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Winter Sowing: What Have You Wintersown So Far??

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TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2012
10:34 AM

Post #8966170

Alright show me your lists here is mine,What have U wintersown?
Father Hugo's Rose
Father David's Rose
American Beauty Berry (white berried and purple)
MockOrange
Japanese BeautyBerry
Spirea
Japanese Maple
Golden Rain tree
tatarium maple(flame)
purple rose of sharons and white
beauty bush
salvia turkistanica
basket of gold allysum(one of my fav's,highly recommend it,it's a perrenial allysum and smells wonderful)
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #8966273

I'm ashamed to say that I have not sown anything. We have snow and below zero weather tonight. I plan to pick up some potting soil on my way home and throw out a few jugs. I plan to sow some gallardia red shades, yellow gaillardia, poppy and euphorbia. I have my jugs cut up already. All I have to do is dig out my seeds and add soil and seeds to my jugs.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2012
11:57 AM

Post #8966284

you are both way ahead of me... I thought I would get going on my WS this weekend - I have a number of digitalis and hollyhocks I want to sow. Nicotiana will have to wait until March...
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2012
12:01 PM

Post #8966292

What kind of foxglove? I have Pam's Choice. It didn't get very big this past year but hopefully, it comes back in a next of year.

Have you tried winter sowing any of the annual reseeders...rudbeckia or poppy? I want to try the Peony Poppy this year.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2012
12:05 PM

Post #8966298

Anita

I WS poppies in previous years without any problems - have not tried rudbeckias though. Digitalis, I have had limited success with as well. I seem to do better with the digitalis when I direct sow, so I will save some of my digi seeds for direct sowing in the spring. Pam's Choice has been elusive for me...

Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 13, 2012
12:07 PM

Post #8966301

oh Anita - I am sorry, you asked what kind of diigtalis -

Camelot Rose
Camelot White
Excelsior White
Excelsior mixed colors
Grandiflora
Pam's Choice
and Apricot Beauty...
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2012
12:13 PM

Post #8966305

yes Ive tried poppys and rudbeckia,poppys you have to plant out at first true leaves cause they hate transplanting,rudbeckia is easy.Here's my fox glove last year the 1st wintersown year it was small and didnt bloom the 2nd year big and bloomed alot ,Its a biennial so next year might not come back but I',m sure it reseeded.

Thumbnail by TomVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 13, 2012
1:19 PM

Post #8966399

You have beautiful, healthy looking foxglove! Mine were not nearly as big the first year. Tom, you probably have a longer growing season??? We can safely plant out June 1st and get the first frost Oct 15th.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 13, 2012
1:54 PM

Post #8966431

The one in the pic was in it's 2nd year,the first year it stayed short,matter of fact I had forgotten what it was until it bloomed.This was the 1st time I had ever grown foxglove.Since I started wintersowing it's the 1st time I've grown a lot of things:o) I never was good at growing from seed until wintersowing,It is really an awesome way to start seed and save a lot of money on plants:o)Tom

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 13, 2012
6:08 PM

Post #8966697

I have seeded:
Calendula Sherbet Fizz
Campanula--blue bells of Scotland
Campanula medium
mixed lettuces
Tuscan kale
Rudbeckia Green Wizard (a total fail last year)
Amberboa (first time with this plant)
Lavatera-variegated
KMOGG-variegated
Larkspur-saved seed, mostly blues
Aster-Spider Chrysanthemum
Nicotiana Fragrant Cloud
Aquilegia flabellata v. pumila
Aquilegia --Fragrant
Silene-Jack Flash
Sedum--three or four varieties
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 14, 2012
4:38 AM

Post #8967039

Celene that's a nice list, from your list I've wintersown Kmogg varigated and the nicotina with success .The varigated kmogg reseeds now for me

Thumbnail by TomVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 14, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #8967172

The KMOGG reseeds for me as well, I just collected some seed because people wanted plants, and while I end up digging out a few misplaced seedlings, I wanted to have enough for everyone who wants it. It's a nice plant :)

I am going to try some cosmos and zinnias again this year, the ones I wintersowed barely germinated last year. I collected these seeds, so if they don't germinate, I only wasted some time. The ones I did not wintersow germinated well.
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 14, 2012
8:42 AM

Post #8967252

I have wintersown columbines, coneflowers, foxgloves, hollyhocks and blanketflowers. I have just prepped a bunch of annuals but not sure when to put them outside. I have the baggies inside a plastic pin with the seed packages unopened so all I have to do is water and dump seeds in the bags and then put outside.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 14, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #8967426

I am sowing annuals right along with my perennials now. I'll sow a few more when my JL Hudson order arrives...Geum (Prairie Smoke), centaurea, corn cockle, dianthus (these are perennials) and some annual coreopsis.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 15, 2012
5:02 PM

Post #8969093

I don't put the tender annuals,like cosmos,zinnias and marrigolds out until much later.I do them when I do my tomatos,in my zone it would be mid March.Rosrarie I have a hard time with columbines,I try them every year and end up with only a couple.Yay I got my japanese maple seeds in from trades yesterday.Tom
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

January 15, 2012
5:54 PM

Post #8969145

Hi all,
Well I am really interested in all of your winter-sown plant list. This next week we, grand-kids and I, will be winter-sowing some veggie seeds.: Carrots, Broccoli, Peas, Spinach, Chard, Turnips, Onions, Leeks for starters.
I am bin into teaching kids to grow food. It's not that I have anything against flowers, I think growing food is a very important skill to acquire.
Keep up the lists, I love seeing what others are growing. Besides, maybe I need to mix food and flowers. One needs their life brightened.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 15, 2012
6:03 PM

Post #8969154

Interesting...I may try a few zinnias, marigolds and cosmos "spring-sowed" in April and see how they compare.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 15, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #8969164

Tom

I have found that columbine seeds are best just scattered outside on the ground. I have had better luck this way than any other way with columbine seeds.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 15, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #8969168

I use GA-3 with aquilegia seeds and they germinate well.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 15, 2012
6:25 PM

Post #8969187

I was planing to start late Febr. so by the time St. Patrick day comes the flowers will be ready for the garden. Is that good idea or shoul I start sooner. Thanks . Etelka
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2012
4:31 AM

Post #8969521

Most of the columbines that I wintersown and had luck with were from swaps. The seeds I bought from Summerhill didn't sprout at all. I wintersown about four or five varieties. These seeds I bought from TM and Swallowtail Garden. It's one of my favorites I also had great luck with lupines but they do not bloom until the second year for me.

I'm in zone 5. Is March too early to wintersow the annuals? Should I wait until April?
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2012
4:41 AM

Post #8969526

Lonejack I grow a vegetable garden with my grandson,I'm really into teaching him all about gardening.Kiseta some seed need stratification to break their dormancy and some can take up to 3months of freezing and thawing and refreezing and thawing to get them to germinate.Some ppl trick them and put them in the refridgerator but then you would have to nick the seed if it is a requirement.But putting them outside you wont have to do that,mother nature takes care of it.So it all depends on your zone and the seed you are wintersowing and it's requirements.My rule of thumb is Hardy perrenials out in Jan,.Tender perrenials and hardy annuals out in Feb.annuals out in March .tender annuals out in april

Thumbnail by TomVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 16, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #8969693

I haven't started either... I just dont have the time. but I do think most of what i'm doing are annuals, so i wont do them until mid-March.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #8969738

Yesterday, I sowed:

Anchusa Blue Angel
Creeping Bellflower
Digitalis Camelot Rose
Garlic Chives
Helenium Mardi Gras
Hollyhock Peach/Raspberry
Hollyhock Single Red
Hollyhock The Watchman
Primula Beesiana
Salvia Azurea
Tricyrtis Puberula
Verbascum Nigra
Verbascum Phoenicnm
Actaea Matsumarae 'Elstead' (cohash)
Snapdragon Major White (3ft)
Pulsatilla


I have more to do. I will wait on my annuals until Mid to late March.

TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2012
7:37 AM

Post #8969753

Carolyn now that's a nice list and thankyou for the tip on the columbine
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #8969860

I work in a kitchen, we use a lots of dressing and mayo jars that have large opening, can I use it like this or should I leave the lid on and cut out small oppening, like 2" large.

Thumbnail by kiseta
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Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2012
9:11 AM

Post #8969885

I'm so behind on winter sowing compared to last year. I have the saved cut jugs, and the soil. I just haven't started yet. I also collected and labelled seeds from my garden last summer and fall so I'm not going to purchase as many seeds as I did last year. Yesterday I did buy some annual seeds:

Four O' Clocks Kaleidoscope Mix
Amaranthus Summer Poinsettia Mix
Zinnia Violet Queen and Enchantress
Sweet William Double Dwarf, Mixed Colors
Stock Giant Imperial, Mixed Colors

I already have in the freezer poppy seeds for Meconopsis Lingholm, Violet Feathers, Black Cloud, Mixed Peony Poppies, Fire and Snow, Antique Rose, Swansdown, Red/White Striped Peony poppies, White Cloud, Flemish Antique, Pink Skyline, and Salmon Pink Venus Poppies.

I'm focusing on adding more fragrant plants this year, and I'll also do bell peppers, tomatoes, and basil again from seed. Last year was my first winter sowing, and I'm sold on this method. I was thrilled at the success rate of germination of my seeds. Furher, I did winter sow columbine Mint Sorbet, and it germinated fine, just hasn't bloomed yet. I'm looking forward to seeing it bloom this year.

Finally, I'm going to say that I liked the milk jugs for sowing the best. The flats and other containers that I used dried out much too quickly, and needed more attention than the milk jugs. Annette

TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2012
10:58 AM

Post #8969991

Kiseta,I would leave the lid off but I would put a piece of plastic over it and rubberband it then cut a few slits in it to let in water and snow and heat out ,I think without the lid the hole would probly be too big and let too much heat out or too much heavy downpours in...Annette don't you just love wintersowing tomatos,I love to try all the different tomatos and they grow so much better when they are wintersown.I use 2ltre soda bottles,they are my favorite.Do you use a paint pen for labeling?.I opened a new group on Facebook called Seed Traders if anyone is on facebook and likes to trade come join it's new and a good way to get some seeds cheaply..
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 16, 2012
12:04 PM

Post #8970058

2 litre soda bottles are my favorite as well. I cut the top off the then use zip lock bags over them. I do this with milk jugs as well...
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

January 16, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #8970062

Thank you, TomVa, for your advice, I also have some large oil bottles, but they have regular size caps, and will use some of the milk jugs. It my look like a red-neck garden in the front , my dog would play with the bottle if I hid the jars in the back yard. I kept some boxes too, I am set. For the soil, should I use peat moss, I have a large bag of it, mix some vermicculite in too?? Thanks again, Etelka
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 16, 2012
12:39 PM

Post #8970083

Etelka,we call it a pot ghetto but I like red-neck garden better lol.I use miracle grow all purpose potting mix for the last couple of years and it has worked well.Your mix sounds fine to me
Carolyn on the 2ltre soda bottles i cut them in half and then cut a lil v on both sides of the bottom half then I can slide the top half back on looks like a shrunken 2 ltr soda bottle then:o) then during spring I just raise the top up a lil then it has ventilation windows on the side to let more heat out:o)
http://www.facebook.com/#!/groups/103053019817358/ this is the seed trading site on facebook..Tom
Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 16, 2012
2:07 PM

Post #8970245

I had never grown tomatoes from seed till last year, and yes the plants were very healthy, we were picking the fruit well into the fall.
I do like the paint pens for labelling, I get them from Michael's here. I label the jug/container on the outside, and I use a clear plastic knife to have a label inside the jug for when I plant them out. I've read on some of the other forums here that some folks like to cut up mini blinds and use them for labels, but I haven't done that yet. Annette

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 16, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #8970266

I use strips of miniblind for plant labels, and the industrial sharpie pen to write on them. Works like a charm.
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 17, 2012
4:25 AM

Post #8970931

I never had luck wintersowing tomatoes. I read somewhere to use red containers for the tomatoes - still no luck. I'm going to try starting them inside this year and try a few in March too. Maybe I planted them too early for my zone.

I have an enclosed front porch that does not get any heat but gets a lot of sun. Last year I prepared wintersowing containers with peppers and they did very well but I did have to acclimate them to the outside. I'm thinking of trying the tomatoes that way too. For water, I was misting them when the soil looked dry. Some of my containers had plastic wrap and they seemed to generate their own water versus the coke bottles I used and had to mist.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #8971036

I do my tomatos in styrofoam cups then you could cover the cups,you know put as many will fit into a gl plastic bag,I put mine in a turned over on its side,plastic shelving unit then cover the whole thing in plastic,I put them out March 1st in my zone then mid april put them in the garden.The row on the right in this pic is all wintersown Tomatos except for some sunflowers..I put 50 plants in.They all grew very nice and healthy.Tom

Thumbnail by TomVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #8971062

Roseaire, I'm surprised you had no luck wintersowing. We are in the same zone. I had betteruck with wsing than any other.
back40bean
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #8971084

Cem9165, when do you start your tomatoes? I've started them in my basement under lights in previous years and it's not a good setup. I had such good success WS marigolds and perennials last year I want to try that method with tomatoes.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 17, 2012
9:30 AM

Post #8971344

The tomatoes that I ws'd didn't produce till August. The ones I started indoors produced a full month earlier...what am I doing wrong?
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 17, 2012
1:32 PM

Post #8971602

were they the same type of toms Celene,in both setups??I got ws tom's around the beginning of July,the early ones I grew like Paul Robeson.now some of the ones with longer daysto maturity. I got in August,but it is so much easier to just put em outside and forget about them till planting time.the only reason I dont use the bottles for them is because by March we can get warm days and I dont want to uncover each one individually and then cover them for the nite,much easier for me to just uncover and cover them all at once..This is the shelving unit on its side with all the Toms and Peppers inside

Thumbnail by TomVa
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tcs1366

tcs1366
Itasca,IL&Lk Delton, WI
(Zone 5a)

January 17, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #8971700

I did 4 Penstemons today.
Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2012
6:09 PM

Post #8972050

back40bean, I winter sowed my tomatoes on April 9th in the seed starter flats, I wet the medium, put the seeds on top, barely covered them, and with the lid on had them in partial shade on my deck. They sprouted very quickly, and I gradually moved them to larger pots and ultimately to these recycled pots. Here's a picture from June 12th., and they got about 3 times taller than this finally. I gave many plants away since I had sown 3 packs of seeds. I believe I covered the seedlings a few times if it got too cold, but if you remember last year, we warmed up in February, and didn't have too many cold days after that.

