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Container Gardening: Pomegranate 'Alhambra'.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2012
5:48 PM

Post #8962576

Have you one? This is a neat ornamental selection so the tag stated. It's 18" (45cm), and by jorge! It bears fruits!

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 10, 2012
5:59 PM

Post #8962589

I'd like to add this plant on the pf, but I don't know how to initiate the new file. For there isn't one made for this cultivar yet. The fruit is roughly the size of a cherry tomato. And it's said to be delicious. But before I eat the tiny fruit, I thought I'd take a few pictures to share.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

January 11, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #8963254

The tiny fruit in close up and next to a naval orange for size comparision.

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KayJones
Panama City Beach, FL
(Zone 8b)

January 31, 2012
4:50 PM

Post #8989899

Lily, first, go here:

http://davesgarden.com/guides/

At the top, choose 'add a plant'

Follow the prompts to fill in the botanical information and click on 'submit'. If it doesn't work for you, go to the bottom of this page and click on 'contact us' and send your pictures and information to administration - they can add it for you.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2012
5:53 AM

Post #8990449

Kay, thank you.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

February 1, 2012
5:04 PM

Post #8991244

Kay, thank to you. The plant is now on pf, pictures are pending.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2012
9:23 AM

Post #9039480

I have one given to me by a neighbor who works in horticulture. I put it in the ground because she had it in a container, but I think it would be better in a container than where it is.

It loves full sun, and does develop those tiny fruits which are delightful just to look at. :)

I'm not sure it's the same plant, Lily, but thanks for reminding me to pull this one up.

xox
A.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2012
9:37 AM

Post #9039497

Amanda, how long have you had the tiny plant? If it does well in the garden. I may just leave it there. I acquired several from a local nursery. I wasn't quite sure of their hardiness thus I kept them in containers to winter them inside.

Hugs to you.
Kim

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2012
10:05 AM

Post #9039540

It does not seem to grow on new wood, so I prune it down to about 3"-4" in the spring. It does come back here which is 7b/8a.

It got too much shade this year and did not produce as many fruits. I think I do have the "dwarf pomegranate" Plant File selected in my "have" list so perhaps that will carry more helpful information. If I choose to keep it in the ground, I should surely move it to a spot with more sun.

The neighbor lady gave me the plant early in spring 2010 (or now was it spring of 2009?!)(Good Grief!!!). It sprouted out late (May/June) I thought because she had the container in full shade, but by the end of the season it had produced quite a number of fruits. This past season not so much probably due to the drought/high heat and increased shade from a giant camellia. The plant is at least 5 years old, though the entire "base" of woody sticks can't be more than 6"-8" in diameter.

The tiny pomegranate fruits had just exactly the same look inside as a regular sized fruit. I think it's a real treasure and you're lucky to have more than one. :)

I love the little pot you have it in - so rustic and cute! Keep me/us posted with its progress.

A.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2012
10:46 AM

Post #9039592

Thanks A. our growing condition must be similiar in many ways. I'm struggling to get my plants to do well in certain pockets ... with lots of canopy shade. That said, the weather signals spring has sprung. Here is the Pom. that I moved outdoor and in the process of 'hardening' it to the elements. One challenging aspect of maintaining smaller containers in our hot/humid Southern gardens is keeping them from being toasted during the summer months.
Kim.

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AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9039701

yep. it was a rough summer last year. I'm going to start scouting for more garbage cans/rain barrels to add to my downspouts so I don't get caught w/o in the middle of summer high heat/drought. :/

A.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9061856

Just to keep everyone update with my little pom. The one that has been placed outdoor early in the season, and given lot of sunshine. It's now showing its first flower bud!

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
9:34 AM

Post #9061859

Hey! I was surprised to see shoots on mine so soon as this past week. Does yours grow on old growth?

Thanks for the update, I think I am going to dig it up and put it in a container where I can ensure it gets full sun.

A.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
9:37 AM

Post #9061869

A. We're in the same zone essentially. Let's me go and look at the plant in order to give you an answer. BRB.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
9:52 AM

Post #9061904

Yes, and yes. The branches appear 'longer' so yes there are new growth from old woods. However, I'm glad you've asked the question for having inspected the plant closely. I saw a good number of new flower forming buds! The flowers buds however, are formed on new growths! So be carefull not to prune the tree/shrub at spring time. Because you can lose out on the blooms, and eventually fruits. ;-)

Having said that to say this; Hubby has a habit of "spring clean up". He goes out there and prune my rose arbor to tidy its looks every early spring. As a result he robbed the Roses of many spring blooms.

Have a good day, back later.

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
10:28 AM

Post #9061952

D'OH!

No worries on this end, but thanks for the reminders. I prune in late fall/early winter when things are dormant.

Going to prune back a neighbor's butterfly bush for her today. Needs a good haircut. Don't think that sort of shrub will mind.

It seemed my pomegranate grew on new growth so I always cut it down to about 5"-6" high. Also doesn't get enough sun there so it is probably affecting its growth. Will update when I get it rescued.

A.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 11, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #9302293

Here are my pomagranates today. As I have learned that the plants can't tolerate drought too well. So I sunk all my little pots into a larger pot pots (to avoid roots dry out) having done so, it also helped me from heavy lifting when comes the time that I need to move these little jewels indoor for the winter. The 'grove' of fruit trees have bloomed, and made fruits continually all season long!

editted for typos.

This message was edited Oct 11, 2012 8:48 AM

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podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

October 12, 2012
8:12 PM

Post #9303619

I just found this thread and love your little pomegranate, Kim. How did your fruit taste?

I picked up a dwarf pomegranate early this year (Punica granatum "Nana"). Mine is in a larger container and is 18 to 24 inches tall. Mine should be winter hardy in my zone.

It has bloomed and produced fruit all summer. I hadn't sampled it yet but was delighted that the hummingbirds and bees loved the blooms also.

I wonder if your plant would grow a bit larger in a bigger container even though the fruits are small.

Sharing a couple of photos ~ The first is the plant with blooms/fruits. The second is the size of the Nana fruit in comparison to a regular pomegranate.
Kristi

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

October 14, 2012
6:22 AM

Post #9304618

Hi Kristi, yes granatum species and some cultivars are hardy here. I have to keep mine in container culture because the lack of sunny spot in the garden which aids their flowering and fruiting process. In containers, I move them indoor for fear their roots mass may be frozen being above ground during our mild winter. As far as its edibility? I think they're nice to have for ornamental, I tried another draft variety fruit, such as this one (inset pic.) It's a little too tart for my taste buds.

The largest fruit belongs to another draft variety of granatum. The smaller ones are those of 'Alhalbra'. I picked those dried out fruits off a few days ago.

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