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Perennials: Shorter yellow perennial for part sun/part shade garden?

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PAgirl60
Tobyhanna, PA
(Zone 5a)

January 25, 2012
2:02 PM

Post #8982095

Hi all,

Can anyone suggest a deer resistent yellow perennial no taller than 12-18 inches for a part sun/part shade garden? Yellow dayliles would have fit the bill, but the deer love them! Thanks
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

January 25, 2012
3:37 PM

Post #8982203

I have deer, too.

Coreopsis 'Zagreb' works well for me and the deer have never touched it.

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

January 25, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #8982226

Ranunculus ( buttercup) brazen hussy , helianthus most are tall some are short but most like the sun, ,Chrysogonum green and gold
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

January 26, 2012
7:22 AM

Post #8982765

Fernleaf Coreopsis is my choice - "Creme Brulee" - 1 - 2 feet - mine is in partial shade - blooms first for almost 4 weeks, then has sporadic blooms throughout the rest of the season -- deer don't like it, and have never had a problem with Japanese beetles, either. Basically a no care plant for me -- here's a pic with hosta -

Dax

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maithyme
Andover, MN
(Zone 3b)

January 27, 2012
4:32 AM

Post #8983790

Beautiful gardens Pirl and Dax. My favorite coreopsis is Moonbeam so maybe the deer wouldn't touch this one either...

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

January 27, 2012
6:10 AM

Post #8983888

Tey tend to leave fernleafes varieties alone
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

January 27, 2012
7:26 AM

Post #8983968

Unfortunately, I've had to stake my "Moonbeam" when it was in partial shade -- although I love it! That's why I went with Creme Brulee -- Dax
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 7, 2012
12:33 PM

Post #8998126

Good old digitalis grandiflora?

These pics were taken a year apart.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 7, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #8998131

Or, if you don't mind a spreader (I divide it and spread it around) Epimedium x versicolor sulphurum. Tough and inexpensive. Some epimediums put quite a hole in your pocket.

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

February 7, 2012
1:21 PM

Post #8998167

how do you divide and when. I bought about 10 maybe and afraid to divide.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2012
2:47 PM

Post #8998239

Which plant?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 7, 2012
3:46 PM

Post #8998309

If you mean the epimedium (and I think you do, because I was scared too..) frankly, just be brutal. It isn't clear where the end of the plant is. Just choose the section you want to lift and drive a sharp shovel into it and lift the separated section up. This is NOT a plant that you dig up in its entirety to divide. You chop off sections from the edges.

There is no "hi, divide me here" place on this plant. But by simply hacking into to it about the size of section I wanted, I was able to give away three sections, and the original plant is thriving.

So, be bold! You will not kill it.

Donna
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

February 7, 2012
4:48 PM

Post #8998366

Yes, the epimedium. Have the same type as Donna.




Gulp...OK... I will try it with a few. Suckers were $$$$

Springtime ok? In a nice shady moist spot.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 7, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #8998426

I divided it in both spring and fall. Oh, yeah, they are ridiculously expensive, because they are trendy. I didn't think much of them until I went Milaegers in Racine and saw a bunch of them in the flesh. I was supposed to be getting a white and a pink but they were mislabled - but back then they were about $5. I'm not normally a "yellow" person but I find the color really nice, and sulphurum is the toughest. As you can see, they grew together, and then started moving sideways. Just pick a corner of the plant and go for it. Don't try to divide it down the middle. You won't kill it but it will make a mess, and it won't work. Just start at the end and force one of those spades shaped lijke a rectangle that have what looks like a sharp edge. Then lift it from the outside.

I did this and drove 30 miles with it in the trunk of my car, threw it on top of a pot of compost for a few days, THEN planted it. It never missed a beat. Three weeks later I came back and took an even bigger piece. All the sections are humming.

Nice moist shady spot is perfect. Mine is actually in part sun part shade. In the new yard full shade.

Spring is good. Remember to remove the old foliage as the new leaves emerge. Once they get going it's hard fto remove the old growth without removing the new.

It's really nice with polemonium caeruleum (Jabob's ladder) which can easily be grown from seed.

Way to go!

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missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

February 7, 2012
7:54 PM

Post #8998547

Great information. Thanks. I will do it.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
2:31 AM

Post #8998733

Thanks for the dividing tip.I love my epimediums.Such subtle little blooms and the leaves are very romantic
missingrosie
Hillsborough, NC

February 8, 2012
5:26 AM

Post #8998826

Hi Joanne
I was wondering where you were - maybe we've been on different forums! Happy Holidays (belated)
got any new garden do dads? I got a dragon made from some kind of rusted piece of equipment. He's/She's cute!...and heavy once placed...that is the home.

ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #8998876

Yeahhhh missingrosey.
I am still here. One of my best sculptures went down in a sudden summer storm at night. Its the end of clay in the garden I'm affraid.
I am going to try and ad a piece of wood to make a new top.
I dont mind bringin in clay for the winter but the 2 piece ones are just too iffy.
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
7:04 AM

Post #8998970

I recieved all of my epimedium in trades that were carried out in the fall from a very generous DGer a number of years ago. This past year, I divided some of my epimedium as they were getting a bit large and encroaching on some of my heuchera and tiarellas that are planted in the same area. They divide easily with a shovel. This trade was carried out in the latter part of last Summer. I will check with my trader to make sure that the trades did take, but I have no reason to believe they didn't. They were nice large divisions with several toes in each division.