Thumbnail by Cem9165
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 17, 2012
6:25 PM

Post #8972074

Beautiful healthy olants

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 17, 2012
6:45 PM

Post #8972097

Georgia has better tomato weather, it snowed here in May last year.

I did the exact same varieties inside and WS, as a comparison: Variegated, Brandywine, Mortgage Lifter and some kinda reseeding currant tomato from saved seeds. I'm just going to let those reseed from now on, they always do. I did purchase one Fourth of July, and it was 2 weeks earlier than the seedlings I started indoors, which produced in July. The WS seed, not till August.
Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #8972104

Thanks, here's a picture of the purple peppers that were also grown from seed. I went to Pikes looking for these seeds again, but they didn't have them yet.

Thumbnail by Cem9165
Click the image for an enlarged view.

back40bean
Decatur, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #8972151

Thanks Cem9165. Your plants looked great. I may put out seeds at different times, starting maybe early March, like TomVa. I get so anxious in the Spring and, as you mentioned, it began for us in Feb last year. That, plus I always order so many more seeds than I need and this is a learning process.
Cem9165
Duluth, GA
(Zone 7b)

January 17, 2012
7:58 PM

Post #8972172

I had way too many seeds last year as well, I haven't ordered any this year, just checking the local nurseries for what they have. I won't be getting too many more seeds, and I especially want those purple peppers again.

BTW if anyone wants for a SASE, I have lots of Siberian iris seeds that were bee pollinated for Caesar's Brother, some Butter and Sugar, Texas Star hibiscus seeds, and Columbine Dorothy Rose. LMK if anyone wants some, via dmail. Annette
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 17, 2012
8:11 PM

Post #8972186

Our last snow was on May 16th here. I am in a tomato growing project at tomatoville.com, so I need to get them to maturity. Last year I had poor results due to our long cold spring. My other tomatoes did fairly well, but I need a head start. I will try some indoors and outdoors as well, for comparison as I did not even try to wintersow the toms due to the extremely cold weather. I just wintersowed hardy annuals and perennials, with varying success. The lupines really like to be wintersown, but do not bloom until the second year. I have not yet tried the annual lupines.

Last year some of my seed-starting projects were interrupted by illness so I will try again, as most of the failures were due to neglect during that time.

This message was edited Jan 17, 2012 8:44 PM
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 18, 2012
1:29 AM

Post #8972336

I had tried the annual lupines in previous years and was not pleased with them. The flowers were late and looked stunted to me. I will be sticking to the perennial lupines because of this. I do think with my short season, that the annual lupines would need to be started indoors and then put out.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

January 18, 2012
6:22 AM

Post #8972548

I'm also ashambed to say that I haven't sown any seeds yet. I do have the drainage and air circulation holes punched, potting mix purchased but need to cut the diameter of the milk jugs..it is just getting cold here. In fact, today it is not only cold but bitter with all the wind. Have somebody coming to show me how to do some computer task that need to be done this afternoon. Maybe tonight I can bring in some of the jugs and start cutting them..maybe I might get a few sown and throw out in the cold temps..but it's more likely tomorrow or this weekend. I have only purchased 6 pk. of flower seeds; want to use up what I have left over from last year that didn't get used and what I gathered from own plants this summer/fall.
roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 18, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #8972610

I found some tomato seeds from 07. Was going to wintersow them but threw them in a little plastic container with a plastic cover with holes punched in and put them in the window. I have packages with seeds and no label but it could be pepper seeds or tomato seeds. I hate when I lose the tags. But I do like surprises so I might try wintersowing some of them and put a few in the window.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 22, 2012
2:38 PM

Post #8977952

Wintersowed more today:

Delphinium ballamosum
White Liatris (floristan?)
Lychnis Dusky Salmon
Lychnis Bronze Leaf Red
Lychnis Angel Blush
Lychnis Vesuvius
Digitalis Excelsior Mix
Anchusa Azurea Dropmore
Digitalis Candy Mountain
Digitalis Primrose Carousel
Digitalis Excelsior White
Digitalis Grandiflora
Digitalis Laevicata
Digitalis Pam's Choice
Digitialis Excelsior Deep Rose
Digitalis Camelot White
Digitalis Apricot Beauty
Digitalis Snow Thimble
Hollyhock Deep Maroon
Shasta Daisy


diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 22, 2012
2:57 PM

Post #8977984

Today I wintersowed:

Poppy Darma Queen
Double Poppy
Euphorbia Polychroma
Euphorbia Marginata
Sedum Empoeror's Wave
Yellow Hibiscus
Celosia Flamingo Feather
Chrysanthemum Rainbow Mix
Centaura Black Ball
Rudbeckia Cappucino
Rudbeckia Mix
Gaillardia yellow and burgundy

I am so excited! I cannot wait until spring!!!!
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 22, 2012
3:27 PM

Post #8978027

Wow Carolyn and Diamond,Yall have some great lists,I'm still trading so my list is growing:o)Tom
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #8978086

Carolyn ~ Have you wintersown Digitalis and Shasta Daisy before? Did it take two years for them to bloom? It took two years for lupine to bloom, but they did well here, much to my surprise. I have collected some seeds from them as well.

I am sorting seeds right now, so I do not have my wintersowing quite ready yet. All a mess from last year. I did direct sow some (old) sweet peas and they are up already due to the warm weather we have been having. Now it is snowing...LOL!! I think they will survive just fine. They were old seeds and I did not want to trade them OR throw them out.

"So many seeds, so little time."
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 22, 2012
4:56 PM

Post #8978145

Evelyn

I am expecting two years for my digitalis. I have wintersown digitalis previously and although it has been a while, I do beleive it was two years. I have not wintersown shasta daisy previously, but did WS James Kellway daisies before and they took two years to mature.

I should have some lupines flowering this year that were put in the year before. I also found out recently that parsley is a biennial as well - I didn't know that.

I am doing hollyhocks this year too - Next season's garden should be interesting.

Tom, I had to make myself stop collecting seeds. I already have more than I probably have room to plant.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 22, 2012
5:05 PM

Post #8978157

I have ws digitalis and it did take two years to bloom, but they're biennials, that would be normal, yes? I did shasta daisies, the quilled petal ones, and I got one or two puny blooms last year (the first year), I'm hoping for more this year. The digitalis is "Glittering Prizes" from Diane's, I'm keen to see what the blooms look like, I seeded them along with some D. mertonensis plants that already grew in the same general area.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 22, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #8978176

Yes digitalis blooms the 2nd year Celene,your shasta daisies will be a whole lot better this year
I hear you Carolyn about too many seeds but you know,can't stop till you have one of all of them:o)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 22, 2012
5:22 PM

Post #8978179

It is my observation that perennials do much better the third and fourth year, but also sometimes the seed catalogs have photos of these ginormous fantastic blooms, and the plants don't end up looking anything like the photos.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #8978214

Right, Celene ~ Hardly ever any flowers and puny the first year. I guess that we seed-sowers have to learn patience.

First year ~ creep

Second year ~ leap

Third year ~ reap!

We still need to know what it looks like when it DOES bloom...but you are right. Seed selling is deceptive to the uninformed. Even when they say - blooms first year from seed - may be one or two flowers!!LOL!!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 22, 2012
6:16 PM

Post #8978238

I think seed catalogs should have to post a photo of the newly-emerged seedling with 1-2 sets of true leaves, a full-grown plant, and a close-up of the bloom. lol
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
8:50 PM

Post #8978400

You are hired! Start selling seeds, and don't forget all the illustrations. Now I realize how difficult it is. If they have a website with photos of every plant not only is it time -consuming for them, but for the shopper. Still, it would be best to be informed. I let go quite a few seeds, once I actually saw their photos. Not necessarily matching the description with words.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 22, 2012
8:53 PM

Post #8978403

Celene wrote:It is my observation that perennials do much better the third and fourth year, but also sometimes the seed catalogs have photos of these ginormous fantastic blooms, and the plants don't end up looking anything like the photos.


Yes, and sometimes the picture of the flower is not in proportion to the plant. That is - small and/or sparse flowers on a large plant.

roserairie
Chicago, IL
(Zone 5b)

January 23, 2012
5:49 AM

Post #8978624

I started checking DG when I'm making my seed orders just to compare the pics people post versus the seed company I'm buying from. There is always a marked difference. I still place the order but find it funny how vast the difference is.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 23, 2012
7:43 AM

Post #8978817

Evelyn, I know it'd be darn near impossible for seed/plant vendors to do this, but I sure wish they would. I try to take seedling photos from time to time, but often here on DG, there are already photos. If not for the kindness of other gardners, I'm confident I'd have weeded out agapanthus, etc.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

January 23, 2012
2:50 PM

Post #8979514

Celene ~

We now have a wealth of information at our fingertips, since we have computers. Before, we would have to have several plant encyclopedias (of which I still have), along with many other books showing the eventual size and needs of the different plants and how to put it all in a plan. Yes, there are many books, but still it does not seem enough. Now we can research without even leaving our desk. Of course it is up to us and hopefully we will share the info as much as we can, as you said...the kindness of other gardeners.

Many seed-selling companies actually have growing instructions for each, not just descriptions of the plants which will emerge from the seeds. Sometimes, universities will have lists and you can view the seedling of a particular plant.

I just found this link a few minutes ago. There are many more out there...

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/horticulture/m1245.html

Here are some more:

(very few pictures on these, but instructions for seed-sowing)


http://tomclothier.hort.net
http://www.jlhudsonseeds.net
http://www.valueseeds.com
http://www.seedaholic.com (a few nice pictures on this one...)

There are more...out there.

Evelyn

This message was edited Feb 6, 2012 9:05 PM
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

January 23, 2012
3:06 PM

Post #8979534

Evelyn,I love Tom clothier site,here is another good onethat shows the seed(actual size),the seed pod and the seedling.Great site
http://www.theseedsite.co.uk/
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

January 23, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #8979536

I am partial to the seed site as well.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

January 23, 2012
3:22 PM

Post #8979568

Thank you for posting these...I knew about Tom Clothier and JL Hudson, but the other info is fantastic. I have some Asparagus falcatus seed, trying to find info on those, and some other oddballs.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

January 23, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #8979923

Anyone had any luck with Lantana? Any special tricks?
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2012
11:29 AM

Post #8993371

Alright now who has sprouts?and of what.I've got Basket of gold allysum,lupines and yellow gallardia
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
11:59 AM

Post #8993405

Diamond, Lantana you can layer it now, it you have a old bush, put some dirt on the old branches and by the time Spring comes, it will grow roots and just cut it off and plant it by itself. Never grow them from seeds. Etelka
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 3, 2012
11:59 AM

Post #8993406

Do you have sprouts Tom? I know a friend of mine had a robin in her back yard on Monday. The weather has certainly been strange - but I'll take it!
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 3, 2012
1:16 PM

Post #8993500

Kiseta,

Lantana are annuals around here. I did get some seeds and got them started inside. Hopefully, I will get some sprouts and keep them alive until summer.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
1:35 PM

Post #8993525

Diamond, it is good to know, because they are price here as bushess. I have some Dallar red and the tall Athens rose, so next Fall if you want some seeds, let me know. this is Athens rose I planted them behide a prple grape agastache in front of the fence. I will not trim them, hoping they will grow 4ft high.

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
1:38 PM

Post #8993528

That was Dallas red, not Dallar. I think it is little shorter.

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 3, 2012
2:17 PM

Post #8993583

Kiesata, I would love to have some seeds. I buy lantana every year. I absolutely love them. Will Lantana self seed down there? Do you deadhead?
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #8993766

Diamond, I never knew it self seed, just noticed that it had roots on if it got covered with soil. I had some yellow spreding Lantana for long time, they got to grow 6feet wide, just gave them away to plant something else. You don't have to deadhead, sometime they rest for a while and start blooming again. It bloomes here till frost, and that is when I trimm the old branches, but with the pink ones I will leav them on to see if they sprout on the old branches. Just found my picture of my 4 Athens rose Lantana, hope it will get bushy this year.

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
4:21 PM

Post #8993773

The last picture is my DIL garden, this is my Athens rose

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2012
6:58 PM

Post #8994950

You have a beautiful garden, Kiseta.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2012
7:54 PM

Post #8995007

Carolyn, digitalis germinates easily warm. I always surface sow it, as I do all teeny seeds. I just started some Pam's Choice that I received last year but didn't get around to sowing, and it started sprouting under lights in 4 days. I always start warm germinators indoors under lights to get a head start with them, and to cheer me up during the winter months.

Here's my wintersow list. Most I start with a warm period indoors, with whatever recommended warm period I find on Clothier or other sites.

