and the Greeks will drop dead of cancer . I don't believe everything the Wikipedia enters. Also, every week is a new thing we are not sopose to eat, and a year later it is ok. I eat everything in moderation and a lots of chocolate, that is the trick.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 8, 2012
2:17 PM

Post #8959509

Haven't tried syrup but I will . Thanks for the tip , . Have eaten it on grits tho .
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 8, 2012
2:18 PM

Post #8959512

Chocolate is the answer to anything .

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 8, 2012
2:24 PM

Post #8959522

We're having grilled lamb chops, a medley of rice, fresh asparagus and later I may polish off the pint of chocolate macadamia nut Ben and Jerry's ice cream I've been nibbling at all last week.

If my one lone tomato hasn't turned to mush I might throw a salad together.

And Digger is right
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2012
3:02 PM

Post #8959580

Etelka, I have had it and it is what happened to baba ghanoush when the Arabs brought it from Africa and the Middle East. We eat many versions of it all summer. In Israel they mix in tahini (ground sesame seed paste).

Sally, what questions chocolate cannot answer garlic can.

Darius, I don't know the answer to the ground meat question. Maybe we need to eat chocolate or garlic or both.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 8, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #8959595

Amen to the chocolate. I think it should be on the bottom of the food group pyramid - something like 7 servings a day recommended :-)

I just stuck a plate of cut-up banana chunks, dipped in a mixture of melted semi-sweet chocolate and peanut butter, in the freezer. I saw on Pinterest where they make a good frozen treat. Since my husband loves ice cream, and doesn't need the fat or calories (and Skinny Cows are delicious, but fairly pricey and lots of unpronounceable ingredients), I thought we'd give this a whirl. Stay tuned - results at ten.

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 8, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #8959703

And a not too bad snack is a cut up banana with a drizzle of Hershey's Special Dark syrup on top. Not as bad as ice cream and satisfies a sweet tooth.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 8, 2012
4:51 PM

Post #8959704

Sometime I freez watermelon slices, it makes a good Summer treat.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2012
5:00 PM

Post #8959722

You guys are really mean! I'm subsisting on smoked fish salad, cottage cheese, cucumbers and tomatoes for lunch and taco salads for dinner. Well, the frozen watermelon would work here. We're having the cooked version of salad tomorrow...vegetable soup. lol

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 8, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #8959781

You guys were sure chatty since I last logged on!

I don't think nicotine is a carcinogen, is it? Its just addictive.

We had Indian tonight - went out for dinner after seeing a play. Was really good. Vegetable Pakora for appetizer and then Chicken Sagwhala. The show was really fun too. The theatre calls it their Pantos show. It really targets the kids in the audience. The set & custumes are bright & colorful, the music fun. One actor always dresses up as a woman - a Harvey Wienstein type actor. It was Treasure Island this year. Oh so fun!

Tam

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 8, 2012
6:40 PM

Post #8959869

Pooh, my Cottage Pie was a disappointment, or maybe just a surprise. Oh, it was tasty enough... but I guess when I read the recipe my thinking cap wasn't on, or I'd have realized the filling was basically a picadillo, and then topped with a 'sweet potato mash mixed with Parmesan' layer.

I would have preferred my picadillo served on rice, not smothered in sweet potatoes. And platanos maduros on the side. sigh.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 8, 2012
6:44 PM

Post #8959876

Me too. Is that an example of fusion cuisine or confusion cuisine?

Tam, that sounds like a super evening.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 8, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #8959962

Sorry the dish was disappointing. I have to agree with the comments as I've never liked mashed something on top of a dish.

Tam agree that the evening sounds like fun.