JoAnn --- if you are nervous about dividing your epimedium, try one at first and see how that goes. I too would have been nervous about dividing epimediums as well, however that was how I received mine...

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ge1836

ge1836
Pittsford, NY
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
8:34 AM

Post #8999078

Robindog gave me my first.I bought 3 since and have 3 more on order for this spring

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 8, 2012
9:32 AM

Post #8999163

Are their any more ideas for shorter perennial yellow plants for shade?
Carolyn22
Athens, PA
(Zone 5b)

February 8, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #8999311

Well I just had a bunch of ideas and just got kicked off -

there are a number of things - yellow epimedium, missouri primrose, Trollius Europaeus, cordalytis lutea, rudbeckia.
dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

February 8, 2012
12:17 PM

Post #8999353

Hi -- Had some time this afternoon, so enjoyed going through my pics from last year to identify some more -- here goes

1. Euphorbia polychroma - Early spring bloom is riveting as you can see --
2. Heuchera (Coral Bells) Stoplight - Striking yellow and deep maroon foliage --
3. Yellow Wax Bells -- Kirengeshoma palmata - It's in the lower left in front of the angel. In August it gets yellow bell-shaped blooms.
4. Lady's Mantle -- A mid-spring favorite
5. Japanese Forest Grass -- Beautiful gold to lime green foliage --

There you go -- some new ideas -- Dax

This message was edited Feb 8, 2012 2:33 PM

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Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
2:22 PM

Post #8999501

Two yellow-flowered plants that thrive in partial sun/shade and fit your height requirements would be celandine poppies (Stylophorum diphyllum) and Allium moly 'Jeannine'. Both plants spread, but are easy to remove where not wanted, and both have attractive foliage. The allium will die back after blooming but is glorious until then. And it is relatively cheap, too--about $20 per 100 bulbs. I hope to plant tons of it in my new garden this fall!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 8, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #8999506

Celandine can be highly invasive. It is here and it's a horror to eliminate for me.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 8, 2012
2:54 PM

Post #8999518

Wonderful Dax. I didn't know heuchera came in yellow. I forgot about ladies mantle - and it's sitting right in my own yard. And a form of allium moly - who woulda thunk it?

These are perhaps too tall, but what about yellow baptisia? There are several kinds of the yellow variety.

http://www.google.com/search?q=yellow+baptisia&hl=en&client=safari&rls=en&prmd=imvns&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=zfkyT9DzEqK62gWApLTfBw&ved=0CHEQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=697
soilsandup
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 9, 2012
7:57 PM

Post #9001189

I am surprised to read that celandine poppies can be highly invasive. I bought 1 plant 10 years ago, and have one plant come back every year. No spread, no die off. It must have never formed any seedheads??
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 10, 2012
5:52 AM

Post #9001492

Maybe it's the difference in zones but I battled that demon for more than 10 years. I hope it's finally gone.
Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 10, 2012
6:54 AM

Post #9001577

Pirl, it does seem strange to me that Stylophorum diphyllum was such a pest for you. It is actually native to your region and I have never known it to be anything other than "pleasantly reseeding" at worst. I have such fond memories of this plant that I actually planted several of them in my new garden last fall.

There are several other plants known as "celandine" that *are* horribly invasive, with the common Ranunculus ficaria being chief among them. Here is a link: http://blogs.scottarboretum.org/gardenseeds/2009/05/confusion-over-celandine/

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 10, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9001592

Thanks for the link and the education, Corey. I do have the invasive one (ficaria) and not the well behaved one. Getting all of the tiny bulbs and amazing roots out is a major job.

Sorry for any confusion.

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Ispahan
Chicago, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 10, 2012
7:32 AM

Post #9001625

Oh my, no wonder you hate "celandine", LOL! Ranunculus ficaria is a nightmare and I am sorry you had to deal with such an evil plant.

On a side note, there are apparently cultivars of Ranunculus ficaria with fancy/double/colored blooms that are sterile and only slowly spread underground.
soilsandup
Sacramento, CA
(Zone 9a)

February 10, 2012
10:28 PM

Post #9002471

And I am relieved that I am not such a poor grower of Stylophorum diphyllum after all LoL
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

February 11, 2012
6:00 AM

Post #9002588

I'm glad you have the right one! I did wonder how you could have trouble getting them to expand when mine were so out of control. Now I know better thanks to Corey.
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