WINTERSOW – start warm
Out= put outside
12/8/11
Aconitum hemsleyanum “red wine” out 1/5
Aconitum carmichaeli “pink sensation out 1/5
Aconitum vulparia out 1/5
Aconitum species – likely anthora - sprouted approx. 2 wks
Actaea racemosa ‘atropurpurea’ out 1/5
Actaea simplex atropurpurea out 1/5
Filipendula (prob pink –Queen of the Prairie) – out 1/5
Filipendula vulgaris “flore pleno multiplex” – sprouted 9 days
Angelica “Ebony” – out 1/5
12/18
Gentiana asclepiadea “pink cascade” – out 1/5
1/5
Thalictrum rochebrunianum – out 1/30
Thalictrum “black stockings” – out 1/30
1/6
Japanese anemone “whirlwind
Clematis roguchi – out 1/30
Echinacea – white – 1st sprout 1/15
1/7
Actaea racemosa “James Compton”
Actaea matsumurae “elstead”
1/16
Tricyrtis macranthopsis (2010)
Astrantia “Lars”
Clematis “Princess Diana” (pink bell)
1/20
Tricyrtis puberula


WINTERSOW – straight out
12/18/11
Asclepias incarnata “Cinderella”
Asclepias incarnata “ice ballet”
1/7
Semiaquilegia escalcarata

As you can see, a few sprouted already, so obviously those won't be going outside this winter. And others haven't finished their warm period yet.

PS Nice list, Carolyn. Glad to see you've started.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 4, 2012
8:02 PM

Post #8995017

Sharon

You have a nice list of seeds you have wintersown. I have started some of my digitalis by just sprinkling the seed on the ground when the flowers had gone to seed and I had some little plants starting last summer. I wanted to WS them as well - I figured if I started them several ways, I would hopefully end up with something.

Most of what I have started so far are biennials - I also have some of the some of the hardier annuals that I want to start - several different types of nicotiania.

Truth be told - if everything sprouts, I will be hard pressed to find places for everything, but isn't that part of the addiction?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 5, 2012
12:22 PM

Post #8995640

Well, I finally figured out a way to drill holes easily in my milk jugs. Cutting to tops correctly is a bit of a challenge. Thus far just planted some columbine, bachelor buttons, and one poppy (a shirley I think). Course my cold frame is under 3' of snow and I have to dig about that much of a path to it. But now I am motivated as I actually have something to put in them.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2012
5:08 PM

Post #8995928

No matter what, Carolyn, you know I'll have far more than I can plant as well. Maybe another incentive to come north to visit your daughter?

Oberon, I just use a utility knife to cut my milk jugs, and do triangular cuts in the bottom with it as well. It works pretty well. Then I use a metal skewer to make the holes for the twist tie. I can't say anything about Alaska, but here I just put the jugs outside on the ground and let the snow pile up on top of them. This year there's almost no snow, but last year was a record 8 feet. I don't envy your Alaska winter.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 5, 2012
7:17 PM

Post #8996088

Sharon

There is always incentive to go out your way - hopefully we will be soon. My daughter was just here though - it was sooo good to see her!

I was going to do more wintersowing today, but I didn't do anything. I think I must be getting lazy in my old age. Perhaps next weekend.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 6, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #8996411

Thanks perenniallyme. I have been using a sharp bowie knife to cut the jugs and a cordless drill to cut the holes in the bottom. but the problem lies in getting the top cut in such a way as to make it easy to tip the top back to put in dirt and seed. I have been cutting almost all the way around with the exception of the handle inch or so and then just put my finger in the hole in the top and tilt the top piece back and open.

You got 8' last year. Wow. It must have moved up here this year. We get occasional big winds that blew my containers several feet and really jumbled them up. Was fortunate to get a few seedlings from most all of the jugs anyway. I had them snugged up against the house by it didn't work. So I figured if I put them in the cold frame they would stay put. I can just leave the top open to allow snow inside to provide water to the jugs as it melts.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2012
3:31 PM

Post #8997075

What kind of tip do you use in your drill for the holes?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 6, 2012
3:36 PM

Post #8997084

Just a standard bit for, well, drilling holes not a screw driver tip. It is fairly small. Tried a slightly larger one and it is too blunt to dig into the plastic. Just sort of skitters off. The one I use is about a 3/16" bit.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 7, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #8998063

I managed to water, drill holes for wiring the jugs closed, labeled (sort of) and added two more types of poppies I bought from a seed store.
The jugs are just sitting in the snow right now until I can get to my cold frame. Pray no wind comes up before then. Clear bright skies and 22F. Should make it over 30 today.
rebecca101
Madison, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 7, 2012
2:33 PM

Post #8998231

Thanks to everyone for all the useful info in this forum! I've learned a lot about wintersowing by perusing these pages. Here's what I've wintersowed this year:

Alchemilla mollis ‘Thriller’
Astilbe arendsii ‘Bella’
Bergenia cordifolia ‘Red Beauty’
Clematis integrifolia ‘Summer Indigo’
Digitalis grandiflora
Galium odoratum
Heuchera americana ‘Marvelous Marble’
Iberis sempervirens ‘Snowflake’
Polemonium caeruleum ‘Blue Pearl’
Ruta graveolans
Stachys byzantina

I guess nothing will bloom the first year...
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 7, 2012
3:23 PM

Post #8998278

Oh, I wouldn't bet on it, but I will leave the guessing of will and might bloom to the more advanced WS'rs here. I have gotten a lot of good ideas about what kinds of things to winter sow here also. This is only my second year trying it so I am staying fairly simple with things (for the most part) that I know do well here.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
5:48 PM

Post #8998412

Carolyn, no one's more lazy than me! I just don't have as many responsibilities as you do, so can more easily get planting done.

Oberon, I think your milk jugs must be thicker than mine, as mine are very easy, and I also leave the handle attached.

Nice list, Rebecca. Most perennials don't bloom the first year, but some certainly do. Most perennial dianthus, delphinium grandiflorum (the dwarf ones), agastache, lychnis alpina, centaurea dealbata, and hardy geraniums have all bloomed for me the first year, but that could possibly be because I started them indoors in January, as they're all warm germinators. I can't say if they'd bloom 1st year if wintersowed.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
6:24 PM

Post #8998433

Rudbeckia, delphinium, poppies and hollyhocks bloomed for me the first year. A couple of my foxglove bloomed but they were premies.
yadavgard
Vashon, WA
(Zone 8a)

February 8, 2012
8:00 AM

Post #8999023

Hello All! I am newbie at seed sowing and have been contemplating winter sowing. From what I read it is a good way to start from seeds.

I was thinking of doing Foxglove, Arizona Sun (annual), Shirley Poppies this year. What would you recommend? Which one should I direct sow outside now as against keep them inside under grow lights etc.

I am in Zone 5b.

Thanks
Vishal
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #8999025

I have seen all of these listed by other WS'ing people here. Poppies can be a bit dicy to transplant from containers but I did it successfully last year by just planting 'clumps'. I managed to salvage a rather poor WSing project after wind scattered my containers. This year, in addition to poppies, I am planting some new seeds for me here. Lisianthus, Love-in-a-Mist, nicotania, gazania, morning glory. I am doing snaps and cosmos as I did last year and they were great. Our zones are similar but I am finding that a zone 5b is not the same across the country.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #8999048

Oberon46 wrote:Our zones are similar but I am finding that a zone 5b is not the same across the country.


Boy, is that ever an understatement!

yadavgard - once you try WSing, you won't do it any other way. It is so easy and the results are so much more than starting seed indoors or waiting for direct sowing to catch up.




rebecca101
Madison, WI
(Zone 5a)

February 8, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #8999084

yadavgard - I've grown Shirley poppies easily just be sowing the seeds right in the garden. They just pop right up as long as you get them in early. then they keep coming back from dropped seed. I know poppies in general don't like to have their roots disturbed. But wintersowing might work too - you could try it both ways and report back here!
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
8:53 AM

Post #8999107

Oberon, when did you start your Love-in-a-Mist, Nicotania and Gazania? Are those hardy annuals plants? I'm wondering if those three are like the Rudbeckia and Morning Glory?

Yada, I would wintrsow all the seeds you have listed. I have wsn the poppies but the plants were not the poppies I expected. They were much smaller. LoL

I have had great success with Dakota Reville Gallardia, Cockscomb, Sedum, Hostas, Rudbeckia, Coneflower, Dianthus, Hollyhocks, Delphinum, Butterfly Bush, Foxglove and Coral Bells. I believe these are all on my list of seeds to start again this year.

I want to find a faster way of making my holes in the bottom of the contrainers. has anyone ever tried a soldering iron to make holes on the containers?
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 8, 2012
9:00 AM

Post #8999119

Hello all... was interested in your thread on WS'ing. I did it for the first time last year and had pretty good luck. I have not put anything out yet. I did it in March last year. I have 3 large black trashbags of 2 ltr pop bottles, plus the ones I used last year. lol I need to decide what I want to put out.

I use a drill on the bottom of my pop bottles to make the holes. I have done them in the valley part of the bottoms and also on the side at the bottom of the bottle. The bottoms are pretty strong but if you use the drill you can usually get through without much trouble.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #8999145

Thanks Crit I have a drill but I don't believe I have the correct tip. I will have to go to Lowes enlist some help with finding the correct tips.
lonejack
Longview, WA
(Zone 8b)

February 8, 2012
9:41 AM

Post #8999174

Hi all,
(I'm from north of the Dixon or I would have said Hi Y'all.)
Not to make fun of all of our brothers and sisters in the South, they are some of the most caring, loving people I have met.

When I was doing milk jugs with the grandkids, I took a cereal bowl and turned it upside down and had my 5 year old grandson
hold a sharpie flat on the bottom on the bowl and turn the milk jug to mark a line all around.
Then I cut a slit at one corner, enough to insert a scissor, and he finished cutting all around; leaving a side flap attached so we could bend the top back.
We then took a piece of 2 X 6" board, folded the tops back, set the bottom on the 2 X 6 and drilled the drain holes. I held the top folded back and helped hold the drill. That way when we drilled through the bottom it went a little into the 2 X 6.
If you are doing your own drilling, sitting the bottom on the 2 X 6 with the top folded back helped stabilize the whole thing.
I have read where some people actually use the drill if reverse to drill through the bottom.
Have fun.
Paul
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
10:26 AM

Post #8999230

I would think that using a soldering iron would mess up the tip with melted plastic. I use a drill but as LoneJack pointed out, it is helpful to have something to drill into. Otherwise the drill bit can skitter a little on the plastic. I will do as he suggested and get a block of wood for backup.

I have only just started sowing the seeds in the milk jugs. Maybe started a couple of days ago. I am really excited this year and hope that the results are better than last year. Even messing it up I had pretty decent return on WS investment. And the idea of not having to put all my seeds indoors under lights is a relief. I will save the 'garage greenhouse' for my dahlias and glads. Will also start lilies that I ordered inside since we have such a short growing season I need all the lead time I can get. At that, the WS poppies bloomed like crazy all last year til freezeup. The only reason I don't just broadcast is that I use preen to keep the weeds down and that would prevent the poppies from germinating also.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #8999314

Paul, I had not considered using the block of wood to drill into. Great idea! I was wondering how you got a bite with the drill in the plastic containers. I had been using an exacto knife. I'm usually an accident waiting to happen, so I made a vow to try a safer way to make the drain holes. I have 3 or 4 garbage bags full of containers I need to fill. The drill should speed things along.

Oberon, how did you make your garage greenhouse? When did you start your dahlias inside?

How soon do you all start feeding your seedlings?
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
11:48 AM

Post #8999318

The block of wood makes sense - I too am an accident waiting to happen. I use an old steak knife that has been in with my gardening tools for quite some time now and just stab at the bottom of the milk carton or soda bottle. Sometimes the whole carton goes flying and I end up having to retrieve it from no man's land in the basement.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
11:53 AM

Post #8999323

LoL@ Susan! Ditto here I end up collapsing the container or with a big slit where I wanted a small hole. LoL
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
1:36 PM

Post #8999469

I finally did what I have wanted to do for years -- one I retired. I bought a 4x8 sheet of plywood, put it on sawhorses, bought 8 shoplights 36" long. I bought about 25 feet of chain, light weight like a dog chain and attached it to the ceiling then cut it off about 5 ' down. That way I can raise and lower the lights as the plants grow. I start out about 3" from the trays or pots. That uses 4 lights. The other four are for big pots on the floor for my big dahlias and things that I will leave in the decorative 5gal or larger pots. Again, I can raise the light bars as the plants grow. I will start my begonias probably next week or so (which is when the nurseries up here do it). They take a long lead time. Dahlias are sprouting now, but will wait to pot them up til the end of March if I can hold them off that long. I have tubers dug from last year, so I don't know for sure which will sprout. Those I will just lay in moist soil to see who is viable and who is not. That way I don't waste dirt on a dead tuber. Then I have maybe 5 or so coming from outside as well as a few lilies. I think I lost track of what I have ordered. I printed off the orders but am too lazy to go look. They should start arriving any time in late March to April. In the fall I have two peonies coming.

