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Article: Camellia sinensis: January is hot tea month!: fascinating..

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Forum: Article: Camellia sinensis: January is hot tea month!Replies: 20, Views: 75
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critterologist
Frederick, MD
(Zone 6b)

January 13, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #8965817

..article -- thanks! I'm sipping coffee at present but may just have to go brew a cup of tea!

Sundownr

Sundownr
(Bev) Wytheville, VA
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #8965819

Yep, good article, thanks Carrie.
I'm sipping a cup of tea while my coffee is brewing.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #8965898

Thank you, ladies. I was tempted to add a page of tea trivia at the end - why the expression "tea for two and two for tea," what "teetotalling" comes from and who invented the first tea bag and why, as well as the invention of ICED TEA, but...I didn't.

I also didn't mention that earlier this year, after a lifetime of tea drinking, I converted completely to becoming a coffee snob! I'm ready to write a follow-up to Jill's coffee article about the best way to *make* coffee. Thanks for reading, friends, enjoy your morning!
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

January 13, 2012
11:07 AM

Post #8966227

Great article, Carrie! Perhaps, you can expand on it at a future date. My wife thinks hot tea every afternoon is a requirement. I would like to know where that came from. She does it because her grandmother did it and it is an engrained habit.

Tea camellias grow readily in our zone. We grew them from seed, but are hoping to add some of the older named cultivars this year. I've become a huge fan of ice tea since I moved south. I drink it year around. My doctor did recommend I replace my soda habit with tea. He said carbonated drinks aren't good for the joints. (Jim).

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2012
1:01 PM

Post #8966371

Wellllll, Anna, Duchess of Bedford is reputed to have invented the custom of afternoon tea, but that was a snack more than a meal. It also became one of the first places men and women could socialize, unthinkable as that is in the 21st century, it was equally unthinkable in the 18th for unmarried or married ladies to socialize with men outside of a rigid social structure (like a ball or a court function). I do not know if Kay's requirement for hot tea every afternoon is related---does she take cucumber sandwiches or scones with her tea?

I'm trying to get my DH (2L of diet Mountain Dew a day) to switch to iced tea. He needs the caffeine but not the sugar. There are plenty of ways to sweeten iced tea w/out sugar. Do you drink the excessively sweet "sweet tea" of the South?

Iced tea was invented in 1904 at the World's Fair in St. Louis. A heat wave had dashed the hopes of a hot tea vendor--nobody wanted a cup of HOT tea! Desperate, he grabbed some ice cubes and stuffed them into the next cup of tea; tada, iced tea. The stories don't say how he happened to come across nearby ice cubes. Was ice even in cubes by then? I think that was rthe World's Fair where ice cream cones were invented too! The ice cream guy is sure to have had ice, right?

Thanks for your comment! Gave me an opportunity to drool some more tea trivia, with which I am stuffed at the moment.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #8966456

Love hot tea and cold tea. Sweet tea is generally too sweet for me. Nice article and afternoon tea or "tea time" is a fine tradition. :)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 13, 2012
2:43 PM

Post #8966480

Yes, tea and a snack are a great pick-me-up to make it through until dinner. Interestingly, it's the lower classes who had "high tea," ie a late substantial tea at the high kitchen table. The fancy people had a lighter earlier tea at a lower table. Thanks for your comment!

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2012
1:04 AM

Post #8966937

I've been fortunate to have had "high tea" in London, England and at the Empress Hotel in Victoria, BC on Vancouver Island. Certainly isn't what the peasants would have had. :) But a lovely, lovely tradition.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
8:34 AM

Post #8967241

Yes, "high tea" got switched with the "low tea"--at least the names did--because it seemed "high class" to have "high tea." But originally high tea was more like what we would call supper, tea was the beverage and shepherd's pie or steak and kidney pie or any one of many "working class" dishes were served. This would have been when fathers, sisters, brothers, and maybe even mothers had been working all day and were tired and hungry and just needed to shove some simple food in and go to bed. (No 8 hour days back then, nor minimum wage laws either.)

Afternoon tea was for wealthy people and is what we think of now when we think of tea sandwiches, cucumber or salmon paste and cutting off the crusts, Devonshire cream and scones (but not with chocolate chips, please), or other dainty foods. Here's where you're worrying about your pinky finger--which was originally extended to balance the cup which had no handle!