Chocolate is fine but have to go with a cooked apple with anything. Although the DH and I had a molten chocolate lava cake or something similar over the hollidays that aced the apples.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2012
3:28 AM

Post #8960102

That's interesting; we all really love hachis Parmentier, which is the French version of Shepherd's Pie. Comfort food at its best. But I think I prefer regular rather than sweet potatoes as your recipe called for.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 9, 2012
4:22 AM

Post #8960130

Oh yes , laurel , Garlic topping on cake and ice cream . (just kidding ). I do buy minced garlic in the pint size and when it gets too low for juice, I add olive oil to get the last bit .
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 9, 2012
8:10 AM

Post #8960408

Funny, Digger. Reminds me of the time DW made a special choc cake form one of the "Foods of the World" cookbooks. measured the flour, nut did not see the lid label - used the seasoned flour (and we love garlic). LOL Even so, it was good and laster just a few days.

Since you like olive oil - have you tried the Texas Olive Ranch varieties? They have one called Rattlesnake with red pepper flakes - can't seem to keep one at the house - empties quickly - lol.

Next time you make the Houston scene - pick up a bottle of BJ's for your DH - I'm sure he will love it - and it's excellent on migas - hint hint.
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 9, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #8960435

I'll look for the TOR , rattlesnake sounds good, and isn't B J's one you have there ? I'll have to have two of those . Maybe pick up some for the kids too .I know we got some of your good stuff before , but don't remember which one.
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 9, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #8960515

You are right again, Digger. We could ship some to you, if you don't want to wait.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 9, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #8960733

I am making stuffed cabbage. One vegan version and one with meat. Some is for us and some for a friend who has an ailing SO. The friend is a chronically failed vegan so I wasn't quite sure where he was at these days and forgot to ask. Bases covered.

Etelka, I was looking for information in the Time Live cookbook, "The Cooking Of Vienna's Empire and ran across a recipe for srpski ajvar, sljiva slatko, podvarak and others. The picture of raznjici (veal and pork skewers over charcoal) is making my mouth water.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

January 9, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #8960756

I am doomed to eat the picadillo cum cottage pie for at least one more meal, and will freeze the remainder for desperate times. I can't just throw edible food away even if it's not particularly to my liking.

I used up a lot of the meats in the freezer in making various kinds of sausage last week, and after a respite I plan to finally tackle the odd bits for terrines, pts, faggots, etc. I have a lot of chicken livers from local pastured poultry but I've never much liked chicken livers... which may put a crimp in a few recipes. I wish I could get caul fat from the local processing house, but they throw it away. (Actually I think it goes in with the stuff they sell for pet food. What a waste for us humans.)

Still lusting for a good enameled cast iron terrine/pt pan (even if used) for some of those dishes.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 9, 2012
1:22 PM

Post #8960871

Tonight is gumbo (for LSU) and Bear Bryant chew cake (for 'bama.) We're not fans of either team, but we are happy an SEC team will be the national champs for the year.

One of the pluses to working from home: I've got three chickens boiling now (one for the gumbo, two will get boned, bagged and frozen.)

digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 9, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #8961013

Sounds like a chicken salad in your future , Terry
Darius , tonight we're having deep fried chicken livers . Dh loves them and wants them once a month .He doesn't get them that often tho .
Bubba_MoCity
Missouri City, TX

January 9, 2012
3:06 PM

Post #8961024

Soft bison tacos tonight.

greenhouse_gal

greenhouse_gal
Southern NJ
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 9, 2012
3:22 PM

Post #8961037

Braised chicken with wine and mustard tonight; I'm serving it with wild rice and a green salad. The recipe is from Susan Herrmann Loomis's On Rue Tatin; I was looking for a different way to serve chicken.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 10, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #8962028

I decided enough is enough. I watch the Food Network religiously: Chopped, Iron Chef, Big Daddy AND Big Mama!

I got home and looked around for something to prepare in a hurry. Found ELEVEN family-sized cans of canned chicken breasts from Sam's Club (forgot I already had a six-pak...). And, with all the talk about polenta lately, you gotta know that I KEEP a box of corn meal...

