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Australian and New Zealand Gardening: Bromeliads for Novices and Addicts January 2012

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

December 31, 2011
7:16 PM

Post #8949456

Happy New Year to all the Bromeliad enthusiasts out there!

I thought a new thread might be in order to start the New Year off, so here it is.

We came from http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1232265/

Here's a group shot to start us off again :)

Cheers, Tash

This message was edited Jan 2, 2012 9:20 AM

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

December 31, 2011
9:33 PM

Post #8949566

Thanks Tash for the new thread. I've been following your new SH with great interest. It's 42C at the moment. It's bl---- hot. Thank heavens for Aircons. Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

December 31, 2011
10:48 PM

Post #8949603

Hi everyone,

Thanks for starting the new thread Tash; I don't know what we'd do without you and the others who understand this infernal electronic stuff. I like your group shot, especially the plants at top left and right and bottom centre. Do they have names or are they orphans?

The temp here's pretty comfortable Colleen so no need for air-conditioners, we just use the ceiling fans and open the windows and doors. I'll be in touch in a couple of weeks for a weather report over there; I'll wait until Australia Post settles down again after the "silly season" and I'll get those plants off to you as I promised. What about you Tash, will you be ready to take yours in a couple of weeks also?

Did some culling of some 5"pot size seedlings today, 1/2 filled the green waste bin and it really hurt as I hate throwing away plants, but then we can't keep them all as I must have about 5-6000 babies coming along and in another year they will have to go somewhere also.

I'm sorting out all the excess plants and I'm going to have my annual sale in Feb. while all the Neo's are still coloured up. I'm keeping it simple this year, just two prices $5 and $10. Prices for the bigger plants can be negotiated at a later date.

Well that's about it for today, see you all again tomorrow.

All the best, Nev.

I found this old pic from my orchid growing days of a group of Cattleya Amber Glow seedlings and thought I'd show it just for a change.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

December 31, 2011
10:56 PM

Post #8949604

.. Also here's another pic that I was looking for a while back when Sue was talking about Aechmea Weilbachii.

It was a plant belonging to the late Dick Jamieson who was a good brom mate in our local Brom Society. Dick said this plant didn't have any special treatment; but look at the flowers, I've never seen anything like it before or since.

Aechmea weilbachii pendula

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 1, 2012
3:19 PM

Post #8950380

Good morning everyone! Busy morning already but now a chance to sit and relax for a while.
No worries about starting the new thread, wasn't sure if everyone wanted it or to keep the old one going, but I thought being a new year, may as well get a new one started :)
Well the brom house is officially finished! yipeeee! We have been doing lots of little extra things that weren't worth taking photos of, but just needed to be done to make it a bit better. Things like the weed mat finished up against the poly pip ribs meaning Jason would have to whipper snip around the poly pipe posts each mow and just under the edge of the cloth, he gave it a test try two days ago and was happy to do it each time, but I was not happy with how much grass it through all through the shade house. So... I spent about 4 hours yesterday cutting folding and shaping a whole new section of weed mat to go perfectly around the poly pipe posts, and overlap the other one and to effectively stick about 4 inches outside the brom house wall. And then using wire and fencing pliers to make my own pins to stake it all down firmly and neatly. It took ages and I was cursing about why I even decided to do it by half way through, but gee it came up great and works perfectly! It was the worst job of all the jobs we did for the brom house, my hands are sore today, my back is so sun burnt, even using an umbrella most of the time to shade me, so I am sore, tired, probably a bit sun struck and still have the flu! LOL. But we did it!!!
So yesterday we re arranged all the broms inside, to where we wanted them, cleaned up all the yard and made it look more normal again. This morning we whipper snipped and mowed and it looks fantastic now.
Our sun birds have found the new brom house already and zoom in and out getting pollen and hanging off the grandad's beard I have hanging up. As we were pulling the old brom house apart for the fence panels to make the new shelves, I was finding my frogs everywhere, on the wire and fencing, so I was catching them all and putting them back into the new brom house and so it's nice to walk around and still see my frogs everywhere and the sun birds coming in and out too.

Nev those Neo's in that group shot, came from a friend who breeds broms, and the story is, that the back right and front middle two are both from the same grex, Neo Stars 'N Bars is the seed parent, but the pollen parent is unknown. We actually got to see the whole grex, which are all pretty mature and all very nice. I have been given permission to name them if I like. My favourite is the purple one, back right. Sadly... it was one of the ones that got burnt recently and we had to shove it in full shade, which has helped it heaps and the burn really isn't that bad, but as a result of the shade, it's lost it's colour! But it's now in the brom house and I hope it colours back up nicely as it's not flowering yet so has a bit more growing to do. It's my profile pic on FB at the moment, such a lovely strong purple colour with black teeth. That particular one, they sold to me, and then once I put the pics up on FB they kicked themselves and said, DAM... should of kept that one. He had culled half of the grex and really they are all stunning neos and all quite different from each other, but like he said, can't keep them all, but hard to work out which ones to cull. But he is pushing me to name that purple one as he's a bit annoyed he let it go, so would still like to see it get registered, I have told him he can still register it if he likes as I have no idea how to do it, lol.
Now the other three neos, are all seedlings they were given where both the seed and pollen parents are unknown and they have just grown them up. They are quite nice too and again, amazing to see the variation in the same grex.
So two are from one grex, (back right and front middle) and the other three are from another grex.

Ok I had better scoot off, Jason has just taken more photos so I'll have a look and add some :)
Tash

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 1, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #8950421

Here is a photo showing the old brom house compared to the new one, what a difference!!! The hill billies have upgraded, lol. It's kind of embarrassing looking at the old one now, ha ha ha. We had to start somewhere and it was better than nothing and did us well for the time we had it, but gee whiz, so happy to have the new one and it looks so much nicer from the street when you look in, and from the window when we look outside. It's luxury for us, weed matt floor, irrigation system, beige cloth, it's just wonderful!

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 1, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #8950544

Hi everyone,

Tash - Now that you've got the job finished all you have to do is sit inside with the sprays going, a nice cold beer in hand, and enjoy it. Looking at the pic's of the old and new is a bit like comparing chalk and cheese. Anyway it's finished now and congratulations to you both, it's a job well done.

As for the pic's of the plants you posted, I'm really not surprised to hear they are seedlings and as you say, with the seed and pollen parents NOIDS, you never know what you will get; that's why growing from seed is so interesting.
I really like the little pale green plant in the front, I think it would make a great contrasting plant in amongst the red and burgundy colours.

All the best, Nev.
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

January 1, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #8950752

wow Tash what a difference there.
your old shade house was very tidy - it all looked way neater than my gardens!
The new tunnel house looks really professional, I am so impressed that you guys did it all yourselves.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 1, 2012
11:07 PM

Post #8950946

Tash, I second what Teresa says. The before and after pic says it all. Wow! A job well done!
weed_woman
Coffs Harbour
Australia

January 2, 2012
1:06 AM

Post #8950965

excellent, a new thread! Hi all, its taken me about an hour to catch up and look at all the piccies! Like you, Tash, i have a crappy cold, shared around over the xmas break with a few others also!
We had a housefull, with mattresses on the floor and continuous cooking and eating! I eventually got the house back on new years eve, and spent new years day cleaning up and getting it back the way i like it. I really enjoyed having all the family come, and there was never a dull moment.
I did a mornings gardening out, today, so am back into it already. Tash's shade house has inspired me to make a new top for mine, so will have to sit down and nut it out.
Just a short note tonight as Hubby has cooked me a yummy dinner, and I have to go pat him on the back, give him a medal, eat it all and exclaim loudly how good it is, or he won't cook again! heh heh.
Sue
perke_patch

January 3, 2012
1:22 AM

Post #8952392

hi everyone. happy new year to you all.
I missed you all but we had a busy week last week with the move (with everyone to help) and clean up all by ourselves as usual. But the best new year present we could have got was the comment (I love it here. lots to do incuding a New Years Eve party. Wish I came here sooner) We were so releived to hear that comment so pressure really off now. Anyhow once all the cleaning was over at unit it was only 1 day to clean here and prepare rooms for our son and family to come down for long weekend over new year. Kids took over the computers each night so no chance to get onto fb or anything else. Last night I was all ready to catch up all the reading but internet wouldn't load up so I had an early night after my best shows were over on TV. Asleep by 11pm. I think fate meant it to be because after pushing all cords in today and turning everything on all worked perfectly. Not sure what went wrong last night.

Colleen I loved that stature of the tractor gnome. he was so cute. tell the boys we approve of their presents and well done on a good selection.

Nev I can't bear to bin seedlings as I am too scared the one I bin will be the one that will be the best. However I am quick to bin any that start to look wilted and stressing out. I figure I have enough lovely healthy one I don't need to struggle on with the weak ones. I know our concentrica hybrids need potting into bigger pots which will give them more room to spread out but I'm waiting for Johnny to pick up 1 more trolley which was promised to us by local fish and chip shop. It is a bread trolley which company is not picking up even though told to so they promised we could have it after suitable period of time. We plan to put shadecloth around it and use it for small seedlings.

Sue I know what you mean about having to praise the men to get them to keep doing things. I can do something eg mop the floor and it doesn't warrant a comment but if J does that same job and I don't acknowledge it it is a crime worth starting an argument over LOL. Anyway he made tea tonight while I tried to get the computer to work. When he called me to come to eat I just had to take a pic to share with you all. It looked so good.

Tea: Qld tiger prawn cocktail and half an Alaskan king crab. tasted as nice as it looked too. I was going to add a question someone asked today (where does that come from) but I didn't want to embarrass her (sorry Jen) Guess she's never seen "deadliest catch". Unfortunately with foxtel IQ I get to see it over and over and over again. Wonder why I watch TV in the office? now you know.

Wendy

This message was edited Jan 3, 2012 10:50 PM

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 3, 2012
12:15 PM

Post #8952945

Hi everyone,

Wendy – I can certainly understand how relieved you must have been to hear that “comment” as even though all the facts say you did the right thing, there’s always that little niggle in your own mind that questions your decision. To hear this comment must have been like getting a huge burden lifted off your shoulders.

Now as for culling, it is probably the most important part of hybridizing; at least that’s what the experts tell us, but it still doesn’t make it any less painful. As the old Willie Nelson song goes, “you’ve gotta know when to hold ‘em and know when to fold ‘em” and that’s the only way you can create space for the up and coming new ones. Like you I have trouble tossing out healthy seedlings, but it becomes a matter of necessity when you run out of space. I know from experience that I’m tossing out plants that could turn out to be something good because I learned a long time ago that you can’t properly evaluate a plant on their first flowering as a seedling (and I’m talking about Neo’s here). With the first batch of seedlings I ever had, any that were destined for the bin were planted in a garden at the front of the house just to “fill a gap”.

One year later when the pups had grown, almost without exception, they were better colour, wider leaves and generally all round better plants than the original seedlings they grew from. True they weren’t show winners, but they were equal to ones I had seen for sale in nurseries and for that matter equal to ones that had been registered with the BCR and in some cases even better. Whether it was because being in the garden they had more access to the things they liked or whether it takes a couple of years for them to show their best (or worst) as some that looked promising and were kept, didn’t perform as well with the next generation. I think it’s a personal thing and something that you have to feel comfortable with. On the other hand, a friend of mine who couldn’t bear to throw seedling out, kept the lot and grew them to maturity. They were so cramped; the leaves were thin and colourless as they tried to compete for light from their cramped spaces against each other on the benches. In the end he lost a lot from rot (due to overcrowding and poor air circulation) and he still wasn’t able to select what was good and what was bad as they hadn’t had the opportunity to truly show what they could do. Even now after about ten years of growing from seed, I still torture myself deciding what to keep and what should go, but unfortunately culling is a necessary part of the process. I know of other growers especially the bigger ones who put all of these culls through the “mulcher” and then return the mulch to the garden; they say that making use of the excess seedlings in this way makes the culling less painful

As for your comment about having to praise men to keep them doing things, well I’m not going near this one as I’m hopelessly outnumbered as I haven’t yet seen any comments on this site from men, maybe they are all “lurkers” and don’t want to be involved as this happens on so many of these forums, but being the only “voice in the wilderness”, my lips are sealed!

As for your seafood meal, well it doesn’t tempt me in the slightest, as I’m seriously allergic to lobster, prawns and crabs; I nearly died as a child from a swollen airway due to eating a prawn I was allergic to and didn’t know.

By the way, I’ve never heard of Alaskan King Crabs either so I looked it up on Google (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alaskan_king_crab_fishing) and was surprised at the statistics. One of the most shocking was, “Alaskan crab fishing is very dangerous, and the fatality rate among the fishermen is about 80 times the fatality rate of the average worker”, so I hope you enjoyed your crab, someone risked their life so you could eat it.

All the best, Nev

Neo concentrica x [Charm x Cracker Jack] This was one of my original "culls" growing in the garden - the original seedling was just plain green, but by moving it to the gatrden in a higher light area, this is what one of its pups looked like. Not much in the shape stakes, but unusual colour.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 3, 2012
1:52 PM

Post #8953091

Wendy, so pleased things worked out, but it sounds like you didn't relax at all over the break.

Nev, that is quite pretty with the purple and the spots.

A quiet day here today, but tomorrow will be a busy one. Catching up on housework today.

Karen
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

January 4, 2012
1:31 AM

Post #8953847

the technique is called positive reinforcement...
I use it in training dogs but it works really well on humans too!
If you get rewarded for a behaviour then you are far more likely to repeat it.
And the best thing is that you enjoy the training because it is far more fun to praise someone than criticise :)

perke_patch

January 4, 2012
4:42 AM

Post #8953900

I agree with the positive reinforcement. I used my teaching degree to train adults in a large teaching hospital. We taught managers how to be better supervisors and praise was high on our training list.

Nev I love the purple colour of your seedling. I wonder if you could cross it with something to keep the colour but improve the shape. I know that we need to cull some of our concentrica seedlings as they are too squashed in the trolley. The few that we have potted up into bigger pots and placed on stands are looking much better especially the ones in full sun. And a couple of our painted delight seedlings are starting to get the coloured patches like the real painted delight. It is exciting watching them change and mature.

Nev Johnny watches the series called deadliest catch all the time on foxtel. That's how we knew about he alaskan king crabs so when we saw one in the supermarket we had to try them. I agree that it is very dangerous work. Even in a survival suit if they fall overboard they are dead within 2 minutes so no second chances there. But I guess the money they can make will always lure men to take on this deadliest fishing.

By the way Johnny went fishing this afternoon. He usually stays out until about 7 or 8pm after the turn of the tide but he came home about 4pm feeling unwell. He has been in bed for a couple hours now so I will have to keep an eye on him. He has been puffing on his nitro a bit lately. I think a trip to the doc is called for. Oh and we'll be having fresh fish and oysters for tea tomorrow night.

It is that time of night again when my bed is calling. Night all. I'll leave you all with a pic of our vrisea dad's favourite (aka John's favourite).
Wendy

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 4, 2012
10:59 AM

Post #8954308

Hi everyone-

Karen - That particular plant has now been crossed with four dark coloured Neo's which although the colour is not as dark, the shape is much better. The result I'm hoping for are plants with the good shape and darker colours; on the other hand as with all hybridizing, I will probably get more with poorer shape and weaker colours.

Wendy - I see where you and dalfyre are coming from about "positive re-enforcement". When I did my Teaching Techniques Course the instructor told us we should always treat the pupils as "little puppies" give them a "pat" when they did something well. If they did it wrong, don't scold them! Just demonstrate again what you wanted and you would always get the best from them; it works! It really does.

Tell Johnny to take it a bit easy for a couple of days and get out and play with his vrieseas and as soon as he feels better he needs to go fishing again to make up for having to stop early the last time. He should be on "Light Duties"; (for those who don't know, this was a well know term in the steelworks down here when they employed 23000 people and the joke was, that whenever someone asked how many work at the steelworks, the answer was "about half; all the rest are on Light Duties")

All the best, Nev

Another cull rom the garden - Neo. concentrica x [Charm x Cracker Jack]. Better shape than the previous one and when given high light, the whole plant turns a rich red/burgundy colour.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 4, 2012
3:21 PM

Post #8954563

Good morning all. A bit cloudy, a nice cool breeze, I like it. Hope those southern heat waves are gone now and that they don't come up our way.

Wendy, I am sorry Johnny isn't well again. I do hope all goes well and that it is just something simple.

Neville, that would look great all burgundy. I have a neo. pheasant (a mini) that has gone quite reddish with maturity and doesn't display the markings as well as it did when younger, but the new pup will probably show off for me when it gets big enough. I love this one.

Karen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 4, 2012
5:33 PM

Post #8954717

This is the same plant(s) when I first got them...

Neo Pheasant (mini)

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 4, 2012
7:55 PM

Post #8954904

Hi everyone. Lovely pics as usual everyone. Nev You sent me some of those Neo concentrica [ charmX cracker jack] too so I definitely have something to look forward to. Hope everything goes well for you today and you're on the mend very soon. Wendy I do like that Vr Dad's Favourite too. I hope Johnny is feeling better too. We had a feed of Yabbies the other day. Niece got them from a friend for me. They're still running down here, but the water is on the way up again so they will stop for a while until it starts to drop again I presume. The fish are biting too. Catfish have been on the protected list for a few years now and have finally bred up and there have been good reports on lots of small ones being caught and released again. It's great to see the river in good health again. Colleen

breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

January 5, 2012
8:01 PM

Post #8956179

My baby Vriesea splendens now. Do i have to fertilize them or anything at this stage? All ive done is make sure there damp and with the peat moss i think ive only misted them once. They have had the lids on mostly. I thought i better give them a little air so they don't rot.
Does the plant i got them off pollenate itself or do bugs from another Brom.?

This message was edited Jan 6, 2012 12:05 AM

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 5, 2012
10:01 PM

Post #8956269

Hi everyone. Have been out admiring my pups and Mums. I have some really good colouring going on. I'm so glad that I'm an addict. lol Hi Nev if you're looking in. Hope everything's okay. Sue My "running Red River " is looking great and you can see that it's even grown. I saw one on E-bay for sale, but mine looks nothing like it. Did anyone see the Neo peimento? for sale on there. What a beauty. A pup of it went for $36 + $7 postage. I'm innocent. I didn't bid on it. I was just looking. Colleen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 5, 2012
10:27 PM

Post #8956282

Colleen I only sometimes look on eBay just to see the pretty pics. Unless a price jumps out at me, I generally miss it.

Bree, its lovely to see the tiny seeds germinating. I'm not going in for the seeds due to lack of space and time, but I love seeing them grow.

These are looking good right now and seem to have survived the rough and ready conditions of the last year.

karen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 5, 2012
11:51 PM

Post #8956295

Lovely Vrieseas Karen. I've just been out and taken some pics to show you all. Hope you like them. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 5, 2012
11:52 PM

Post #8956297

another. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 5, 2012
11:54 PM

Post #8956299

another recognise this one Nev? Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 5, 2012
11:56 PM

Post #8956300

another Colleen

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perke_patch

January 6, 2012
5:18 AM

Post #8956394

Colleen I love the family of monkeys in your first pic.

Bree well done on the seedlings. Is this your first tray of seedlings? I couldn't resist the big black seed pods on Nev's recurvata hybrid called "peach parfait" so I harvested some and dried them out for a week or more then put them in coir peat on 12the December. We already have little green plants all over the tray. Boy aechmeas are quick. Almost as quick as the one and only billbergia seeds we put down. We have a quite rare billbergia which after flowering develops a good sized round seed pod. I decided to try to grow them. Apparently I put down 2 dishes of seed. Last week we potted up one tray as the plants were too tall to sit wtih the lid on the dish. We got 48 plants in those little 1 inch square seedling trays. Today when watering I found the 2nd tray just as big so will have to pot them up soon.

I started working through all the pups today. I had the grandson Hayden going round the yard and picking out pots with really big pups. He ended up with so many onthe ute I couldn't work properly so I had to tell him to stop. He then tried to cut pups off for me so I had to tell him to go upstairs to check on Pa for me. He got sidetracked on the computer. I managed to get a few potted and a lot removed and labelled waiting to be potted. That's a start. I like to just potter without Johnny around. Unfortunately his foot is up like a balloon today and very painful to walk on so he had a lazy day watching the cricket.

I posted a heap of pics of vriseas on fb the other night. Yesterday morning we went round taking new pics of all of them again showing how much they have grown and coloured up. I will download now and hopefully get them up on fb too.

Anyhow Jen is picking me up at 7am tomorrow to go to Olive branch sale so I better get some sleep. Ghost is almost finished so better log off and shutdown. Night all.

Pic is tillandsia capitata maron. It started out a completely red plant which then turned yellow in the middle before the yellow bit started rising up out of the middle until it was a capitata flower spike. It is yet to open any little flowers. But I love it so felt the need to share it with you all.

Wendy

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 6, 2012
11:59 AM

Post #8956905

Hi everyone,

Karen – I like you little mini Neo Pheasant. It’s a very popular mini and although I can’t speak from experience, I have heard it likes a lot of sun to bring out its magnificent colours. Judging from the colour of the plants when you first got them, it seems to me you have the correct lighting sorted out anyway.

Bree – Your little seedlings are looking good. It will be interesting to see if they finish up with the banding of their parent or whether they turn out be something completely different.

Colleen – Those Neo concentrica x [Charm x Cracker Jack] pups I sent you were from un-flowered plants that had been growing in a shady area so you won’t really see them at their best until you grow on any pups from them, but there are some nice colours and reasonable shaped plants coming from that cross.

You have a nice lot of plants in the pic’s you’ve posted and the second last one you asked if I recognised, looks like one of the seedling pups mentioned above. Also is that last pic Nidularium Ruby Lee? If so, it will take more light than you are giving it and when grown in strong light it will be much darker in colour.

Wendy – Pleased to hear the recurvata seed has germinated for you and it will be interesting to see if the babies are as nice as the mother. You speak of your “one and only” billbergia seedlings and from what you describe the mother plant was possibly one of the helicoid (watch spring) types of Billbergias. What is the name?

I have a couple of different ones and Bill. rosea is one that self sets seed quite readily and the seed pods are a quite large being bit bigger than a marble with bumps all over the surface and are light green in colour and covered by a silvery/white scurf. I have sown some of these and find they “grow as quick as grass” so when planting don’t plant them too close as you’ll finish up with what looks like a container of sprouted seed of the type you eat.

Even though I don’t grow many of them Tillies always fascinate me as there are so many different types and they are always full of surprises and colour changes just like your Til. capitata.

I hope you and Jen have a great day at “The Olive Grove” today and remember, don’t spend all the housekeeping money!

All the best, Nev.

Billbergia rosea – Notice the tightly rolled petals resembling a “watch spring” and the reason for the name helicoids being given to this group of Bill’s ...

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 6, 2012
12:03 PM

Post #8956909

... the flowers are more obvious in this close-up shot. Also notice the immature seed capsules which are the silvery/grey colour I described above and of of a bumpy appearance (located immediately behind the petals) .

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 6, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #8957261

Good morning. Lovely to see all the pics and read all the news. Wendy, I hope Johnny's foot is better soon. Is one of his medications causing it? Apparently one of mine is causing my feet to swell and be quite sore to walk on. Hope to get to the sale later today, depends on Barry. Wish I still had wheels.

This is one of the very first plants I got as a pup from Wendy's either September or October 2010. So this is exciting to see this happening for the very first time...

Ae. Fasciata...

Karen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 6, 2012
4:55 PM

Post #8957313

Wendy, the name of that vriesea has worn off due to weather exposure, but it was something like Vr. Fosteriana Red Chestnut. Do you remember the correct name? Ta tanks.

Karen

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perke_patch

January 7, 2012
4:58 AM

Post #8957799

Karen, Johnny said your vrisea is definately a red chestnut.

Nev, that seond picture showing the close up of the flower and the round 'marble' of seed definately looks similar to the berry we collected but it wasn't rosea. I can't believe we never took photos of it and now we don't even have a pup from it... just the seedlings. Hopefully it will be a species and we will get a lot of them to share with friends LOL

We had a lovely morning at Olive's today. She was selling plants with pups so we did get some good bargains. When we brought them all home we performed surgery on several and shared pups with each other so we actually got more than we bought. Will post pics soon. have to upload them first.

Wendy
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 7, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #8958225

Hi everyone,

Karen - Ae fasciata is also the very first bromeliad I got many years ago when I was growing orchids. It is the plant in fact which helped make up my mind to start growing bromeliads as a hobby. When I went from growing orchids to breeding foreign finches in 1975, things we going pretty well until 1980 when different patterns of shift work intervened. I found on some occasions due to working double shifts I didn’t have sufficient time to “go bush” collecting termites for “live food” for the baby finches, and if I missed out feeding live food for just one day, the parents left the nest and the young subsequently died.

It was due to these circumstances I decided to change my hobby to growing ferns, and consequently I decided to renovate a section of the old original orchid shade house which had fallen into disrepair. During the renovation I spied something “pink “in a far corner. It was the original Ae fasciata I had started with when I grew orchids; neglected and forgotten for many years and still growing without any care since I had stopped growing orchids some years earlier. I decided at that point, that if these plants could survive all this time without any special attention the direction my new hobby would take would now be bromeliads and not ferns as first intended, and I have been growing brom’s ever since.

After a bit of research into Ae. Fasciata, I find that it was one of the first bromeliads to ever be introduced into European culture in the 1800’s. It is produced and grown in millions in Europe and is still one of the biggest sellers and is is marketed as the “Silver Vase Plant”. It is used as a substitute for cut flowers and used in homes only when in flower. When the flowers die they are usually just disposed of, until the following year when another one is purchased to provide flowers for the home once more. It is still my favourite brom after all these years because it is so versatile; I have them growing in pots, in the garden, on rocks and in a tree. All I can say is they’re probably the best choice of a plant for any “beginner”.

Wendy – I have another couple of Billbergia species which have seed pods similar to the one you speak of. One is Bill. brasiliensis and the other is Bill. macrocalynx. They are still around in collections and fairly easy to obtain, but they do grow quite large. I have a Bill. macrocalynx which is over three feet in height and as you can imagine, the pot was forever tipping over, so it’s now planted in the garden where it seems to be growing even taller!

I’m please you all had a good day at the “Olive Branch” and I look forward to seeing the pic’s of your purchases.
That’s about it for this morning and I’ll finish with a pic of my Ae fasciata growing in a Peppercorn Tree.

All the best, Nev.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 7, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #8958334

Nev, I've never seen those growing in a tree. Live and learn, hey?

Wendy, I am so pleased you did well at Olives and look forward to seeing your ''haul".

Mine was small, just 3 new plants.
This one is an un-named bill.

Karen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 7, 2012
1:56 PM

Post #8958338

Sorry, I put the wrong size photo in and it is huge! Pity we can't delete them and repost.

This one is neo. Little Ol'

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 7, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #8958341

That' better. Here is the last but not least from Olive Branch...

Neo. Apricot Nectar...the pic is a little more pinkish in colour than it should be.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 8, 2012
11:48 AM

Post #8959291

Good morning everyone,

Karen - I have no problem with your large photo as after previously using Photo Bucket to post pic's on the Garden Forums, mine were always large like that, and it was very good, as it showed more detail. I don't adjust the size of any of my pic's when I post them here and they all seem to come up a similar size so I'm a bit puzzled as to how you managed it (but then I'm always puzzled about all things to do with computers so what's new?)

Apricot Nectar is a beautifully coloured Neo which I find changes from green to a pale apricot tinge and progresses right through to a full apricot colour (after which it is named) to a more pinkish colour like yours as it matures. It's a good grower and pupper and I'm sure you'll be very pleased with it.