Lucky you! I went to Europe last summer and the purpose was to go to Spain, but I wanted to fly through London so we could have cream tea with a friend of mine at Fortnum & Mason's, but those plans fell through and we flew through Madrid going and Paris leaving (just the airports, mind you). That is, have tea with milk and scones with clotted cream = cream tea.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2012
8:41 AM

Post #8967248

Yum!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 14, 2012
2:02 PM

Post #8967632

It's tea time and I'm hungry!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 14, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #8967925

carrielamont
Did not get to stop by London and I am sorry, but you did make it to Europe.
Love the extra stuff you put in the blogs.
I also wanted to thank you for the discussion of Earl Grey Tea.
Thanks for looking it up for me.
and the link!.
If I had not run into this article of yours - and you answering my questions- I - I would not have got around to knowing the difference in bergamot and monardia (mint- bee balm)

Bergamot is much more - so much more than a mint. not as sour as lemon, more bitter than a grape fruit - but the good stuff in it as well as - a treatment for malaira - which probably makes it an anti imflammatory.

So combining bergamot with green tea might just be the perfect health drink!

This message was edited Jan 14, 2012 8:55 PM
seacanepain
Midland City, AL

January 14, 2012
7:57 PM

Post #8968057

I don't care for the super sweet iced tea that is often served in restaurants, but what is served in most southern homes is good..
lol. No cucumber sandwiches. Usually cookies. (Jim)

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
8:32 AM

Post #8968479

You're totally welcome, and if you hadn't asked, I wouldn't have looked it up! I vaguely thought it came from a plant like bee-balm...not. And I knew it was used it some men's colognes, but 50% of all women's perfumes!!! Who knew?
aulani61
Emporia, KS

January 16, 2012
4:19 AM

Post #8969512

I have a cold right now so sipping hot tea hits the spot since the rising steam is perfect for clearing things up. When I had a cold as a kid, my mother used to put a piece of salted lemon in the cup before pouring on the tea. The Asian store sells salted DRIED lemon and I found that it works too. I am from Hawaii where many people preserve lemons by packing lemons with rock salt in gallon sized jars then putting the jars on the roof to sit in the sun. After several months, the lemons shrink by about a third, absorb the salt, and are used in cooking and to flavor teas, especially during colds season. When they were little, my children would ask their grandmother for a piece of lemon to suck on.

So, I am having a cup of black tea with salted dried lemon this morning. It reminds me of my childhood. Keeping the tea kettle going introduces needed moisture to dry furnace air too.

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
7:56 AM

Post #8969787

Yes, when I have a sore throat my DH makes me tea that has about 1/3 fresh lemon juice and 1/3 honey. It's not very appetizing--too sweet--but it works on the sore throat. Salted lemons? How interesting. The MDs always say gargle with hot salty water (to my daughter who gets laryngitis frequently). Hot salted lemons seems to combine every cold remedy together!

I hope your cold gets better--but how did you get from HI to KS?
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 16, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #8969836

I had a bunch of tiny little peppermint candy canes left over from Christmas. I put them in my tea and it adds just a tiny bit of sweetness but also soothing peppermint for a sore throat. So, if you end up having some extra try it and see what you think?

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #8969906

Mmm I do that with coffee and hot chocolate. We don't have leftover candy canes this year but we DO have leftover Werther's butterscotch/caramel/thingies...wouldn't those taste good in a cup of coffee? Off topic from tea.
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 16, 2012
11:12 AM

Post #8970008

Why!!! Yes!! I had not thought of that, that is a good idea.
THANKS!

carrielamont

carrielamont
Bedford, TX
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
1:13 PM

Post #8970118

That's me, just a fountain of good ideas, NONE OF WHICH I EVER ACTUALLY CARRY OUT!!!
Liquidambar2
Mount Vernon, KY

January 16, 2012
1:57 PM

Post #8970212

Carrielamont;
You are too funny! Thanks for the chuckle -- I feel the same way about myself at times.
I just now finished my Earl grey tea and the last peppermint cane -- Christmas is now officially over.
I guess I could have another cup without the peppermint - that would delay any attemp to actually carry out some of my fountian of ideas.

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