So, being a good Louisiana girl, I started with sauteing some rough-chopped bell peppers, onions, and garlic in some olive oil (you could throw an old shoe in with a trinity, and it would be good). Threw in a dash of Season All, cayenne pepper, cumin, paprika, and some fresh ground black pepper. Then, I tossed the drained and rinsed chicken breasts in with the trinity, and broke up the chunks.

Meanwhile, I put on a pot of lightly salted (Kosher Salt) water for the polenta, then, poured the corn meal into the boiling water -- BIG MISTAKE -- and, I know better... So now, I'm looking at this pot full of soft marbles wondering how to selvage this made-up dinner. I added three spoons of sugar and 1/4 pat of real butter and tried to mash them up with a fork. Not working at all -- too many lumps.

Then it hit me -- AHA! The Food Network chefs ALWAYS pull out the blender! So, I did, too! I poured the lumpy, hot, gruel into the blender, threw in two slices of processed American cheese (hey, the Food Network chefs must work with what they're given in the mystery basket...), and turned those lumps into the smoothest, creamiest mush you ever wanna see!

Then, I poured it into a Corningware dish and let it set for about 10 minutes, sliced it into squares, and laid a square in my dish. I Lovingly spooned my seasoned chicken on top, and hoped and prayed. It sure SMELLED good...

It WAS good! Success!

The end.

Linda

Uh, I have some for lunch today, too...lookie...

Anybody wanna name what I made, you go right ahead!


This message was edited Jan 10, 2012 1:29 PM

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2012
4:06 PM

Post #8962450

Sorry Linda, I can't put a name to your recipe. I'm usually pretty good about tracking the ethnic roots of recipes but yours sounds original. I've not eaten some of the ingredients in your recipe including canned chicken, Season All or American cheese and I didn't even know cornmeal came in a box. Wow! Is that because it is a small size? I buy stone ground five pound sacks. Is it white or yellow? I've probably eaten American cheese in something that I didn't know about but no one pointed it out to me. Is that like Velveeta? I've had that before. It looks like cheese from Mars (to me and please forgive if you love it) and nothing I know so I've never bought it. Along the same lines I could not bring myself to eat Spam in Hawaii though I'll eat any offal on a dare. Anyway, your dish does look so good and it sounds like you are happy with the results. If you want to know how to cook polenta just ask. You must have spent a good deal of time cleaning up from your efforts despite using so many canned and processed foods.

We are having garden soup from our greens, beans, rutabagas, carrots and so on. I defrosted a pint of smoked brisket to add. I have a slightly stale bread from a local bakery to make soup croutons.

This message was edited Jan 10, 2012 7:10 PM

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 10, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #8962457

Picked up lamb chops at Costco the other day and we didn't finish them off, so tonight is the two leftover, diced, with added assorted veggies and chicken stock which we will have over a baked potato. The curry sauce is one I pick up at an Indian food market and makes a nice sauce. Had that in London, although this will be much milder that the stuff there that curled my hair and rolled my socks down. And brought tears to my eyes. I ate it anyway...once you get that first blast of heat, the remaining doesn't seem so shocking. \

On Linda's behalf, she said she knew better!! I watch a lot of Food Network shows too but I still seem to cook the same old meals. Having a garden for more than five months out of the year would help I'm sure. Red Mill has a very nice coarse cut cornmeal for polenta. In a small bag.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 10, 2012
4:41 PM

Post #8962484

Tonight I have made Chicken Sagwaala (Sagwala) for dinner. It was so good at the Indian restaurant out and I had chicken to use so I looked up the recipe and have it almost ready for dinner. It smells good!

Gymgirls' canned chicken delight?

Tam
digger9083
Dahlonega, GA

January 10, 2012
4:46 PM

Post #8962493

Looks like something I'd enjoy . Gotta try it .

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 10, 2012
4:55 PM

Post #8962507

Last night was gumbo (not that it helped LSU any); it was good, but I think I can tweak it into something a little better still.