Just for comparison, I'll finish with a pic of one of my Apricot Nectar plants which is just starting to colour up and will get progressively more colour until as matures until it eventually is the same colour as yours

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 8, 2012
2:35 PM

Post #8959547

Neville, I am so excited at the colour range of Apricot Nectar. Even with the gold, it is so beautiful.

As for the accidental large picture, I simply forgot to resize it. I take my pics straight off my computer where they are each over 4 megabytes. I have a really simple resize tool which comes up when I right click on the photo. I would be hopelessly lost without it.

One I've had for about a year or more is this mini Neo. Alley Cat. Very small but well marked and consistent.

Karen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 8, 2012
4:15 PM

Post #8959665

Hi everyone. It's great to see pics of what I will have when mine get older. Whoo hoo love the yellow, Nev. Have been and ordered the Reo to hang the broms on [in their pots] That will be delivered today and John will set it up when he brings the boys home from his place. In the meantime I have to move everything around so that he can get in there. It's lovely and cool so looks like the job might get done today. It's nice not having to stop and see to the boys so can please myself what I do and when. Colleen

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perke_patch

January 9, 2012
4:48 AM

Post #8960146

this is my apricot nectar back in November. It is a lovely plant and I am always amazed at the colour changes.

I decided to take pups off all my hula girls today ... 3 of them with pups. One was still newly flowering and I realised once again why I do love this neo. It had a beautiful pink flush in the centre. We are experimenting with this plant and have put 2 into large 8inch pots with a fair bit of fertiliser to encourage growth. They are certainly much larger plants that others we normally plant in smaller pots. So we are going to put them in slightly larger pots from now on.

Not sure if everyone saw all the pics of our vriseas. We spent quite a while the other morning taking updated pics of the foliage vriseas to put up on fb. I didn't realise we had so many different ones but some are looking so nice at the moment.

Karen I also bought a few of those billbergias in the $5 special shed. I also found a potted bill sanderiana with the big dark teeth and another one not potted up in that shed. I just had to grab another one at that price. There was also a tub of pups of 'moon over fort dix' so grabbed one of those too.

It is so hot here in my office even with a fan going at the window trying to get fresh air in here but it is still way too hot to stay in here. Think I might have a shower and go to bed in the airconditioning. We are not getting much fresh air here though at the moment. With the fire on Moreton Island and a breeze coming from the NE we are coping all the smoke. This is not doing Johnny's breathing much good.

Night
wendy

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perke_patch

January 9, 2012
4:52 AM

Post #8960149

I was sent this plant in a swap but the lable has faded and I am unable to identify what it is. If any of you know know this is one you sent to me please let me know the name so I can redo the label. I have this plant growing in top top ring of a totem getting good morning sunlight and pure speckled sunlight again in the afternoon.

Wendy

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perke_patch

January 9, 2012
4:58 AM

Post #8960154

Nev I checked out your billbergias on FCBS and macrocalynx looks similar although I remember it as being a tan coloured tube. The flower looks like same one though. Would this bill be tan if grown in shaded area?

Wendy
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 9, 2012
12:20 PM

Post #8960763

Hi everyone,

Colleen – Glad to hear your construction with the Reo is on the way. You won’t know yourself with all the extra plants you can add by hanging. I now have more plants hanging in my shade house than I do on the benches , and I find they love to grow this way even though I was told by many of the (so called experts) that they wouldn’t do any good.

To me it just seems more natural, as when they are growing in habitat they grow in all different areas from the forest floor and rocks right to the very tops of high trees and everywhere in between. I don’t know if it’s just me or not, but the shade house just smells healthier when I grow plants in this way, it has that beautiful healthy earthy/bushy smell. I think this creates a great extra “mini environment “which gives plants the chance to grow at four or five different height levels.

The main thing to remember if using galvanised rod, or mesh to hang plants from, is to protect your plants from contact with the zinc in the galvanising by painting or neutralising the zinc by washing down well with vinegar. If you don’t you run the risk of burning the plants or worse still poisoning them by the toxic run off from the galvanising when watering. In other words, you have similar problems as you do when the plants come into contact with copper or timber treated with preservatives containing copper. I know I “beat this drum” often, but I once lost quite a few valuable plants from rot due initially to poisoning caused by copper leaching from overhead treated roof timbers in a shade house...End of lesson!

Wendy – I’m not familiar with ‘hula girl’, do you have any pic’s you can post please?

You will find that most Neo’s will grow larger in a bigger pot with extra fertilizer, but remember to make sure they have good light otherwise they will grow long and spindly leaves which won’t even fill out once the nitrogen has been used up. Also if you grow Neo’s in the garden, they will also attain greater size than they will in a pot as they have the freedom for the roots to seek out the food and nutrients they require without the restrictions of the pot.

Sorry to hear you’re copping the uncomfortably hot weather up there. I don’t like to “rub it in” but our forecast temps for the next couple of weeks are in the 24-28C. degrees range, and will be certainly better than the heatwaves we had in January a couple of years back.

Sorry, I can’t help you with the ID of your mini Neo., it wouldn’t have come from me so maybe someone else can ID it for you.

As for the Bill. macrocalynx, mines growing beneath 75% shade cloth and has always only ever had green foliage. I don’t think growing it in a more shady area will turn it to a tan colour, it would probably only just deepen the green.

I’ll finish with a pic of a little Guzmania species I recently acquired, Guz. remyi.

All the best, Nev.

Guz remyi

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 9, 2012
1:30 PM

Post #8960886

Wendy, your Apricot Nectar is beautiful.
Nev, I sure don't regret getting it, I love it.

Wendy, when we got to Olives, it was after lunch, and the shed was bare. I think only 2 bills left, and I'm sorry now I didn't get both as the other was different, much larger. I was penny pinching and missed out.

From my bedroom window, I am seeing more colour now in my little brom patch. My collection looks so small in this pic, but there are others scattered about as well. The vrieseas are down further under the trees, and more of the hardy ones growing out the front. A lot of work still to be done, but plenty of time to do it in.

Karen

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perke_patch

January 10, 2012
5:13 AM

Post #8961586

Nev this is hula girl

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perke_patch

January 10, 2012
5:14 AM

Post #8961587

and another shot of hula girl

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 10, 2012
11:00 AM

Post #8961991

Hi everyone,

Well I say everyone but where are they all? Lately it just seems like its Karen, Wendy and myself and it doesn't seem like it's worthwhile posting stuff here if there isn't anyone here to read it.

Karen - You say your collection looks small in your pic. Take it from me, it will get big soon enough and then you will be like the rest of us and screaming out for more space. Remember with the production of pups, bromeliads can at least double in quantity each year if well grown, so it doesn't take too long. If you grow from seed, well there is nothing to speak of except tiny plants for a few years, and then all of a sudden there are thousands all needing to be repotted at the same time.

Wendy - I lke the Hula Girl, its colour combination is most unusual, is it one of Allan Freeman's also?

Just to brighten the day a bit, here's a couple of pic's of some of my Neo seedlings.

All the best, Nev.

Seedlings from my Painted Lady (sport) parent

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 10, 2012
11:01 AM

Post #8961994

... next

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 10, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #8961997

and another,

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 10, 2012
11:05 AM

Post #8961999

and its sister

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 10, 2012
11:08 AM

Post #8962005

and to finish off, here's a pic of their Mother (a Painted Lady [sport])

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 10, 2012
11:35 AM

Post #8962038

Hey what about me? I'm here too. I just got a bit lost in the Shadehouse clearing the broms so that John can put up the Reo. As I've been moving the broms one way all the Mummas and babies have been going out the other door to be repotted. As you can imagine , my paved area is covered with large broms and some of the pups removed and repotted and the front area has some of the other just sitting there. I'm lucky it has been quite cool and overcast otherwise it wouldn't have been a very good job. I'm only half way through the SH so will probably be missing again today. The tanks might be here this week. Then we will need some rain to fill them. I still have to get the pressure pump. Any ideas, it has to be a 6 tap pressure, whatever that means. Colleen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 10, 2012
1:58 PM

Post #8962291

Love those seedlings, Nev. Especially the second one. We are in for a hot day so I won't be in this room once it heats up. It is the hottest room in the house in summer, and the coldest in winter.

Wendy, I like that Hula Girl too. Very nice one.

Colleen, sounds like you are keeping busy with all your plants. I like that one you posted too. I've run out of plants to photograph.

Karen

Break of Day and Pimiento (sp?)


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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 10, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #8962334

Hi All. Nev, I'm still here too but as Sue says I've just been lurking. Love looking at the photos and comments. If you check out the top there have been 589 views of the page so there are obviously lots of other lurkers too. Now I feel guilty so here's a photo of 2 curlies, Vr fenestralis and Zapita. Keep up the good work. Jen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 10, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #8962391

I want those Vrieseas Jen. They're beautiful. One more bay to go and then the SH is ready for John to do what he has to. Just a heap of broms to repot and that will be finished. Colleen
dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

January 10, 2012
10:35 PM

Post #8962965

lol - I am here lurking & really enjoy the pics of (to me) exotic broms :)
All I have is B. nutans...
and one day I'd like a small collection but for now there is just no place to put anything.

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 11, 2012
2:41 AM

Post #8963031

Helloooooo! He he he he... are you missing me Nev, he he he. Cheeky aren't I?
I have been so busy for the last week or so, got the shade house all done, then got dragged off camping and then this week has been a week or cleaning out our daughter's room and mess! She hoards like you wouldn't believe. Tomorrow and the next day we have to go to the "big smoke" which I hate, but it can't be avoided! So there goes the week.
i have just caught up on all the posts, great to see things so active. Love all the pics!
So many that I still don't have, lol.
I was a bit upset today to find we have two neos with cup rot. One is a nice Macho pup we got several months ago and has been growing into a lovely specimen, and the other is a Painted Delight I was lucky to buy off a member of our Facebook Group and the mother plant is a stunning neo.
I knew to wash them out immediately and tip all the water out of them, and then I posted on Facebook in the group asking for advice. I got some great advice about using cinnamon in the cup and then a friend who is part of the group and has grown for many year now rang me and told me about using mancozeb instead of cinnamon. So I have followed his instructions this time and will see how that goes. I just hope it doesn't hit anymore broms. I hope they will both produce at least one pup each to replace themselves.
One neo that got burnt in early December and then suffered rot in the cup, I noticed today seems to now be doing ok and has a pup coming up. So I am pleased it is saving itself.
I also found another couple of pups on some of our Vrieseas so I was very pleased about that too. And our special neo, Serendipity Girl has a nice pup coming up now too. It's all happening. I just hope we don't get anymore rot happening.
Ok well I have got to go
Tash
Here is a photo of our Vriesea Maroon Shadow with pups coming up.

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 11, 2012
4:15 AM

Post #8963060

I guess I am that novice mentioned in this thread title so I don't post but I do catch up on the posts and lovely photos every chance I get so am still out here also. Thanks again for an enjoyable thread.

That last V. Maroon Shadow is a stunner ~ Tash! I love the darker colors. Do they require more or less light?

Can anyone tell me what causes cup rot? Can you prevent it by regular maintenance with cinnamon? Kristi
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 11, 2012
5:33 PM

Post #8964014

Hi everyone,

Colleen – Sorry, how could I forget about you? You’re probably our only S.A. connection who’s a regular contributor. All I can put it down to is a “blank spot” in the old memory bank. All of you older members know what I’m talking about, and you young ‘uns will know what I mean when you get old as well.

Anyway, my comments certainly got a few of you talking again, which is great as forums are all about talking to each other, and sharing information and ideas not just pictures.

Jen, I’d never noticed that little bit of info. at the top of the page before (Replies: 57, Views: 654) but it’s a very interesting statistic and it shows there are still a lot of people who don’t want to talk to us. To these people I say, “Don’t be shy!” come out of the woodwork and say “gooday”, you don’t have to own a massive collection of plants, in fact you don’t have to own any brom’s at all. Just tell us a little about yourself and your attraction to these wonderful plants. One of our members, (“dalfyre”) only has a Billbergia nutans but still manages to drop in occasionally and say “gooday”. You may have a problem with a plant and don’t know what to do; just post a message and ask for ideas on how to solve it, if no single person has the answer, collectively we can probably sort something out with some suggestions on what to do or where find more advice. That’s what it’s all about and this is how we all learn, listening to others who share their tips and experiences. Remember, you’re never too old to learn and it’s the person who asks the questions who gets the answers, just ask Tash; it seems like only yesterday that she was firing questions left right and centre, but she has put to good use the info from the answers she got and is building a great collection now and often is the one giving the advice and sharing her knowledge with others. So it’s a very much case of “what goes ‘round comes around”; remember we all have to start somewhere and we all have something to offer.

Colleen – It seems like you’re making more headway on your “makeover” than I am. Just remember that the plants you have moved outside will be vulnerable if we get some more hot weather, so don’t forget to cover them with some shade cloth or other protection while they are waiting to be re-housed. Sorry I can’t help you with your pump question as I don’t have a clue as to what a six tap pressure pump is, but when you find out you can tell us all.

Karen - Break of Day and Pimiento are two great plants. I’ve had Break of Day for a number of years and it’s always been one of my favourites. I am always amazed at the changes of colour it displays in varying degrees of light but my favourite is still the one that’s grown in “high light” (see pic) and the golden yellow shades it produces.

Jen – I love the pic’s of your vrieseas. Is the one on the left a fenestralis or a fenestralis hybrid? I have one but mine is a darker green but it still has the attractive curled back leaves (recurved) I think is the word the experts would use instead of “curled back”.

Colleen – It looks like you can see a bit of light at the end of the tunnel now that you’re on the home run with your renovations. All you’ll have to do now is fill it up!

Dalfyre – You may not have a collection as yet, but you are certainly picking up lots of ideas and suggestions that will make things much easier for you when you do eventually start one.

Tash – Well, well well, look who’s back. How’d you like playing Harry Buttler for a few days? I know what you mean about daughters, I have one myself; but then aren’t they just following in their mother’s footsteps?

It’s never nice to find a plant with rot and it’s even worse when you are unable to do anything to salvage it. Personally I’ve found the best way to deal with this problem, is to firstly drain all water from it, then completely cut away the rotted section and let it dry, dust the cut away areas with a fungicide powder and leave it to dry for about three days. I then flush it thoroughly, pot it up again and give it a good watering and leave it in an area with very good air circulation, (preferably hanging up). I’ve found in almost all cases these plants will go on to produce one or two pups. That’s the beauty of brom’s; they’re practically “bullet proof”. Incidentally, the rot is usually started by fungus spores which breed quickly in areas of the plant that have suffered a “trauma” of some type and are already weakened. It may be burns due to hot weather or cold burns due to freezing conditions, simply just broken leaves, damage to the centre where something has fallen on it or contact with some toxic substance such as copper or zinc which caused burning, or water dripping into it from overhead CCA treated timber (which contains copper) or the water drips from a new galvanised pipe frame (contains zinc). This is all compounded when your plants are overcrowded, so as a good preventative, increase the space between plants and improve the air circulation; these are probably the two most important preventative and remedial steps you can take.

Podster – You say you’re a novice, like it’s a problem. We all have to start somewhere and are all novices when it’s all boiled down, and if we all lived to be 100 we would still never know all there is to know about brom’s. As for the “cup rot”, you mentioned (which is one of its many names), see the comments above. I’ve unsuccessfully tried cinnamon on a couple of occasions but other growers I know,swear by it so I guess it’s just one of those things that works for some and not others.

Well I guess that’s about it until tomorrow and I’ll finish with a pic of one of my favourite brom’s which I mentioned above, Neo Break of Day.

All the best, Nev.

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 11, 2012
5:40 PM

Post #8964036

Hi everyone. Well the SH is all cleared ready for John to do his thing. I just finished repotting so more broms and only a few more to go. The main thing has been done so don't have to hurry now. Are you lurking today Nev? lol just paying us back aren't you? I really do enjoy your posts and there's a wealth of information in everyone of them. Sometimes though, I think a lot but don't put [pen to paper] so to speak. Have taken some pics of the poor SH at the moment and will take some more as the work goes on. Tash how is your new SH preforming. Do your plants love their new hotel? I certainly would if I was a plant. Wendy I do hope Johnny is feeling better. Teresa the broms don't take up too much room, unless you get addicted like [some] of us. They really are an easy plant to have and not too much goes wrong. The bugs don't seem to worry them, not like the Brugs, the odd slug or snail might have a nip but I don't think they like them. GOOD. Well I'll be back later and let you all know what else I've been doing. Colleen

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dalfyre
Christchurch
New Zealand

January 11, 2012
10:24 PM

Post #8964382

I really fancy having a conservatory with a nice tropical corner with tillandsias hanging down then tiers of various other broms & a few nice big ones at the base...
If we win lotto I will put a conservatory on here but otherwise I will have to wait until we decide to look for a new home.
When I was last in the market for a house the real estate agent thought I was a bit 'unusual' and commented that I was the only client ever to check the garden & fences before the house.
I had two dogs to consider & if the house didn't suit their needs then it didn't suit me.
This house only needed a gate put in to keep the dogs safe & the garden had good bones...
I could just see a hint of potential under the weeds & over grown foliage.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 12, 2012
11:28 AM

Post #8964918

Hi everyone,

Colleen –Good to hear you now have the bulk of your work done and it’ll soon be all “systems go” when John gets there. No Colleen, I wasn’t “lurking” yesterday, just typing while you were. I had started to “run off at the mouth” a bit that’s why you didn’t see what I had written.

It’ll certainly be interesting to see the before and after shots of your construction and I’m really looking forward to them.

I must ask, what’s the name of the nice Neo you have posted? I find it really quite attractive and looking at the faint concentric rings I can just make out on a couple of leaves, I would guess it has concentrica somewhere in its family tree.

Dalfyre – I really hope you get your conservatory one day, as anyone who puts their dog’s needs before things that others see as more important must be a nice person and deserves some reward. I’ve had dogs all my life; no special breeds just the best breed “mongrels”. I find they make the best companions a man could ever want and I currently have an old mate who is now 17 years old and getting near the end of his life. His name is Clyde and he follows me everywhere I go. He’s “deaf as a post” and arthritic like me and we both get around at about the same pace. Even when I’m potting up brom’s he lies on the floor in his old bed and watches me.

Anyway, that’s about all for today

All the best, Nev.

Just for a change this morning, no brom pic’s; but I just had to share this early morning surprise with you.

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 12, 2012
2:02 PM

Post #8965119

OMG Nev I hope that wasn't in your toot. I would never go back there again if I saw it in mine. They give me the heebie jeebies. On a lighter note Good morning to everyone. The Neo is "Princess Di" Nev. I didn't know Sue was having a sale. She usually sends me an e-mail if she has anything that she thinks I might like. I had better go on FB and see what's she's up to. John will be here today with the boys so hopefully will be able to show you some of the progress tomorrow. I'm sure it will be a few days or a week before I get the SH back to anywhere near normal. Must go Colleen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 12, 2012
3:53 PM

Post #8965232

OK, no snakes in the forum, please. What a nightmare.

Am about out of here, but thought I'd pop in to say hello. Have 2 pics to put up this morning. I finally got around to dividing my poor, crushed neo. Kautskyi. I am hoping the mother (bottom) has enough left in her to produce another pup or two. They are vigorous growers, these pups.

Karen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 12, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #8965233

And this one I got from Wendy. It has grown into a beauty. I am glad I don't do shows, as it is obvious I don't have the right conditions to keep some sunburn occuring while still getting the best colour possible.



This message was edited Jan 12, 2012 4:56 PM

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 13, 2012
1:08 PM

Post #8966383

Hi everyone,

Colleen - I apologise for the pic of the snake in the last post but I had it sent to me from the a mate and it was called “Pilbara Toilet” so I can only guess that’s where it came from, but it certainly makes the point of “putting down the toilet lid”!

I looked up the parentage of your Neo Princess Di; and it did have concentrica in its breeding as I suspected and I can only say to all you “would be hybridists” don’t overlook using Neo. concentrica as a parent just because it’s common and has been around for a long time. Just look at its track record in the BCR and see all of the beautiful plants that it has produced when used as a parent. By the way, did you get that plant from Sue? I have one which I got from her but it’s not adult enough and not coloured so can’t be compared, but I’m certainly looking forward to it maturing after seeing your plant.

I see there isn’t any post from you today so I guess you’ve been too busy working John on the shade house construction and I eagerly await the pic’s as I’m sure we all are.

Karen – They are two nice healthy looking pups of Neo kautskyi you have there, and it’s one of my all time Neo species favourites. You say the mother plant was crushed, how did that happen? There’s still a very good chance you could get some more pups from it; so if you haven’t already done so, give it a double dose (10 gm to a 13cm pot) of Osmocote around the top of the pot. I have found this helps strengthen up mother plants that have just produced pups and it should be doubly beneficial in your case seeing the mother plant had been crushed and suffered a trauma as well.

For anyone who doesn’t know of this plant, it’s well worth growing as it’s a bit unusual in as much as it colours up to almost yellow when given good light. It is easy to grow from the seed it regularly produces, and I think it’s one of those plants that should be in everyone’s collections. Besides which, by growing it you are perpetuating another Neoregelia species plant and preventing it from becoming extinct...

I don’t know if it’s previously been used as a parent in breeding, but last year I crossed it onto Neo Nobel Descent which is a hybrid, and again which tends to show a lot of yellow when grown in strong light. This is a very robust plant with rather thick leaves and is a very good grower which can tolerate a lot of strong light (I hesitate to say full sun as sun intensities are different in various states). The aim of this crossing is to produce robust growers which carry the yellow colour and which will withstand strong light.

Karen your variegated plant is quite a sight. You say you’re glad you don’t do shows, why? Plants in show are no different to what we all grow except they have been well cleaned up and given a good tidy up, with dead leaves removed, marked leaves trimmed and the wells cleaned of debris; it’s just mainly about attention to detail. Don’t worry about the little bit of marking on the leaf of your plant, it can be neatly trimmed off by shaping the leaf end the same as the other leaves. Rubbing a bit of Aloe vera sap on the cut edges will often minimise the browning effect on the cut edge as well...It’s still a good looking plant even with the mark on the leaf.

I’ll finish off with a pic of plant I bought as Ae. Nudicaulis 'Costa Rica'

All the best, Nev.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 13, 2012
4:27 PM

Post #8966589

Hi all. Nev, I was interested in what you had to say about the neo. Kautskyi. The mother plant was simply crushed by her offspring which I left on far too long. I'll try the Osmocote and see if she will produce more. Meanwhile, if anyone doesn't have neo. Kautskyi, one of those pups is available for trade, the one on the right. I'll keep the young green one as its root system isn't very good yet.

As for doing shows, not having a car is very restricting.

Karen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 14, 2012
12:52 AM

Post #8966933

I put this up on FB but thought I'd put it here for those who don't visit FB. Not one I take pics of much. I've never seen it in flower, but it is getting a pup now. You'll recognize vriesea ospinae.

Karen

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perke_patch

January 14, 2012
2:26 AM

Post #8966963

Hello everyone. nice to see so many of you posting comments and info and sharing your pics.

Karen your ospinae will throw out at least 2 yellow multibract flower spikes soon as your biggest pups look about the same size. The best we have had is 4 or 5 spikes at one time. We hardly ever deliberately pull off pups but let this plant grow in a clump as multi flowering looks impressive. If we do find a pup fallen or knocked off we pot it up and usually always have a few growing solo. I think yours may have come from our place too didn't it Karen???

Nev I thought you must have had that snake in your loo. I bet if you lifted a lid and found that sight you would really say cause I think if you didn't look and had to do that job it might have been one resulting in a holy visit (to God's pearly gate)

Well Jen and I had a lovely couple of days touring brom gardens in Bundaberg to Hervey Bay area. We saw 7 gardens in all and did just under 1,000 klms round trip. I don't think we could have sqeezed many more plants into the boot and backset. most of what we got was bare rooted to save space. I'm sorry I can't post pics as I carried my camera downstairs put it on the bench to take to the car and of course left it there. It was still on the bench when I got home today. So sorry. We were so tired when we got home this afternoon that we both said we would leave the new plants till tomorrow to pot up and take pics of. I think Jen and I should be happy with our gardens as we didn't see anything that was better than ours just different. Certainly having a bigger collection doesn't mean better as usually bigger means they are not as maintained perfectly as a smaller collection would be. Usually bigger just means more work than you can possibly keep up with especially with a tree canopy for shade. Trees mean lots of leaves in and around the broms. Believe me we get enough leaves in our broms and most are under shadecloth which is under tree canopy.

I will have to talk to Sue about getting a Princess Di pup. WOnder if Jen has one yet perhaps she might have a pup. I got a couple of nice neos from our trip including another fairyfloss and pink sensation as well as luna which we didn't have. Can't remember all the others so will wait for potting and pics. Lots of billbergias though.

Wonder if Jen has posted pics on fb yet? must go and check that now before an early night.

Pic is of 3 mother plants which all look similar to each other. they are clockwise from top left purple surprise, purple star and front carnival
Night all.
Wendy

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perke_patch

January 14, 2012
2:33 AM

Post #8966965

and their 3 pups are totally different. clockwise top purple star, purple surprise & magnifica.

amazing broms aren't they?
Wendy

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perke_patch

January 14, 2012
2:36 AM

Post #8966967

hang on where did magnifica come from? wonder if I wrote the wrong name. I remember doing these pics and I am sure it was the pups off those 3 plants. I think I may have written a wrong name. I'll just have to do it again if we get pups at same time. I know I was amazed that 3 similar plants had totally different colored pups.

DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 14, 2012
12:14 PM

Post #8967450

Wendy, its great to hear about your trip. Wish I was up to a trip like that. I see you brought the rain back with you. Much needed too. I am way over my watering quota already here.

Going down to see the Amorphophallus titanum at the Catlans one day soon, and then again when the flower opens if we can get the timing right. I figure I most certainly will never see one again in my lifetime, so well worth the trips. I guess they will have thousands of people visiting from now until it flowers, and the day it opens will probably be really crowded. When are you going down? Are you going to wait until it opens?

Karen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 14, 2012
1:04 PM

Post #8967565

Good morning everyone,

Welcome to a nice wet day here. Looks like no outside work today so maybe I’ll pot up a few small brom seedlings in the garage and try and catch up on the back log.

Karen – I’ve been double dosing my worthwhile old mums now for a few years with very good results. I started doing this after I read a short article (“Looking after you Mum’s”) in one of the bromeliad journals. It seems to work well on most genera with the only downfall being not much colour in the pups until the effects of the extra nitrogen wears off, and then it’s everything back to normal. On one Neo mother, (Nobel Descent) I got eight pups all at the same time and they all grew normally, but the mother died of exhaustion; (too much child birth I expect).

Karen your vriesea ospinae is also a very good candidate for this treatment as I’ve found out many times. When mine got like yours I removed the pups and planted them up in their own pots and they all flowered within the year. Unlike Wendy, I’ve never had one flower yet when allowed to clump from a “trunk” (for want of the correct term) I suspect either the trunk takes too much of the plant’s nutrients and they aren’t getting to the new growth, or because I’m in a different climate which could also have a bearing on the plant's performance as well, but that’s just what happens down here. I removed about four pups from an old ospinae like yours, which just left what looked like a “stick in the pot”. I gave it the extra Osmocote treatment, and the old trunk went on to produce another six or seven pups (I’m just not sure of the number) it could have even been more. The two big pups at the top of your plant can easily be removed by just carefully bending out and downward from the trunk being careful to retain a bit of “heel” on their base, and even the small pup is plenty big enough to remove as well in my experience. Worth a try I think.