Dahlias should be lightly watered upon planting then not again until they have sent up a few sprouts. I am not so good on the watering thing with seedlings. They just survive on their own with occasional watering. I spray seeds to keep them moist until they have germinated then wing it. I have some osmosis trays, as well as just plain old flats, plus 2" bedding pots, on up to the big guys. I start hardening them off around the middle of May.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 8, 2012
1:58 PM

Post #8999484

Okay, I hate to be a girl about things, but how the heck do you cut that dog chain? Normally Lowe's cuts it for me, but I was impatient last time, and bought the decorative white stuff, and my cutters won't budge. TIA for help for the tool ignorant :)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
3:32 PM

Post #8999569

LOL. Well the dog chain isn't that thick that a good pair of bolt cutters won't snip it. Or if you have a sharp wedge, you could just slam it through the chaiin. More effort and then you have to bend the link a little to get it loose. I would probably wait at lowe's and let them cut it to size. My husband was too lazy to cut it and just sort of draped it. I didn't want to be picky so I let it go until this year when I will use the bolt cutters to cut it to lengths I need.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
5:21 PM

Post #8999693

Here are a couple of pictures as a visual aide. I am not saying this is a pristine operation - just what works for me this year.

Thumbnail by Oberon46
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
5:23 PM

Post #8999698

Closeup of where I cut the jug to allow the top to flip back and still give me a large enough opening to sow the seeds. by the way, I mix the tiny seeds like snaps with a find sand to get better spread. Read that somewhere and it works great.

Thumbnail by Oberon46
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
5:25 PM

Post #8999700

Here is the fastening to keep it closed and the hole with the drill bit next to it. The bit looks larger than it is.

Thumbnail by Oberon46   Thumbnail by Oberon46
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
5:35 PM

Post #8999712

Here are a few containers out side waiting for me to dig out my cold frame where I can tuck them in out of the wind. Will throw a few shovel fulls of snow inside on top of them. My number one helper, Woodie.

Thumbnail by Oberon46   Thumbnail by Oberon46
Click an image for an enlarged view.

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
4:59 AM

Post #9000070

I went to Lowes last night to pick up my new drill bits and a 2 x 4, then went home to drill some holes. I was able to move pretty fast with my containers.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
6:59 AM

Post #9000192

Celene, the links of the chain are usually not soldered or welded. You should be able to unattach by opening a link with a couple of pairs of pliers.

(just waking up with 1st cup of coffee so I won't say more)
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9000208

Oberon, congrats on the retirement! I'm looking forward to my own retirement. LoL I'm curious about your greenhouse in the garage. Do you have shelves that you enclose in visquene? I have considered this for my own unheated garage. I'm not sure how to protect plants from the draft of opening garage in frigid temps.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 9, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #9000221

My WS'ing did better with the 2 ltr pop jugs than with the milk cartons, so I didn't even save milk cartons this year. Sometimes I drill my holes at the bottom around the outside of the jug. I hold them in my lap when I do it and when I get away from the hardened bottom they drill real easily. There is just a small amount at the bottom where the water doesn't get out, but with the amount of dirt I put in the jugs, it didn't matter.

I need to start looking through my seeds to decide what I want to WS. I also am going to start some more canna's by seed in the house. I did that last year and they did GREAT!
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
7:34 AM

Post #9000232

Crit did you use bottom heat for your Cannas started inside?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 9, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9000248

Crit, we don't buy anything in a 2 liter jug so while I would love to try it...
My garage is heated and runs between 50-55 most months. Since I start up my 'greenhouse' the first of March, the weather is pretty mild and the plants aren't hurt by a temporary blast of cool air. Today we are having a chinook and the temp is 40F. Not so good for winter sowing though as it might confuse the seeds. But then, what germinates at 40F?
Good comment on the chain -- I will have to go look to see how they are strung together. But you know the lights don't weight much so any light weight chain would work. I use chain rather than string or rope since it is so easy to just move the hooks up or down to raise or lower the lights.
If I am propogating, I use 4 ounce dixie cups with holes in the bottom and an inverted 12 oz clear plastic drinking glass for a 'dome'- going to try that for my lysiantha and keep them in the house where it is warmer to speed up germination. Wish I had several heated pads but they are darned expensive.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 9, 2012
8:01 AM

Post #9000269

No Anita, I don't use bottom heat on the canna's. I just plant them in the peat pots and put them near a window that gets afternoon sun. They all sprouted fantasticly! I clipped the shell with toe nail clippers then soaked them, at least, overnight. I also tried gently hitting them with a hammer to crack the shell prior to soaking, only hit 1 too hard and it broke open. I was really quite surprised at the germination rate! Didn't matter which method I used to break the shell.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9000327

I'm also suprised at how well the Cannas germinate. I finally have some of the bronze cannas. I soaked the seeds but forgot to scratch the surface. I have had most of them to germinate. I have also started some amaranthus, calla, and lantana. I found a heat map from Menards for $20. I couldn't believe how cheap it was. Of course it does not have a temp control, so I took a gamble. It's worked well this far.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 9, 2012
9:27 AM

Post #9000370

I have sent out a call to some friends and family to see who buys things in those clear plastic 2 liter jugs. I wasn't really thinking very 'globally' when I figured I wouldn't have any to try. :)
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 9, 2012
10:06 AM

Post #9000400

I too prefer the 2 liter soda bottles. Unfortunately, we don't buy them any more either... I will have to save what I do have for next year as well. At least that way, I should lessen the possibilities of removing a finger or a hand with the steak knife if all my holes have already have been created! :-)

diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
10:16 AM

Post #9000409

LoL I have collected 2 liters from the drinkers at work and from the families I collected milk jugs. Sometimes I would hit up the coffe shops for the milk jugs. Right now I have 2 bags of containers to cut up so I thingk I'm set for this season. Does anyone recycle their jugs?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 9, 2012
1:47 PM

Post #9000692

That's what I was wondering. I recycled mine but was wondering how you can get the plants out easily without cutting the tops clean off. the two liter jug thing where you simply cut them in half or so, then cut slits to allow you to slide the tops back on would work great and allow for recycling
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 10, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #9001812

I generally don't use mine again for wintersowing, as the tops usually break off by the time I'm done with WS, but I do often recycle some of the bottoms for potting up divisions of shallower-rooted plants for my summer "cheap perennial sale." The rest I put in city recycling.
I have no problem collecting containers, as I probably drink close to 2 gallons of skim milk a week.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 11, 2012
4:06 PM

Post #9003287

I don't think it would be very easy to remove the plants without the top totally off. I recycle mine too.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 11, 2012
4:50 PM

Post #9003330

My daughter said I should go to the recycling place where they separate stuff like paper and plastic. You can fish around and take all the 2 liter bottles you want. Those could be recycled as WS pretty easily as described here. They just don't have a very big surface to plant in
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 13, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9005129

I got a lot if wsing done this weekend. WooHoo I'm excited about getting more done and the possibility if more new plants.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 13, 2012
11:08 AM

Post #9005252

I just finished up my seeds this morning. Not sure if I am gaining much. Our season is so short and it doesn't really warm up outside to sprout stuff til around april or may. Oh well. We'll see. At least the containers won't get tossed across the yard this year. My cold frame got dug out this weekend and they are all safe and secure inside.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 13, 2012
12:30 PM

Post #9005331

Well winter finally got around to coming around here.it got cold!!,lol,but all my sprouts that sprouted early are fine and growing good.Im ready for spring,here in a few more wks I will be putting tomatos and peppers and some annuals then a cpl wks after that the tender annuals :o)
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 14, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #9006370

I need to go through my seeds and see what I want to WS. I usually put mine out in March.

HAPPY VALENTINE'S DAY everyone!!!!

I wanted to share a picture where I am 'growing a dog'. lol Bobbi likes to lie in the sun, but the ground was too cold, so she gets up in the planter. lol DH made the trellis for me and spelled 'peace' that way intentionally, because our yard is so peaceful. It is our haven. In the summer I plant cypress vine in the pot and it grows onto the trellis.

Thumbnail by Crit
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 14, 2012
10:46 AM

Post #9006473

that is just adorable. Great use of a planter until it is ready for 'the real thing'
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 14, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #9006578

Crit, love the sign and the dog! LoL I have wanted to grow a trumpet vine. I wondered if I could grow it in a pot. I heard TV can take over a garden so I was wondering if it is a heavy seeder or if it sends out the runners? does anyone have any experience with Trumpet vine? If it sends out runners, I can plant it in a pot but if it reseeds all over the place I better not plant it. I have had terrible luck with invasive vines, first with Morning Glory and then Passion vine. I can't get clematis to grwo around my lamp post but I still have MG! LoL

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 14, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9006782

I planted MG around the shepherd's hook that holds my bird feeder and in about a month, I had to cut the feeder off the hook to fill it, lol.
perenniallyme
Jamaica Plain, MA
(Zone 6a)

February 14, 2012
3:24 PM

Post #9006821

Anita, I haven't grown trumpet vine, but know from my neighbor's yard and my brother's yard that it's very invasive. (!!!) It sends underground runners many feet away. It may also seed itself, but that I don't know.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2012
12:25 AM

Post #9007239

Thanks Per

This message was edited Feb 15, 2012 2:44 PM
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2012
10:22 AM

Post #9007694

A question regarding drainage. I have holes in the bottom of my jugs and they are in my cold frame sitting on my deck. Since it was just dug out of the snow it has ice and snow in the bottom (a few inches). If my jugs sit on top, as more snow comes in (I folded the cold frame tops back to allow snow inside to keep the seeds moist (as much as falls through the milk jug top or the slight opening where the top meets the bottom) how will they drain until the bottoms thaw out. I guess since it should be little warmer in the frame sitting on a dark deck, the snow and ice will melt. I wonder if I should put them in some sort of grid, or into flats that have holes in them to elevate the bottoms a bit above the deck.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2012
11:49 AM

Post #9007777

Oberon, maybe someone with more experience will chime in but I don't think you need to elevate your containers above the deck. Some of my containers are in a crate with holes in the bottom but most are in card board boxes. They seem to drain okay.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2012
12:52 PM

Post #9007864

Are they in the snow? I assume they are outside.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2012
1:30 PM

Post #9007910

Yes they are outside in the snow. I placed my boxes outside a few weeks ago to make more room inside my house. I have been wsing for a few weeks. A couple of the boxes had few inches of snow inside before I filled them with the jugs. So some of my jugs are sitting on top of snow inside the boxes. Some of the jugs have snow on top.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9007921

Well, sounds like my set up more or less so I won't worry about it. I WS poppies because I don't want to broad cast them in the garden. I preen the garden to try to keep the weeds down and that would also (obviously) prevent the poppies from germinating.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2012
1:46 PM

Post #9007937

Do you have pictures of your poppies?
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 15, 2012
2:03 PM

Post #9007969

oberon I always do a few holes near the bottom in the side of the container, for good drainage,especially on a container with a flat bottom..
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2012
2:21 PM

Post #9007986

I wondered about that. Rather too late for now. I will watch them when they thaw out and if they seem to be swimming I will elevate them somehow til they drain. Diamond said she didn't have any trouble but the side holes would be good insurance.

Yes I have many pictures of my poppies. What are you interested in. I have mostly pink peony, red single and doubles, purple, lavendar, black; then some must have crossed because I ended up with some red with 'eyeliner' of black around the outer edges. I had a heck of a time trying to keep them separate to get seeds this last fall.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 15, 2012
3:38 PM

Post #9008062

Wow, I would love to see the purples, blacks and red especially the one with te eyeliner. I wsed some poppy thinking it was the Oriental. Unfortunately it was the California poppy. My favorite is the Alpine. I am wsing the oriental this year and hopefully that is the what will grow.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 15, 2012
5:15 PM

Post #9008160

I dug up all my orientals in the back yard last year. I am sure shoots will come up anyway. They were so floppy and unattractive most of the time. And when they were done blooming the plants looked awful. I planted a geranium there called Splish splash. Blue streaked. If yours don't grow, let me know and if I get some growth from roots that I didn't remove I will send them. I will post some pics as soon as I can find them.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 16, 2012
5:54 AM

Post #9008561

Oberon, if you have some seeds from your poppies, I would love to have some. All I have is a dark red I had in a planter last year.

I'm starting to think about what I want to WS. I will put them out in March. I have some plastic storage bins that they were throwing away at work because they were cracked. Perfect for me because I get drainage out of the bins.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 16, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9008565

I never had any luck with perennial poppies, love the annuals, though. I don't have any decent pictures of my poppies from last year, they were great.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 16, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9008569

Crit, send me a dmail with your address
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 17, 2012
6:23 PM

Post #9010517

Well, I finally planted my lisianthus seeds. I put them in one of those flats with styrofoam trays that allow you to plant 75 little plugs. There is a large hole in the bottom of each one and you put a mat under it that wicks water from a flat underneath. Sorry my discriptive skills are lacking. Anyway, I got hold of a heating pad and have set it on there set for 75-80 which is the germination temp recommended - 10-20 days to germinate. I put two seeds in each little plus. Didn't try to note which colors when where. I would just be thrilled if they germinate. Never planted pelleted seeds before. I have them in the dining room out of direct light. Oh, there is a clear cover on top to keep in moisture.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 18, 2012
6:20 AM

Post #9010861

I keep forgetting to bring my list up here to remind me what I've got out there, but here's what I think I remember I WS'd so far: (# of containers)
Red Fox Veronicas (about 20-26, something like that)
Dark Knight butterfly bush (12)
A light pink butterfly bush (don't recall the name) 12
Columbine (don't remember the variety) 1
Deep wine double Hollyhocks 1

This year, other than the Columbines and Hollyhocks, I've only sowed what I planned for in advance so there's not that many. I couldn't help myself with those 2 additions though, I dearly love Hollyhocks and have never grown Columbines and had been wanting to try it. :)
Oh, I wanted to mention also... I think I read in this thread, someone talking about their Hollyhocks and when they first bloom... but, the first season I had my baby Holly, she bloomed wonderfully!! Let me see if I can find a picture or 2...