Tonight is a repeat, because...

a) I have wrenched a muscle and maybe pinched a nerve between my shoulder blades. Whatever it is, I am only moving slow and painfully. Even moving clothes from washer to dryer and out was extremely painful.

and

b) I woke up at 1:30 this morning to the sound of water blasting out from under our kitchen sink, and we spent the next hour mopping up, dragging a sopping area rug outside and heaving it over the porch rail (luckily it caught a lot of the water, as did about a half-dozen rolls of paper towels stowed under the sink and a thick rug in front of the sink. I only mopped up about a gallon and a half.) It coulda been a LOT worse, although slipping on the wet wood and landing flat on my back probably didn't do anything positive for my pre-existing back problems :-)

Anyway, I have no hot water at my main kitchen sink, but hopefully my husband will have me up and running soon after he gets home.

So, I figure that's as good a reason as anyway to keep chowing down on warmed up gumbo.

Tomorrow night is a new recipe - a soupy rendition of stuffed peppers. Yes, a soup with tomatoes, green peppers, lean ground beef, onions, and seasoning, and a sprinkling of rice. We are fans of stuffed peppers, so we'll see if we like the same flavors in a soup, or not.
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2012
5:18 PM

Post #8962533

Tam, I like the title. Maybe in caps? Maybe Gymgirl's Gyration. She did go through a lot of work to prepare it and there are eleven cans (approximately) to go. I'm not familiar with sagwala and looked it up. That's right up our alley. Thanks for the direction.

Terry, please explain what extreme cooking event led to your wrenched rhomboid (or trapezius). I bet you were cheer leading during half time again. Would you share the soupy stuffed peppers if they make your "A" list? This sounds like something that would go over well here.

The "vegan" stuffed cabbage was actually better than the one with meat. If anyone wants the recipe I'll share by DM since I plan to add this to my catering menu. I've otherwise found my general DG posts flung hither and yon on the internet.

Tammy

Tammy
Barto, PA
(Zone 6b)

January 10, 2012
5:26 PM

Post #8962542

And I declare the Chicken Sagwala a success! It was really good.

Tam

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 10, 2012
5:29 PM

Post #8962548

I think it's that thing called "age" starting to horn in on my activity level. It has been low-level achy for a while, and last Friday it was definitely and notably sore after I did an hour of weights, although I didn't lift any more than usual, or do anything that should have aggravated it. Sigh. It's gotten worse as the days have worn on, and now it throbs around to my ribs and down my left arm. I'm such a wimp.

I will share the soup recipe if it is share-worthy :-) I think it might just be a mild chili-in-disguise, but I'm withholding judgment until I taste it for myself.

On a happier note, I think I finally latched onto a pizza dough recipe I like, and can make up and keep on hand. I just need to get the courage up to fire my oven up higher than 450 when I stick it in there. (Outer crust texture was good; middle bottom was soft - it needed more fire. I'll get there...

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 10, 2012
5:36 PM

Post #8962557

I was scared to put a pizza in at 500, but you'll get over it when you taste it. At least in my oven, smaller pizzas work better, too--maybe 14".

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 10, 2012
5:41 PM

Post #8962565

Thanks Celene - I need all the encouragement I can get! I *know* I need to; for some reason, it's just hard to punch in 500 on the temp setting. And I think you're right about smaller - these were thinned to fill 18" perforated pizza pans, and I think I need to worry less about stretching the pie to the edge OR I need to divide the dough into 3 balls instead of the four the recipe specified.)
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #8962575

When we don't use our wood fired outdoor oven I love lining an oven with unglazed quarry tile. It works almost as well. Once I get the tiles out to line an oven I leave them in for a while and make all kinds of breads that would be done on an oven floor. But beyond great pizza and flatbreads, there are all kinds of foods that benefit from a lined oven.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 10, 2012
6:06 PM

Post #8962603

I like my stone much more than the perforated pans.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 10, 2012
6:30 PM