Wendy – WOW! When you guys go brom shopping you don’t muck around do you? It’s more like a "Brom Safari" from what you describe, anyway the main thing is that you enjoyed yourselves and got some nice brom’s that you didn’t have before; now for all the potting up. As for leaving your camera at home; naughty, naughty, naughty! Now we can’t see what you both got up to!

Where did the name Neo 'Magnifica' come from, was it one of your plants, or one you saw on your trip and the name was still in your mind? It’s not a registered name, there is a Magnifica ‘Red’ and a Magnifica ‘Madness’ but no just plain Magnifica.

Karen – As for going to see the Catlans’ plant, you’ll need to have your timing “spot on” as the flower’s only open for a day I think. I reckon you’ll smell it long before you see it. I saw something similar when I visited the Parrot Park in Bali and believe me they’re really “rotten”. The translation of the Balinese name means “corpse flower” just to give you an idea of the smell ... So be warned!

That’s it for now and here’s a pic of another of my favourite Aechmeas.

All the best, Nev.

Aechmea orlandiana ‘Touch-a-Pink’ (unregistered)

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 14, 2012
3:10 PM

Post #8967713

Hi everyone. Just a quick visit to let you know the Reo is all up now . I have a job ahead of me but I'll get there. I should be able to get about 100 plants up there so that will give me a nice lot of room on the floor now. I haven't down loaded my pics as yet only the empty SH so will start with that one. Have a great day everyone. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 15, 2012
2:54 AM

Post #8968247

Here's an up-date for you all to have a look at. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 15, 2012
3:01 AM

Post #8968250

I have put about a dozen plants up so far but I think there has to be an easier way than what I'm doing. I'm using plastic coated tiewire. John actually put holes through the tops of his pots and threaded wire through them and then hung them. Has anyone got any tips for me please. I have about 100 to hang. Colleen

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perke_patch

January 15, 2012
4:11 AM

Post #8968275

wow Colleen you will be able to display so many plants on that new reo. what a wonderful idea. While we were away Johnny had a bit of a rearrange of the pond area. He pulled out one of the ospinae clumps which was pretty well surrounded by other plants but it stuck out of the top being so tall. However it really does need some TLC as the lower stem is totally bare of plant. As you described to Karen Nev, I think this is what our one needs too. I will have a look at it once the new purchases are all potted up. Tried to get them done today but every time I got into it someone else came to buy some broms or join us for a cuppa. I would just get back into it and pot another couple and something else would happen, a phone call, visitor or brom buyer. We took our sales money and got some new fertilizer, and a ute loat of potting mix.

Nev those photos I posted are ones I took a while back. I remember the day so clearly and how when the pups came off the mothers were identical but the pups totally different. I am sure the pups came from those 3 mothers that's why I was surprised when I saw the different name when I had copied and pasted the file names. I'll probably never get those 3 plants together again to compare pup colours.

Pic is a new giant guzmania we got from Olive Branch. not sure if I had already posted this or not but it is a lovely plant worth looking at again so here it is labelled as guz giant white.
Wendy

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

January 15, 2012
1:32 PM

Post #8968816

Do you think this is Aechmea Orlandiana?

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

January 15, 2012
1:33 PM

Post #8968817

side veiw.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 15, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #8968818

Wow Colleen, that looks great. I don't have any ideas for hanging the pots though, sorry. The plastic ties may not work if the plant becomes too heavy.

Wendy, that is a beautiful Guz. Home again, and straight back into it, by the sound of it.

Nev, I might try that with the ospinae. It looks so happy at the moment, but I would like to see it flower.

Bree, I can't help with the ID, but the plant is a beautiful colour.

Went to Bunnings yesterday for some more potting mix and pots, and got a tall pot (terracotta painted stone colour) for my blanchetiana which I want to use as a feature. I think I'm going to need more gravel in the bottom though, and I want a concrete square for the pot to stand on, so won't be doing anything with it until next pay. The pot is big and there is no way I can move it by myself, so will have to wait until next weekend when Barry gets back. Well, have to make sure he gets his exercise, don't I.

Brought my vrieseas in under cover, as the wells were really stinky. Emptied and cleaned them out, and will keep them under cover while it is raining. Will also repot a couple. The Kiwi's have outgrown their pots and keep toppling over. They do get a bit damaged under the trees, but cant be helped. Even found macadamia nuts in the wells.

Karen
The group under cover...

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 15, 2012
8:40 PM

Post #8969348

Good afternoon everyone,

Well there’s not a lot of change in the weather here on the south coast of NSW, it’s still raining on and off; not heavy but just enough to prevent you getting out in the garden.

At last I’ve had a chance to look at the new posts since yesterday, however it’s still the same members doing the posting. I’d like to see a few of the other members having something to say as well, come on, don’t be shy, come on and at least say gooday!

Colleen – Good to see your mesh going up at last. Is that John on the end of the claw hammer? You’ll really surprise yourself at the number of plants you can get by hanging them on a bit of mesh like that. You ask about ways of attaching them to the mesh; there are many different ways of doing this and every grower has a different method, but when I previously had plants hanging like that, I made some hangers out of some old wire coat hangers. (If they were galvanised I scrubbed them with vinegar first to neutralize the zinc in the galvanizing...This applies to any galvanised mesh or wire that may come into contact with your plants)

Take a length of the wire probably about 12” long (you have to just work out what suits your mesh the best). With a pair of pliers then bend one end of the wire into a “U” and then bent this “U” at right angles to the straight piece of wire. This will become the rest for the bottom of your pot.

Now pass the straight end of the wire up through one of the drainage holes in the bottom of the pot and pushed it up through the inside of the pot so it comes out the top and the “U” forms a “snug” rest for the bottom of one edge of the pot to sit on.

Position the pot at the height desired and then bend the top of the wire over the nearest horizontal piece of mesh above the pot to make a hook to hang over the mesh to support the pot. It is not necessary for the pot to be sitting on a horizontal piece of the mesh although it can if you prefer it so.

Once you have adjusted the “U” bends so they are in the correct position for your pots, straighten out the top hook and remove the hanger from the bottom of the pot. Now use this hanger as a template to cut sufficient wire pieces to make the required number of hangers. Make “U” bends on the bottoms of each of these and then start fitting each to the pots you wish to hang.

Wendy – As for the wayward pup with the 'Magnifica' name tag, well I guess it just becomes another NOID until it eventually flowers and hopefully the name can be sorted out. As for the Guzmania, it’s sure something to look at and I think you may have posted that on Face Book as I think I’ve seen it before.

Bree – Your plant does look like one of the many Ae orlandianas or an orlandiana hybrid. Whatever it is it’s well worth growing. Do you know these grow very well on trees also and they seem to grow faster and attain a larger size as well.

Karen – You have a nice looking collection of vrieseas there. Best to make sure they have plenty of space between them to allow for good air movement and prevent any problems with fungus. The stink you mention is hopefully just the old vegetation in the cups rotting naturally and no cause for alarm. If however the smell would kill a horse at twenty paces, you possibly have some sort of rot. This is easily identified, because when you give the cups a good flush out, the smell should go away, if it remains, you could have problems.

As for the new large pot you bought for your Blanchetiana, make sure it has adequate drainage holes in the bottom. Quite a lot of these fancy pots just have one “piddling” little hole in the bottom which can easily get blocked up which causes the mix to stay continually wet and become sour to the detriment of the plant . Extra drainage holes can easily be made in the bottom with an electric drill using a masonry bit. Make sure you give the pot a good soak in water first and don’t use a hammer drill as you will surely crack the pot. Place a reasonable quantity of rubble in bottom of the pot to act as extra drainage and also help prevent the pot from toppling over.

That’s about it for now

All the best, Nev.

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 15, 2012
9:08 PM

Post #8969365

Hi everyone. Well I've been off line all morning since about 8am. Had to finish up ringing a tech to get me back online. I now have a new password that I have to remember. Thanks Nev for your detailed description of the coat hangers. As luck would have I have a whole bag of wire hangers just sitting there. I will have to get some vinegar though. I will get some when it cools down a bit and soak them in it and give them a good rub. Would hate to loose any broms. Bree your plant isn't Ae. Black Knight is it? Nev what are the 2 broms in your pic? Can't quite make out the tags. Yes, that's John my son with the hammer. He's a very handy person to have around. He'll have a go at most things including babysitting. He's going to be a Gramps in May. He's loving the idea. Must go Colleen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 15, 2012
10:31 PM

Post #8969391

Hi again,

Sorry I forgot to mention the plant in the centre is Ae. Fasciata Rubra, quite nice but very slow to grow for me and won't give me any pups. The other one to its left is just an Ae. Orlandiana.

Colleen - As for the vinegar and the coat hangers, they may be alright depending on their age but since I damaged some good plants from contact with galvanising, I make it a point now to treat all galvanised products the same, just to be sure.

All the best, Nev.
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 15, 2012
11:30 PM

Post #8969408

Love the photos Wendy, Nev, Bree and Colleen. Haven't finished sorting all the new broms yet but I thought you might like to see what Russell Holz... is up to now. As well as his beautiful Billbergia hybrids he is also growing Caladiums. Couldn't resist buying a few. These are some fairly ordinary ones because I couldn't select from his really fancy ones. Enjoy the rain. Jen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 16, 2012
12:29 AM

Post #8969430

Hello again everyone. Jen, those are pretty. They don't last very long here, sadly. Conditions are too tough.

Nev, that is such a pretty brom. Never seen one that colour before. Yes, the smell went with the rotting leaves, but I left the vr's to dry out before wetting them again. Just to be sure.

Bree, I'm sure I've seen that Aechmea before. I've got one but it is the pinkish version. Yours is much darker and richer. They are both well marked.

Colleen, wish I had a younger handy man around. Barry is great but I worry sometimes that he does too much.

Here is the pot I got yesterday. Not filled or in position yet, but put the plant in to see how it would look. I love it. I will fill about 1/3 of it with gravel first then add the mix. Will see if Barry can drill the extra holes, but may have to wait until next week as his tools are at his place.

Karen

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 16, 2012
1:38 AM

Post #8969458

Know what you mean about Caladiums, Karen. I've lost a few because I forget about them in Winter and plant over the top of the poor things. This time they're staying in pots.
Lovely pot, Karen. I used to plant into my display pots but got tired of having to replant after flowering or if the plant got damaged. These days I just leave the plant in its own pot, put styrofoam in the bottom of the display pot for drainage, pack bubble wrap (Wendy and Johnny's idea) around the plant's pot and bark on the top so it all looks nice. Makes it very easy to change plants.
This is one of my favourite Billbergias. It's a big one. Rings of Saturn. Jen

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perke_patch

January 16, 2012
5:50 AM

Post #8969602

Colleen I had to scroll back up to check out John when you said he was going to be a Gramps in May. My memory of him was of a young man and even taking another look he doesn't look old enough to be more than a young father .. certainly not a grandfather. He must have good genes hey???

As soon as I saw your orlandiana I immediately thought it was orlandiana rainbow which goes very deep red in full sun. I will take a pic of ours tomorrow if it stops raining long enough.

Colleen I have included a pic of some wires we buy from a local orchid grower. We only buy them because of convenience but Johnny has made some up. Just wrap your wire around your pot or get a scap of steel the size you want and make a gig. when wire forms a ring of size required cross wire over at back allowing several inches crossover then bend up the ends. Fold top over to form a hook as in the picture. The pots now just slot into the ring and get hung over the wire. Very easy to make and each time you do they get better and better, especially if you make up a gig to get bends in right place.

Jen I am still trying to get to all the new plants too. It was tool cool and windy at the back of the ute today. Johnny actually thought we would pop round to see all your plants and the wonderful shadehouse everyone keeps talking about (he wanted to check out his handywork) but when we rang to see if it was ok to come ... no answer. you said you were going to school to check on everything and meet the new boss. I guess that's where you were. Counting down your remaining days off now I guess and trying to get everything done before times up.

Must be off to bed. Early doctors appointment tomorrow morning and I haven't even worked out Johnny's prescriptions yet.


Wendy

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 16, 2012
12:24 PM

Post #8970070

Gooday everyone,

Well the rain’s stopped so at last I can get out in the garden again and try and do some unfinished work. As I told you previously, I had started a bit of a garden make-over and erected some extra shade cloth; but due to all the interruptions over Christmas and the stop/start rain we’ve been having ever since, it’s still not finished. Now I find I’ve just lost interest in the whole thing, “I’ve gone off the boil” so to speak. Now I have to try and motivate myself again and pull my finger out and get on with it so here’s Hoping!

Jen – Caladiums are beautiful plants and make wonderful companion plants for orchids, brom’s, Anthuriums and ferns. I tried to grow them some years ago when I grew orchids, but found that each year they just got smaller and smaller and eventually died. I came to the conclusion that I needed a heated glasshouse for them down here in our winters and never tried to grow them again, but how I wish I could. Do you know if Russ is hybridizing these as well as brom’s? How tall is the Billbergia in your pic Jen? I have a favourite growing in my garden as well which is one of the spotted types. It grows to about one metre tall if planted in the ground and has green flowers. It’s an unusual light brown in colour and gets a pinkish cast through it when grown in good light and the reasonably large white spotting really sets it all off. It’s an old one that goes by the name of “Kip” and I’ll attach a pic to this post, although as you all know the camera doesn’t always capture the beauty of all plants.

Karen – You’ve done all the right things with your vrieseas and I’m sure they’ll like their “freshen up” and reward you with some nice growth. What do you feed them on? Jack Koning who we all know as the “Master Hybridizer” of these once told me he just uses the normal Osmocote, and he grows some beautiful stuff, and grows them to perfection. It’s always wise to take tips from the master as I’ve found with mine. I’m a bit like you now and wish I had a young fit handy man around as well; it’s very frustrating to think that I was once that young fit handyman, however jobs that once took me half an hour to complete now take half a day and that’s only if I can manage to do them at all. Getting old “suks” doesn’t it? I like your new pot, it really compliments the blanchetiana and the size and colour couldn’t have been better. By the way, is that Barry standing beside it?

Wendy – I like those types of pot hangers too, and the beauty of them is that you can make all different sizes to suit all size pots. Mostly these day I just use plastic hangers and hang them from the roof timbers at different heights and I suppose they could even be adapted to hang a plant from the mesh as well. I get mine from our local brom society for about 20 cents each so it’s hardly worth the trouble of making them is it?

Colleen – Glad to hear you got your computer sorted out. I hated it when I used to have to get a computer technician, I could just see the dollars flying out the door. Fortunately I have a bloke now who does all our work and who was once working as a computer technician. He says he gave it away and bought a courier run as he couldn’t stand to see his boss ripping people off and charging big fees and paying him “peanuts”. Because he delivers newspapers to all of the paper shops down the coast during the night, he has spare time through the day which enables him to do a few computer repairs for his friends. Some of the stories he has told us about the costs these places charge is mind boggling. He used to work for a boss who would charge an initial upfront fee of $50 just to look at the computer. From then on it was an additional $75 per hour or part thereof. He said it wasn’t unusual for his boss to charge someone $125 for something that could be fixed by a single “key stroke”. He said his boss thought it was a great joke being able to rip off ordinary honest people simply because they were like me and completely illiterate with the workings of a computer. Aren’t we pleased we found him to now do our work; I don’t think I’ve ever paid more than $25 for a job yet.

Finally I’m still suffering from shock! John a grandfather? I can’t believe it.

All the best, Nev

Billbergia ‘Kip’

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 16, 2012
12:39 PM

Post #8970084

Also a couple of nice little Ae recurvata hybrids

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 16, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #8970086

and this one.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 16, 2012
4:59 PM

Post #8970502

Jen, that is food for thought about how to fill my large new pot. And would definitely be easier to handle with the pot just sitting in the big one. Will work on that, thank you. Rings of Saturn is a lovely bill. I am on the hunt for more bills, always.

Wendy, love that pot holder. Looks easy too. Good luck at the doctors. Hope its all good news for Johnny.

Nev, yes, that's a very unwilling Barry standing by the pot to show some idea of its size. He seemed to think he should have been given time to shower and dress for the pic. Hehe... Love those Ae. Recurvata hybrids. I don't think I've seen anything like those before. I have the ordinary ones, but nothing like those. Well done. Kip is nice too.

The vrieseas have survived the year despite me, I'm afraid. Wasn't well enough last year to tend to my plants much at all, and I haven't fed them anything. They've been put out under the trees to be knocked about a bit by falling macadamias among other things, plus a few bouts with the possums, and are usually on their side rather than upright. I am hoping that larger pots will overcome some of that. Will give them a bit of osmocote while I'm at it.

Colleen, I agree, John doesn't look old enough to be a grand dad. He looks fit enough to keep up with energetic grand kids. I am sitting back now waiting for the great grands to start coming along. Hopefully not for a while yet though.

Karen








splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 17, 2012
1:04 PM

Post #8971572

Hi everyone,

Things seem to be getting quiet again on here with Karen and myself being the only ones posting since yesterday.

Wendy, Johnny, and Jen’s tip about what to do with your large pot is just one example of the advantages of these type of forums where ideas are shared, and to just add another little tip about preventing plants in pots situated in the garden form being knocked over, try this simple and cheap alternative. Get an old pot (doesn’t matter if it’s broken) of the same size as the one containing your plant. Dig a hole in the garden a bit deeper than the pot and put some broken bricks, gravel or any sort of rubble in the bottom for drainage. Now plant this “empty pot” in the hole so the top of the pot is level with the mulch surface. Firm it in position and then simply slip the pot containing the plant into it. It will prevent it from getting knocked over, it’s easy to remove to work on the plant or even if you want to relocate it.

Recently I wrote a short article about increasing growing space in the green house, and seeing how it’s been a bit quiet here I thought I’d share it with you all. Rather than drag it out in one post, I’ll send it as Part 1 and Part 2 starting with part 1 today.

USING ALL AVAILABLE SPACE (Part 1)
Neville Wood 2012

Some time ago now when I found I was running out of bench space in my shade house, I was considering different ways to fit more plants in without crowding them too close together and impacting on their health due to poor light and air circulation. Then it finally dawned on me that in the wild, when growing in their natural habitats, they are growing at all different heights and light levels i.e. on forest floors, cliffs, tree trunks and overhanging tree branches and this is when I thought, "I can also grow them at different heights and make use of all available vertical space".

When I mentioned my idea to a few other growers I was told it was very risky, mainly because water overflowing from the high plants would fall onto the lower ones which could also transmit any disease they may have. The lower plants would be getting extra water falling on them from the plants above them as well. My argument was that this type of thing happened in the “wild” and besides, if they were growing suspended at different heights, they would have better air circulation and the chance of disease would be minimised because the plant’s health would be improved and thus its chances to combat any disease. As for the claim of the lower plants getting too much water I could simply hang the smaller pots at this level as they dry out quicker and can use the extra water anyway. My main reasoning was that a common problem with brom’s, was rot caused mainly by overcrowding on benches and the resulting poor air circulation which caused the plant to stay too wet. With the plants hanging and air circulating all around, this wouldn’t be a problem and the plants would dry out quicker with this extra air circulation.

It had got to the stage with my plants that I had to do something to prevent overcrowding, so I decided to give it a go anyway. I reasoned that “nothing ventured, nothing gained” and I purchased a couple of bundles of plastic pot hangers and set about providing suspension points along the overhead roof timbers from which I planned to hang the plants. These were simply protruding screws or flat headed nails which were located nine inches apart to comfortably accommodate the 13cm pots I use. Finally I fitted the hangers and commenced hanging up the excess plants, and it didn’t take too long for all the plants to be in situ hanging from their respective suspension points on the roof timbers...Part 2 tomorrow.

That’s about it for today and I’ll finish with a pic of some new hybrids from Neoregelia carolinae ‘tricolour’ x Neoregelia Medusa made by Allan Ladd a nurseryman of BOOYONG, NSW.

All the best, Nev.

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 17, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #8971679

Good morning everyone. Well what a day yesterday. I didn't get anything done re putting the broms back into the SH. I gathered a heap of wire coathangers and got the vinegar but spent most of the day moving my plants around so that the BL=== sun wouldn't scorch them. It was 44C here yesterday. Today it is overcast and there's a beautiful cool breeze coming through the front door. There's thunder too but no rain as yet. I turned the sprinkler on in the garden and let the chooks out and they mulched the garden for me. I find they don't do any damage to the plants as the plants are big enough to withstand a bit of scratching around and the chooks get rid of a few bugs for me. I have a couple of chooks that love the snails and they look like real experts getting them out of the shells. Well I'm going to get these hangers soaking in the vinegar and see how many broms I can get hung up today. Back later. Nev I love the pic. Colleen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 17, 2012
4:22 PM

Post #8971869

Colleen, I would love to have chooks here, but I'm not really up to caring for them. I eat a lot of eggs, so it would be good. Don't work too hard today, especially if it does get hot again.

Nev, looking forward to part 2, and I do love those neos you've posted. It was pointed out to me that the concrete pot could get very hot in summer, and if that is the case, then Jen's suggestion would also help insulate the inner pot from the heat. I know my bird bath is in the sun, and it gets hot, then the water gets hot too. Learning all the time. I like that.

Woke up to sunshine this morning to bright sunshine, which was nice after the rain. But had to hurriedly put plants back under cover, as I'd put some out to get wet. They wouldn't take the shock of the sun on them.

Off today to meet a friend I haven't seen for 2 years. Will be lovely to catch up.

Karen

Tillandsia Mallimontii, first flower, perfumed.

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 17, 2012
4:55 PM

Post #8971912

Hello everyone, I wrote a post the other day and was being lazy, didn't do it in word or copy it... and yup... it vanished on me, doh!! teach me to be lazy huh?
Sorry for being quiet, I have just been so busy with non brom stuff, the daughter's room, back to school stuff, etc. Hubby is back to work this week, and daughter back to school next week, then normality should return... that's if it was ever here at all, lol.
So now I have a lot of catching up to do. Thanks for the comments Kristi on Maroon Shadow, yes it’s a nice dark coloured vriesea and I will be hoping to grow at least one of the pups up to breed with in a year or two. It likes a lot of light but not direct sunshine, well in my climate anyway, so it’s in the bromhouse under shade cloth but gets light all day.
Nev I am laughing about daughters, mine is not following in my footsteps…. At this stage in her life anyway. I was a real tomboy at her age (still kind of am) and was not into ‘girly’ stuff at all! She is 12 in two days and spends longer in front of the mirror to get ready than me! She is a real ‘girly’ girl and drives me nuts! LOL
As for the cup rot, I have read of nearly everyone doing the cinnamon thing, but I had a friend ring who is within this same northern climate and say don’t bother with the cinnamon when they are at this point (leaves coming out) go straight to the fungicide and get that into them. So I took his advice and made up a strong paste to his directions and painted it all through the cup, sprayed a tiny bit of water in to allow the fungicide to wash into the base of all the leaves and put them into a sheltered area to avoid any more water getting into them. We’ll see how it goes. He said the good thing is, that the fungicide won’t hurt them and is a stronger better help than cinnamon. Yet I know other big hybridisers that absolutely swear by it. So I might give it a go next time, I’m not sure.
Karen love the kautskyi photos, it’s one of my favourite neos as well, I have a couple of them but could easily have more. My first one was so nice and yellow, but has now gone rather green, because it used to sit in full sun and got burnt as summer hit, so had to go under cloth. Now that we have beige up instead of the green, it’s starting to colour up again. (slowly)
Nev how did that cross with Noble Decent go, that’s really quite interesting to me, how are the seedlings going? They should be nice ones 
Wendy … sounds like you and Jen had an amazing adventure, lucky ducks. I can just imagine how much fun you had and all the wonderful broms you would of seen.
Colleen the handing space is going to be great. We too have been making up some pot hangers for our smaller minis and things to hang up, I have made about 5 by hand with pliers and a pot, but I have decided I need to make a jig so I can make them identical. My dad gave me a heap of thick wire that is coated with a plastic coating, so no point in wasting it. Nev I like your idea too, I might try that method out, it sounds really stable for a side wall.
Love all the photos that have been put up and the ideas that have been thrown around. This is always a great source of information and help, also loved part one of your Available Space document Nev.
Well nothing new here, the broms seem to be going well, did a bit more potting and re arranging yesterday but that’s about all. Haven’t even taken any new photos for a week or so. I’ll attach a photo of something non brom related for today, this is our white Bat Plant, we also have the black one which is more common apparently but this is the first time the white one has flowered.
Tash
PS I wasn't lazy... I wrote it in word this time, lol.


This message was edited Jan 18, 2012 5:32 PM

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 18, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #8973014

Hi everyone,

Colleen – I’m glad we’re not copping the hot days you’re getting down there. I know I complain about the rain and the cold winters here but I don’t know how I’d handle temperatures like that. Just the term “chooks” takes me back to my childhood; in those days where I lived, everyone in the village had chooks and there was no need for a garbage bin for food waste as to supplement their wheat, the chooks ate the lot and paid us back with fresh eggs. Ah those were the days!

Karen - I’m like you with the eggs, I’ve been eating them all my life and I think they are one of the best and most versatile foods going, and what’s more they’re better for you than junk food. I have to start every day with a couple of eggs, as they really get me going. Tillandsia mallemontii may only be a very small Till. but it has one of the most powerful perfumes you could wish for, and it only takes one or two flowers to be open to let you know it’s in flower as the perfume wafts right through the shade house.

Tash – Yes, D.G. used to swallow my posts as well and it made me so frustrated, so I always type them in Word now and then paste them when I’m finished. You speak about breeding with Maroon Shadow; it’s a beautiful brom with its impressive multi branched inflorescence (flower spike) and for those of you who don’t know it there’s a pic on http://fcbs.org/pictures.htm. I don’t know of any seedlings it’s produced, but maybe Jack Koning could tell you what it’s like as a parent.

I know Vr. Angela is an “oldie” but it has also been producing some nice plants when used as a parent (I think Jack did a bit with it too) and it’s certainly worth having even if you don’t want to breed from it. I’ve only just sown the Nobel Descent x kautskyi seed and it seems to have all germinated well, so hopefully lots of seedlings in the future and certainly plenty to share among my friends. I love the “bat plant”, are they difficult to grow? I expect that like everything unusual I like they can only be grown in the tropics, ….please tell me that’s not true and could I could grow them here?

USING ALL AVAILABLE SPACE (Part 2)

The only problem was that I still had more plants than suspension points to hang them from and I soon found myself looking for yet more space. The answer came in the form of extra suspension points equally spaced between the original ones, but to overcome the crowding problem of these extra plants being too close to the ones already in situ, I would need to hang them at a different level so the leaves weren’t touching the plants next to them.

To achieve this I had to extend the distance from the hanger to the suspension point and this was achieved with a simple piece of thin galvanized wire with a small hook on each end (Never use copper wire or any other copper products near brom’s as it is toxic to them and contact with it will eventually kill the plants). The galvanized wire was strong enough to easily support the weight of the pot, was cheap to buy and was easy to work with. I did foresee a problem with the wire though, as I realised that in windy weather the pots would move and the wire could possibly damage or even cut the leaves of the plant above it. To eliminate this risk the wire was covered with 3.9mm black plastic tube of the type used in home irrigation systems. (It’s commonly called spaghetti tube and is available at Bunnings and similar type stores and is quite inexpensive)

There was also the possibility of a second risk because if the leaves were regularly making contact with the galvanized wire or runoff from it during watering, they could suffer burning from the zinc in the galvanizing. So to overcome this, the wire was first soaked in common household vinegar for a couple of hours to neutralise the zinc (the toxic component of the galvanizing). Once the wire hangers were finished and in place I found I could now hang plants successfully at a second level thereby doubling the capacity of my hanging plants. I have found that the plants requiring more light are best hung from the higher level and the ones requiring less light can be grown at the lower level or on the benches and it’s easy to experiment with different light levels and find out each plant’s preferences.