This message was edited Feb 18, 2012 10:22 AM

Thumbnail by speediebean
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Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 18, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #9010888

I also love hollyhock but don't seem to have much luck growing them. Maybe I will try WSing them instead of buying a plant. It may be more hardy that way

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 18, 2012
6:44 AM

Post #9010895

That one photo'd above was the only one I'd ever tried to grow, and she was Winter Sown, 2 winters ago when we had like 47 feet of snow. =) She's in a rather sandy/rocky full-sun location, the soil is semi-well amended with compost. I didn't have one little bit of rust on her or anything, she really seems to like it there.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 18, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9010923

I'm getting ready for WS'ing today...some goodies from the FB seed trading forum, and other trades with local gardeners...

Perennial alyssum
perennial ageratum
Some kind of allium from which my neighbor let me collect seed, lol
Adenophora
Agrostemma
Many Dianthus
Some Silenes and Lychnis
Sweet Peas
Sweet Cicely
Tons o' lettuces and greens
Pearl Bush
Yarrow
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 18, 2012
9:34 AM

Post #9011062

Thanks Speedy. I think I will give it another try. I would guess I overwater and rot them. And my soil is pretty peaty and rather heavy. It drains well, provided some overeager gardener doesn't flood it every time the top inch gets dry.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 18, 2012
9:39 AM

Post #9011065

That is very nice Speedy
Ive got sprouts of Japanese Maple,butterfly bush,salvia turkistanica,spirea,balloon flower,yellow gallardia,lupine so far
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 18, 2012
11:17 AM

Post #9011148

I never thought of trying to grow a bush. I guess I thought it would take too long to see it big
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 18, 2012
11:48 AM

Post #9011171

I have planted seeds two weeks ago and I don't have any sign of sprouts. planted Larkspur, columbine orange cosmos, red salvia and cleomie. Is that ok or maybe I am not watering enough. Tonight it should rain and that should be enough. It has been 50-60 degr. daytime, goes down to upper 30 at night.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 18, 2012
12:51 PM

Post #9011214

Oberon, I've sowed some bushes, it depends on the growth rate. Rose of Sharon blooms the first year, or def. the second, butterfly bushes bloom the second year pretty reliably.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 18, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #9011245

I would love to have a Rose of Sharon but it would have to be pretty hardy. Able to withstand down to say -20, though it rarely gets that cold, but -10 to 15 isn't too unusual.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 18, 2012
2:26 PM

Post #9011273

Kiseta, I would suggest you check the soil in your containers, down about 1-2 inches, and if it's dry at all, then water, but really unless it's been particularly rain-free since you sowed them then they should be ok. Also, if you're getting down into the freezing (and below) temps at night at all, that's probably why you're not seeing any sprouts yet. I sowed most of my stuff about 3 weeks ago and see no signs of life yet, but I figure maybe in another month or so, or 2, or 3. (those would be the Veronicas). The butterfly bushes et al were all done within the last week or so.
I'd forgotten, I also sowed some Pieris Dorothy Wycoff seeds as well, oh my gosh, how'd I forget that!? I sowed 7, figuring that should give me enough sucess (I hope) to cover just one side of the underneath of my deck. =)

So, butterfly bushes bloom the second year, not the first, Celene? This year is the first time I'm WS'ing them... or, growing them at all from any stage, for that matter, so I'm just trying to gear up for what to expect. Do they WS successfully, from your experience? Any problems with transplanting seedlings?


Oh, here's another shot of my Holly during her first year...

Thumbnail by speediebean
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 18, 2012
2:33 PM

Post #9011286

Oberon, I have along the lines of eleventy million seeds, so if you plant some and they die, it won't be much of a loss, lol. I don't think they will, though. It says it's a Zone 5 plant, but that lists -20 degrees, which it just about never is here. PLMK if you want seed, I'll check the pods on the plants.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 19, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9012017

speedibean I have seen butterfly bushes get a few blooms the first year but much more the second year.with wintersowing..The containers I have sprouted all went out on the wintersolstice in Dec.We as probably everyone have had a real mild winter
Kiseta if you have condensation in your containers when they aren't frozen then they don't need watering.In all my years of wintersowing I have never had to water the containers till mid april,by then the tops have been removed on the containers that have sprouted because of our warm temperatures
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2012
9:34 AM

Post #9012022

this is really dumb, but--- you cut off the tops when they are mostly germinated? Or after you see the first few little green things coming up? It never occurred to me to just cut the tops off...maybe I shouldn't admit that. :(
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2012
10:47 AM

Post #9012064

Oberon, not a silly question. I think the containers are cut in half for ease of filling and venting. My 2liters are cut in two. Once the weather warms and my sprouts are getting big, I remove the top half of the container. If my sprouts are touching the lid then it definitely time to remove the lid.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9012081

Gotcha. I cut my milk jugs about 90% through only leaving where the handle is. Then I use the handle and my thumb in the hole to 'pry' the 'lid' up to plant. So it would take nothing to cut off the lids when the plants are say 2-3" tall
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2012
11:24 AM

Post #9012103

That's usually how I do it. Makes it easy!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 19, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #9012120

I can hardly wait to see how this year turns out. I did such a really bad job last year and still got some plants. So this year I should have plants out the wazoo!!
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 19, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #9012199

LoL the first time I heard of wintersowing I was so sure people were making it sound much easier than it was. I had questions and doubt each step of the way. I was so sure I was going to mess everything up...until I planted my first sprouts, that's when I git hooked. LoL My wintersown babies convinced me to expand my existing bed and create more. I probably have over 10 flower beds now. There's no way I can allow my new sprout to be homeless. Now that I have 3 years of wsing under my belt I don't want to start seeds any other way.


TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 20, 2012
2:35 PM

Post #9013725

Amen diamond,what you thought was a hard to germinate seed,wintersowing makes it so easy that even me!! can grow from seed
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
3:53 PM

Post #9013821

I set out more seeds. I can hardly wait until spring!!!

POPPY DRAMA QUEEN
PAPVER SOMINFERUM DOUBLE
EUPHORBIA POLYCHROMA
EUPHORBIA MARGINATA SNOW TOP

HARDY YELLOW HIBISCUS
CELOSIA FLAMINGO FEATHER
CHRYSANTHEMUM RAINBOW MIX
CENTAURA BLACK BALL
SEDUM EMPEROR’S WAVE
RUDBECKIA CAPPUCINO
SALVIA BLACK/BLUE
RUDBECKIA MIX
GAILLARDIA YELLOW
GAILLARDIA BURGUNDY
CELOSIA RED VELVET
CROCOSMIA
CROCOSMIA MASONGRENDEN
PURPLE CORAL BELL
JOE PYE
GAILLARDIA Apricot ArizonA
BLUE FESCUE
MALVA ALBA
MALVA SYLVERTRIS
BALLOON Flower Fairy Snow
COLUMBINE dbl WHITE
CRANESBILL JOHNSON BLUE
LAVENDER
CORAL BELL MIX
PRETTY POLLY AND PLUM PUDDING
PEONY POPPY
PINK AND RED
HOSTA NOID
BUTTERFLY WEED
SCABIOSA BURGUNDY AND VANILLA
ECHIE SUNRISE
BUTTERFLY BUSH BICOLOR
ECHIE POW WOW
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 20, 2012
4:04 PM

Post #9013834

Holy cow. That is amazing.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
4:28 PM

Post #9013877

Oberon, I'm not done. LoL My list is nothing. Some of the other folks would have 100 containers out. LoL I may have 50 by the time I'm done. I have flowers beds all around my home. Last year I made a bed around my shed. I have to fill on some of the holes. LoL

In 2009 I started making beds. I have some bfore and after pictures. The first pictures are after the beds were made and the winter sown plants were initially planted. The second pictures are of the same bed (maybe different angles) a couple of months later.

Thumbnail by diamond9192002   Thumbnail by diamond9192002   Thumbnail by diamond9192002
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diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9013886

One more inside the fence

Most of the plants were wintersown

Thumbnail by diamond9192002   Thumbnail by diamond9192002   Thumbnail by diamond9192002   Thumbnail by diamond9192002
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Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 20, 2012
4:49 PM

Post #9013902

What a lot of work. You really have a wonderful variety of flowers. Are they both perennial and annuals? Do you sow several containers of one flower, or pretty much one type in one container assuming you will get enough of that kind to fill your need. I ran out of milk jugs so I guess I have to start buying salads so I have some of those flat containers. Not really very deep though. And we don't get anything in the 1 liter jugs. How much, like 1/4 tsp of seeds, do you put in each jug? i mixed my poppy seeds and some of the tinier seeds with a fine sand to to get more spread. I read that somewhere.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
8:14 PM

Post #9014183

I usually only sow one type of seed in each container but I will sow several containers of the same variety of seed. Most of my seeds are perennials, some of the plants may be annuals. I have4 the same annuals every year, lantana, zinnia, marigolds and petunias, usually. I also try to sow some herbs every year.

The amount of seeds I add to each container depends on how many seeds I have and the size of the container. The gallon milk jugs of gaaillardia, hosta, rudbeckia and coneflower may be sowed pretty thick.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2012
1:30 AM

Post #9014255

I know you all put the tops of your ws jugs back on and they are attached with a thin strip of uncut plastic on the jug - I typically just cut the entire top off and then use a zip lock gallon bag with slits cut into it. This has always worked better for me.

I have not tried this yet, but I was thinking if I could use the side of the milk jug and make a divider in my milk jug going diagonally from corner to corner. Then I could and use the soil on both sides of the divider for 2 different types of seeds. This way I could get 2 different types of seed into each jug - thoughts?

I am going to try this in my next batch...
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2012
6:05 AM

Post #9014399

Sounds like it would work Carolyn. What seeds are you putting in the same container?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9014442

that really is a good idea Carolyn - completely cutting off the top and using a zip lock as a 'tent'. Would surely make it easier to sow and to check on condiitons. I am out of milk jugs and will have to use some of my flats to sow the last of my seeds. Although every time I read here the more I want to go buy more new seeds from the ideas presented.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 21, 2012
8:30 AM

Post #9014550

Anita,nice list and great before and after pics,your garden beds are beautiful..
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2012
9:16 AM

Post #9014612

Anita

Not sure yet - I still have some perennials to sow and also some of the hardier annuals.

I am going to try this - I would think it would work and I will be able to get twice the mileage out of my contaners.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 21, 2012
10:15 AM

Post #9014699

Carolyn, I think it sounds like a great idea, there's no reason at it for it not to work. As long as there's transpiration, drainage, and sunlight, it's a win/win/win! =)

Your beds sure are looking gorgeous and filling out so nicely!! I absolutely LOVE the placement of your bird bath, too!! =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 21, 2012
6:14 PM

Post #9015210

Well, I just finished WSing the last of my poppies as well as some nasturtiums Wasn't sure you could WS nasties, but figured I would give it a try. I have really tried to be careful this year. Even planted flats with holes in the bottom, spread the soil and tamped it down, used a ruler to make little rows for the seed, then labeled each row. they are out in cold storage (cold frame) sitting on top of milk jugs as I have little room. The milk jugs just got a good snow fall so they have moisture. Not sure if I am jumping the gun up here. I have at least another month of snow. I can always bring them into the garage but that sort of flies in the face of the who WS idea.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2012
4:04 AM

Post #9015507

Oberon, I agree with your last statement "...that sort of flies in the face of the whole WS idea". Think of it this way: In nature, when do the seeds naturally fall off the plants and land in the soil? Probably something like August-September-October? And then they will sit there, utterly exposed to all the elements all that time until they germinate in the Spring. If they can survive that, out in the wild (and, they CAN survive it, they were made to!), then they can survive your loving care too! =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2012
6:51 AM

Post #9015649

I guess I am thinking that there are some things that will do that 'outside' but don't do it here. viz, you can sow the seeds but you won't get flowers. For instance, nasturtiums. I am sure that of all my nasties from last year some must have dumped seeds that I didn't clean up, but I won't ever have volunteers from those seeds that sat out all winter. Same with bachelor buttons. Anyhoooo. This year will decide that for me. The containers are out there for better or worse. Plus I have different types of containers so I can also tell which ones seem to do better here.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #9015745

Oh goodness, bachellor buttons should do GREAT winter sown!! My first attempt at gardening was winter sowing, ...hmmm, I think 3 years ago, and one thing I had the most success with was Bachellor Buttons Blue Boys. That was the year thta we (in my neck of the woods) had hugemongous snows from Mid-December, feet and feet and feet worth. All my babies were utterly burried for months and months. They grew up super happy though!

To help figure out what does well with Winter Sowing, look for clues in the names. Names with words that indicate their climate of origin, like Siberian, Mountain, Brook, Canyon, should do very well. Also, tips on seed packets will include stuff like:
Reseeds or reseeding
Wildflower
Will Colonize
Self Sows
Hardy Seeds
Can be direct sown early
Seedlings can withstand frost
Sow outdoors in early Autumn
Sow outdoors in late Autumn or early Winter
Sow outdoors in early Spring while nights are still cool
Sow outdoors in early Spring while frosts may still occur
Weed (such as butterfly weed, joe pye weed, jewel weed)
Needs Pre-chilling (freeze seeds, refrigerate seeds, stratify for x amount of days or weeks)
Needs Stratification
Those are all very clear clues that they'll do well WS'n.

If you'd like a (long) list of seeds that do well Winter Sown, pop me a D-mail. =)
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2012
9:44 AM

Post #9015878

speedi, I have gotten seeds in exchanges that only have the name of the seed on them and no planting instructions. Hence, I never know if I can WS them or not. Could you copy and past the list to a dmail to me too.