Post #8962624

See, I have a stone (actually I had two but they disappeared; this is a third.) But it's smaller than the perforated pans. And I have HUGE pizza eaters in my family. They like their pies big and they like a lot of 'em. I guess I could buy additional stones or unglazed tiles, but then I'd have to store them. Whine, whine, whine...
MaypopLaurel
Cleveland,GA/Atlanta, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2012
6:44 PM

Post #8962646

You bad! Is that a saying we can popularize?. Isn't "My bad" so over? I like lining the oven with quarry tiles. SO cut extra tiles with the tile saw to make an entire oven rack shelf complete. I soak the tiles in water, turn the oven on to max and it's like a true bread oven. I throw on some course corn meal before laying on the pizza. Pizza is perfect. Aside from that I have a cast iron skillet method that is really great too.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 10, 2012
6:47 PM

Post #8962651

That's exactly what I do, Laurel.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

January 10, 2012
8:13 PM

Post #8962794

Hey, Ya'll!
I turned "Linda's Gyration" into yet another culinary creation my "Chopped Champions" would just love!

Since I had one serving of my "Gyration" left, and I had researched even MORE polenta recipes, I raced home, sliced up some Jalapeno sausage, and sauteed that in a splash of olive oil. Then, I added
yesterday's chicken topping and some Prego Tomato Sauce (with Meat) and worked it all together.

Then, I heated up the polenta, spooned the NEW topping on, threw on some marinated carrots and sliced Jalapenos. Talk about a kick!

I poured a glass of White Zinfandel (not cause it matched anything, mind you -- but, simply because I LIKE it. Crusty bread was optional, and I opted out.

Delicious!

P.S. No Velveeta Cheese was used, and no animals were hurt in the making of this meal.

Maypoplaurel,
Sounds like an awful lot you haven't tried! My philosophy is that I have to try a thing at least once before I decide whether or not I like it. Otherwise, what's my frame of reference for knocking it? And, I'm good with me, which is why I never put much stock into other people's opinions about what or who I should or shouldn't like either.

And BTW, I've been eating polenta since I was a kid. Only, where I come from, it's called "Corn Meal Mush!" Image, all these years you've been eating my "Mush" and calling it Polenta. Thanks for the offer of your recipe -- I like my mom's recipe best, and don't think it can possibly be topped -- except, maybe, with some more canned chicken, of course!

Hugs!

Linda

Thumbnail by Gymgirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

patrob

patrob
Goldthwaite, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 10, 2012
8:32 PM

Post #8962817

A #12 cast iron skillet is perfect for pizza. I mostly use that huge skillet on a covered gas grill, but it works well in the regular oven too.

Linda, your chicken and polenta sounds like a good quick and easy recipe. American cheese is a mild processed cheese firmer than Velveeta. I've tried Spam and actually ate a Spam sandwich that a dear friend made for me because I did not want to hurt her feelings. I just don't care for the texture. However, I do like Velveeta! In fact, queso made with Velveeta is one of the national foods of Texas. We use our salsa made from the tomatoes, peppers, and onions that we grow to make it, but most use Rotel.

I'd really like to get some of the Provel processed cheese I had in St. Louis some years ago at Cunetto's. I e-mailed and asked about the house salad, and they replied that the cheese is Provel, a combination of Cheddar, Swiss, and provolone. Yes, we had a few glasses of wine while we waited for our table, but it really was an excellent salad.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

January 10, 2012
11:26 PM

Post #8962994

Pizza on the outside grill used to be a favorite. Easy to make and cooks fast. Sorry to hear about your shoulder. If it doesn't get better have it checked out by a Dr. Nothing like the sound of running water when there shouldn't be any to wake a person up fats. Did a pipe break?

Tam The chicken sounds very good.

MK5 dinner sounds delish also.

Terry

Terry
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)


January 11, 2012
5:48 AM

Post #8963109

Time for a new thread. Follow us to here: http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1236727/

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