After a plant count I was amazed to find that the number of hanging plants now totals 357 which are slightly more than those on benches, so I now have effectively doubled the available accommodation for my plants. I have been using this method for three years to this date and I haven’t lost any plants from disease as was originally suggested to me by fellow growers. So if you’re running out of space, “look outside the square” and consider hanging some of your plants from the overhead timbers. (End)

I’ll finish with some pics of another new hybrid bred by Allan Ladd, and registered as Billbergia Allan Ladd by Ross Little who also took the pics. It’s a result of Bill. Pyramidalis x Bill. Windigig Special. This just goes to show you can breed champions from common plants (Bill. Pyramidalis) which is one of the most common Bill’s in cultivation and often dismissed as a possible parent because it’s so common. (This is a good lesson for Tash who is one of the new breed hybridizers).

All the best, Nev.
Pic 1

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 18, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #8973025

No 2 Side view

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 18, 2012
11:56 AM

Post #8973035

Pic 3 (Inflorescence)

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 18, 2012
12:00 PM

Post #8973039

Pic 4 (Flowers) Note the resemblance to Bill. pyramidalis

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 18, 2012
2:04 PM

Post #8973192

good morning,
I love your part 2 there Nev, great info and well written. amazing the ideas you come up with. Well Done.
Nice Bill by the way, I would not of picked it as a bill until I saw the flower, love the colour on top and that red underneath, amazing. Allan Ladd at his best again :)
I like Allan, he's another one of them most helpful fella's that will share his knowledge and help you without all the secret squirrel garbage. I have one of his neo's here that is close to flowering and will make a great parent, that's why he sent it to me, striated and will produce variegated seedlings. So that will be interesting, I hope I have something of interest in flower at the same time as it.
Yes sorry to say Nev, the bat plants only like the tropics, I think they do ok in Brisbane, but not further south than that. They are a unique plant, I have never seen one and then my neighbour showed my hers and gave me a pup off it, the black variety. (more common). so I found out there was a white version, but two different kinds, one that is about half white still with a lot of black to it and a more rare pure white one. so I hunted down the pure white variety and managed to buy two from the same seller on ebay. (that was my first ever ebay plant purchase, lol, before broms) and I gave one to the neighbour. She is the one who got me into broms as she gave me so many pups early on, some I screwed my nose up at (Ae bert) but slowly they grew on me, lol. So that's how the bat plants happened. I now have the original black on she gave me, still hasn't pupped for me, my white I brought and two other whites that were given to hubby in trade for some Desert Roses. (Yet to see them flower to see their true colour).

As for the Vrieseas, yes I must say I like Angela too, and have a young pup of her. I think the colour will be an interesting one to use, but Jack is way ahead of us all, lol. I do talk to Jack quite a bit, he's a fantastic guy and so helpful and quite a funny man too.

Well what can I share today?

I have probably shared this one before, I'm not sure... I'm not that old yet but I already forget... imagine me in another 30 years... scary!
Well apologies if I have shared it before but it's Neo Dream Baby and I love the size, shape and colour.

Tash

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 18, 2012
3:50 PM

Post #8973327

Tash that dream baby looks enormous beside the minis. Lovely plant.

Nev, thank you for sharing part 2, and that bill. is fantastic. I have Pyramidalis growing in very large clumps, and one lot has even climbed a tree. They look fabulous when all out in flower, though the plant itself is rather boring.

I am washing and potting today, so hope the rain holds off until the towels are dry.

Have a great day everyone.
Karen

Bill. Pyramidalis en masse...

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 18, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #8973419

I enjoyed the article USING ALL AVAILABLE SPACE Nev and would ask if you had a photo of your aerial display that you could share?

And, after reading through everyones posts, I can't help but wonder how cold your areas get in winter and how do you all overwinter these gorgeous plants?

I could easily be fond of the variegated bromeliads.
I also love the mass plantings of like bromeliads. Very pretty when in bloom.
Thanks for sharing all the photos and information. Kristi
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 18, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #8973443

Hi all. Have been out this morning making more hangers. All been dipped in vinegar and wiped Nev. I have one section nearly full now so will put a pic up and you can all let me know if you think that I can improve it. Beautiful group planting Karen. I haven't got any of my broms in the ground here. They all reside in the SH so are quite protected except from the extreme heat. Boy, it gets hot in there but no direct sun. Love your 1 and 2 Nev. It makes for good reading and as always so many good hints in there. Tash love "dream baby" beautiful colouring. Must go it's starting to get a bit warm out there now. Colleen

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perke_patch

January 19, 2012
3:11 AM

Post #8973734

Hi everyone. Sorry I haven't been onliine for a couple days Nev. My monitor decided to not work yesterday so I was left with only the laptop. The laptop didn't have a shortcut to the latest DG so I wasn't able to catch up on the postings. Couldn't play games either as the small screen means scrolling up, down and left & right to see it all. not suitable for most games. So watched TV and had an early night with a book. I love my new monitor. It is sooooooo wide. Only just enough room to fit the powerboard up against the side wall of monitor shelf.

Nev I love your article. we have hooks of all different lengths and I like to have things hanging at different levels. I hang about 4 pots around the outside of a hanging basket all at different heights. works well. I love those variegated neos and hope one day I will get some seedlings like that. I also love that variegated billbergia. I thought at first it was a neo in the pic1 but the side view quickly dispels that.

Tash I love that dream baby. It is one of our favourites and we are always telling people it is not for sale and we don't have pups yet. Well we do but not ready to let them go yet LOL.

Colleen your vertical wall is looking good. I love the look of those baskets you used for the ones on the left of screen. very clever.

I booked the add in the papers today for a sale weekend of 28 & 29. We actually started setting up tables today and cleaning plants to put out for sale. There will be some real gems out next week. We are now starting to get a regular stream of people popping in to look and buy. We decided we would sell one of our big imperialis rubra as it was getting too big and dominating a large area. We still have 2 others around the yard even bigger that we will not sell as we wouldn't be able to pick them up to move. The first person (a landscape designer) we offered it to grabbed it and a smaller one for a paved courtyard garden she was building. A quick $100 for us and the chance for her to make a few $$$ or give someone a bargain.

We have already put out a couple of our favourite neos hearts music x fury as in the pic. I'm sure they will sell quickly on Saturday and if anyone comes over the next week they will have a good selecton to choose from with 3 tables already set up.

Wendy

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 19, 2012
2:53 PM

Post #8974615


Hi everyone,


It’s good to see there’s plenty to read today and what a better start than with a pic of a nice Neo. From Tash, Neo Dream Baby. I’m not familiar with this plant and so I looked it up on the BCR and found the following:

?parents, Registered by R Smyth. This is a variegated sport from a non-variegated seedling from a batch vaguely called 'Aussie Dream', 35cm diam –

Aussie Dream was the collective name given to a grex (the collective name of all the seedlings from one cross) of a cross made by Bob Larnach at Wyee and which produced many lovely variegated plants.

Tash - I’m a bit disappointed with your news of the “Bat Plant” but then on the other hand I probably wouldn’t have room for one either.

Karen – That’s a magnificent clump of Bill. Pyramidalis you have there, and as I said, it’s one of the older brom’s which can still be found in a lot of gardens around Australia. Like all common plants that people seem to lose interest in as new ones come along, they still look fantastic when grown en masse. What is interesting though is that the Bill. ‘Allan Ladd’ was bred using this old plant as one of its parents. I also have a few seedlings Allan made of the same cross, and although none of them are variegated they do have attractive burgundy coloured foliage which contrasts beautifully with the typical Bill. pyramidalis flower.

Podster – I’ll get a couple of photos today to demonstrate what I was talking about in the article I wrote and I’ll post them tomorrow.

As for temperatures, I can only speak for myself on the south coast of N.S.W. In my area we do sometimes get down to 0 degrees centigrade on the odd occasion but it’s usual to only get 8-12 degrees centigrade in the colder winter months but the south westerly winds add a further wind chill factor to that as well. I don’t do anything special to my plants during this time, it’s simply a case of if they can’t survive my conditions, I don’t grow them. Fortunately we don’t get and snow but do on very rare occasions get a “black frost”.

Like you I’m fond of variegated plants as well and have been fortunate to have bred a few with my amateur hybridizing which adds to the interest of this pursuit. However I do have a reasonable collection of variegated plants I have purchased and swapped over the past few years and they do help to give contrast to the other colours when they are all coloured up.

Coleen – Well everything’s starting to come together for you and the presentation of your collection. As you can now see have added another interesting dimension to your brom accommodation by making use of previously unused space. Another idea is to hang a bit of “old man’s whiskers” from the mesh in between a few of the plant as this also adds a little more interest and character to the collection... Looking Good!... I’ll bet it looks good with the “fairy lights”.

Wendy – I’m surprised that you can even find time to play games on your computer; not my cup of tea I’m afraid, I’d much rather be laying with my brom’s.

As for hanging my plants, I think I’ve become addicted to this method of growing and like you have plants hanging everywhere, even hanging from pots that are already themselves suspended by hangers.
I like your Heart’s Music x Fury and I’m sure they’ll sell well just like any other plant with a bit of colour. I currently have about 200 freshly potted pups I have to sell and like you I’ll probably have a sale as well, but it won’t be until early next month as I too have to make some space.

I’ll finish with a couple of pic’s of a few of the variegated seedlings I have bred recently. No show stoppers; but then we all have to start somewhere, and who knows what they’ll be like when they mature.

All the best, Nev.

Painted Lady (sport) x ?

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 19, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #8974617

and a few more

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 19, 2012
2:55 PM

Post #8974620

This was the first to show colour

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 19, 2012
2:57 PM

Post #8974624

and there were some radial reds as well

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 19, 2012
3:01 PM

Post #8974632

Still a way from maturity but showing promise

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 19, 2012
3:03 PM

Post #8974636

and finally

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 19, 2012
7:51 PM

Post #8974936

Wow, those babies are really growing well, Nev. I particularly fancy the purple stripey one in the last tray. Would love to see what that grows into on maturity.

Not much doing here. Lazy day, weird weather.

This is an old photo showing some of my orchid and bromeliad flowers. Lost the cymbidium, but all the others are still going.

Karen

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perke_patch

January 20, 2012
3:59 AM

Post #8975068

Hi Nev. I think you meant playing with your broms not laying. I had visions of you camping out overnight with the broms to keep you warm. Then I realised you missed the p. LOL

Unfortunately Nev I got hooked on Millionaire City but it is fast losing attraction. I only have 4 more spots to expand the city though so am struggling on till the end. can't wait. not tempted to join any other game as I don't have time. However I don't mind a game of cards now and then. Also play words with friends around the world but have found if I leave that till last thing at night I have trouble working out a word when I'm tired. sometimes I just chuck in a 3 letter word so I can go to bed. should learn to do this early but then others come straight back with another one so I can't win can I? Crap on TV at the moment unless you like tennis so might as well play cards right???

we've started getting ready for our sale in a week. Have 5 tables set up and full of plants cleaned and priced. taking big coloured ones out of totems and replacing with half grown ones so we have places to put trays of newly potted pups on shelves. we always seem to pass over the same plants without putting them out for sale. good example is the overflowing baskets of minis we've had for a long time and never split up. time to split a few away to pot up and sell. Haven't even taken pics of them in so lon and they should be recorded prior to splitting. will get onto that tomorrow I promise.

Karen I have a gardneri starting to flower at the moment. Also have about 6 or 8 smaller ones at different stages but one I discovered today has had the ends of every leaf chewed. Must have had a grasshopper visiting recently. Hope my butcher birds caught the bugger. They are often seen sitting on the shadecloth looking down into the broms below before diving down and coming back up on top to dispose of whatever they have found. That's why we feed them all and as long as they are catching grasshopper and grubs we will keep feeding them. At the risk of scaring a few customers away Johnny nearly stood on a 4ft snake today. Not sure which one got the biggest fright but there were quite a few broms knocked over when I got there and no sign of the snake. I don't think the snake was capable of knocking large aechmeas over so I think we know who got the biggest fright.

Wendy
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 20, 2012
10:56 AM

Post #8975482

Hi everyone,

Karen – That’s a great collage (is that what it’s called); how did you do that? It certainly saves time instead of posting pic’s one at a time and it would be a good way to spend some time when the weather’s crook and gardening’s out of the question.

As for the variegated seedlings, yes they are growing well. The first pic’s of the Painted Lady (sport) crosses were taken a couple of years ago and most of them have long since coloured up but the little radial red seedlings were about eighteen months old when the pic was taken last year and they’ve really gained a bit of size since then and like all the others are overdue for re-potting. I just wish there was a teenage boy or girl in our area who was interested in brom’s and willing to help me do the potting and accept seedlings in lieu of payment. I’d get my seedlings potted quicker and they’d build up a brom collection quicker.

Three friends came yesterday to buy a couple of plants and I commented to them that it was only a few years back when I started to grow the seedlings that I was complaining about how long they took to grow and now I’m complaining that they grow too fast and I can’t keep up with the potting.

Wendy – Yes I did mean “playing” and not “laying” (I’m not a bloody chook you know) but I do have a very annoying keyboard that has a couple of lazy keys that don’t always deliver what I tell them to, and the “l” is one of them. You may have noticed that I also spelt Colleen with one “l” (sorry Colleen) and I really do know how to spell her name; I really must get another keyboard!

I’ve also noticed that your keyboard has a lazy “g” as well; a computer bloke once told me that they knock out these keyboards so quickly in China for a few cents each that it’s pretty common for them to have one or two lazy keys, so I guess we get what we pay for. I got mine for nix so I can’t complain.

How about you start off posting a few pic’s of your mini’s and some of our other members might follow, as it’s a while since any mini’s were posted here. I’m starting to get more interested in them as my space becomes more limited and I’m sure a lot of others are in the same situation, especially those living in flats or units without a back yard.

Gotta love the cheeky little Butcher Birds with their sweet melodious song, you’d never think what cruel little buggers they really are though and how they will string a smaller bird up between a fork in a shrub and rip them down the middle (hence the name), but then that’s the law of nature isn’t it? I feed them also and in doing so hope that I may be saving the life of the smaller bird they were going to have for dinner... By the way, did Johnny say what type of snake it was?

Kristi – In answer to your request for a pic of the hanging plants I’ll post more than one to show the different ways I have utilised re-cycled material to provide suspension points. The first pic shows where it all started with just a few screws or nails spaced along a piece of roof timber to provide the initial suspension point. It was then expanded by hanging pots from the suspended pot above and thereby increasing the growing space available.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:02 AM

Post #8975485

The next place to be modified was one of the shade cloth covered areas. Here I used off-cuts of wire mesh and bent them at right angles. These were attached by brackets and screws to each side of the roof timbers thus allowing for two rows (about ten inches apart) of suspended plants.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:15 AM

Post #8975499

... and then I hit the "Jackpot". A volunteer group where I work one day a week, was donated a trailer load of steel "bits and pieces" from a metal working business. The idea being, they could sell it for scrap and use the money for something else. In this load I spied some bits of metal bar which were 4mm thick x 20mm wide x 20cm long and with a hole in each end. These had been left over from an order and no longer wanted, and I was able to get the lot for a $20 donation.

I was then able to make substantial anchor points by screwing these to the underside of the roof timbers and suspend a plant from each end. In between I was able to put screws in the timber midway between each bar so I could hang more plants at a different level as well.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:20 AM

Post #8975507

This pic shows the finished "living collage" which in effect has more than doubled the amount of available space for my plants as well as being quite pleasing on the eyes.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:24 AM

Post #8975514

Finally, by hanging plants from the pots immediately above them, I have increased the amount of useable space, even more.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:32 AM

Post #8975521

Back again, made another Boo Boo

This sentence should read as "Wendy – Yes I did mean “playing” and not “laying” (I’m not a bloody chook you know) but I do have a very annoying keyboard that has a couple of lazy keys that don’t always deliver what I tell them to, and the “l” is one of them as well as the "p". You may have noticed that I also spelt Colleen with one “l” (sorry Colleen) and I really do know how to spell her name; I really must get another keyboard!

All the best from a "mixed up" Nev.

ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 20, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #8975556

Hi all. Nev, they look great. Makes mine look a bit inadequet ? you know what I mean. Holy cow, Wendy, I'm always scared that I might run into a snake in my yard. I think I would faint but the funny thing about creepy crawlies is just after I got into bed last night, Ben, the dog was in the SH barking. It was his " I've found something that scares me " bark. So big brave me went out with the torch. Here he was going a bit forward then back and still barking. He was almost talking. I said what have you got there? I thought it might be a bird or a mouse. Well it was a yabby. The boys and I cleaned the pond out a bit yesterday and filled it right up to the top. He either got out when we pulled some of the Alocasias out or was able to get over the top because it was so full. The boys put about half a dozen yabbies in there last year and we found some of them walking across the yard the next morning and have never seen any of them since. Cameren kept saying to me that there might still be some in there and I replied no I think they've all gone. Well they haven't, so I expect they're all still there somewhere. I must go and move some of my big broms back into the SH to make room in my paved area so that my visitors will be able to have a seat. I have a couple of ladies coming to have a look at my garden this morning. Colleen

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 20, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #8975895

Nev ~ thank you for the visual display. I am impressed and agree, it is pleasing to the eye. I like the invite of the chair in your fourth photo. I suspect you enjoy many an hour right there. Years ago I had done a similar suspension using chains to attain the different levels. I like your ideas and may eventually borrow a few.

Everyones' photos make me want to step into them and look closely at the gorgeous colors of your plants. That is until I hear the talk of snakes. LOL
I got up at dark thirty this morning and while in the bathroom, thought of the snake photo in the commode that was posted above. That is the stuff that nightmares are made of.

I'm glad most snakes tend to head another direction for you.

Showing my ignorance, what is a yabby?

DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 20, 2012
10:43 PM

Post #8976110

Hi all. Nev, what marvellous photos. The colours are gorgeous. You need a photo program to do a collage of pics, the one I use is a very basic Microsoft Picture It. There are much better programs around than that though. I don't think they even make Microsoft Picture It anymore though I could be wrong. I need a simple program that does cut outs etc but they all seem so complicated to my old brain.

Tomorrow we are going down to Jacob's Well to visit the Catlans and see their Amorphophallus Titanum plant. I wanted to see it once before it flowers and if possible again on the day it flowers. Unfortunately, this depends on Barry being available on the day. Apparentlly today it is 1.84 meters tall and still growing. Carol Evans has posted a photo on FaceBook of it as it looks now. I'll get some pics tomorrow. Wendy, have you been down to see it yet?

Looking beautiful today, I have the name of this written down somewhere but I'm sure everyone already knows it.

Karen


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Violet_Moon
Lockyer Valley
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:06 PM

Post #8976118

Hi All

I have only just joined the forums, but have mainly been reading bits and pieces of these brom threads, as the main plants I’m interested in are Tillandsias. I have a small but steadily growing collection, including a T. fasiculata that I have tried to cross-pollinate (but forgot to record which flowers I tampered with so THAT should be interesting when I finally find out what they grow up into!!). I have a 3m x 4.5m shade house which houses my Tills, a dozen or so orchids, and some herbs. I was lucky enough to pick up a cheap second hand shade house just before xmas, but now we need to reassemble it, and it’s 7.4m x 3.7m with three rows of shelving around inside, so it’s a reasonable sized job to put it back together, considering it took us two days to pull it apart and get it home!

Anyhow, I ave a couple of Q’s I am hoping someone can help me with.
I thought I read somewhere on the net that some Tills need to have the pups removed from the ancestor plant, lest they die. I know that a lot of Tills like to clump, so I’m guessing for the majority it’s not a problem, but if there ARE a few who will die if not removed, I’d like to know if anyone knows which species they are, so I can see if I have them in my collection.

My second query is about ants. I have ants moving into to my T. bulbosa, and T. streptophylla. I know they bring mealybugs, which I have also seen and I think I now have under control, and while I put antsand around my greenhouse, how can I treat the ants without killing off my Tillandsias. Are the ants living in the streptophylla going to kill it?
Many thanks for your help in advance.

Kristy
Lockyer Valley, QLD
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 20, 2012
11:11 PM

Post #8976119

Hi Kristy, and welcome. I can't answer your questions, maybe Wendy might have some advice when she comes in. I love tillandsias too and have a modest collection. My problem has been baby snails curling up in their midst.

Will look forward to seeing pics of your plants (tillandsias are in the bromeliad family) in the future when you have your shade house set up.

Karen
perke_patch

January 21, 2012
3:10 AM

Post #8976142

Hi all. Nev I fully understand the keyboard problem. my keyboard just left the d off the end of the word, but lucky I was watching the screen and caught it. I gave up using the cordless keyboard because when the batteries decided to die the keys just wouldn't work, first a few then the whole thing. no warning. If I got caught without fresh batteries I was stuck, unable to shut down or anything. give me a cable version anytime now.
Kristy, my belief is that the ants provide nutrients for the tillandsai and don't harm them at all. whatever the ants bring in provides food for host. Karen we don't have any plans to go to Jacobs Well this week. I think the smell would make Johnny ill so we will settle for seeing the pics. I'd love to go down there but ...
I crossed pollen onto my rodrigueziana when it was flowering and dutifully hung tags from pollinated bits. Towards the end the ants were everywhere up and down the flower spike so I just left them to it. Today I checked and no viable seed pods showing in parts I crossed but towards top where ants did the deed there are a couple of very big seed pods developing.

Nev I had to pot up some of your seedlings today. they were just getting too big for the pots and trays they were in and were crowding out smaller plants around them. They are now in bigger pots are happily housed in a totem. I also had to pot up some x blanchetiana plants today. They look like they are going to be big plants so are now in tubs that they can grow into. There are some more of your x blanchetiana seedlings from another batch still in seedling area too Nev. I should have taken some pics before they were spread out. Sorry. I also potted up some of our seedlings too. I think the seed was from you too Nev. I'll take pics tomorrow I promise.

Wendy

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 21, 2012
12:58 PM

Post #8976702

Hi everyone,

Colleen – What do you mean inadequate? No one or no collection is inadequate, it’s just that they are all different, that’s why we share information on forums such as this in the hope that we can get some ideas from others.

When I first tried growing plants with a vertical theme, I attached them to branches of Ti Tree (Paper Bark) or to give it the correct name, Meuleleuca. They grew really well and made a nice natural looking feature in the middle of my shade house, however unfortunately after a few years the base timber inside the paper bark rotted away and the whole thing just collapsed, and that’s when I started mounting them in other ways.

I guess what I trying to say is, that we live and learn from experience and from the experiences of others. When this happened to me I didn’t feel “inadequate” I just had to find another better way to do it and just like your mesh wall, you will also find many different ways to hang your plants, some will work and some won’t. But while you’re doing it the plants are growing all the time and before you know it you won’t see the mesh for plants which have outgrown their pots.

What’s with the Yabbies? Did you intend breeding them for eating?

Podster - A “Yabbie” for want of a simpler description is a type of freshwater lobster, just Google “Yabbie” and you‘ll find out all about them - you know that we in Aussie land always have to give things a local nickname which sometimes confuses people from other countries, but then if you always ask, all will be revealed.

Karen – Its sound like you and I are about the same when it comes to computers with you a bit in front. Tash was trying to teach me about making a collage with a programme called “Picnic” but I got a notification today to say its closing down in April, so that’s buggered that idea. Oh well back to the drawing board!

Good luck with the Amorphophallus Titanum, I’ve seen and smelt it once in Bali and have no desire to ever smell it again, but it certainly is something very different.

Your pic is of Aechmea fasciata and they should all be starting to flower about now as mine are also. It’s probably one of the most common and most beautiful brom’s around and one that’s in almost every collection. It was (I think), the second bromeliad to ever be imported into Europe in the 1800’s and it’s been grown ever since and mass produced in the millions in giant heated glasshouse in Holland for the European market. They do come in other forms as well. I have the ‘rubra’ form( which I posted a pic of recently), as well as a dark form called ‘purpurea’ and a couple f different variegated forms, but none of them grow as easily as the original form.

Kristy – A big welcome to our friendly little forum, it’s small and more like a family than a forum but everyone seems to get along fine and we all try to help each other so feel free to ask as many questions as you like as they always open a discussion and then everyone learns something.

I’m not a Tilly grower myself but I read somewhere that when certain Tillies form into large very compact clumps, they start to die in the centre due to an accumulation of moisture and a lack of circulating air to dry them out sufficiently, as they do need an abundance of air hence the name (air plants). You could possibly get an answer from someone on another forum I regularly visit as there are a couple of recognised Tilly experts there. You will find it at: http://www.bromeliadforum.za.net/forum/index.php

As for your question about the ants, the short answer is that no, the ants living in your plant won’t kill it. I have read that they live in conjunction with some plants and actually live inside the fat bodies some of the bulbous Till’s. It is supposed to be a “scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” relationship, where the plant provides accommodation and the ants eat other invading insects, but again you could ask this question on the forum mentioned above for a more in depth answer. As for poisoning ants, by doing so you will also be poisoning other insets that do good, for example small spiders who live in many brom’s and kill other nuisance insects.

I personally never use insecticides as I don’t want to harm the other wildlife such as skinks and frogs that live among my plants, but that’s just my personal choice, other growers have other ideas.

Wendy – Unfortunately I’m not much of a typist and can’t look at the screen while I’m typing and that’s how these things slip past me.

What you say about the ants being responsible for pollinating you plant really opens a can of worms with me as I’ve said for some time now that I think a lot of these so called “hybridizing experts” that claim to have made and registered these “you beaut” hybrids but never give the name of the pollen parent, didn’t pollinate them at all. If they were honest they would say the reason they don’t give the name is that they don’t know it because it was done by insects!

I’m very much looking forward to seeing the pic’s of your seedlings as this is the part of brom growing that interests me the most as there’s always something new to see.

That’s about it for now and I’ll finish with a pic that was posted on the forum mentioned above, so when DG puts the copyright on the pic as mine, please be aware it isn’t! It was taken by another chap named Bruce and first posted yesterday in the Tillandsia section but it’s such a wonderful plant I just have to share it with you all and just hope a policeman doesn’t come knocking on my door with a fine for breaching copyright.

All the best, Nev.

Till. funkiana

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 21, 2012
4:43 PM

Post #8976965

What a beautiful pic Nev. I'm sure that you won't get into trouble for sharing. We all do it at some time. My fasciata hasn't flowered as yet. It's looking especially nice but no sign of a bloom. I got the pond area sorted out yesterday and the broms that were in my paved area are now back home. Still lots to do though. The boys were rapt when I told them about the yabby. They spent a lot of the day with a string and a piece of meat trying to catch it. No Nev, I didn't intend to breed them. The boys just wanted to keep them for pets. Hi Kristy you will certainly learn a lot of good tips hanging around here. Nev is a book of knowledge and he shares his information with anyone who is keen to listen, or read as the case may be. Must go lots to do but I'll be back soon. Colleen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 22, 2012
2:12 AM

Post #8977266

Nev, Tillandsia Funckiana is about my most favourite till. I have a couple of plants but they have a lot of growing to do to catch up with that one. I had one flower last year, but this year they have not flowered :(. I moved them from their favourite spot. Will have to put them back.

I went a bit crazy today at the Catlans and got some billbergia seedlings. They all bear the name of the parent plant, and have not got names of their own. I need to get better pics but here is one to start with. The parent is bill. Moon Tiger, and I got a couple of these, each totally different. This one I really like, but remember, it is just a baby, and will probably get more pink through it as it gets older.