My best reseeding flowers are the zinnia's and bachelor buttons-blue. I had very little planting area at my other house, but I always knew I would have those!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2012
10:57 AM

Post #9015943

Watch out. It's a lonnnnggggg list. lol
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2012
12:07 PM

Post #9016022

LOL. I hope it has common names and not botanical. I'm not that good of a gardener! lol
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2012
12:27 PM

Post #9016036

common names. I just bought (not all on list)
Cardinal Climber vine
columbine dragonfly mix
purple coneflower
cosmos
lobelia cyrstal palace (Ferry~Morse shows it as blue on one envelope and purple on another
Salvia Blue bedder
stock giant imperial mixed

The envelopes don't give much info so will try to find them in the plant database

I also bought (in the crafts dept at Walmart) sticks, like popsicles come on to label the containers, esp those with mixed seeds
PermaCycle
Indianapolis, IN
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2012
2:58 PM

Post #9016211

Carolyn22 asked if containers can be divided with plastic to permit sowing different seeds. Most definitely. Any piece of plastic or even thick cardboard can be used. The cardboard helps to retain moisture. For several seasons, I've recycled those landscape pieces used to create borders for this purpose. Works great.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #9016230

You know, I wonder why seeds (all kinds of seeds) won't survive the winter in some places -- like here where winter is longer and perhaps colder. I mean lots of things self sow -- columbine for instance. It makes it through. What is it about some seeds that that won't work. For instance, we can sow half-hardy seeds but not tender ones.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 22, 2012
3:09 PM

Post #9016231

PC - so apparently you have tried it. Makes sense to me that this would work and go a long way towards getting more mileage from the containers.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2012
5:01 PM

Post #9016385

Oberon I'm not sure what the answer is for the seeds, hopefully someone can explain that. I was surprised that some plants are annuals but the seeds survive the winter to produce new plants every year. Those are good seeds to wintersow in my zone ie poppies and cockscomb.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2012
9:45 AM

Post #9017129

I wish someone from Alaska, preferably the central or anchorage area (including girdwood, Kenai) would post here. I think I could look up posts from ChocoMoose and see if she ever discussed it. I am pretty much putting all my seeds in one container (uh, eggs in one basket) this year.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2012
1:57 PM

Post #9017379

Oberon46 wrote:You know, I wonder why seeds (all kinds of seeds) won't survive the winter in some places -- like here where winter is longer and perhaps colder. I mean lots of things self sow -- columbine for instance. It makes it through. What is it about some seeds that that won't work. For instance, we can sow half-hardy seeds but not tender ones.


The only thing I can come up with is, God planned it like that. =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2012
2:08 PM

Post #9017390

Well, that is a given. but he usually has a rational to the plan --- so like, what is the plan?? Oh boy, that should being them out of the woodwork. Cancel that question. Back to the original. Why do some seeds make it through the winter and others don't.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9017401

Heeheeheeeheee, you're funny!! One thing I can think of is outter shells and their thicknesses. Some might need more freeze/thaw cycles to stratify than others...maybe?
Oh dear, you've made me think and now my head is on fire. Pardon me while I go put it out. =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 23, 2012
3:38 PM

Post #9017495

Hmmm. Good idea. also the word I was reaching for was 'rationale' not 'rational.' However, poppies, one of the hardiest of flowers, has tiny little seeds and they need the cold to grow. So the cold does something to the seed. Maybe lets it know that winter has passed and it is time to grow again. You're right. This is giving me a headache. Phooey on it. Let's just enjoy the flowers .

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2012
4:01 AM

Post #9017946

It seems to me that the answer is probably more science-y than my little brain cell can handle, so I'm with you, let's just enjoy! =)

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 24, 2012
5:24 AM

Post #9018014

I am not sure about seeds, but for actual plants, cold-hardy plants genetically carry a trait that thickens the cell walls so that they don't burst when frozen. Tropical plants, which are not exposed to freezing, develop no such genetic trait and therefore die.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2012
5:56 AM

Post #9018061

I have a question for 5 zoners: When do you place your annuals out to ws? And do you plan to cover only when freezing temps approach? Last year I only wsed herbs but I didn't start them until danger of frost was past. I'm wondering about Amaranthus, zinnias, petunias and lantana specifically. I want to get them planted earlier enough to have plenty of bloom.

Oberon, I am going to google your question. I have a question for you. Why are plants considered annuals if their seeds survive through the winter?
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2012
6:47 AM

Post #9018122

My lettuce leaf red poppies are already coming up from seed dropped last spring. I usually break open a few of the pods and spread them around. Then when the blooms are through, cut them down and plant summer flowers in the same wooden container. I then do the same thing with them. That way I have plants in the container from spring through summer!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 24, 2012
7:03 AM

Post #9018137

Crit. What a neat idea. What is your temp now?
Diamond. I will answer first then dive to the google machine. My guess is that they are considered annuals because the plant itself doesn't survive the winter, and in some cases neither does the seed. In other cases, the original plant dies but the seed doesn't, hence my question. Why do some seeds survive winter and others don't. Or is it just that I deadhead so assidously that the poor plant never has a chance to perpetuate itself. I don't think that's right, but ...all seeds are not created equal???
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9018184

We are having unusually warm weather for this time of year. Days run in the high 50's to upper 60's with down around freezing at night. It is such confusing weather for our seeds. I have not put out any ws'ing yet because I don't want them to start growing then get hit by 'real winter' and them die off. Our normal temp for this time of year is the 40's. I may go ahead and do some since the nights are colder. I could always bring them in if winter decides to hit.

I use 2 ltr pop bottles set up in bottle holders like you get from the store, or the round trays that pots come in from the gardening centers. It keeps them from being knocked over by critters or the wind and I like to be able to monitor them without having to open the lid or pear through a tiny opening like with milk jugs. I used both last year and the milk jugs did not do as well as the clear pop jugs. Even if you don't drink pop, I'm sure you could find someone like me that does!

If anyone is interested in swaps, I am having a St. Patricks Day swap with sign ups open now. You can go here to read about it and sign up if you like.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1243603/

Have a wonderful and blessed day everyone. Think I need to get around and start doing something that requires me to get out of this chair! LOL
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 24, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9018188

I have finnaly seen some green in my jars, mosltly larkspur. Thank you Huggergirl (by the way, how you been) I can just picture all that blue in my yard. thanks again. Etelka
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2012
10:09 AM

Post #9018356

Oberon, I found the answer to your question. The answer is too long to post here, just a page or so to read but very interesting. Here's the link: http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/hil/hil-8704.html

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2012
10:24 AM

Post #9018369

Celene, you are much smarter than the average bear! =)

Diamond, I've got a big fat list of seeds/plants that do well Winter Sown, regardless of the zone you're in. Would you like me to D-mail it to you? From my understanding, it doesn't matter what zone you're in, in regards to when you Winter Sowing, it's all a matter of whether or not the seed can take, or needs, the freeze-thaw cycles to stratify. (not "startify", heeheehee) The big fat list I've got is a good starting point, and I'll be glad to share it if you like. =)
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 24, 2012
11:07 AM

Post #9018412

Speedie, I would love to have your list! You are so nice to offer. That is pretty interesting. I always thought wintersowing was based on your zone and what seeds could survive the low temperatures in your area.

I found a book that was written in the 90s about what seeds need to germinate. This entire book is posted on the USDA website as a PDF file. It has interesting information to offer. Here's the link: http://ddr.nal.usda.gov/dspace/handle/10113/41278?mode=full&submit_simple=Show full item record
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 24, 2012
12:18 PM

Post #9018498

Oh, thanks for the reading material. I read the shorter on and am now going to the usda site. thanks again
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2012
10:54 AM

Post #9019538

Anita ... that is an interesting page indeed. I usually soak my seed in boiling water and larger ones like for canna I gently tap with a hammer. Be careful or they will "shoot across the room" ! :-)

speedi ... I found a sight I had printed off seeds from when I was cleaning my seed bin the other day. It has even more listed! lol http://www.wintersown.org Check it out.

Such great info that everyone shares! Thanks so much!

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2012
2:04 PM

Post #9019747

I suddenly remembered I had some cheap aluminum bread pans like you buy in the store with plastic lids. Usually three to a pack. I built up a supply at Christmas. Now I am going to plant seeds in them. Works great as I have run out of the other containers
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2012
2:47 PM

Post #9019791

Speedie, thanks for the list. I went to the site and was soooo surprised to find Amaranthus could be wintersown. Does anyone here have any experience wsing any of the Amaranthus? The Love Lies Bleeding is the variety mentioned as a tender that could ne wintersown in late wintwr, which would be now for me. I have been hoping to have the LLB, Elephant Head and the Summer Poinsettas. Those are the seeds that I plan to ws as soon as possible.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2012
4:57 AM

Post #9020320

Diamond, WOW, what a large and tasty chunk of reading (from the NAL), thank you a trillion tons!! I have never WS'n Amaranthus but of course I will have to try... there are just so darned many plants that I have not worked with yet, because most of my experiences are with things I can get from work, and that selection is limited. We only sell what, A: is hardy in our area/zone, and B: What popularly gets sold. I am constantly seeing names of plants on here that I've never even heard of (Alsobia, for example), but are positively gorgeous, and for that I have to thank all of you more than I ever could! =)

Crit, shooting seeds across the room with a hammer sounds like good fun to me! heeheeheeee. I am very familiar with wintersown.org however, but I wasn't sure how "kosher" it would be to share it on the site here. Trudi is my hero! =) So, now the list is even longer?? Oh dear, it's been a while since I've perused the site to see what all is on the list, so I see that now is the time to do that again, >>sigh>>. A gardener's work is never done! =)

OK, now, how do y'all get those cute little images on here? I love smilies! < =D

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 26, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9020646

Thanks to Diamond, I have learned that it wouldn't be considered out-of-place or rude of me to link another site which is wonderful with Winter Sowing info. (it's how I got started!)
...So, without further ado, I give you... Wintersown.org. More specifically, the page that links you to all the different types of seeds that are good for WS'ing.
http://www.wintersown.org/wseo1/Seed_Lists.html

That page is chock full o' information when deciding what you want to Winter Sow. =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2012
10:32 AM

Post #9020705

This is the site that has databases of plants that have been WS and the results for each zone. Even one just for Alaska. I was able to copy zones 1-5 into excel and make a searchable spreadsheet out of it. I sorted by Latin name, common name, then zone. As I added each zone to the spreadsheet I added a column (only one) and put the zone for that list next to it. That way when all the items are in one list I can select by the zone that is of interest, or compare results between zones. Has been very helpful in identifying potential WS seeds.

Thanks Speedie
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2012
3:13 PM

Post #9021003

Mary

That is such a good idea. I just book marked the site, but I think your way will make it easier to search.

Today, I finished up my perennials. Not sure if I want to start my nicotiana next month or perhaps in April. I will try some of the impatiens seed I have in April

This is what I did today:

Hollyhocks:
Tricolor
Pink Doubles and Ruffles
Single Cream with Raspberry Throat
Spring Celebrities
Maroon/Burgundy
Alba Emma
Shades of Pink
Very Pale Pink
Nagrita
Dark Double Pink
Dwarf (Sideleca?)
Double Red and White
Double Pink

Balloon Flowers:
White
Fuji Blue
Fairy Snow
Mother of Pearl

Campanula Frost

Lupine - red
Tricyrtis Shihrotosiso
Anchusa Azurea
Jacob's Ladder
Helenium Red
Primula Elatior

Japanese Anemones:
Japanese Anemone Prince Henry
Japanese Anemone Tomentosa Robustissima
Japanese Kriemhilde

Burgundy Gallardia
Yellow Gallardia

Ecinacea Paradoxa

Eryngium Rattlesnake Master
Penstemon Red Riding Hood
Astrantia Moulin Rouge
Stokesia Purple Pixie

Helenium Mix
Red Cardinal Flower
Shasta Daisy Crazy Daisy

This time I used 6 packs from annuals and put my gallon zip lock baggie over the entire 6 pack. We will see how these work.




Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

February 26, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #9021059

I have a question (several) about growing Dayliies from seed. Has anyone here done it and how hard is it to do. I've read a couple of 'how-to's' and it sounds pretty easy. Guess first thing I need to do is get them in the fridge so I can get them started in 3 weeks. Any helpful idea's?

speedi, i make my smily by ^ _ ^ but no spaces between. If you are on a regular computer and not a laptop, you can make a whole bunch of different ones, but I'll have to find that. I use my laptop more than anything.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 26, 2012
4:01 PM

Post #9021064

I would not use aluminum pans, I believe that the aluminum cations are toxic to plants.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9021079

Oh shoot. I never thought of that. Has anyone else heard of that? I am sort of committed with the four I have just done. I can't take the seed out without inadvertently mixing it too deep in other soil. So you think that they won't grow. None are vegies, just flowers.

Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9021102

I had not thought about aluminum causing any problems. Everything I used is plastic though.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2012
6:55 PM

Post #9021244

You must be exhausted. And you must have containers EVERYWHERE!!!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 26, 2012
7:22 PM

Post #9021283

Oberon, you may get germination, but the more acidic the soil, the more likely you'll have problems. I'd get the seedlings out of there as quickly as you can after they germinate.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 26, 2012
8:37 PM

Post #9021369

Okay. Will do. I surely appreciate the heads up.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2012
2:35 AM

Post #9021452

Crit, thank you for the :-) help (let's see if it works), and I've got daylily seeds Winter Sown right now as we speak, so I'll keep you posted on how they come along. I used to be in another forum (which has now shut down :( ), and one person in there grew *nothing* but daylilies. He was from upstate New York and he Winter Sowed them with GREAT success. However, he used only milk jugs (as I recall), and I have mine in milk jugs as well.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 27, 2012
5:14 AM

Post #9021550

I think I'm the only WS'er who uses flats. I like the little cells, they appeal to my OCD nature. I line them up so that the Jiffy on the top of the plastic faces all the same way, and they are hinged on the left side with clear packing tape. hee hee. I'm one of "those" people.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #9021729

I use some flats also. I use a ruler to make nice straight rows just like the nursery here does. And I mix the finest seeds with a fine sand toget better distribution.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #9021786

Celene, you have OCD, and I've got AOTR... All Over The Road. :-) I've got my milk jugs in one area, (but the handles all face the same direction!), ... and then I've got a few elsewhere... then a few flats of assorted shapes and sizes... At least they're all on the deck! =)
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9021802

LoL I want to invite all of the OCDers to my home. You all would be busy for months.

Speedie, I winter sowed daylily seeds with no problems. That was a lot easier than putting them in the fridge.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
8:16 AM

Post #9021823

Okay. Let's see a show of hands! Who straightens out brochures on a counter while waiting in line... ROTFL
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 27, 2012
11:35 AM

Post #9022058

I straiten peoples pictures and trow rugs, thos that counts??? I also mispell things.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2012
11:38 AM

Post #9022065

LoL
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
12:08 PM

Post #9022099

very very close...I bet you pick dead flowers off of other people's african violets.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #9022105

Oberon, you caught me!! >>blush>> I straighten out the tubes of biscuits and cookie dough etc in the dairy case 'til DH pulls me away. =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
12:15 PM

Post #9022111

LOL. Ah, I knew I could count on you speedie. But all your plants are not planted in a row are they?

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2012
12:57 PM

Post #9022169

HECK NO! < =D One bed is planted in "drift" style... not that you'd know it now, mind you. The other is sorta random-like, since it's oddly shaped and scalloped.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #9022261

What is drift style?
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9022287

I am assuming it is drifts of the same type and color of plant...
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9022300

I found this on drift planting. I was wondering the same thing. LoL

Drift planting" is a term I use to describe a more relaxed and naturalistic approach to the arrangement of plants. The implications of this system, however, affect more than just the planting layout. Plant choice, quantities and even the overall layout and design of the garden are subtly altered by this approach.


It sounds like it's exactly what Carolyn described, natural looking swatches of colors and plants.

This message was edited Feb 27, 2012 5:27 PM

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2012
2:40 PM

Post #9022316

Wellllll Carolyn... heh heh, ummm, no, I'm not nearly as organized as that. There was a smattering of anything from Purple Coneflowers to Black Eyed Susans, Blue Boy Bachellor Buttons, Becky Shasta Daisies... Oh yeah, Blue Flax, and I don't remember what all else. I know there were some Cosmos in there too. =) I'm a mess; a mess I tell ya, a MESS! =)

Drift planting looks sorta like the pic I'm attaching. You alternate and stagger your plant types like this.

Thumbnail by speediebean
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #9022335

I understand. Will try to adapt some of that. Mine are much too regimented. But what can you expect from a bean counter.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
4:00 PM

Post #9022429

I am so excited. I admit that while I planted these seeds inside, I have never grown them before. I put the lisianthus on a heating pad since the 17th and they have just now germinated. I am putting their tray under the aerogarden light. And my portulaca have been under aerogarden lights only since the 23rd and they have germinated. Ohhhh I hope I can keep them going.

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 27, 2012
5:13 PM

Post #9022525

I like drift plantings and self-seeders, that is a look I appreciate. But when they are winter-sown, they are in flats. lol

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2012
2:33 AM

Post #9022861

Oberon, OH BOY!!! Yay you!!!! Have you got spots all picked out for your new babies when they grow up? Isn't it so cool when you try something new and it works!?! What a wonderful exhilarating feeling! You have pictures of 'em, right? ;)

Celene, I like drift plantings too, but I think I have yet to get the hang of placement of plants, 'cause it sure didn't look very 'drifty' or filled in when they grew up that first year. The second year the self-seeders helped a lot though, but still not quite enough. This year I'm gonna load that area with nothing but Red Fox Veronicas, along with whatever is left over from last year. I want that bed FULL.

Today I think I'll pop a few more Veronicas outside, along with some tomatoes. Yesterday I cleaned out the container that I had a couple tomato plants in last year (silly me, got too gung-ho and grew THREE plants in one whiskey barrel, DUH!), so today I'll add more compost (in amongst the garlic) and it'll be ready for ONE plant come Spring. The garlic plants are only around half of the perimeter, semi-circle like, so I think there should still be room for one tomato plant. Of course, it's always dangerous when "I think". =/

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

February 28, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9023051

Plants help me learn about drifts and weaving in and out of each other's space in a lovely and natural way, I just facilitate their appearance in my garden as teachers.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9023063

just wanted to share this,I got my first article published and its about wintersowing http://naturalfamilytoday.com/lifestyle/quick-guide-to-winter-sowing/

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2012
6:54 AM

Post #9023106

WooHooo Tom, CONGRATULATIONS!!! And a very nice article too, I like it! And, I "liked" it! =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 28, 2012
10:40 AM

Post #9023342

Author!! Author!! How really neat. And a really good article. Straight forward with enough info to get people interested but not so much as to be overwhelming. Way cool.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 28, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #9023461

Can't find any other place to ask this so here goes. I WS seeds from Ferry~Morse labeled "Stock, Giant Imperial, Mixed Colors." When I try to get more info I get referred to larkspur or delphiniums. Larkspur has a different latin name. what is the difference among larkspur, delphiniums and stock. I though stock was a short little flower
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 28, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #9023474

Excellent article Tom! May I have your autograph?
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 28, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #9023575

Mary

They are all different, although I think larkspur may be related to the delphs. Stock is a shorter flower and it drys very nicely. A lot of times you will see stock in arrangements from the florist.



kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9023602

We used to grow night sented stock, and if you have a porch to sit in the evening, you will enjoy the nice fragrence. It is not much to look at, but it is nice to enjoy. I think it is one of the seeds you can wintersow. Etelka
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2012
2:26 PM

Post #9023606

I found the picture. The regular stock has nice fragrence too, but it grows like the delphinium taller. Stock is also a annual.

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 28, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #9023620

I just googled a bunch and confirmed that indeed, while they look very similar, they are different species, same family. Larkspur are annuals and delphiniums are perennials (though very short lived.) Why they put the name 'stock' on the seed pckt for delphiniums I have no clue. Ferry~Morse doesn't give enough information on the packets.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 29, 2012
11:33 AM

Post #9024651

Well, I am about to WS tomatoes, peas, beans, and decorative cabbage. Peas and Beans are the bush variety. Tomatoes are for cooler regions. I really love the big beefsteak ones but can't seem to get them to produce.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 29, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #9024664

Oberon, are you putting your veggies outside?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 29, 2012
1:09 PM

Post #9024806

Yes. Others say it will work so I am going to try it.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

February 29, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9024916

Ok was just wondering. We are in the same zone. I was thinking about starting some Amaranthus. I read it could be started in late winter.

I have a question that is off the subject of wsing: Butterfly bushes are supposed to be cut back in late winter. My butterfly bushes are putting out some green leaves. Is it too late to cut the bushes back? Are they supposed to be cut back before new growth? Does anyone know?
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 29, 2012
3:26 PM

Post #9024961

http://www.mountainvalleygrowers.com/mvv2-94.HTM

probably more than you want to know about butterfly bushes
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

February 29, 2012
5:26 PM

Post #9025148

I looked up Amaranthus in the wintersowing database and it shows that pretty much all the Amaranthus WS's successfully in zones 4&5. I have not sown it myself yet.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 29, 2012
5:54 PM

Post #9025195

I was playing around with the idea of Amaranthus - I have never grown it. It's worth a try.

Anita - I have 2 butterfly bushes - I don't cut them back unless I need to trim branches that are in the way. Years ago, I had a nice red one, I trimmed it back and lost it. I don't know if perhaps I would have lost it anyway, but I haven't lost the ones I have since I stopped cutting them back. It sounds odd, doesn't it?

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 1, 2012
2:55 AM

Post #9025441

Oberon, THANK YOU for that wonderful link on butterfly bushes and care tips!! I've got quite a few Winter Sown to go along that fence line (between the neighbors and us), and will need this information next Spring. I have yet to do pruning on the ones we have at work, so I didn't realize this. Oh, and in case you're wondering, I've got Black Knight and Pink Delight sown. The plan is to alternate them along the fence, I think that'll make a rather attractive "hedge row". =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 1, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9025632

I should think stunning would be more like it. Good luck. They are so beautiful
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 1, 2012
8:41 AM

Post #9025783

Speedie I would live see to see your hedge row.

Oberon, excellent info in bfb. Where did you find the Amaranthus info? I thought the Love Lies Bleeding variety was the only one that could be wintersown in late winter.

Carolyn, thank you! I have a yellow honeycomb bfb that I love. If I kill it I would be devastated! One of my bushes is start to get green growth. The weather is tricking my plants.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 1, 2012
8:47 AM

Post #9025787

Somewhere up above (I think) was a really good winter sowing site. I think Speedie posted it. It has separate databases for each zone with reported WSing attempts - successful and not. I downloaded zone 1-5 into excel. Has been very helpful. Would be glad to pass it on to anyone interested. I can send it either .xl or .xls -- new or old versions of Excel. Just send a dmail with email as I cannot send it to DG. I don't think DG does attachments.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 1, 2012
10:03 AM

Post #9025873

Oh oh oh, that site is simply wintersown.org!! (Yippeee, I actually know something!) =)

I sure hope my butterfly bushes come out stunning and beautiful, right now I'm just fretting left and right because I don't see ANYTHING popping up yet in my containers. =( The only things sprouting are my bulbs.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9026860

Speedi,do you have them in shade or sun?I have a few butterfly bush sprouts popping in the containers but they are in direct sunlight all day when the temps stay up more consistently then I will move them to a shady spot for them to grow out orI will go ahead and plant them..
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2012
7:01 AM

Post #9026863

Are you consistently 70 degrees yet Speedie? You probably won't get any sprouts until your weather is 70 for a while.
diamond9192002
(Anita) Fort Wayne, IN
(Zone 6a)

March 2, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9026873

Wow Tom we have had one day where the temps were in the mid 60s and you have sprouts already?
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9026874

Waving furiously!!!!! Haven't been here for a while. Hi, my name is Patti and I am an OCD'er. lol Yes, I have to straighten things that are crooked (especially PICTURES!), have to have things going all the same way, etc. My DH laughs at me!

We've had a really mild winter so haven't done any ws'ing. I have just started to put things in starter cells and put out some Poppies (that had been in the freezer) and Agastache seed.

Now I have to go back and read those articles. I use wintersow.org quite a bit. Have to read the article from our own 'famous', published Tom.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 2, 2012
12:09 PM

Post #9027154

Anita,I have sprouts of butterfly bush,basket of gold allysum,lupines,japanese maples and pearl bush and yellow rudbeckia and red hibiscus so far,it has really been mild here this year
huggergirl
Columbia City, IN
(Zone 5b)

March 2, 2012
12:16 PM

Post #9027170

I ve got out 50 gallon jugs,dont have my list on hand. Nothing special just more perenials,Ive sown a few new things hope they are well behaved..LOL..

Also got 8 flats under lights so far..More seeds to do in the next few weeks
Wave 6 colors I think..
alyssum
lobelia
hyacinth bean
blackeyed susan vine yellow and white
Bocca
angelonia
Zinnias
marigolds
pansies,w/sd also
violas

Thumbnail by huggergirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 2, 2012
12:27 PM

Post #9027178

Is that a root cellar to the right? Your jugs are so orderly. I have all sorts of containers including a big plastic tub that held bulk pretzels.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2012
12:37 PM

Post #9027190

huggergirl, hello how are you? That is the spot where I saved your picture with larkspurs, My seeds are comming up in the jars, I hope to have them in garden by April also I have w/s salvia, cleomie. Does your larkspur comes up in the same place, or it is changing. I thank you again for the seeds. Etelka

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 2, 2012
1:00 PM

Post #9027233

Hiya Patti, nice to meet you! >>Waves furiously back>> Remind me to straighten up my WS'n containers before I take pictures, heeheeheee. Nice to meet you too, Huggergirl. (Love the name!). Goodness, all you neat tidy people are making me feel self-conscious! =/
Tom, I have them in the sun, from first morning sun to about 1:00 or so. They're on my deck out back, which is the only spot I've got for 'em without DH disowning me. ;) I'm not, however, steadily getting 70* temps though. I think we might have hit 70* once so far, but mostly the highest yet has been in the low-to-mid 60's. Thank you Diamond, now I can stop fretting and panicking. =) >>PHEEWWW!!>> Just popped out into the rain (before coming on here) to peek at the babies for the first time today and I FINALLY HAVE MY FIRST SPROUT, YAY!!! It's a Hollyhock, too and boy oh boy, I can't tell ya how much I LOVE Hollyhocks! OK, this has made my day; no more worrying about the butterfly bushes, and I have a Hollyhock sprout, *and* DH came home with a little treat for me!
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 2, 2012
1:08 PM

Post #9027251

Perhaps I jumped the gun. We are running 20-35F here. Maybe too cold to have put my poor seeds out.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 2, 2012
2:29 PM

Post #9027357

Which seeds did you put out? Winter sown seeds? If they are Winter sown, then they'll be happy. =)
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 2, 2012
2:51 PM

Post #9027382

Well. That is the problem. I think I got carried away and just sowed whatever I wanted:
Antirrhinum Majus, First Ladies
Aquilegia vulagris, Rost Barlow
Coleus hybridus
Larkspur, Giant Imperial Mix
Cosmos, Sensation
Echinacea, Purple Coneflower
Cardinal Climber
Lobelia, Crystal Palace
Nicotiana, Whisper Mix
Love-in-a-Mist, Miss Jekyll
Poppies, Icelandic, Shirley, and my own seeds that will grow for sure
Salvia, Blue Bedder
Tomato, Siberia
Nasturtium, Whirlybird Mix
Beans, French
Kale and Cabbage, decorative
Peas, bush

So what do you think won't make it. I could still bring them inside.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 2, 2012
3:31 PM

Post #9027422

Hey Speedie. I ordered some of those New Zealand delphiniums. Seeds. Do you think they would winter sow. They are supposed to be perennial so it seems like they would do well.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 2, 2012
3:56 PM

Post #9027464

Oh yes, I do believe your Delphiniums will do well winter sown. I also think many of the rest of your list should do ok too, the only ones I'm unsure of are:
Beans
Peas
Antirrhinum Majus
Larkspur
and Coleus. Someone else better-informed will have to tell you about those, I'm sorry. :(
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2012
4:04 PM

Post #9027476

Speedie, I am going by the list of flowers you have attached on the February 26the , that is pretty complete list. Also separates the annuals from the perennials. Thank you for it, it helped me a lot to still determin what seeds to get and order. Etelka

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 3, 2012
6:20 AM

Post #9028033

Oh good, I'm so glad it helped, you're very welcome! That's the site where I got my beginning in gardening, and it sure has helped me a lot!