Karen

PS - if anyone is interested, we got some great pics of the Amorphophallus titanum (Corpse Plant) today. The bud is amazing in itself, now standing at over 1.84 meters, and not smelly yet, so still quite approachable. It is just days away from opening and we will go back and complete this slide show when it does open. Here is the link...

http://s31.photobucket.com/albums/c352/loonilori/Amorphophallus titanum - Corpse Plant/?albumview=slideshow


This message was edited Jan 22, 2012 3:15 AM

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 22, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #8977784

Hi everyone,

Colleen – Thanks for the kind words, but everyone on here has their say, and I’m sure we all learn from each other’s experiences, after all that’s what it’s all about isn’t it?

Is that pic you posted (a before pic) of the area where you installed the mesh along the back wall or is that another area? If so, I can see lots of space there and certainly more room for lots of brom’s.

It’s great to hear the boys are still doing things that I did as kid, such as learning about the “great outdoors” and about nature’s creatures as well. When we went Yabby fishing as kids we would just put a bit of rotten liver inside an old stocking tied to a fishing line. Prior to this we would put a bit of liver in the stocking and hang it in a tree somewhere so the flies could blow it. Once it became “alive” it was ready to use for bait. The yabbies were attracted by the smell of the rotten liver and used to get their claws tangled in the stocking while trying to get to the liver. We would just slowly pull in the stocking and remove them from it, no need to even use a net.

Hi Karen – Naughty! Naughty! You broke the “old gardeners “most important rule of gardening and moved a plant that had previously been growing well in its former position to a new position that it obviously didn’t like. I guess we all do that from time to time, but then if we didn’t try new things, how would we learn; and who’s to say it wouldn’t have grown twice as well in the new position anyway?

I like your Billbergia, a nice pale one for a change. I haven’t heard of Moon Tiger which just means that it another of the many unregistered hybrids. Do you know what the other parent was or is it a cross that was made “Nature’s Way” and done by ants or other insects? I have a few different Bill’s I’ve gathered over the years and I really like them but I’m afraid they’re not everyone’s ”cup of tea”, for example, my daughter hates them with a vengeance and says they are “gross”!

A little word of warning though just in case you don’t already know; I have found they are prone to getting flyspeck scale down in the centre, especially when grown in the warmer climates and because a lot of Bill’s are spotted, it’s sometimes very hard to see. I find a good preventative measure is necessary to combat this and I use a spray called Clensel; it is made of natural ingredients which don’t seem to harm lizards, frogs etc. and I spray my Bill’s every month, especially down in the centre which is hard to get at. I often found this flyspeck scale on plants which I got from growers in the tropics as it apparently is quite a problem in the tropical climates. But a good clean, and then a regular preventative spraying keeps them clean and free of this pest.

I really liked all your pic’s of the “Corpse Plant” to give it its common name, but after once experiencing the smell, just looking at pic’s is as close as I ever want to get to it. Who are the lady and gent in the pic’s? Is that you and hubby? ... Just curious as I like to put faces to names.

Just to finish with a little bit of handy info if you all don’t already know, I mentioned “Seasol” in an Email to a friend this morning and it dawned on me that not everyone may know about it or have used it. I personally can’t speak highly enough about it; I think it’s a wonderful product and I’ve had excellent result from using it, especially with plants that are stressed. It isn’t a fertilizer but more of a “tonic” and I’ve used it after freezing winters and heat waves where plants received severe tissue damage due to hot and cold burns, and the recovery was just amazing. I really recommend you read all about it at http://www.seasol.com.au/ and I’m sure after looking at its benefits you’ll want to try some. (And before anyone says anything, NO I don’t work for Seasol! I just believe in promoting a good product)

All the best, Nev.

I'll finish with pic's of a couple of nice Guzmanias I have growing in the garden

First Guz. Sunny Time

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 22, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #8977787

... and secondly Guz Hilda, these are my two favourites.

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 22, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #8977877

Hi everyone, just a quick note this morning, it's back to school day today, so about to head out and take daughter for her first day back... and last yr of primary school. She is very excited, one to be seeing her friends and two.. about being a senior this year.
Things will start to get back to normal, lol. Normal... what is normal in this household?
Nev I didn't know about Picnic closing down, so had to go take a look. It looks like it's all moving to Google+ which I have not heard of, but I will investigate, the good news being it will still be free then. Also in the meantime, all the premium services of Picnic that usually you have to be a paid member to use, are free until it closes! So that mean quite a few extra better features until April. I will have to work it out and let you know.
Yesterday was a big day, I got both hubby and daughter to help me. I printed out only the name column of my spreadsheet and I sat on a milk cart while they went from area to area of all our broms calling out the names on each brom. I ticked off the ones on the list and had to add 68 I think it was in the end that I didn't have recorded. so I now have a much more comprehensive list.
Now to keep on top of it and record each new one as we get them.
Ok I must scoot, or daughter will be late, love all the pics and info everyone has shared, sorry i didn't get to address everyone individually, must scoot off
Tash
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 22, 2012
2:57 PM

Post #8977983

Hi again. Nev, yes, that's Barry in one pic, and me in another. Just showing an idea of the height of the plant. Amazing, isn't it! They say when the flower opens, the stench can travel up to 2km away. Ugh! I don't know that a surgical mask will be enough protection, but I will only get one chance in my life to see the flower, and I'm gonna brave it and just hope I stay conscious.

Nice Guz's there.

Hi to all others popping in. I have a day to go begin and I'm starting late.

Karen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 22, 2012
4:04 PM

Post #8978068

PS - Nev, Moon Tiger is the parent plant, that's all I know. These are 3 seedlings from the same batch, all from Moon Tiger. Triplets, but hardly identical. You'd never know.

Karen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 23, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #8979221

Hi everyone,

Tash – Firstly regarding “Picnic” closing down, I was sent an Email about it which I’ve just forwarded on to you. I thought everyone would have been sent one but apparently you slipped under the radar.

That was a great idea to recruit hubby and daughter to help you with a “stock take”, I’ll have to do something like that because I’ve got bloody plants all over the place, and I’m in the middle of trying to sort them all out but just seem to be getting into more of a mess. As for recording all the new ones I get, well I started doing this a while back and then for some reason, forgot to follow through. What I need is a good secretary to keep track of these things.

Karen – I’ll bet you and Barry can’t get another pic standing next to that flower once it opens and the “perfume”???? becomes apparent. In fact you won’t need to go there to smell it, if the wind’s blowing from that direction you’ll probably smell it from where you live.

While walking through my vriesea and Guzmania shade house yesterday I found a plant of the variegated form of Guzmania lingulata var. ‘minor’ (which is the mini version of the standard form)had started to dispense seed so if anyone wants a bit to try, please let me know and send me your postal details. I think it must have been crossed with itself by ants as there were no other Guzzies out at the same time and because it is a species the babies should all be similar and miniature in size, but the variegation can’t be guaranteed nor can the colour as there are various colours within this species range (even yellow) see the FCBS Photo Index. For anyone who doesn’t know it, it’s a beautiful little fast growing, variegated plant growing to about six inches high and it has brilliant little scarlet flowers and well worth growing.

Regarding your Bill seedlings from the parent Moon Tiger (unreg.) I see on Face Book where there have been quite a few people who have bought these plants and are commenting about the differences between them. For those of you who don’t know, seedlings from hybrid parents can throw any size, shape, or coloured plant which rarely looks much like the parents.

Once the first hybrid is made in a plant family, the gene pool becomes all mixed up and then it’s possible to get millions of variations; as one lady described, “Just like kids”. You can also get plants that look similar to plants which were in a previous generation, and to explain it simply, the seedlings may resemble either of the parents (mum or dad), or any of the past relatives, (grandparents, aunties, uncles, cousins etc) and of course they may look nothing like any of these and be completely different altogether.

So if you’re buying seedlings expecting them to be the same as the parent, you’ll be disappointed as the seedlings will all be different. The only way to get a replica of a particular plant is by buying tissue cultured plants where they have been “massed produced” in a lab from the original plant, or the more common method of taking an offset (pup) from the plant you want. Growing them from seed just won’t do it.

I think what confuses the issue even more is that when only one parent is known, that’s the only name shown on the name tag; and to be correct, should be written as e.g. Neo “Such and Such” x? Or Neo “Such and Such” x (Unknown). ...Eventually the”?” or the “unknown” gets dropped from the tag, and from that point on the seedling becomes known as Neo. ‘Such and Such’. The other problem lies with unregistered names, where people just give plants a “pet name” for their own benefit; but once this plant is swapped and/or sold, it becomes a big problem if the name is the same as a registered name of a completely different plant. The names on labels are very unreliable and can be incorrect for a number of reasons and if you’re buying an immature plant, ask to be shown the mature mother plant or a pic of the mature plant so you know exactly what you’re buying.

As for seedlings, well remember they’re just like kids and will all be different. Like I tell people, buying seedlings is like buying a lottery ticket. ... You may get a champion or you may get a “lemon”, you pay your money and you take your chances. The thrill is in the anticipation of just what you might get. Finally, don’t judge a seedling when it first reaches maturity as the next generation of pups are often much better looking plant than the original seedling.

Just to demonstrate what I'm saying, the pic below is of a group of seedlings all from the same cross and as you can see, everyone is a little bit different with one even showing some spotting although neither of the parents were spotted.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 23, 2012
12:23 PM

Post #8979265

This is a pic of Neo 'Thunderbird' (the parent of the seedlings above). Unfortunately it's on the decline and the colour and shape are past their best and the pic doesn't do it justice.

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 23, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #8979282

Good morning Nev and all. You're always a trough of information. I'm always open for seeds if you have any to spare please. John is having a great time with them . They are slowly growing here but will have plenty of work down the track. I have a bottle of Seasol now and will give all the broms a dose when I finally get any order into the SH. My sister is coming today and wants to go fishing. I said to her we'd better get going early in the morning as the weather is just so hot. We have had a couple of thunder storm go around us the past couple of days. A lot of noise but not one spot of rain. The new rainwater tanks will be here next Monday so it can hold off til they're in if it wants. Oh,oh one of the boys has his alarm clock set. The peace has gone. be back later. Here's something different. Colleen

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #8979706

Hi all.
Nev I remember yabbying as a kid when I stayed with my grandma and pop for holidays. The cousins would take us yabbying. we would bait the pots and then go swimming off the bridge. Getting in was easy cause we'd jump in from the bridge. We stayed in the water as long as possible because we knew as soon as our feet touched the mud to climb out the yabbies were going to get us on the toes. Those were the days.

Jen and I love going to Catlans to pick out billbergia seedlings. We deliberately pick all different ones from the same grex as you just don't know what they are going to grow into. We have some stunning ones (when we don't fertilize them and strip their colour). They provide a layer of colour in between the neos and often can take a good amount of sun. And you can buy 3 or 4 different seedlings for the same price of a new release from a hybridiser and often the seedlings end up just as nice as the release.

Nev those guz you posted are some of our favourites too. Johnny has discovered the giant versions and he loves collecting them. He would be happy if we got rid of all the others and only kept giants. But you can squash them in to an area and just pull them out when the flowers begin and then they can spread their wings until someone comes to buy them or we can just enjoy the colour for a few months.

Well who is sick of the rain in Qld? We've had almost constant rain since yesterday or even night before. Tanks are overflowing even though Johnny gurneyed the paths up the back. They get slippery with a build up of algae so have to be kept cleaned. We have our tables full and they are all out on the back lawn with the broms enjoying a good shower. Pic is 8 of the 11 tables ready to be carried out on Friday to set up for sale this weekend. All those you see are $8 with a few smaller lingulatas for $5. If we can get rid of all those we have lots of space out the back for new pups and seedlings.

Wendy

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:36 PM

Post #8979715

Nev here are some pics of our seedlings as you requested. These are 2 aechmea leptantha x blanchetianas getting a good size and now potted into bigger tubs so they can take off. Both parents are big plants so we expect some good size from these too.

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:40 PM

Post #8979722

and these are those seeds collected from blanchetiana that were interwoven in the ixora bush with ants pollinating one side of the spray. The tray on the left is the ixora ones and the tray on right is the straight blanchetiana from other side of spray and nowhere near the ixora flowers. There is a definate shade difference between the 2 trays but it is the straight blanch... that has the more yellow colour where the ixora ones are much more green. Will keep taking pics as they grow.

Wendy

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:42 PM

Post #8979723

and these are calichroma x blanchetiana seedlings from Nev. they are also getting some size into them so will need more space soon.

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:45 PM

Post #8979730

and these are seeds collected from Nev's recurvata peach parfait and sown on 12 December last year. This is about 5 weeks of growing to get to this size. I'm impressed with the rapid growth of this lot.

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #8979732

and this is a seedling I got from Kay Plitz labelled K31. I like the colour of this mature plant. I think it is well worth getting seedlings from other people because some can turn out to be very nice like this.

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:53 PM

Post #8979740

and as Nev said the anticipation is the thing I like. It's like waiting for xmas morning to see what you got.

And now just for Karen here is some of my tillandsia funkiana flowering. this one is a clone I got from Cooran on sunshine coast. It is more long and thin with flower protuding from thin end of plant. This one is mounted on a coconut fibre filled sausage.

This message was edited Jan 24, 2012 10:53 AM

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:56 PM

Post #8979744

and this is a much nicer but slower version from Collectors corner which is mounted on a net filled ball.

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perke_patch

January 23, 2012
4:58 PM

Post #8979749

and a closer view of the funkiana from collectors corner showing the shape of the plant and flower.

Better go and do some housework. too wet to go outside so might be a computer day today. Will probably be back later to see what else as been posted.

have a nice day everyone.
Wendy

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 23, 2012
5:13 PM

Post #8979774

Oh Wendy I wish I could be at your sale. Your plants are beautiful. Colleen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 23, 2012
11:22 PM

Post #8980077

Hi everyone from a very saturated Qld. Despite the rain, I've managed to do some potting today, though still have more to do. Some plants need to be divided, such as an alcantarea, still only a pup itself, with a second pup now too big to allow either to grow well.

Wendy, I love those funckiana. They've always drawn me, and are one of my most favourite tills. I put mine back under "their" tree and hope they'll do well again. One is dividing, setting pups. Hope your sales go well for you, and that the weather clears up before then. Wish I could afford to make a bigger dent in Genny's bills but maybe a few more will do me.

Nev, I don't even know if I'll be capable of getting near enough to photograph the plant. Can only hope the wind is strong enough to blow the smell in one direction so we can approach from the other. I phoned this morning to see how the flower was progressing but they were having torrential rain and only knew that it wasn't opening today.

Colleen, that rooster is a champion, and the hen is adorable.

Karen


Here is another of the seedlings I got. This one is from Champagne Charlie, a mottled white and green with a very rich attractive purple throat.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 24, 2012
12:02 PM

Post #8980688

Good morning everyone,

Colleen – There’s nothing like chooks, they bring back so many boyhood memories for me with the rooster standing there proud like the “king of the castle” watching over his harem.. I don’t know what you get up to with chooks in SA, but when I was a boy an old farm labourer once said to us, “do you know how to put them to sleep?” Obviously thinking it was some sort of joke we said no. He picked up a "white leghorn" (he said they were the easiest to do it with) he gently tucked its head beneath its wing like they do when they sleep, and while holding it firmly under his arm, he then slowly just rocked it back and forth for a short while until it settled. He then sat it on his thigh until eventually it was just sitting on his thigh on its own without him holding it... and was asleep!.

As if that wasn’t enough, he then asked us if we knew how to hypnotise a chook. Again we said no and with that he took the same chook and held it firmly (belly down) on the dirt with its head outstretched, and held in a forward position with the underside touching the dirt. He got one of us kids to get a stick and told him to start just in front of the chooks beak, and using the stick, very slowly draw a straigt line in the dirt away from the chook for about two feet. After a short time he let the chook go and it just lay there staring at the line in the dirt; and if you think I’m having a “lend of you”, just try it. I don’t know if it works on all chooks but we only ever did it with older and quieter white leghorns and it usually worked for us. In fact we got into a lot of trouble from doing it once, but that’s another story.

Anyway, did you go fishing; and most importantly, did you catch any? Wendy’s always teasing me with pic’s of the beautiful fish that Johnny catches up north, and it really makes my mouth water as I love fish. I don’t go fishing any more as the river’s now too polluted due to development and is very different to what it was when I was a boy and as rock fishing is very dangerous especially for someone of my age I leave that alone as well and any fish I now get comes from the fish market, but it’s never as nice as freshly caught fish.

Wendy – What you say about the Bill seedlings is exactly what I was saying yesterday, you never know what you will get, especially with Bill seedlings; because a lot of growers fertilise them quite heavily to “push them along” and the nitrogen drains them of colour initially. It’s only when the nitrogen has worn off, that the colour starts to become apparent, and you can bet your bottom dollar the colour will be much improved once they are mature, especially if you only give them very minimal feeding with a low nitrogen/hi potassium fertilizer or no feeding at all.

As you say buying seedlings is the most economical way to get value for your money as it's cheaper than buying known and registered plants. Another thing to consider also is the fact that each one is “unique” and you will be the only person with that particular plant. If you get a “good’un” you can virtually name your own price and you also have the right to register it with a name of your choosing as long as you do the right thing and show the name of the hybridizer (if known.)

There are a lot of very nice Bill. seedlings becoming available now as more and more people are starting to hybridize them, and I think we will see many more nice ones in the future as what we are seeing now is just the “thin edge of the wedge” so to speak. I bought a dozen about two years ago now and they were very young with no colour, but they had promising parentage and I was prepared to wait and now some of them are maturing with beautiful colours. There is one very colourful one which is quite small and who knows it may be the start of new generation of “mini Billbergias”. The thing to remember is what I’ve said many times before, “good light equals good colour” and as you say they will stand good light.

That’s a great array of colourful plants you have ready for your sale Wendy and as they say, “colour sells” and if you want to sell something you must display it to advantage and you’ve done all that. All you want now is for a break in the weather before the dollars come pouring in.

I don’t think there’s anything more satisfying then looking at healthy little seedling you’ve grown yourself, and yours are no exception! You certainly have something worth looking forward to there in that little lot. As you say the leptantha x blanchetiana will be big plants (up to four feet high) and I expect they will be able to stand up to the Qld. sun very well once they have been acclimatised and hardened up, and from what I’ve seen of similar crosses they are very tough and should have yellow flowers supported by a variable leaf colour.

Karen – I like the look of your Bill. ‘Champagne Charlie’ seedling. I went to look up the parentage but find it’s another that hasn’t been registered. I’m not judging the hybridizers for not registering their plants, but it does make it more difficult for future hybridizers when they are unable to check the parentage or the breeding formula of a possible plant they wish to use in a breeding programme. Judging by the deep purple down in the throat of your plant, I would say it would very much benefit from being grown in strong light to bring out its colour and I hope you will post a picture when it's fully grown and coloured.

All the best, Nev.

Here's an old Billbergia but an often forgotten one, but still a beautiful plant in my opinion, Bill. 'Muriel Waterman'

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 24, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #8980690

... and a closeup of its "short lived" but beautiful flowers

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 24, 2012
12:08 PM

Post #8980696

and to give an example of the effect light has on the foliage colour, firstly Bill. 'Kip' grown in low light

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 24, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #8980700

... and the same plant the following year after growing in strong light

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 24, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #8980704

Here's a picture of Bill. 'Hallelujah' grown in low light, which some people find attractive.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 24, 2012
12:14 PM

Post #8980707

...and finally, Bill. 'Hallelujah' grown in bright light.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 24, 2012
6:39 PM

Post #8981238

Hi everyone. Nev, sadly, I think the nursery has become too large for two elderly people to manage well, and they admit things are out of control now. As I said though, by selling them off cheap the seedlings have a chance to become what they are meant to become and good luck if one gets a real beauty.

Something a bit different this morning. Through torrential rain, flooding roads closing behind us even as we drove, we two adventurous old age pensioners drove through to get this pic.The pics were taken in pouring rain, so not great. It was so dark too. But this is the first pic taken of the open flower of the Corpse Plant at Jacobs Well. We quickly got the pics and ran to beat the second road closing on the way out. Drove through some hairy patches but made it through and got home safely. Was it worth it? Well, there are some great pics of massive rain drops, but a couple of pics made it worth while, even if they aren't the best. This is the link to the slide show. 8 new pics added to the 10 of the bud, so not too long.

http://s31.photobucket.com/albums/c352/loonilori/Amorphophallus titanum - Corpse Plant/?albumview=slideshow

The smell must have been dampened by the rain as we had no problem getting up close and personal, but I did notice it clung to our clothes as we were driving home. Shame about the rain, as there is a possibility that both roads to Jacobs Well will be closed today, especially with the high tides now. I hope others get a chance to see it. I believe we are the first. It depends too how long the flower stays open. Could be open for 2 or 3 days if conditions are right. Or not.

Hope you will enjoy the pics. For many of us, this is a once in a lifetime opportunity to see this flower as it is quite rare. From base to tip, it now stands at 2.1 meters tall.

Karen

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perke_patch

January 25, 2012
2:33 AM

Post #8981424

hi all. thought I wouldpost a pic of a mature billbergia seedling from Catlan's. this one is a cultivar of helen of troy. this is on the front stairs where it gets some afternoon sun and the colour is really good.

Wendy

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perke_patch

January 25, 2012
2:36 AM

Post #8981425

and this one is cultivar of champagne charlie from Catlans. again it is on the stairs and getting some afternoon sun showing lovely colour.

Wendy

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perke_patch

January 25, 2012
2:50 AM

Post #8981430

and this one is amoena viridis x glymiana from Val Honeywood

Wendy

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 25, 2012
3:00 AM

Post #8981433

Lovely bills. Hallelujah has to be the most beautiful bill of all. Wendy, its amazing how different the plants are from the same parents. Nev, I have been on the lookout for a Muriel Waterman for some time. I could have got one from the Olive Branch recently but I'd run out of money. Next time!

Karen

This seedling from Peggy Sue.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 25, 2012
12:47 PM

Post #8981989

Hi everyone,

Karen – I hope you managed to get home through the flooded roads OK and didn’t get too wet. Boy! What some people will go through to get that elusive pic of an unusual plant; I guess you were lucky the smell wasn’t at its strongest or you would have needed a “tele-photo lens”. But at least you’ve got some good pic’s of a very rare plant in flower, which is something a lot of people will never have the chance to get, and I’m sure they’ll be appreciated by all who see them.

I think what you say about the Catlan’s nursery could also be said about my collection, as I'm finding it increasingly harder and harder to keep up with the amount of work required. With mobility restrictions it’s very difficult, and I think in the not too distant future I will have to make some very hard decisions about just what to keep and what to let go. I do know though, I won’t let my plants go to rack and ruin through lack of care like I've seen with so many other collections owned by the elderly, but the best way to solve this problem is yet to be worked out. Any ideas are welcome.

Wendy – The pic’s of your newly acquired Bill. seedlings, demonstrate just what it’s possible to get when buying new seedling hybrids, and I especially like the Amoena viridis x glymiana (which sometimes also goes under the synonym or “morelii”) I think the colour you are seeing now is just the start, and it will get much better given the right light conditions which can also be enhanced with a little supplemented “potash”.

They say “a change is as good as a holiday” and it often rejuvenates us and gives us the boost go the extra yard. Well I think the same can be said for brom’s as well. No, (before you ask) I’m not sending my brom’s away on a holiday, I was referring more to a change of environment and growing conditions.

We all know that if a plant isn’t doing well in a particular spot, we can sometimes move it to another place and it will perform better. Well I have two Vrieseas; Vr. Flaming Sword and Vr. Elfie which I was given when I first started growing brom’s and although they’ve grown well and produced lots of pups (which were removed and given away), they have never flowered.

Last year I decided they had taken up bench space long enough without any result so it was time to get rid of them. However, me being the way I am, I find it very difficult to just “dump” any plant, even if they’re a bit sick and especially not ones that are in the peak of condition and doing everything right except flowering, so I decided to take them out of their pots and plant them in the garden in a totally different environment.

I don’t know whether it was the change of environment or the fact that they overheard me threaten to “dump” them if they didn’t perform, but this last month they both finally flowered and I’m attaching pic’s of the plants I’m talking about. They’re not “world beaters” but they do fill a vacancy and are now guaranteed a spot in the garden along with a few Neo seedling “culls” and some excess Portea petropolitania extensa and Neo Sheba, which were surplus and came to live in the same home.

I’ve come to the conclusion that these two vrieseas just performed the same way that Vr. Phillipo-corbergii does for me; that is, if I remove pups before they flower, they just continue to produce more pups and don’t flower. However if I leave the pups on and allow them to “clump” they produce flowers. It will be interesting to see if these two plants flower again next year if they are left undisturbed, only time will tell.

All the best, Nev.
Vriesea Elfie

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 25, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #8981991

... and Vr. 'Flaming Sword'

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chrissy100

chrissy100
Sydney
Australia

January 25, 2012
5:31 PM

Post #8982318

Sue's lovely garden is under threat ...she is experiencing flooding with more to come.
I am sure she will be in everyone's thoughts.
Be safe everyone.
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 25, 2012
8:11 PM

Post #8982480

Hi everyone,

So sorry to hear of more of my brom friends threatened once more with flooding. The main thing is to look after yourselves; the brom's can be replaced and anyone who gets their collections wiped out, drop me a line and I'm sure I can find a few to get you started again.

All the best, Nev.
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 25, 2012
9:23 PM

Post #8982522

Hi everyone. Nev we went fishing yesterday and Branden caught his first fish. He was so excited you had to get out of his way with the waving fish and the rod. We caught about 10 fish altogether but none to bring home. It was a lovely day down by the river but boy, was it hot when we got home. Every afternoon the thunder clouds come over but they're all full of them selves. Not a drop of rain here. Everyday I have to water as it is so dry. The broms aren't so bad, just have to make sure they don't get any full sun. The ones that have been put onto the Reo look good but I'm watching them closely. I do hope Sue is okay. Karen thank you so much for getting the pic of the Titan Lily. I wish I could have seen it in person. Must have been a real kick for you to actually be able to see it yourself. Well I'm still watering out the front so had better get back out there. Colleen
perke_patch

January 26, 2012
5:07 AM

Post #8982627

Hi
sitting here listening to the frogs again outside the office window. They are liking another shower of rain tonight. apparently we have red eyed tree frogs. never seen or heard them before all this rain.

Nev I like the story of the vriseas which never flowered until you planted them. we've never had a phillipo corburgii flower for us even though we have several clumps of them. I've put one on a shelf where it gets pure sun, we have them growing in a tree, pots of them everywhere and the first clump we ever had is still in this tree stump. never a flower.

We have a neo which we are ready to dump called 'beverley's pink pants'. It has never done anything to make it something I wanted in my collection even though we had pups of it growing in so many different parts of the yard. Jen convinced me that it is a nice plant so I tried one more time and hung a pot of it from a tree branch where it gets morning sun. I found it today and what do you know it has a deep red centre donw inside a tall thin brom. the outside has a pink/red tinge down the lower outside too. It is still nothing spectacular but it does look better than I have ever seen it before. And the pot is overlowing with about dozen plants in the pot now.

Nev we are starting to think that we have also reached that stage where our collection is big enough. At the moment we are coping as Johnny is not too bad but next week he could be imobile again and I can't do everything by myself. a couple weeks ago when he was going through a bad patch we wondered if we would ever catch up on what needed to be done. if we can clear all the tables we have full of plants we will have more room and a lot less plants. We had a couple here today and they took a box of plants with them so that takes care of the float for the weekend.

big day tomorrow so I must be off to bed now. Night all
Wendy

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 26, 2012
5:30 AM

Post #8982644

I love that last photo ~ Wendy. Good luck on your plant sale tomorrow.

I hope those receiving rain are doing all right.

So many of you are knowledgeable about Bromeliad IDs, if anyone is interested in looking, here is a request for a Brom ID http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1238288/

Nev ~ you might consider hiring your secretary and paying the wages in spare Brom plants ~ lol

I think we all wonder what to do with the plant collections as we age. It is a consideration.

splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 26, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #8983059

Good morning everyone,

I hope you all had a happy Australia Day yesterday and maybe we can all spare a thought and say a prayer for our friends up North who are being hit with floods, especially those who copped it last time. Quite apart from the obvious damage cause by the flood waters, it must be mentally devastating to be told you have to evacuate your home and leave all your loved possessions behind not knowing if you’ll ever see them again. The good news however is that during all of these disasters, Australians show the true “Aussie Spirit” and come together as one to share and help each other through the crisis. No matter what type of disaster it is, there always seems to be help at hand from our “one big family” and those of us who aren’t in the affected areas usually manage to help in other ways whether it is donating food, clothing, money or donations of toys for children who have lost everything . It seems that at times like this, petty squabbles are put aside and everyone comes together to help each other and it make one proud to be an “Aussie”. As I said in the previous post to anyone who gets their collections wiped out, please drop me a line and I'm sure I can find a few plants to get you started again.

Colleen – It must have been funny when Branden caught his first fish. I can just imagine him waving the rod around and everyone else ducking and dodging to get out of the way and it would have been even funnier if you had all been in a boat, gee I wish I'd been there witha video camera!. Was it fresh water you were fishing in and what sort of fish did you catch?

It seems like you need to do a “Rain Dance” and get some of that rain up north sent down to you to settle the dust. Like you say, you need to watch the plants hanging on your mesh closely as they will dry out twice as fast as those on the floor or benches. During very hot weather it may be beneficial to mulch the top of your hanging pots with a bit of sphagnum moss to help retain the moisture for longer.

Wendy – I’d love to see your red eyed tree frogs as I’ve never heard of them before. Reading the description in Wikipedia they sound very attractive: (Red-eyed tree frogs, as their name states, have red eyes with vertically narrowed noses, a vibrant green body with yellow and blue striped sides, and orange toes). Although they are variable in colour, the pic of your particular frog doesn’t seem to have the same prominent red eyes shown in Wikipedia so it maybe a different type. (See the Wikipedia pic below)

I think it’s time for drastic measures with your plants of Phillipo-cobergii. What you need to do is walk past each plant with Johnny and as you do, just mention to him that seeing they don’t flower, you’re going to put them all through the “mulcher”, this might just jolt them into some action!

I haven’t heard of a plant called Neo. 'Beverley’s pink pants', but from what you say, maybe it would be worth hanging it up just beneath the shade cloth roof where it gets extra light; the extra light and higher temperature sometimes stresses them into action.

I hope you do well with your sale and from what I saw in your pic’s, the plants are so colourful they should sell themselves.

Podster – Sorry I can’t help with the ID but I just can’t seem be able to enlarge the picture and in its present size it far too small to be of any help.

Your idea of a secretary is a good one, do you know of a brom loving secretary that would accept brom’s in lieu of wages?

I know we have a brom forum here, but I’m going to finish firstly with a picture of a frog. This is the “Red-Eyed Tree Frog” as shown in Wikipedia and as you can see the eyes are much redder than those of Wendy’s frog. However it doesn’t really matter what colour the eyes are, it’s good to have any sort of frogs in your garden as it’s a sign of a good healthy environment.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 26, 2012
12:26 PM

Post #8983072

... and just to demonstrate what I said previously about everyone pulling together to help each other during a crisis (in this case floods), here's a (not very clear pic) taken from a newspaper story of the last floods. It is of a most unlikely combination of creatures putting their differences aside, and is of a frog hitching a ride on the back of a snake a they escape flood waters.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 26, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #8983086

.. and just to show I haven't "lost the plot" completely, and forgotten it's a bromeliad forum, here's a pic of some bi-generic seedlings I grew. The seed parent was xNiduregelia 'Something Special' and the pollen parent was unknown, so at the very least they are bi-generic (crosses of two different genera) and possibly (although only a very slim chance) they may be tri-generic.

The colour variation is starting to show here and they went on to look mostly like Neoregelias with coloured centres and only three being similar to the xNiduregelia 'Something Special' only lighter in colour.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 26, 2012
12:45 PM

Post #8983105

Here's one of the seedling which matured to look more like a Neoregelia

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 26, 2012
12:47 PM

Post #8983108

... and another

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shellharbour
Australia

January 26, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #8983113

... and another which went on to look more like the mother plant, although a lighter colour.

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 26, 2012
3:54 PM

Post #8983331

I too am thinking of those who are being flooded out again. I don't understand why they go through this year after year. The authorities that release flood lands for sale and development really should be made accountable. I am so lucky we get good run off here. My back yard down near the fence looks like a creek but it never causes a problem as I don't put anything down there, even plants. Restricts my plant space, but better than watching things drown or rot.

Nev, that orangey-red in the last pic is super. Love it. I have a flower open this morning that I am hoping Wendy can ID (as I got it from her). The flower is a single petal folded into almost a tube. The plant is small, and I honestly don't know if this is a tillandsia, or one of those small vrieseas. Showing my ignorance, I know.

Keep dry and if you have to drive, be safe.

Karen

ok, could this be Vr. correia-araujo? Wendy?


This message was edited Jan 26, 2012 7:42 PM

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 27, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #8984288

Hi everyone,

Well it looks like it’s just Karen and me today.
Where’s everyone gone again?
I think we all need to remember that the only way these forums work well is if people will participate.

Come on now, drop in and talk to us!

Karen – I don’t know much about Tillandsias and Vrieseas except to say that from what I’ve seen, quite a few of the green leafed Tillandsias and small Vrieseas look very similar when not in flower. However, I don’t think there’s any doubt that your plant is definitely Vr. correia-araujo as you suspected. There is another small Vriesea of similar appearance (Vr. Flammea), but the flowers on this are redder.

Karen your “orangey-red” description of the plant in yesterday’s pic has prompted me to tell you about another orange coloured plant I have. It’s something a little bit different as it comes about from an “accident of nature”. Its parent is a nice looking smallish Neoregelia called Neo Aussie Dream ‘Red Glow’.

Now I know that some plants from the Aussie Dream grex are known to have unstable variegations; this one however is a little bit different as every time it pups, it does so by producing one pup from each side with the difference being that one pup is variegated and the other is plain. It consistently produces both sorts of pups from each variegated adult plant, however the non-variegated adult plants only ever produces non-variegated pups. Don’t ask me how this happens, I don’t know; all I can suggest is that the genes have been so mixed up during the breeding process they don’t know what they want to do.

Incidentally, if you have a variegated plant that throws non-variegated pups, it’s deceiving to put the same name tag on them as the variegated mother plant. The person receiving it may think that it will become variegated as it grows and matures, and it won’t!

To correctly identify this type of plant you should write the word (NOVAR) after the name. This then informs the buyer that it has NO VAR ... IEGATION. So in this case you would write Neo. Aussie Dream ‘Red Glow’ [NOVAR]

Below is a pic of one of these plants which I took yesterday on the potting bench, and although the old mother has rotted away you can clearly see the two different pups still attached to the base of the dead mother. Even though one pup is not variegated, it does mature into a nice plain orange coloured plant which is still well worth growing.

All the best, Nev.

Neo Aussie Dream ‘Red Glow’ [Right] & Neo Aussie Dream ‘Red Glow’ (NOVAR) [Left]

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 27, 2012
11:50 AM

Post #8984301

Also ready for repotting are some Nidulariums in this case two plants which were purchased as Nid. Procerum 'Orange'. The are however slightly different to each other, firstly this one ...

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 27, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #8984302

I'm here Nev. To answer your question from yesterday, it's a bl--- carp, but he didn't care as long as he caught his first fish. We had a bit of rain late yesterday but it's very humid now. I've had to put the fan on behind me sitting here at 6am. Doesn't look like a good indication for today's weather. Will be busy getting boys school gear ready today. Making sure that it's all together. Nev those hangers that you use on your pots are very expensive. Do you know where I can get them cheaper, please? John has sent me some pics of his SH now with the Reo up. It looks lovely but I have to work out how to download them so that I can show you. He said that his old Mummas are still pupping. He has put them all together now and they seem to like the maternity ward. I'm trying to put all my different sorts together too but the wall is all mixed up so might have to re-do that later. I won't be putting any Vr's up on the Reo. I think it might be a bit hot for them and they are doing so well where i have them so I think that i will just leave well enough alone. I need another cuppa so might pop over to the Tearoom now. Colleen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 27, 2012
11:54 AM

Post #8984306

... and now this one in which the tips of the bracts are white unlike the previous ones which were orange.

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shellharbour
Australia

January 27, 2012
12:07 PM

Post #8984329

and finally, one of the red forms of Nid. Procerum.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 27, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #8984339

Hi Colleen – Glad to see you’re back from fishing. The "bl--- carp" as you describe them are a fish much liked by the South East Asians. I had some in Bali which had been minced up with various spices and made into fish cakes and they were very tasty. Personally I still prefer the fish that comes out of the salt water.

Regarding the pot hangers and I assume you’re talking about the black plastic ones I use. They are available from Garden City Plastics in Sydney. We get ours through the Bromeliad Society for the same price that they cost the society about 30cents each.

All the best, Nev.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 27, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #8984497

Hi all. I'm running a bit late this morning, and need to go an attend a few things, so will pop back in later if I can. Hope you all have a lovely day.

Karen

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 27, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #8984519

Good morning everyone,
I had a bit of a giggle reading through the posts I was behind on, especially the chook stories Nev, too funny.
Love all the photos.
Wendy I hope your sale is going well and Karen that corpse plant flower is amazing. I have never seen one in person so seeing your photos are just amazing.
Nothing much has been happening here, afternoon and evening rain usually but the mornings are blue sky generally and can be quite humid as all the moisture gets drawn up out of the ground.
The broms seem to be loving the rain water and the pups are taking off which is great to see.
One of our particular favourite Neo's, when we got it months ago was leaking a clear jelly and we just presumed it was odd but nothing to worry about. I have since seen one or two others do it as well, but not taken notice of which ones were doing it, I think they were Vrieseas though. Anyway this Neo I am referring too settled in, went through our longer and cooler than normal winter and then flowered. It was only a pup itself and was a bit disappointing that it never grew up to it's full size, but at least we'll get pups off it sooner I guess. So anyway we have continued to notice this same Neo still leaking this clear gel from time to time. Almost looks like swollen up water saver crystals when we see it. So it prompted me to ask a couple of people and they told me it's a sign of the plant having damage of some kind and is not a good thing to be seeing.
The thing is, the plant didn't look damaged when we got it and nor does it appear to be damaged now.
Has anyone else experienced this and is there something we should be doing? It was suggested to repot her again, but I'm not too fussed on doing that as like I said we got her in about July, and she was a rooted pup, not freshly cut, but once potted was very wobbly so we had to brace her. Then she flowered a couple of months ago and about 6-8 weeks ago we repotted her as she was still just not sitting too nicely in her pot, and gave her a good hit of fert to help with the pup situation. She has one nice size and coloured pup coming up and another node on the back that should come up too.
I don't really want to upset her again by repotting her, but perhaps I should to make sure there is nothing unsavoury in the pot. She doesn't always produced the gel, it's not continual, but it is on and off and strange. I just hope we get the pups off her and don't lose her and the pups before they are big enough if she is infact sick or damaged. She was a rather expensive neo (best chunk of $100), and it has sentimental value as well. (anniversary gift). I have debated just pasting a bit of mancozeb around her base in case it's some kind of rot on the stem, but I can't see anything wrong with her.
ok well enough of that, I will choof off for some poached eggs, yum yum and then go for a brom house wander and check on everything :)
Hope you are all well and the rain is not upsetting too many of you down south, Sue has dried out again and the broms seem to have come through ok by the sounds of it all.
Tash
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 27, 2012
2:46 PM

Post #8984535

Good morning all. You're right, Nev. The forum won't work unless we contribute. I know I'm a bit slack about writing but I do love reading and looking at the photos so keep up the good work. I love your Neo Aussie Dream Red Glow. Wendy and Johnny have a big sale today. They generously invited me to bring some plants over as well. Hopefully it might clear a bit of space for both of us. Wendy has 12 tables full and you still can't even see any spaces where they've come from. The weather is still showery so I hope it doesn't discourage the buyers. I'm off soon to give a hand. Hope you can make it Karen. It would be nice to meet in person. While we're on Nidulariums, this is my favourite, Nidularium Litmus. Wendy has one called Procerum Blue that looks they same. Are they?? Hope the rain has stopped at Sue's place. Her photos on FB yesterday were scary. Jen

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 27, 2012
2:57 PM

Post #8984546

Tash I posted at the same time as you. Sorry to hear about the gel but can't help with what is causing it. Strange how things always happen to the expensive broms not the commoners. Karen, forgot to say thanks for the Corpse plant photos. It was great to see them without having to actually smell it. Your shadehouse is looking good Colleen. You are getting some nice broms.This is a fenestralis hybrid from Catlan's that's starting to show nice colour. Jen

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 27, 2012
3:00 PM

Post #8984550

And this is my favourite plant at the moment. Looks like it's just left the hairdressers. Vr Gympie fenestralis. (If there is such a thing). Jen

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 28, 2012
1:12 AM

Post #8985020

Hi. I am very tired tonight, but we did get down to Wendy's sale, and Jen, it was so lovely to meet you. Those are fine broms there. I love the blue, and don't get to see many of those.

Wendy and John, we had the most pleasant afternoon and really enjoyed the conversation, the company, and the plants.

Nev, that is amazing about that plant that throws 2 different pups. Nature continues to surprise us.

I did get some prizes today, but it was a bit dark to take pics when we got home, so will start clicking tomorrow. Only 4 plants in all, but ones I really like.

Retiring early as I need my beauty sleep.

Karen
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 28, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #8985860

Sorry, in a rush again this morning. Weather isn't helping me keep on schedule either.

A pic of the plants I got from John & Wendy's yesterday.

TL - Neo. AF.815 NOID
TR - Till. Karwinskiana
LL - Jeanmum Gus (Wendy gave me details but forgot. Maybe you wouldn't mind again, please?)
LR - Neo. Orange Crush
Centre features mini Neo. Red Waif

Karen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 28, 2012
8:20 PM

Post #8986131

Good afternoon everyone,

I hope the rain is easing off in the northern areas that have been really copping it bad, and that those members in these areas are safe and well and haven’t suffered too much damage to their collections at the hand of Mother Nature.

Tash – Good to see you back with us again now that your daughter’s back to school and things are returning to normal once more.

Regarding you question about the “gel like” substance oozing from your plant, I know exactly what you are talking about as I’ve had it happen occasionally to different Neo’s in my collection. I’ve just hosed it off only to find it returned again the following day. I hosed it off a second time and this time it didn’t return nor did there appear to be any damage or other problems with the plant. I seem to remember someone asking the same question on the “old original” Bromeliad Forums on the Garden Web a few years ago. The response was that quite a lot of growers had had similar things happen to their plants with no apparent damage to the plants. No one seemed to know what the cause was and it was more or less just dismissed as “one of those unexplained thing”. Apart from that I can’t tell you any more about it... Just one question, why do these strange things always happen to our special plants? I would suggest you post this same question on the Bromeliad and Air plant Forum http://www.bromeliadforum.za.net/forum/index.php and see what answer you get from the growers on there. That way you’re getting feedback from growers all over the world and have a better chance of finding out the real cause.

It’s good to hear that Sue and Bill are safe and well and have come through all the local flooding OK.

Jen – Nice to hear from you again too, did you get my answer to your email OK? How did Wendy’s sale go, did the weather hold off for you all and more importantly, how did Johnny's legs hold up? OK I hope.

I seem to remember a question once before, either here or on another forum about the name Nid. Litmus versus Nid ‘Procerum Blue’ and I think we decided then that as the Nid ‘Litmus’ was the only name recorded and there was no sign of a Nid ‘Procerum Blue’ recorded anywhere, that Neo ‘Litmus’ was the correct name. The name ‘Procerum Blue’ probably stems from the fact that the experts initially thought it was closely related to Procerum as is recorded in the text of the FCBS Photo Index where it is shown in both of its colours, pink/red and blue which is why it was recorded with the name litmus, (just like the litmus paper we used in high School which changed colour when exposed to different chemicals). Anyway , whatever the name, it’s a beautiful and most unusual Nidularium and for those of you among us that don’t know of this plant, it’s unusual as the bracts change colour from pink/red to blue as it ages. Below is what is recorded in the FCBS about this plant:

A plant circulating in the USA, AU & NZ. as antoineanum. Nobody knows who identified it but it seems closely related to procerum. Its name reflects its unique habit where the primary bracts are red at anthesis but as the inflorescence ages these turn blue.

Jen, I like the pink “flushing” in your fenestralis hybrid from Catlan’s and I think it will possibly get even more colour yet, so more pic’s as it matures please. I also like the look of your beautiful fenestralis with its distinguishing feature of the beautiful curved leaves. I don’t know where the name Vr Gympie fenestralis came from, as there is no registration for it. The “Gympie” has probably been just added to the label initially to identify the area it came from and now someone has written it as though it’s part of the name. I also managed to get hold of a nice Vr. fenestralis seedling from Allan Ladd. It’s only young yet, but is already showing the beautiful incurving of the leaves.

Karen – That's a nice little haul of plants you bought at Wendy's borm sale and I'm sure you'll find them a good home.

To finish today I’ll show an old pic of the main display of our local 2009 Bromeliad Society’s show.

All the best, Nev.

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 28, 2012
9:51 PM

Post #8986177

Nev, love the display. Thanks for the explanation about Nid. Litmus Blue. That clears up some of our debates. Also thanks for your reply email. I was waiting until the rain stopped a bit so I could see what pups are coming on. The pups I've already taken off are pretty boring and I've sold some at Wendy's sale. It's going quite well despite the rain. They have a beautiful range of plants. I'll try to make a list this week of any of my interesting pups and I'd love an email of your current list.
Karen it was great to finally meet you and Barry. You certainly got some nice ones yesterday. They look especially good in your photo montage. Very clever.
Sorry Tash, haven't seen the clear gel but Nev doesn't think it does any harm so that's reassuring. How's your new shadehouse going? What about an updated photo. This is my Vr. philippo-coburgii just about in flower. Have to show it off because it mightn't happen again. Jen

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perke_patch

January 29, 2012
5:30 AM

Post #8986307

Hi all. As Jen said we were quite busy yesterday morning until the rain came at about 1:30. The only people who came after that was Karen and Barry and with Jen and us plus another lady Suzannah. we had a lovely afternoon of just sitting, chatting and drinking tea and coffee. Sorry Karen I zoomed right in on that plant but can't work out what it is. I'm trying to remember what you got. If you come back again bring it with you and I'll try to identify what it is for you. Can't think why I didn't right a label for you. Today it was raining all morning so no customers but about 1pm the sun tried hard to come out and the gardeners did too. For about 1 or 1 1/2 hours we were busy then the rain came back and again nobody. We had lots of broms under the tables to top up so we still have about 9 tables full of broms so we will open again next weekend to clear some more. Johnny actually let a few larger foliage vriseas go this afternoon for good $$$. some that he had multiples of. He also let some big alcantareas go too. So that helped the $$$ count, but didn't clear the tables.

Jen we have a fenestralis like yours. DOn't know where we got it but we did buy seedlings from different people. Perhaps we both got a fenestralis from Margaret Patterson in Gympie and that is why we both have them with the good curled over leaves. Even John C is impressed with the shape of ours and we intend to cross it with lots of other vriseas as soon as the flowers are ready.

I wish one of our Phillipo Corburgii would flower. we have a very healthy clump in the tree but no sign of a flowering. ah well when they are ready.

Better go to bed now as we are supposed to be off to Seaworld tomorrow for Emily's 4th birthday. Hope the rain clears tonight so we have a good day.

Night all. here is a pic of our fenestalis to see if similar to Jen's.

Wendy

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 29, 2012
2:44 PM

Post #8986903

Hi everyone. A bit of a dull morning here but the rain is holding off. Nice to have a break.

Jen, it really was great meeting you at last. I look forward to the day when we can visit your garden too.

Wendy, so sorry, I put the pic up in a hurry. It does have tags. One says "Jeanmum Gus", the other can't decide if its Vriesea Racinae or Vriesea Guttata (seedling). I remember you said something about one or the other, but can't remember which one you said. However, looking on the web, Racinae is quite spotted, whereas this one isn't.

Going out today. Not sure where, just getting out of the damp old house for a bit. Even if its just to a shopping mall somewhere.

Tash, if you pop in, Happy Birthday. Hope you have a lovely day.

Karen
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 29, 2012
3:11 PM

Post #8986951

Hi everyone,

Wendy - Sorry to hear the weather put a bit of a dampener on your sale Wendy, but I guess these things happen, and besides there’s always another day when the sun will be shining.

There’s a bit of excitement here this morning, there’s a tenant in one of the nearby flats who is walking up and down the street screaming at the woman across the road and threatening to kill her. You should hear the language coming out of his mouth every second word starts with “F” and it’s just non-stop, and so loud it’s a wonder you can’t hear it up where you live. He has a Toyota Hilux ute with a small cage on the back about 1M x1 M x0.5M and in it he keeps his three dogs. The poor bloody things barely have room to turn around. The RSPCA has already been out once but it’s still happening. We haven’t heard him all weekend and were hopeful he had moved on, but unfortunately he’s back here again and shouting this morning. Sorry about that little outburst, but it’s a bit uncomfortable when you start to feel threatened in your own home, isn’t it.

Back to “brom talk”; there seems to be a fair bit of breeding going on with fenestralis recently and it will be interesting to see what the future results will be and as we all know, the results of hybridizing are full of pleasant surprises. Perhaps the name Vr. Gympie fenestralis was written on the label by the original purchaser to identify that he got the plant from Margaret Patterson and it’s just gone on from there. Personally, any details like this I always write on the back of the label so it doesn’t get confused with the name.

Jen – It’s interesting to see your Phippipo-corbergii coming into flower, as mine is doing the same even though we live in totally different areas.

Sorry, with everything happening this morning, I just haven’t got my mind on Brom things so I’ll finish now with another pic of one of our show displays.

All the best, Nev.

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 30, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #8988258

Hi to all you invisible people out there,

I don't know if it's worthwhile writing this or whether anyone will even see it, but here goes anyway.

Firstly I received a phone call from Colleen last night to say she may be off the air for a while as her modem has died and she has to get a new one and she asked me to let you all know that's why she's not communicating with you all.

Now here's a question from me after I first call out in a loud voice HELP!

I received the following Email this morning and as I'm a suspicious person with computers after having been duped a few times I was wondering if any of you have had the same message or is it some sort of scam.


Dear Hotmail Subscriber,
=====================


Virus Notification



A DGTFX Virus has been detected in your folders. Your Hotmail account has to be upgraded to our new Secured DGTFX anti-virus 2012 version to prevent damages to our web mail log and to your important files. Click your reply tab, Fill the columns below and send back to us or your email account will be terminated to avoid spread of the virus.

Full Name: ...
User name: ...
Password: ...
Reconfirm Password: ...
Date Of Birth...



Note that your password will be encrypted with 1024-bit RSA keys for your password safety.


All Hotmail User Should Reply Now !!!
Failure to do this will immediately render your Web-email address deactivated from our database.
Thank you for your co-operation.

Warning Code :ID67565434
Hotmail Account Support.
Copyright ©2012

Have any of you heard anything about this as I need to know that it's genuine and not some scam that will infect my computer with more bugs. The words that made me suspicious were:

All Hotmail User Should Reply Now !!! . I would have thought the word should have been "Users" (plural) and that's what made me suspicious in the first place.

Thanks in advance

All the best, Nev.
77sunset
Merino
Australia

January 30, 2012
2:19 PM

Post #8988407

Nev. I always like to read this thread but as I am not right into broms as much as those on here , rarely post.
However, in regard to your 'scam'.

We are always getting this type of scam for various sites etc , such as our mail provider, PayPal, eBay , our banks .

I delete them all without a thought . I have forwarded some as spoof mail to those named, bank etc and have been warned to never open any .
I would delete it and contact Hotmail if I were you and ask about it.
I am positive you will find it is just another of the millions of scams out there. They seem to be never ending.
Jean.
brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 30, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #8988462

Nev, I agree with Jean. If there were a virus on Hotmail it would be on the news as it is so widely used. They would never ask you to give your password. Delete it without opening. I regularly get one from 'Paypal' asking me to upgrade my bank details. Good pick up on the 'user'. I'm a bit naive when it comes to computer scams as I guess most honest people are but am learning fast to toughen up and get a bit suspicious. Here's another of Richard's crosses that looks like it might have potential. Jen Vr platynema var. x Fantasy

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

January 30, 2012
7:08 PM

Post #8988756

Im a hotmail user and haven't seen this message before.
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 30, 2012
8:32 PM

Post #8988892

Nev, anything, email message, web message, anything at all that asks personal details, passwords, numbers, addresses, etc. is a scam, someone out to get your details and put them to their own use. Always contact so called sender (in this case, Hotmail) and report the message. Barry gets them all the time and just reports them. Never once in all his many years on the computer getting these messages has even one been legitimate.

Not very chatty today. Had to go out, and coming home, the bus refused to stop at my stop and went down the hill to the next stop as another lady wanted to get off there. I hit the roof at her, as walking uphill always brings on an angina attack with the risk of a heart attack. To add injury to insult (in this case) my arm caught on a branch or something and with my thin skin and being on blood thinners, a small wound bled like crazy and I arrived home not knowing what to do first, have angina spray or staunch the bleeding. Argh!!! Sorry to vent.

Going to put my feet up and daydream of beautiful broms.

Karen
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 31, 2012
4:42 AM

Post #8989056

Hi all! I love all the beautiful bromeliad photos being posted. I keep saying I want this or that one, till the next one comes along. In this climate that would not be realistic.

Nev, I use hotmail and went to look but have never seen that one. There is no telling where it was generated from.
Surely you deleted it and hopefully have no serious bugs. I trust nothing and am rarely disappointed.
And yes, I'd work from Bromeliads and food of course but I'd have to quit my day job. LOL

Can't hold a candle to y'alls but will post a photo of the Cryptbergia ( I believe it is Red Burst ) starting to bloom in the greenhouse.

one of the 'invisibles' Kristi

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perke_patch

January 31, 2012
5:32 AM

Post #8989118

Hi all. Nev I'm still around. sometimes I only have time to read posts. sometimes I want to upload some pics from the camera to show you something and get so caught up in naming brom pictures and filing them etc that I forget to come back to upload a pic. I have to write myself notes now to remember to do things. If I think of something I want to do on the computer through the day I come upstairs and jot it down on the notebook I keep on the desk. Only way to make sure things get done. Johnny asked me today if I had a spare small notebook so he could jot down things he wants to do today so he can make sure they get done. I guess we are all getting older and finding gaps in our memory banks.

Karen that little vrisea you got is racinae. When I bought some they had been wrongly named by GC as guttata but that is a big bigger brom with a pendular pink infloresence. Racinae has a slender infloresence which stands straight up in the air. Karen I just worked out what that label said "remembe I said I had put 2 down side of the house and put seamungus on them? they were double the size of the ones down the back yard. I think you got a label saying seamungus.

Next time you come back here bring any broms with you that names have gone missing. I will try to name them for you.

This pic is mini neo satsuma growing in the sun up near the shadecloth.