Celene

Celene
Columbus, OH

March 3, 2012
6:26 AM

Post #9028041

Delphiniums, larkspur, and snapdragons do very well with WS. I have zero luck with beans and peas, except sweet peas (go figure). I think coleus needs more warmth to germinate.
huggergirl
Columbia City, IN
(Zone 5b)

March 3, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #9028047

Oberon46 wrote:Is that a root cellar to the right? Your jugs are so orderly. I have all sorts of containers including a big plastic tub that held bulk pretzels.


Ob,LOL..Thats the roof of our house,we live on a hill,walkout basement kinda thing. You can Thank the DH for the somewhat orderly fashion of the jugs. I Have access to an abundance of water jugs,Very easy to gather a bunch fast,Im lucky..

Ancorage Alaska WOW,Cool..Is this your fist time wintersowing ?? Its my 2nd year,Ive been starting underlights for a few years..Just discovered what WSing really was ..BOY was I missing the boat..Ive Gardened for EVER with blinders ON...LOL

WSing has blown my mind ..Im soo hooked...

Etlka,glad your larkspur are doing well.To answer your question,Yes my Larkspur are always moving around..LOL..I help them a little too.Certain areas that need more I will let them go to seed,over populated areas I try to gather the most seed pods I can. I have a Cottage -rock garden,I like messy over planted,No WEEDS tho..LOL..

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 3, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9028132

TomVa wrote:Yes digitalis blooms the 2nd year Celene,your shasta daisies will be a whole lot better this year
I hear you Carolyn about too many seeds but you know,can't stop till you have one of all of them:o)



I'm still reading this list from well back into January! But I agree with Tom. :D

I have started using the online DG Journal feature to record my sowing for this year. I couldn't find my little notebook which I had been using for my garden notes and I had to start sowing!!!

I've sown over 40 different kinds of perennials, annuals, vegetables, shrubs. I just started in the last week or two.

When wondering about whether it's too early to start, I always look for germination information on the packets, depending on the plant. WS in milk jugs is my favorite too. Sowing indoors is sorta dangerous I think if you don't have good lighting. Especially stuff like tomatoes. Blah.

Good to see you all here - I see some of my stuff I think from the Round Robin we just went thru - I am sowing some of yours too!

Edited to say:

The things I put out in jugs are mostly perennial. Since most seeds have their own specific heat and light requirements, I think the weather takes care of everything out there. If it ain't warm enough, it won't sprout.

BUT if something says to plant it in the ground when the soil is 80 degrees (?!) then I know I need to start it indoors if I want it to bloom before frost. :D

Some of the seed packets say "germinates in 7-10 days" or time "to maturity" or "to bloom"
and that also gives me an idea. No science here I'm afraid.

As for my milk jugs I do what Oberon does and cut them all the way around except for about 1" where the handle sits. I use an exacto knife/blade to cut around - it's not very exact, and you will all SHRIEK when I tell you that I don't put drainage holes in my milk jugs. :/

I've never had anything drown. It's easy to tell if the soil is dry - I can hold up the jug and look at the bottom as I water. When the entire bottom is saturated the color of the soil thru the opaque milk jugs tells me when it's time to stop watering.

I don't leave lids on the milk jugs either as I think this defeats the purpose of having it open to the air and a way for heat to escape. I usually seal the jug with clear plastic tape. Labeling is sometimes a challenge, so every year I devise a new "system." Last year I numbered jugs and kept a written list of the numbered jugs, their number, and the contents.

Depending on the weather/season and how big my seedlings are, and how much time and resources I have available - I take the top off the jug and transplant most things into 2" square plastic pots. I hate losing plants to "thinning" so I don't usually. Last year I planted "too many" zinnias (is there such a thing?) and gave many away. Same for a lot of my plants.

I've found also that I am more comfortable direct sowing certain reliable annuals that will come up where the seeds lay. Other stuff I am just too paranoid to leave to chance.

From reading this entire thread, I do believe I will direct sow the columbine seed I have received in trade. I had tried to WS poppies for years before learning in the propagation forum that direct sow was the way to go. I hope to try them again this year after years of disappointment.

"Joeswife" (Debra) has a neat thread about her winter basement garden. She sows things in plain water bottles on her windowsills. Everything grows like crazy. Ha ha.

Well thanks for reading this far. I enjoyed reading each and every one of the 280+ posts this morning. -phew-

Time for more coffee. Have a great day. :)

A.

This message was edited Mar 3, 2012 11:51 AM
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 3, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9028176

Hugger, this is my second year. I went sort of wild with all different types of seed. I rather thought that there were some that wouldn't do well, but figured 'trial and error'. I have extra bean and pea seed so may sow some indoors under lights for a backup. Tomatoes too.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2012
9:38 AM

Post #9028262

Congratulations Speedi, did you do the happy sprout dance? Let the greenwave roll on,@Amanda,columbine is one of those seeds that need light to germinate so dont cover with soil,I did successfully wintersow but it took holding onto the jugs for a year and they germinated the following spring.On poppies you can winter sow but you have to make sure you transplant as soon as they get their first 2 true leaves,they hate transplanting,you could also sow them in toilet paper rolls then place the rolls in a milkjug,milkjug holds 6:) then you could just plant the tp roll and all.I use this method for things that dont like to be transplanted that I dont want to take a chance with direct sowing..But with common poppies,zinnias and marigolds I direct sow also:)
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2012
10:43 AM

Post #9028324

I plant my poppies in large pots that I will be planting something in later on in the spring. I just put them on top of the soil and tamp the soil with my hand to let them drop into the crevices of the potting soil. The spring rains get them to germinate and sprout. I then leave them there and never have to transplant. After bloom I let some of the seeds drop into the pot and harvest the others. That way they are already in the soil for next year. The next spring they come up and I start the process all over again. Has worked well for me and I get double use out of the pots.

I have decided to go ahead and put out some ws'ing jugs. I'm not doing anything that needs stratification so should be OK. Asters, Coneflowers, Columbine, etc. Tom, that is interesting about the Columbine pot. I may have to do that if I have a jug that doesn't sprout this year. Who'd a thunk it? LOL I did have a Candelabra Bush that I planted 3 seeds and they never came up, so I re-purposed the soil. Low and behold!!!!! I had them come up in the pot where I put the soil! lol Just didn't give them long enough.

Off to read more threads then back to work!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 3, 2012
3:14 PM

Post #9028586

Tom, I have been doing the Happy Sprout Dance throughout the house all day today! =) Not only do I now have my first Holly sprout, but as of this morning, I've got a small handful of just-more-than-microscopic Redfox Veronica sprouts!! Wheeee!!! I'm really excited about those, I was starting to worry that they wouldn't do anything. And, thank you for the tip about Columbine, I didn't realize they need light to germinate. I'll go out tomorrow morning and take a closer peek at the seeds I've got sown, and if they're buried, then I'll sprinkle a few more on top and press 'em in. =) I hope they do something at some point this year, but if not, then I'll hold onto the container until next year.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

March 3, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #9028792

Yes Tom, that was good information on the Columbine, and also about using the cardboard out of TP for do-it-yourself peat pots without the peat. lol I just put some Columbine in my ws jugs. I will be sure and save the jugs if they do not come up and hope they do next spring. Do you just leave the cover on the jug all summer, or how do you keep them? Everyone talks about how easy it is to grow but I have not had any luck with them so far. Even buying already growing plants.

speedi, where did you find the Redfox Veronica seed? I bought some plants at the end of last year (you know how plants look at the end of the season!) on sale, but they didn't make it.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9029212

I got my seed at work the end of last summer... "deadheading with a purpose". :-)

I'm hoping I have luck with the Columbines, I'll keep y'all posted.
huggergirl
Columbia City, IN
(Zone 5b)

March 4, 2012
6:31 AM

Post #9029217

Does anyone know how to start a new thread ??? Ive lost 2 posts now ??? or Im cross posting ?? I too need to learn how to continue a thread.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

March 4, 2012
9:37 AM

Post #9029496

Go to the group trades, swaps and red robins. At the top of the page it says Post a Thread. Start a new thread then post that number at the bottom of the old thread to show people where to go. That is how I do it anyway.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 4, 2012
10:04 AM

Post #9029527

Assume you can just cut and paste the url at the top of the screen to the last entry in the old thread?

Hubby just told me that we have the third highest year for snow fall up here. 123". He is taking the snow off the eaves as we speak. I thought that ten foot hill on top of my front flower bed was a bit higher than usual. Down the driveway it dips down a bit as he tries to miss my other bed with the snowblower as he clears the drive. Either way, there is easily 4-5' on that bed also. sigh. I guess I would rather have snow than a tornado. Hopefully all our DG folk down south are okay. Not so for many others. Oh, a church collapsed yesterday up here. Roof caved in but the walls are standing. fortunately it was a Saturday and no one was in the church. They had just listed it on Craig's list to rent.
Crit
Sand Springs (Tulsa), OK
(Zone 7a)

March 4, 2012
10:11 AM

Post #9029540

Yes, that is correct Mary. Glad to see you post. I've been worried about you! Saw on the TV about the church collapse in Anchorage. The news, however, said that there were people inside. So much for the news. lol
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 4, 2012
10:13 AM

Post #9029544

No, there were some kids in the gym part of the church playing basketball but when the first heard the big 'whoosh' they ran out. No one got hurt. thanks for worrying for me. I appreciate the thoughts. I have been looking for people checking in from the tornado path. It covers such a large area.
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 4, 2012
10:31 AM

Post #9029560

Update: there were six people getting ready to go into the church part. The church part is the only part that collapsed. The gym was apparently untouched.
TomVa
Central, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 4, 2012
11:16 AM

Post #9029601

Crit,on saving jugs that didnt sprout,I move them to full shade and,I leave the tops on but I cut extra ventilation holes in the top for the heat to escape . I leave the tops on to try and keep other seeds from falling down in them and sprouting,you have to check them regularly to make sure they dont dry out.If they havn't sprouted by fall,put a piece of clear tape over the ventilation holes you made and by the following spring as long as the seeds were viable they will sprout,some seeds require a warm then cold then warm period,so be sure to hold onto the jugs that dont sprout this year for another season,I've also found the plants growing in the compost pile a year later after dumping the jugs:o)
I hope everyone made it through all the bad weather all right,and my heart goes out to all the families in southern Indiana and Kansas and elsewhere..

This message was edited Mar 4, 2012 4:20 PM
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 4, 2012
11:31 AM

Post #9029615

I read about seeds that need that third element heat cold heat or vice versa cold heat cold, then presumably heat. So maybe four elements. Would be nice to have a list of seeds needing that combination
huggergirl
Columbia City, IN
(Zone 5b)

March 5, 2012
5:22 AM

Post #9030386

Crit ,I am at a huge loss, I cant find any directions for continuing a Thread, I see no numbers to copy...Ive never copied and pasted on here...im soo Lame.. although i can Learn...LOL...and Im willing..but this thread is slow for me cant upload photos,lost posts..Tamara

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2012
6:17 AM

Post #9030495

I'll do it Tamara. Today! :D

AmandaEsq

AmandaEsq
Greensboro, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2012
6:25 AM

Post #9030509




Please join me on Page 2 of the "what have you wintersown so far??" thread.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1245290/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1245290/
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1245290/

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Other Winter Sowing Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Winter Sowing Seed Swap .....part 2 alicewho 213 Mar 23, 2007 1:01 PM
Lessons learned for next year #2 zenpotter 256 Mar 23, 2007 7:56 AM
Milk jugs TurtleChi 99 Mar 19, 2007 12:20 PM
WS Poppies & transplant problems marie_ 100 May 11, 2011 4:44 PM
Database germination info bluespiral 6 Mar 5, 2008 12:23 PM


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