Wendy

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 31, 2012
12:02 PM

Post #8989558

Hi everyone. The crook Modem let me in this morning so I thought that I would take advantage and say G'day and put up a pic. The new one should be here today. Thanks for passing the message on Nev. I'll pop into the Tearoom and let them know too. See you when it's fixed. Colleen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 31, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #8989560

Here's another while I can get on. Colleen

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

January 31, 2012
12:12 PM

Post #8989577

Hi everyone

Well it’s raining again down here, so it looks like more inside work today. Yesterday I had to go into town to pick up the grass trimmer which was being repaired. When I got home I just looked at the state of the grass which was about six inches high around the edges as the young bloke who cuts it couldn’t do the edges last time as the trimmer wouldn’t start. Any way I told him that if it wasn’t repaired by next time he came he would have to cut the edges by hand, well you can guess the rest. He wasn’t able to come next time was he, he had no transport.

Anyway while I was looking at this untidy grass, I thought I’d have a go at doing it myself. I haven’t been able to do it for over twelve months due to the problems with my legs and back, but I just felt like I could tackle it and the untidiness of it encouraged me even more. Well I managed to do it OK and then psyched myself up to have a go at the mower as well. To my surprise and after losing a lot of sweat I finally managed to mow it all (albeit very slowly with numerous spells). So yesterday I was feeling pretty pleased with myself for doing something I never thought I’d be able to do again, and I must say it’s a far better job than the young bloke usually does. But boy oh boy, I’m paying for it this morning, I have aches in places I never even knew I had places.

A big thanks to everyone who responded here and sent me emails about the bogus Email. Just out of interest, Tash said she had managed to check it out and found that it was a scam that had been doing the rounds since 2009. I know I probably should have been more aware, but I’m afraid I’m of the “old school” and still inclined to trust people; unfortunately I’m quickly learning this is different age and it's something I shouldn’t do anymore.

Jen – I like your Vr platynema var. x Fantasy, it has lovely colour and doesn’t it show just how good as a parent the platynema is. Richard is certainly turning out some good stuff and from what I’ve seen in some of the pic’s so far, I think he’ll be creating some champ’s of the future.

Karen – Sorry to hear of your experience with “the bus driver from hell” yesterday. I think a report to the bus company is in order, outlining just how serious this situation he created could have been and demanding something be done about the driver. Probably in hindsight, you should have stayed on the bus until it got back to the terminus and then demanded the manager arrange other transport for you (a taxi) or you would take your story to the newspaper. There’s always a “cowboy” who won’t use his brain to look outside the square.

Kristi – That’s a nice little well grown Cryptbergia you’ve posted and for those of you who don’t know this type, it’s a bi-generic cross between a Cryptanthus and a Billbergia. Unfortunately I don’t do well with them or Cryptanthus but if my memory serves me correctly I seem to remember the flowers being an unusual combination of blue and green. I’ve heard Texas can be a pretty harsh environment for growing brom’s so tell us a bit about your method of culture e.g. potting mix etc and is that a tray of pebbles I see your pots sitting on and does the tray contain water to create humidity? I was also going to suggest that if you do well with Cryptbergias you should be able to also grow Cryptanthus, but I notice a Cryptanthus leaf popping up in the very bottom of the pic so you already grow these.

Wendy – Your idea of the little note book is a good one, I’ve been doing the same thing for some time now, it does have one drawback though, I can never remember where I put the bloody thing!

You also mention Vr. Guttata which is an interesting vriesea species that is easy to grow and quickly multiplies. It is best grown in a hanging position so its pendulous habit can be seen to advantage. Its spotted foliage makes a good contrast to the colour of the flower spike (inflorescence) which appears overall to be a silvery pink with yellow flowers. Unfortunately, out of all the plants in my collection, this one seems to hold the most interest for grass hoppers who can destroy the flowers overnight.

Your pic of mini Neo 'Satsuma' once again demonstrates the great results you get with the colour of your plants when they are grown in good light.

Colleen – Good to see you’ve managed to get on the forum with us this morning. You have a nice variety of plants there, and the shade house is now beginning to take on a look a bit like the "botanical gardens". I’ll look forward to seeing some more pic’s when you get the new modem.

I’ll finish now with a pic of a beautiful Cryptanthus hybrid, bred and photographed by Chanin Thorut a "Forum Friend" of mine from Thailand. He has named it after Lisa Vinzant who is his friend and a well know hybridizer from Hawaii.

All the best, Nev.

Cryptanthus Lisa Vinzant

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

January 31, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #8989620

An early start this morning. Darned birds wouldn't let me sleep in, even just a bit. Don't know what weather we are in for, but so far (at 6.30am) the sun is shining.

Wendy, when you explained the seamungus, I roared laughing. Thought I had a brand new plant here. So its Racinae, not jeanmun gus...hahahahaha! Thanks though for clearing that up for me. The colours in the plants with good light are so amazing, aren't they. My blanchetiana didn't get any light during the rains, and in that short a time has reverted back to almost wholly green again. It will soon colour up when the sun returns though.

Colleen, I do hope your computer is fixed today. It is so frustrating when things don't work and you have to wait... Good luck with it. Nice pics there too.

Kristi, its lovely to see your pic. Tell us more about the conditions there, I'd be interested too.

Nev, that is a really beautiful Cryptanthus Lisa Vinzant. I've never seen anything like it for colour. I do have crypts here but it can be a battle keeping them alive. They are a bit fussy. The bus driver yesterday was a woman, and she just didn't want to pull up 3 stops in a row. She wasn't to know the problem she caused me, but she isn't the first to do this and it upsets me when they do it. I really am thinking of calling the company and complaining. She also wouldn't stop to pick up 2 passengers at another stop and left them standing there. I was so distressed when the bus didn't stop for me, I forgot to use my govia card when I got off the bus, so on top of the distress, I will be charged an extra fee. I don't want to be responsible for anyone losing a job but some of these drivers really need putting back in their place, they are so rude.

Karen

Blushing Tiger colouring up nicely, and in need of dividing...

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

January 31, 2012
2:19 PM

Post #8989702

Good Morning everyone,
I hope you are all well. Yes there are lots of email scams getting around, rather annoying and sad the way they get away with these things. Another one that I get all the time... which bugs me the most... is not via email but the home phone! And I get this one nearly every week it's that often and that annoying. So if any of you ever get a phone call usually by a person with poorly spoken english claiming to be from Microsoft Windows... claiming your computer has issues that have been transmitted back to them... I'm telling you... it's a load of poppy cock. Windows technicians couldn't care less about your computer and if you have a problem you take it in to a shop to be fixed, they would never ring you. Usually this scam works that they claim you have some issues and will talk you through them to fix it free of charge. Then as the call goes on, it usually goes one of two ways. They say the next bits require payment to help you or they need remote access to your computer. If you allow this, it allows them to take over your computer and access EVERY piece of information on it, including your banking details!!!! Which is what they are after in the first place. I just hang up on each call now, as I have up'ed them several times and told them not to ring and I am onto their scam, but they still keep calling so now I just hang up.

Ok back to broms.
Thanks for all the Birthday wishes to everyone too, it was a quiet day at home and as you'll all know I missed out on the Vriesea I was bidding for on ebay for my birthday, lol, oh well, no matter, it went out of my price range at the end.
I have now had 3 neo's hit by cup rot, instead of two and I am worried it's a trend that might continue. Not sure if it's our high heat and humidity doing it or what? Today they are all going to be sprayed with fungicide to see if that helps the situation as I am not liking losing so many at once. My Neo Painted Delight that was hit first with the macho, well it fell to bits on Monday so it's gone, no chance of a pup there. The macho is very wobbly in the centre :( Then yesterday the centre of Mauve Star fell out too.
Having a bad run!!! Thank goodness touch wood it's not been a Vriesea. I am wondering if perhaps the water in the tanks of the neos are just getting way too hot during the day and that's what's doing it?
We have had some really hot weather and so I'm wondering if that's what has caused it, as it's only hitting the neos... and they have all been in the new brom house. None in the garden have had it happen and they get full shade for the hottest part of the day, where the ones in the brom house are under 75% beige and then the topper is 75% green cloth and that would kick in around lunch time to double the coverage up. So they get protection, but I'd have to say if I stood up the back of the garden it would most likely be cooler and damper feeling than the brom house would be... if that makes sense?
I'm probably grasping at straws??? Just trying to work it out as I don't want the trend to continue. We have a tight budget in this household and seeing young broms kick the bucket is just disappointing, if I had a spare or pup from that plant I wouldn't be so annoyed, but seeing as they are one offs, it's disappointing. Also shows me the importance of having more than one of your favourites, ie keeping your pups if they are special or important...just in case.

Well what else has been happening? Not a lot, lol.
Nev, I think I only have one or two Crypts that were given to me, but gee ... seeing your Cryptanthus Lisa Vinzant would make me want to go and buy one like that. What lovely colour, beautiful.
I love all the pics that get posted on here, amazing to see how different a certain brom looks in someone elses collection, I am still amazed at how much the growing conditions change the look of them. You can look at your own and think you have them in the right spot, right light etc, and then you see one that is just amazing compared to yours and realise... opps... need to move mine, lol.
Colleen, I hope you get the computer sorted, I must say I am sooooooooo lost without mine when it breaks down. I do everything on mine and it's kind of my life line to the world so I feel rather lost and lonely without it, how sad is that, ha ha ha.
Ok well have a great day everyone... now what photo can I find?
Another one of Richard's baby's, Vr Fantasty X Milky Way. It's starting to look quite nice now.

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brombirdie
Brisbane
Australia

January 31, 2012
11:39 PM

Post #8990309

Love your Satsuma Wendy. I know what you mean about having a notebook. Couldn't get by without my lists anymore.
Colleen, your broms are looking great. Well done.
Nev, I love that Cryptanthus. Those colours would make it worth the effort. Must have been the day for mowing. My son usually does our lawn but I got motivated and did ours. It was so humid that I almost melted but it looks pretty good.
Karen sorry to hear about the unpleasant busdriver. I know they are probably on strict timetables but they have to remember that they are dealing with people not just rules. Your Blushing Tiger has good colours.
Tash, I'm sorry to hear about your rot problems. It's so frustrating when you don't know what's causing it. Hopefully it won't affect any more. Your Vr is looking lovely. Why don't you post the photo on FB or message it to Richard. He said he loves to see what they look like when they grow up. If it's different from others he might let you name it. He suggested I could name and register one I posted. What a buzz! 2 others in the grex have been called Cherry something so Cherry it is. There's already a Neo called Cherry Delight so I was thinking Cherry Charisma, Cherry Mystique or Cherry Brandy. Here's the brom (Sorry to FB readers who've already seen it.). Vr platynema variegata x Mambo. This might be the only chance I ever get to name a brom so I want a good name. Which name do you all like best? Where are you Sue? What do you think? Jen

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

January 31, 2012
11:53 PM

Post #8990310

The modem let me back in. Hi everyone. Beautiful broms especially those Vrieseas. I love them. Don't know how long this thing will let me stay so will be quick. Thanks for the comments everyone. I'm trying hard . Here's another pic. Til tomorrow if I can get back in. Colleen

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perke_patch

February 1, 2012
4:10 AM

Post #8990369

Hi all. who's watching the cricket? 20/20 game so lots of boundaries being hit and very fast game. best type of cricket. Plus there is nothing else worth watching. a few movies that I've already seen or cricket.

Nev I love mowing and Johnny won't let me mow our little piece of grass so I mow the big yard next door. Last week I mowed the day before weigh in and lost 1.8kg even though I had cheated several times and expected a tiny loss at best. I now have less than 2kg to go so fingers crossed this week will see me reach the goal or come very close. I moved to progress though and can now have 2 meals and 2 milkshake so we'll see if my meal choices have been good or not.

We had a lovely hot and sunny day today with a heavy shower this afternoon right on home time so lots of traffic and skidding wheels. Of course the result was a nose to tail right in front of our house. 4x4 with a huge towbar at back had no damage at all but the newer people moved had a little dint in front bumper but there was water pouring out of the radiator and was not able to be moved. The poor lady had to wait for her hubby to finish work and drive home from the city. He then called a towtruck. She could have had it towed and we could have driven her home but she didn't want to do anything till her hubby had a look. Anyhow we had a nice chat and she brought her hubby in to introduce us and thank us for taking care of her. All we did was stand there chatting.

Jen we have the same vrisea that you want to name. I immediately though of cherry brandy as a good name before you suggested those three so that is my choice. Tash we also have your vrisea and it is showing some lovely colour, shape and pattern. Tash we have had a few plants rot off too. we have lost so many of our nova seedlings due to gutter overflowing and drowning the trolleys below. Unfortunatley the novas were on the bottom shelf and didn't like all the drips. They have been moved now and hopefully we can save the rest. They have been repotted and are now happy in totem rings. Johnny had to put some more shadecloth up to block out the bit of sun coming through between the fence and the roof on western side. That little strip of sun was enough to put some burn spots on a couple of vriseas so it had to go. It now looks so neat and finished.

Colleen I have a ADSL2 modem here that I am not using any more. I could have sent it to you. I now have telstra high speed cable modem so other is hiding in a drawer. hope you get your new one soon so you can access the brom forum at ease.

I went round the yard today and in one section found these painted delights at various growth stages. Tash if you want one please let me know. We also have 2 full sized ones in front yard and both are starting to put out pups so we will have even more soon. Raphaels and hula girls are same. we have so many of them now but it is so hard to let any go. we always say we will put some out next sale but when it comes time to pick out ones for the tables I can't help looking at them and leaving them where they are. Is everyone like that with favourite broms?

Nev I found your list in the back of my notebook today and it occurred to me that I owe you a parcel. So sorry to be so slack. I remember gathering up the pots with pups ready to remove and send but don't know where they went. I don't think I sent them did I? can't remember packing them so Johnny probably put them back in the garden. I will get to them I promise. Will let you know when I send it. Hope I haven't promised anything to anyone else and forgotten to send.

Oh I think I will lose a few trays of seeds. We tend to keep the door of the little seedling houses rolled and tied up and during the recent rain apparently the frontof the shelves were getting rained on. I have experimented with some trays have holes in lid and others no holes. Well the front trays all had water sitting on their tops BUT the ones with holes had allowed the water to drip inside so they were all full of water. I don't think the seeds like swimming so I'm expecting they will not recover. I know one tray was fenestralis seed which had shot with little plants already growing. They don't look happy now. I will always remember to let the door down now if we expect rain.

This pic is the painted delights I found down the back right hand side.

Wendy

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perke_patch

February 1, 2012
4:17 AM

Post #8990371

and while looking for painted delights I found this plant. It's a seedling of canistrum lindenii novar. I must have potted one seedling straight into a larger pot with a good dose of fertiliser because this is 10 times bigger than others from the batch. After seeing this one I potted all the others today from small 4inch seedling pots into larger pots with good dose of fertilizer. Hopefully we will have about 15 or 20 good sized ones soon. I know they don't have the variegation of lindenii but I think the plant looks good enough to keep. DOes anyone know what a lindenii with no variegation would be called other than lindenii novar???

Wendy

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

February 1, 2012
11:37 AM

Post #8990846

Hi everyone,

Karen – Birds don’t worry me of a morning as I’m always up at four thirty anyway, and besides it’s the best part of the day anyway, watching the sunrise.
Had to have a chuckle about the Seamungus thing and I can understand how you could misinterpret it if you weren’t familiar with the name.

As for the bus driver, I don’t care if it was a man, woman or a bloody Billy Goat; they still need a good kick in the arse by the boss. You give some people a bit of responsibility and they think they can dictate to the world. . This is obviously not just a “one off mistake” it’s being done by other drivers also and it’s become part of the culture and if you ask me I think the whole bus company needs a good “shake up” from the boss down. Why should you be concerned if they may lose their job, it may well have cost you your life. Whether she knew your problem or not has nothing to do with it, she needs to do her job and do it properly, after all that’s what she’s getting paid for. You really do need to report it as that sort of person is just plainly irresponsible and won’t ever change until they get a good wake up call, and besides if it happens again it may just bring on a heart attack walking up the hill and you’ll think (too late then) I wish I’d done what Nev said.
OK, Nev’s off his soap box now.

Tash – I have to laugh about what you say about the phone calls, as it reminds me of one we sometimes get from someone who sounds like a Pilipino woman with a high pitched voice. Their opening line is, “good afternoon sir, I am Albert from Melbourne”. While this is taking place you can clearly see the LCD on your phone showing it’s an overseas call. When I say “that’s funny my phone says this is an overseas call”, the connection is broken straight away. As for that one where the caller claims to be a technician from Microsoft warning me of a serious virus I have on my computer, I politely thank them for the warning and say I’ll take it to my computer technician to have it fixed. He then goes on to say only a special scan can fix it and only his company has access to such a scan. It at this stage I tell him he’s a liar and to “piss off’.

Sorry to hear about your rot problems Tash, I can’t give you any more advice other than what I have said previously, but what you say about the water in the cup getting too hot can and does happen, but usually it’s the tips of the new leaves that are burned and not the whole plant rotting. All I can advise is a daily inspection of your plants using your nose more than your eyes as you will smell the rot before you see it. There’s another lesson to be learned here also; always write the date and the name of the person you got the plant from on the back of the name label. That way if you have to get another you know where you can start looking. I always keep at least one extra pup from any good Neo’s just to cover this type of situation. The other thing to consider is that if you have just bought the plant, it’s possible the rot was already there when you got it. With anyone who gets plants from me and loses them to rot within three months; I always replace them as I believe the rot was probably already present when they first got it. It obviously isn’t something I was aware of and didn’t know about, but at least I feel I’m showing good faith by replacing it. I have also noticed some growers (even very experienced ones) who lift plants out of awkward spots by grasping a handful of leaves including the young tender middle ones. If this ever happens a plant you are buying, don’t take it, as the new young leaves have probably been broken right down in the centre of the cup by this practice, and that’s a good starting point for rot.

I like your Vr Fantasy X Milky Way and I remember when Jack first showed a pic’ of it on the Garden Web he said he had high hopes of it being a good parent; well the “Old Master” wasn’t wrong, as it’s starting to turn out some beautiful plants.

Colleen – That looks like it could be a neo seedling with concentrica somewhere in the family tree. That top leaf is the giveaway as you can just make out parts of three concentric rings which is a common feature of concentrica that’s often passed on to its children and grandchildren.

Wendy – Oh dear Wendy, your starting to get the same syndrome I have it’s called the CRAFT syndrome and I’m always forgetting if I’ve sent plants that I’ve promised or not. I always keep track of them on the computer, but then when I go through the list I ask myself, “now did I put those plants on the list or not?” So I’d send the same message to all my friends out there in “Bromland”, if I’ve promised you plants and still haven’t sent them, please let me know, I’ll be grateful for the reminder.

In that last pic you have as Canistrum Lindenii NOVAR, the name is no longer Canistrum lindenii it’s been changed to Edmundoa var. lindenii. I’d remembered something about it and checked the synonym list and this is what I found:
Canistrum lindenii var. lindenii = Edmundoa lindenii var. lindenii

Whatever the name, you have a great healthy looking plant there, but the names of your seedlings would therefore be Edmundoa lindenii if they aren’t variegated. If it was a pup taken from a variegated plant it would be Edmundoa lindenii NOVAR to signify that it came from a variegated plant but doesn’t have the variegation (No VARiegation) any more.

Wendy if you look up Edmundoa lindenii on the FCBS Photo Index you will see that the variegated form is albo-marginated. This tells me that usually seed from an albo marginated plant will just produce mostly albinos with sometimes a small percentage of non-variegated plants. Do you know what the mother plant was like?
I just have one final question for you, why do a lot of your pic’s come up sideways?

All the best, Nev

I’ll finish with three pic's of Edmundoa Lindenii rosea, firstly the whole plant

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

February 1, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #8990851

Next an overhead view of the inflorescence

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splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

February 1, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #8990852

Finally a close up of the individual flowers

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

February 1, 2012
2:37 PM

Post #8991061

Wow, Jen, that vriesea is magnificent, and you get to name it! Wowow!! I like all those names, but Cherry Brandy suits the colours, maybe?

Colleen, that's a lovely soft lilac colour in the centre of your brom. I think its very pretty.
I do hope your modem gets fixed soon. Frustrating not to know if its going to work from one minute to the next.

Wendy, congratulations on your weight loss. What program are you on?

Nev, you made me laugh this morning, reading your post. I agree that these bus drivers do need pulling into line. The attitude of some of them is appalling. But I find it hard to stay angry at things like that. I believe I am responsible for myself, and I've had enough experience now to know to get up the front of the bus and make sure the driver stops. I'm not shy about telling the driver what I think, and that last one was apologising to me still as I began walking back up the hill. Think I got through when I said I'd sue if I didn't make it back without an angina attack.

I love the inflorescence of that Edmundoa Lindenii rosea.

Hope everyone has a great day. Hello to anyone else reading.

Karen
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

February 1, 2012
5:21 PM

Post #8991266

Hi everyone. I have the new modem but I'm still using the old one at the moment. It lets me come in sometimes. Thanks for the offer of the ADSL2 Wendy but I dont have 2 here only 1. We're a bit backward in the country. Not much gardening getting done today. I've been back and forth to the school taking bugs and empty hornet's nests and pine cones and spiders for their Science lesson this afternoon. I'll post another pic and get into the tearoom for a cuppa. Colleen

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
6:35 PM

Post #8991378

Sorry I'm slow getting back here... for Nev and Karen (and anyone else interested) I will try to describe the climate in my area of Texas. I hope my Fahrenheit/Celsius conversions are close. Please don't laugh too hard.

We see average summer temps in the mid 90s F (35 C).
Extreme temps of 105 ( 40 C) with last summer seeing many days in excess of 100F ( 37 C).
Last summer we also had extreme drought conditions here although our average rainfall is normally high. In addition, we have high humidity in excess of 50% (currently 95%) but sometimes dropping to nil.

Daytime winter temps average 40s F to 50s F ( 10C) with our first freeze around the end of November and seeing temps dip below freezing many times ( mostly at night ) throughout winter. We see a rare ice storm and occasional snow but for the most part winter is tolerable. Winter is usually history by the middle of March.

My interest in your lovely Bromeliads has prompted my interest in knowing your growing conditions with hopes of learning how to better tend my own plants.

I have had a few Cryptanthus, the Cryptbergia I posted above and Dyckia plants for a while. My greenhouse is what has inspired my interest in bromeliads as I can now overwinter plants in bright light conditions.

The greenhouse does stay a bit dry so I do have these pots sitting in trays of pebbles. When the water drains from the pot, it will remain to provide humidity for the plants. I use rainwater when available and often only add moisture to the pebbles.

For a soil blend, I use a favorite quality potting soil which has a peat base. I mix it 50/50 with shredded pine bark. This blend seems to provide enough areation and drainage suitable to the types of plants I am growing.

I have a selection of Cryptanthus, Orthophytums, a couple of Dyckias, a Guzmania, a Deuterocohnia and three recently acquired Aechmeas.

A. nudicalis v. rubra

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DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

February 1, 2012
8:41 PM

Post #8991546

Krista, you seem to have more extremes of temperatures than we do here. I am in a rather temperate zone where any extremes are not uncommon so much as quite short lived. That is why I was wondering what your climate was like. Our friends from southern states here might have more in common with your climate. We never, ever see snow this far north. I can grow plants in the open here that definitely need greenhouse conditions further south.

Though I can't really advise you, would help others to know what you are drawn to. Do you want to try, for instance, large broms such as vrieseas or alcantareas, or smaller ones. The biggest part of my small collection is the neoregelias, as I love the wide range of colours available in these.

Karen
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 1, 2012
9:29 PM

Post #8991579

I must say I'm jealous of your temperate climate. To be able to grow these outdoors year around would be delightful.

What I'm drawn to? Hmmm... they are all beautiful. I really like the deep, dark shades of purples and greens and I definitely need to stick with smaller varieties as my greenhouse space is limited. At least till I eliminate some of my other plants but that would be hard to do.

That is why I love following y'alls threads. You have so much information to share as well as the photos of a wide variety of Bromeliads. I am always appreciative.

perke_patch

February 2, 2012
4:45 AM

Post #8991732

Hi all
Nev thanks for the info on edmundoi lindenii. I'll write out some new labels tomorrow. I wondered if it would be novar if a seedling but didn't know what it would be called without the albo markings. now I know. thanks Nev. you're a hive of info again.

The pics are sometimes sideways Nev because I turn the camera sideways to get more of the longer thinner aspect of a plant, eg in billbergias or taller plants like this one. i should rotate the picture before posting but sometimes I upload the pic and attach it before thinking of it. sorry.

Yes I agree I suffer from craft and without a notebook I would forget a lot more. If I didn't enter bills as soon as I receive them I would forget to pay them by due date. I have developed ways to assist me with this disease. Oops I just remembered an email I was supposed to send last night and forgot. I better go do it now before I forget again LOL.

night

works4me

works4me
Brisbane
Australia

February 2, 2012
6:04 AM

Post #8991813

Hi all, I am new to this forum and new to growing bromeliads. I have been growing mostly succulents for a good while now and have only just started my brom collection, mostly neoregelia. I purchased some lovely large plants from a local grower, some of them already flowering.

I had hoped to keep them close to the house so I could admire them while working around the house and at the moment I have them under a wide patio where they get good light but no direct sunlight. I have noticed some of them seem to be losing colour so I guess they need stronger light and for the time being I have moved them nearer the patio edge where they get early morning sun. Hope this works while I organise my husband, Michael, to recover the fernhouse in the back yard with new 50% shadecloth as the old stuff is covered with leaf debris and mould and would probably not be a good environment for my lovely new plants.

BUT, I noticed today that two of them seem to have had the middle chewed out of them and initially thought it was the result of bugs (we have a lot of grasshoppers) feeding on them. The ‘tanks’ no longer hold water and I figured whatever was eating them had caused damage deep down in the centre of the plants. However, after reading through some of the recent posts on the forum I am wondering if the problem is ‘cup rot’ as this was mentioned a couple of times along with the suggestion to use ‘cinnamon’ or mancozeb. I am going to sound like a real dummy and ask what form of cinnamon to use and how much. I am only aware of cinnamon sugar ... but then I’m not much of a cook either.

Both of the plants that have been ‘attacked’ are in flower and it looks like the middle section of the plant has been shredded and chewed up ... can someone please tell me if this might be cup rot and if so, exactly how I should go about remedying the problem. I also remember reading about using fungicide ... again what type and how much.

OK, now that I have finished stressing, I will mention that we live in Brisbane, on a 5 acre property in the outer northern suburbs. Both my husband and I are retired and spend a good deal our time working around the yard. We have no chooks or animals (other than a Rhodesian Ridgeback, whom I originally suspected might have been the culprit) so there’s always lots of mowing, especially now that we have had heaps of rain ... and perhaps that’s part of the problem, though as I mentioned earlier, my broms are under cover but I may well have been overwatering them and I have not been ‘flushing’ them either.

Anyway, now I am waffling ... hope I have not bored everyone too much. Obviously I have much to learn and I thought this was going to be easy. I was told broms were low maintenance and very easy to grow and I guess in time I will learn to do it right. Meanwhile I need a lot of help ... sorry to start out on the forum in panic mode. Thanks in advance for any info forum members can offer.

Shirley
splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

February 2, 2012
12:08 PM

Post #8992261

Hi everyone,

Well it’s raining again and they’ve forecast more for the weekend and into next week as well, so that’s put paid to any outside work with the brom’s. I’ll probably make a start on repotting the smaller seedlings as I can bring them into the garage and do them there on a portable potting bench I have.

Colleen – I see in your group shot that you have a Nidularium Longiflorum (bottom left with the deep pink/red flower). This is a very popular Nidularium and a good one to start with as I’ve seen it growing and flowering in deep shade as well as out in the open with just a bit of shade from a tree in the middle of the day. It grows and clumps up quickly if planted in the garden and the beautiful rose like shape of the bracts stay in colour for months after the small white flowers have finished. It’s a plant that is inexpensive and I highly recommend it to anyone just starting with this wonderful genus or is looking for a brom that will grow and flower in a shady location.

Kristi – I was looking through the description of your weather conditions and thinking, “they are variable but they’re not as bad as I’ve heard they were”, and then I came to the bit about the freezes and the temperatures dipping below freezing, snow and the rare ice storm. That’s where you’re much more different to all of us here. Having said that though, I think that if you can manage with the plants you describe, it would be worthwhile trying some vrieseas, as I’ve found they are much more resilient than they look, relatively inexpensive and easy to grow and certainly more cold tolerant than Guzmanias. I love the Ae. Nudicaulis ‘rubra’, did you know they grow very well if mounted? In fact I have found they grow much better mounted than in pots.

Shirley – A big welcome to our friendly little group and I’m sure you’ll make a lot of friends here and pick up a few tips along the way. I see that you’ve already learnt one of the most important lessons and that is, you need good light to get good colour. With your proposed new shade cloth, I would think that in your area (Brisbane), 70% Beige would be the most suitable. Before you go and buy it, ask around some of the local growers for their advice first or perhaps someone on here that is closer to your area could advise. As you’ve probably read here recently, a lot of us have changed to the beige shade cloth with excellent results.

With for your question about the problem plants, it’s much easier to advise on these things if you can post a picture to show the type of damage, but from what you describe, grasshoppers could certainly well be the culprits. Having said that, the fact that the centres of the cups are chewed, also creates a good starting point for a fungus attack which could lead to cup rot. To quickly find out if you have cup rot, just smell the water and if it is “rot”, the smell will almost knock your head off. If it just smells a “bit off”, well that’s just the normal rotting of the rubbish in the water and is a natural process which in the wild creates a “soup” which provides the plants with a continuous supply of dilute liquid food. If it is rot, empty the plant of water, remove any dead leaves or flowers and allow to dry for a few days and then treat with a reliable fungicide as per the container directions.

As for “sounding like a real dummy” as you say; asking questions doesn’t make you look like a “dummy”, asking questions gets you answers from others, and you learn from others and don’t make the same mistakes they have. You’re only a dummy when you ask questions and don’t listen to the answers.

I can’t really advise on the cinnamon as I’ve only used it once without success, but other growers swear by it. The cinnamon I used was the ground cinnamon powder that you get from the spice section in “Woolies”, I don’t know if this was the correct type but this was what I was told so perhaps someone here that’s used it successfully can offer better advice. The main thing to remember is that if the plant does die, don’t “toss it” as it will more than likely still produce pups even when there’s just a bit of rhizome left at the base.

Also some dogs will also eat brom’s, make no mistake about that. It’s the smell of the water in the centre that attracts them. Emptying them frequently and refilling with clean water can sometimes break this habit. Probably the main cause of any sort of rot is the lack of circulating air caused by having the plants too close together, remember in their native habitat most of the brom’s we have, grow on trees and have air continually circulating around them. We only put them in pots for our own convenience which deprives them of this air circulation. So space around the plant is of the utmost importance.

Finally, you mention that your plants may have been over watered. I was told many years ago by a recognised orchid expert that more plants (all types) are lost every year due to overwatering. He said that plants need to dry out a bit between watering and if you aren’t sure whether the plant needs watering or not, leave it for another day or two and then water. When we get continuous soaking rain over a long period and you have a large collection, you just have to put up with the consequences but if you only have a few plants, you can empty the cups and turn the plant on its side for a few days. This allows it to use up the water in the pot without becoming waterlogged and thus preventing the onset of rot.

You certainly haven’t bored people here with your questions as everyone learns from the answers which are often varied and you need to chose which best suits your circumstances. Feel free to ask questions any time as questions start discussions and that’s where we all learn as everyone has different ideas.

All the best, Nev.

I’ll finish today with a pic for all of you tillandsia growers, it was taken at one of our Illawarra Bromeliad Society shows and is of one of the smaller and more petite Tillandsias which even when not in flower still looks attractive

Tillandsia fuchsii

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

February 2, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #8992443

Good Morning everyone,
Wow everyone has been busy in here or I have been slack, one or the other, lol.
Jen I love that Vriesea, Richard is really producing some beauties lately, I did have a large scary bid on one of his last night on ebay, lost… so bid on the other one…. Lost as well. Just as well really, as I couldn’t afford them anyway, it was hubby’s fault cause he was in my ear saying just bid on it, we’ll work it out! LOL Nice that he loves broms too…. But I’m the one who does all the finance in this household and he knows how to give me headaches.
Wendy sorry to hear about your seedlings, I have lost many since starting with seedlings 6-8 mths ago, I am still trying to get a good system going that works well for me in my climate.
Your Neo Painted Lady’s look great, yes please, I would love one. I was most disappointed on my birthday to have my one and only one fall out of its pot completed rotted.
Thanks Nev for the advice regarding rot. I think I nearly hyperventilated the other day from all the sniffing, ha ha ha ha. I hope there won’t be anymore rot, but I guess it’s a fact of brom growing, I just hope it’s not something we are doing wrong.
Wow Kristi I have to agree with Karen, you have far worse or greater extremes than I do. I live up north in Aus, maybe one of the most northern members who are active in here and so dealing with cold is not something I ever have to do. I seriously hate to imagine what the temp gets too in the sun outside, but our Summer heat would be quite similar to yours, but with high humidity most of the time. Summer is also our Wet Season so it does tend to rain a lot…although the rain is rather late this year. In our winter, we rarely dip into single didgits, usually only get down to 12-14 degrees C, and if it does go below that, we moan loudly, lol. (Aslo because our homes are built to be cool, not warm and we don’t own many warm clothes, so when it gets that cool, we really feel it.)
That does raise issues in it’s own though, as I’ve heard that our lack of a real ‘winter’ prevents certain broms from ever flowering up here which is a shame. However I am so glad we don’t get snow or ice up here, brrrrrr, I am only relatively young but already have many old injuries and I think I’d be a crippled in the cold, lol.
Welcome Shirley, so lovely to have someone new in here, and you will learn so much … I sure have.
Nev has already covered it all by the looks, great job Nev, lol. I too have never tried the cinnamon thing, only cause I am still only new to broms so have only just experienced my first lot of rot. With fungicides…. Along with everything you use on broms….. make sure they do NOT contain copper. I use Mancozeb with added Sulphur as my fungicide brought from Bunnings.
I can vouch for the dog eating broms scenario too, we have an older dog, sadly getting close to having to be put to sleep, and about 6 weeks ago…. Completely out of the blue he completely destroyed two neos. No reason…. I had used Seasol 2 days prior but had hosed it out, so I don’t think it was a smell, as I’ve used it before and he’s never done it, I think it was just spite and boredom and because he could.
Can’t wait to see some of your photos of your plants and it sounds like you live in a beautiful area. I would love to have acreage one day….
Tash
DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

February 2, 2012
2:46 PM

Post #8992452

Hi everyone.

Shirley, welcome to our little patch here. Make yourself at home, and ask all the questions you want. I see you are in Brisbane, so will have a lot in common with a few of us as far as climate etc. goes. Hopefully you will learn where to buy good broms and how to care for them. I find basic common sense works well, but there are always things come up that I don't know how to deal with, and it is good to be here to ask the right people.

Does everyone have a favourite brom type? I love tillandsias, as everyone knows, but I also am very drawn to neoregelias because of the huge colour range. I know Wendy's John loves the foliage vrieseas. Anyone else have favourites?

Karen

For some reason, this plant was named Queen of Spots, but surely it is Neo. Lilliputiana?

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

February 2, 2012
3:21 PM

Post #8992473

oh been meaning to ask... do we want a new thread for February or are we all happy to just keep going with this one?
Karen, my favourites are Foliage Vrieseas too, but followed by Neo's and a bit of everything, lol.
We have more Neo's than anything and I like that they are usually so willing to pup, unlike Vrieseas which can make you wait a long time and then some of them only give one pup.
Tash
ctmorris
barmera
Australia

February 2, 2012
3:35 PM

Post #8992489

Hi everyone. Welcome Shirley. I'm sure you'll find a wealth of information in here. If it has already been covered then just ask away and someone will put it up again. The new modem has been installed and Nev I don't know why you had a problem setting your's up. After I got all the plugs in and played the disc it just told me what to do. I'm no genius when it comes to computers so it must have been really easy. Hope everyone is well and enjoying the weather wherever you are. My favourites are foliage Vrieseas too but I love the Neos too and everything else. lol be back later. Colleen

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works4me

works4me
Brisbane
Australia

February 2, 2012
5:11 PM

Post #8992591

Thanks to everyone for their welcome to the forum and for the helpful advice. I am going to try to upload a couple of photos of the damaged broms ... hope it works. If the photos appear, you will notice the ragged edges of the leaves which suggests something has munched on them but deep in the centre the leaves are almost see thru, which probably means way too much water and rotting.

I love the neos and I want them all. I tend to get rather obsessed when collecting plants and I love the bright colours in the neos. I did buy a lovely vriesea last week which was just called ‘vriesea patterned leaf hybrid’ which, from my research, I think is a vriesea saundersii. I will attach a photo of this one in my next post if I can and I’m sure someone will be able to identify it correctly. It is quite a large plant and already has three pups, one of them quite large so I was pretty happy with my purchase.

As for the shadecloth ... what a pity I did not ask questions first. A couple of days ago, after deciding the broms had to go from the patio up to the shadehouse to keep their colour, I rushed out and bought 10 metres of green 50% cloth. They had green or beige but I’ve always used green so went for that without giving it a second thought. I went for 50% rather than 70% because we have quite a few very tall eucalypts that will throw shade and I thought 70% might be too much. Anyway, I am stuck with the green so I will use that and hope it works for me.

With regards to watering, would once a week in summer be reasonable and should I just fill the tank or water the soil as well. Thanks again for the advice.

Cheers Shirley

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works4me

works4me
Brisbane
Australia

February 2, 2012
8:17 PM

Post #8992820

Hi again, more questions ...

First one ... fertilizer - I was told by one grower not to use fertilizer on neos as it makes them grow too big and turn green, particularly when used on minis. It seems like most of the growers on the forum use Osmocote. Which one, I notice there is one for natives, one for succulents, one for orchids, another for roses etc. Someone else said not to use a slow release fertilizer in Brisbane as the granules explode at 22 degrees so the plants get too much too quickly in hot climates. Too much contradiction and I am easily confused but very happy to take advice from forum members.

Second question ... fungicide. I have some Fongarid in little satchels which has to be mixed with water and sprayed on foliage (I think) and I also have some powered sulphur which I have used on my succulents on occasion. Would either one be suitable to use on broms if they do get cup rot.

By the way, I smelled the cups and they don’t smell bad so I guess I better take another look at Rebel, the ridgeback. He was home alone yesterday and maybe thought my plants were getting way too much attention and he was punishing me. I used to have them on a stand (will add photo) before deciding they need more light and more air and only moved them a few days ago and they are now sitting on the ground and easily accessible.

I did think of other questions I wanted to ask earlier but my memory is not what it used to be and I am very easily distracted. So I’ll leave it for now, thanks again

Shirley

just remembered ... as we don't have a town water supply, I have been watering with bore water which is on the hard side and probably contains all sorts of minerals etc.

This message was edited Feb 2, 2012 8:36 PM

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springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

February 2, 2012
8:51 PM

Post #8992853

hi Shirley, just a quick reply from me, everyone else will be able to give you more advice than me, cause I am still relatively new :)

I'm glad they don't stink, hopefully it's not rot then. I will say that some of my Neo's get a bit of a stink and go a bit yukky looking in the middle as the flower gets old and past it's used by date, lol. But someone else will be able to advise you better off your photo.

As for the fert question, everyone is different. I go on the advice I was given which is to only fertilise young pups and broms that have flowered. Nev will be able to give you lots of info on this :) He's our source of information, lol. Too much nitrogen turns plants green, and yes makes them grow like mad, so most broms if over fed will end up with too longer leaves, too big and too green. so I give all my pups a good feed of fert as I pot them up and never feed them again until they are old and have flowered. A brom only flowers once in it's lifetime, which I didn't know when I started, and once it has flowered, it will never grow another leaf, but all energy will be put into it's flower and then pups/offsets. So fert will then help it out as it's past it's prime and will lose colour anyway.

I'm honestly not sure what my fert is, as I was lucky enough to buy 5kg off a local grower who buys it in a big 20kg bag. So again one of the other members will be able to tell you which one to try. Things like a bit of monthly seasol I believe is fine if you want to give them something as ... Nev has explained it's more a tonic than a fert as such.

I did notice in your last photo the big slab of timber you have the broms sitting on. A word of warning, that looks to be treated timber and if it is, it will be treated with copper! A big no no for broms. Treated timber needs to be sealed thoroughly if it's used near broms as water splashing off the treated timber and onto your broms can burn or kill them. That also goes for new timber fences, and over head rafters (in a shade house etc) where rain will cause the copper to leech out and drip onto your broms.

I am pretty sure Fongarid is fine, I think I have a packet of that here somewhere too :)

Ok better scoot on over to Facebook and check on the brom stuff over there and then take this blasted Microwave back to Target since Sanyo have recalled them,
talk to you all soon,
Tash

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

February 2, 2012
9:52 PM

Post #8992882

I'm pretty sure THIS is what a over watered Brom looks like, these brown marks apeared on some of my broms with all this rain. Its been raining for weeks now and ive moved all my plants up high but don't have any undercover for them. Looks like it may not flood now after all. Good!

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

February 2, 2012
9:52 PM

Post #8992884

another...

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

February 2, 2012
9:54 PM

Post #8992885

Aztec is one of my favourites, i love its colour and its a pretty small pup.

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breeindy

breeindy
north coast nsw
Australia

February 2, 2012
9:56 PM

Post #8992886

and i love the red in the centre on Wild Gossip(when all my other broms have the same dark centres).

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works4me

works4me
Brisbane
Australia

February 2, 2012
10:46 PM

Post #8992901

Yes Tash, they are sitting on treated pine sleepers ... again, never gave it a thought. However, most of the broms are growing in plastic pots sitting inside larger terracotta pots as I haven’t got around to repotting them, which is probably a good thing as they are not sitting directly on the treated pine but the excess water from one shelf could be dripping on to the broms or into the pots on the next shelf.

We have now covered the offending slabs with black builders plastic as an interim measure till we get the new shadecloth done ... if it ever stops raining long enough to do anything. Most of them are still sitting on the cement floor of the patio (is that bad?) to get a bit more sunlight, though there’s not much of that around even though the weather bureau keeps promising fine days.

When we do get to move the broms to the shadehouse (which has a steel frame) they will sitting on galvanised weldmesh fence panels cut in half to form shelves so hopefully that will overcome another problem.

Thanks for the advice Tash and hope you get your microwave sorted and thanks Breeindy for the photos of overwatered broms ... mine don’t have brown marks, but the leaves appear to be kind of shredded. Maybe someone can tell the problem from the earlier photo. This time I have attached the vriesea photo

Cheers, Shirley

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ctmorris
barmera
Australia

February 2, 2012
11:08 PM

Post #8992904

Hmmmm I like the vrieseas. What is that one Shirley? Colleen

works4me

works4me
Brisbane
Australia

February 3, 2012
12:22 AM

Post #8992916

Hi Colleen,

This is the one I mentioned earlier, I think it is vriesea saundersii … maybe someone on the forum will know for sure.

Shirley

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

February 3, 2012
12:30 AM

Post #8992920

Oh Bree, I hope it stops raining! It's terrible to see the broms getting damaged. Love that wild gossip too, one we don't have yet :)

Yes Shirley that does look like Vr saundersii to me.

Good work covering the treated timber up, yeah cause if the leaves touch or the water splashes, you could have trouble.
Sitting on concrete is fine :)

You have to also watch galvansied mesh and zinc coated things too, but I think Nev says if it's old like old fencing, it's fine. And if it's new, to wash it down in vinegar first to neutralise what it is that can hurt the broms. We have all ours that are in the shade house sitting on old fence panels, great shelves and cheap.

Not sure if you are planning to pot the broms into the ceramic pots, but if you do, firstly just make sure there is enough drainage in the bottom as ceramic pots usually only have one small hole and you want your broms to drain well and not rot inside the pot. Secondly just be aware... as I just learned 3 days ago... they take such good hold of the pot... you probably won't ever get them out. We had only one in a ceramic pot, my Neo Macho that suffered the cup rot (not from the pot) but I wanted to repot it and check the roots and trunk to make sure the rot hadn't gone further but we tried and tried, and could not get it out of the pot. Had to smash the pot in the end to get the brom out, and boy... great roots.

But that was a lesson for me... don't plant directly into a ceramic pot ever again... just sit the plastic pot in the nice pot, lol.

Ok wow, so much from me today... ha ha ha.

Oh took the microwave back to target, if you have brought a black convection microwave from target between July 2010 and Jan 2012, check up on it... there are two models being recalled for severe electric shock warning, 8000 microwaves. I have a link on my Facebook wall if you need the model numbers :)

Tash

works4me

works4me
Brisbane
Australia

February 3, 2012
2:03 AM

Post #8992935

Hi all, me again,

The gal mesh panels we plan to use for the shelves are old fence panels that we bought second hand so should be OK. Mind you, they might be a whole lot older by the time we get round to doing all this stuff. Good to know that vinegar will neutralize any nasties though.

Yes Tash, the plan was to pot the broms directly into the terracotta pots. Now that you mention it, I have had trouble in the past removing other plants, I guess because it’s porous, the roots actually grow into the sides of the pot. New plan needed there too.

Did you get a new microwave or a refund? Ours is years old, time we got a new one but we need one with a door that is hinged on the bottom and opens down (like a regular oven) or is hinged on the right side not the left. There are very few available hinged at the bottom and none (that we have been able to find) that are hinged on the right. Pity they don’t make the doors reversible like they do with fridges.

I have never visited Facebook. I am not very computer savvy and a bit paranoid about viruses and worms and all those other nasties that get into computers. Sounds like there is a bit of info there too. May have to try it one of these days.

Anyway, enough from me … I feel like I have been monopolizing this thread all day.

Thanks again, Shirley

podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
4:23 AM

Post #8992967

Shirley ~ I've been enjoying your questions and the answers you've received. I also was wondering about the use of clay pots. I hadn't noticed anyone using them so I am glad you asked.

Breeindy ~ the water damage really bites on your beautiful plants . That will stay will them for life. We had heard in the news about the major rains you are receiving. Could you lay the pots on their sides to prevent more damage? Aztec is a good looker.

Nev ~ you mentioned that the Ae. Nudicaulis ‘rubra’ could be mounted. I may need another tutorial on that. This is all brand new to me. I do love the deep color on it although most photos look more reddish as the name implies.

I will also do some Vriesea shopping. I did find a reference site that listed cold tolerances on various Broms and had been referring to that when curious about some of the larger ones. Currently I find I am drawn to the Aechmeas.

Never too old to learn here... Kristi

C. pink zebra

Thumbnail by podster
Click the image for an enlarged view.

splinter1804
shellharbour
Australia

February 3, 2012
12:34 PM

Post #8993451

Hi everyone,

Well, well, well, everyone has been busy; and it’s great to see.

Tash – It might be a good idea if you could start a new thread for us as this one’s getting a bit long. I’d like to nominate you to start a new thread each month, will anyone second that motion?

What you say about your dog getting a bit of age on him could explain why he ate the brom’s; as dogs get older some of their senses deteriorate i.e. hearing and sight mainly but when they do, their sense of smell becomes more sensitive to compensate. I would say even though you washed out the Seasol, he could still smell it stronger than ever and thought he’d see what it tasted like. I’ve got an old dog (17) and he is deaf as a post and he can be sound asleep out the back in his bed, but as soon as I open the dog food and put it in his dish (even if I do it very quietly) he’s always standing at the door waiting before I’ve finished.

Tash, what you say about not having a winter as such can also work in your favour with Neo’s. Due to them not flowering easily, they stack on more layers of leaves instead and make up into much nicer plants, similar to what they do in Thailand.

Karen – Although I have a mixed collection of brom’s, you’ve all probably guessed by now that my all time favourites are Neoregelias. I think they are the best brom’s of the lot. They are easy to grow, have a magnificent colour range and are virtually trouble free.

Your tiny Neo looks very much like Neo. Lilliputiana; either that or a hybrid from it. What I like about this little plant is how the flowers stand up high out of the vase and they look much larger in proportion to the plant than other Neo’s do.

Colleen – What’s the pale pink brom hiding over behind the flamingo? It looks interesting, is it a Neo? I know now why we had trouble with our modem, we bought it at the Telstra shop but we didn’t get any bloody disc; we were given a number to ring and do it via instructions over the phone. After first having problems understanding the accent of the lady we were speaking to we finally got onto an Australian lady who soon set us straight. But as I told you, we had other things to fix up as well after that Club Telco mob stuffed everything up, but I better stop now as I can feel the old blood pressure rising just thinking about them.

Shirley – Don’t worry too much about getting the green shade cloth, we were all growing plants quite successfully beneath that before the beige and other colours became available. The reason I said 75% beige was that with the increase of reflected light, it still gives you about the same as 50% green anyway so I’m told.

Watering is an individual thing which is wholly dependent on your climate, growing conditions, type of mix you are using and whether your plants are benched or hanging, in pots or mounted; there are lots of things to consider. I only water once a fortnight down here in summer and once a month in winter depending on the weather of course. With it raining like it has been for some time down here I haven’t watered for a month this summer, on the other hand if it was abnormally hot, I would water once a week. Best to talk to other growers in your area who have the same conditions and be guided by what they say.

Looking at the pic of your damaged plant, it looks to me almost like something was dropped on it and damaged the leaves; could your dog have been chasing a cat or something and jumped onto it by any chance? If it was eaten it was certainly eaten by something much bigger than a grass hopper by the looks of things. Do you get bush rats or possums in your area? They like to eat brom’s also.

As for fertilizers, I think we’ve all been told that same thing about fertilizers. What they should have told us was that if you feed your Neo’s a high nitrogen fertilizer it will drain the colours and the same applies to Billbergias also. I once wrote an article on this very subject and I’ve attempted to attach it to a DMail to you, if you don’t get it, send me your email address and I’ll send it that way. I think it will explain things a bit more clearly (I hope). It’s available for anyone else who would like it also, just let me know.

With the fungicides, any well known brand will do, as long as it doesn’t contain copper; as Tash said copper is poisonous to brom’s and some of the early fungicides contained a lot of copper, so it gets down to reading the label. I do know of growers that use Fongarid with good results and I also know of growers who dust the cut ends of pups with sulphur before they plant them so I guess either of those things is safe.

Finally I just want to congratulate you on how neat and tidy your plants all look, it’s a pity they won’t always look like that once you catch “bromeliaditis” (an incurable chronic disease which attacks bromeliad growers), and as Tash warns, beware of CCA treated timber, it contains copper which can leach out when wet and drip on brom’s or be absorbed up through the drainage hole if on benches.

Bree – I don’t know that the brown marks on the leaves are caused entirely by overwatering alone. It may be that the leaves were damaged by some other cause initially and the excessive water has started to rot in that area because they were already weakened. It may also have been caused by water lying on the leaves in those places and the hot sun shining on it (even briefly) which causes a “magnifying glass effect” and will burn those areas. Personally I would cut off all the brown bits, empty the plant of water and tip on its side so the cut ends can dry out and then treat the cut ends with a fungicide to try and prevent the rot travelling down and into the cup.

I like your Neo Aztec, it’s similar to a couple I have called ‘Gold Fantasy’ and ‘Gold Fever’. I hadn’t seen the ‘Wild Gossip’ before but it’s very much like ‘Hot Gossip’ and I see now that both are listed as "parentage unknown" and were previously known as Anna #39 and Anna #40 respectively.

Shirley – What you did with the builders plastic is a great idea; anything which just acts as a barrier between the plants and the CCA treated timber will do the trick. I started writing this response yesterday afternoon before these latest posts were in, and at that stage you hadn’t used the plastic so that’s why I mentioned the CCA treated timber again through this post somewhere.

Your Vriesea does look like Vr saundersii to me also, (I think you already got one from me Colleen), it’s a nice brom and the flower contrasts nicely with the foliage. See http://www.photomazza.com/?Vriesea-botafogensis

Tash – That’s all good advice from you, I was going to mention about the pots as well. I don’t know why after all these years; someone hasn’t taken the trouble to explain to the manufacturers that the holes need to be bigger and there needs to be more of them. A little tip though, if you do have to drill more holes in a terra cotta pot, soak it in water for 24 hours first, it is much easier to drill through. Use a good masonry drill bit and set your drill on “drill” not “hammer drill”; otherwise the hammering effect will probably break the pot.

Shirley it’s the zinc in the galvanising that does the damage, I learnt this from when I bred aviary birds. If you used new galvanised wire, sometimes the small parrots would chew on the little lumps of galvanising and poison themselves and for that reason we always painted the wire with flat black oil based enamel. It prevented the problem, and you could see the birds better also as it made the wire almost invisible from a distance. Also, don’t worry about asking questions, as you can see, they’ve started a lot of healthy discussion which is what the forum is all about, sharing information and helping each other.

Kristi – What you say about laying the pots on their side is a good idea which works; and I’ve used it often when there is continuous rain. However now that my collection has grown so much and I’m much older and slower I just don’t have the time or the space to do it.

As for mounting the Nudicaulis, it can be mounted on any type of rough bark tree branch (alive or dead) as long as it’s not a tree that drops its bark. Take a pup that’s just starting to put down roots and tie it directly onto the tree. Don’t put any sphagnum or mix of any sort beneath it or the roots will just grow into that and not onto the tree. You can tie it on with old nylon stockings, strips of shade cloth or fishing line, the main thing is, IT MUST BE FIRM AND CANNOT MOVE – IF IT CAN MOVE, IT WON'T PUT DOWN ROOTS! Once it in place and secured, hang a bit of “old man’s whiskers” over the stocking or whatever else you use to tie on with so it doesn’t look like it’s tied on; it just looks more natural. Give it a good watering and a dose of Seasol or similar to help with the stress of relocating.
Don't forget that mounted plants require more watering than those in a pot and a light spray with the hose every day or so will work wonders.

You say you’re drawn toward Aechmeas, a word of warning in your colder winters, don’t select Aechmeas with burgundy coloured or bicoloured leaves as they are more cold sensitive than the others.

I love the colours in your little Cryptanthus, I think it’s great and I really wish I was successful growing them. Check out the following site http://fcbs.org/cryptanthussociety/csjournal.html you may find it interesting and very helpful.

Well that’s it for today, good growing and keep the forum fired up with questions.

All the best, Nev.

Here's an old picture of my Ae Nudicaulis aequalis

Thumbnail by splinter1804
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DawnSong
Brisbane
Australia

February 3, 2012
1:09 PM

Post #8993493

Goodness, we have been busy writing. No news or questions this morning, so will just say hello to all and keep moving.

Karen

springer99

springer99
Queensland
Australia

February 3, 2012
1:51 PM

Post #8993548

Good morning everyone,

LOL ok ok we have a new thread to go over too. For anyone who isn't familiar with what we do, generally at the end of each month one of us start a new thread and add the link here so that we can all follow it and move on over to the new one.

So here is the new link...

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1240908/

Just click on the link and follow it over to the new thread and then write in there :)

See you all over there

Tash

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