March 22, 2012
6:16 PM

Post #9053325

Stylophorum spreads too slowly in my woods, although rabbits or deer chewing it down to a nub last year did not help. I have seen it planted with blue phlox and virginia bluebells and I think it could be planted with bleeding heart. I am only beginning to grow perennials other than daylilies and the adventures are often tragic. I really like Digitalis grandiflora but the first year I planted it I thought it was dead in the Spring. So I pulled it up. The roots were crowded with new shoots. I think I expected it to grow like purple foxglove which is more or less biennial. . Now grandiflora is seeding itself and I just cut off the dead leaves. One more lesson learned. The Ranunculus ficaria I narrowly escaped introducing it when I saw it blooming at a state park near Lake Ontario Some things, like lythrum are all too pretty and then your sorry. (Hmm---like women?) Anyway, fortunately I left that celandine growing where it was. Kniphophia, or however you spell it turned out to be rabbit, deer, or woodchuck candy and one or the other gnawed it right to the ground--but it's rising fine-maybe chopping all it's leaves of is the way to manage it, as the leaves were a tortured mess during the winter although they stayed green. I think this year I will fill in with annuals in the places where I don't know what perennials to plant. I decided I hated coreopsis--just turned all brown seed pods, although I was probably lax with dead heading. But that's another low yellow flower, if you like it. I'm thinking of planting yellow and orange cosmos where the coreopsis was if I can make up my mind what to do with the beastly seed grown red monarda. The red is dull-should have planted the tall red or the very old red. Now the monarda is coming up in solid clumps all over. The orange cosmos may look as good with it as the coreopsis was supposed to. The maybe I'll plant dahlias behind it all. And cannas. Even though the cannas were a mess last year and never bloomed. I suspect a virus. But I suppose I'm really going to end up with a mixed flower bed if any of it works. (Last year a tree fell on it too.And my back hurts from sawing up the blasted tree.------------------------------------------------------Weedy

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2012
10:07 PM

Post #9053535

PAgirl...Anthemis tintoria in gold or yellow and Thermopsis (they look like lupines, see pix below). Ya didn't say how much shade or rather how long. Sometimes if the shade is not all day plants that would work in sun positions can handle a bit of shade, ie such afternoon or morning. Another yellow at that height is scabiosa ochulara, it blooms all season for me. My deer don't bother any of these in my garden. Alchemilla molis, Santolina virens (love the fragrant leaves on this one). Not sure if Semiaquilegia comes in yellow, might check, they are a shorter columbine. Potentilla (the perenn.). Think there is a yellow geum also. There is also a new chrysanthemum named Banana Creme. Again it does depend on how much sun they would actually get.

pix: Thermopsis 12-18"

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 23, 2012
4:41 AM

Post #9053641

Weedy, my stylophorum spreads all over the place, but by seeding, not stolons.
So there are lots of individual plants scattered around, not one contiguous patch.
But it pops up everywhere around here, including cracks in the driveway!

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PAgirl60
Tobyhanna, PA
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2012
5:42 AM

Post #9053707

Hi all,

Thanks everyone for all your suggestions. I got some Zagreb Coreopsis seeds free through a SASE and wintersowed them. Nothing yet, but I've read they can be a slow starter. Hopefully, they'll germinate and I'll have flowers next Summer! If not, I have all your wonderful suggestions to consider.

Thanks Again All,

Jane - PAgirl60
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 24, 2012
8:09 PM

Post #9055851

Both coreopsis are quite beautiful. I like the way they make a mounding affect. I believe they need to be dead headed and will bloom all summer.
The epimediums are quite dainty and so pretty.
Celadine poppy: one more reason to know and use the scientific names! I had the same problem with a DG'er discussing the Ceratostigma plumbaganoides. She was calling it plumbago, and I had a different idea of plumbago.
Weedy: your garden sounds like a challenge. Hang in there--it will get better.
Missouri primrose can be invasive.
I appreciate the yellow mid-size yellow flower suggestions. I have some Penstemon cobeae that I started from seed last year. I don't know what color it's going to be yet. It should boom this year-always exciting to see what color it turns out to be! If it's purple, I plan on planting some yellow flowers at it's feet. So, I guess I will have to wait another year to see if yellow plants will grow by it.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 25, 2012
9:11 PM

Post #9057017

Ceratostigma p., the common name is plumbago, and southerners have another plant that is Plumbago, (not sure which one it is but I have grown the Ceratostigma. The cer. is a ground cover with brilliant blue flowers that bloom late in the season, once they are hit with frost the leaves change to a bright red and the contrast is fabulous.

Pix: Phlox paniculata "David".

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 26, 2012
8:29 PM

Post #9058535

I a familiar with both of the "plumbagos". Here's the other Plumbago. It too, is pretty.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/414/
I have a little bit of the Ceratostigma plumbagnoides. Did you plant yours in sun? shade? or part of each?

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2012
3:15 PM

Post #9059541

bird...I grow them in full sun, lol, what's shade?

Pix: one of the local golf courses, yup the rock are natural.

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arfitz
Caldwell, NJ
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
4:17 PM

Post #9059610

There are yellow versions of aquilagea that stay low and the deer leave alone
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 27, 2012
6:33 PM

Post #9059761

Well, that's some rock! I don't know much about golf, but I am thinking it would be difficult to hit the ball over that rock!!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2012
7:06 PM

Post #9059793

lol birder, I was thinking it could be used to bounce off of. But then I'm not a golfer, lol.

arf...I haven't had a bloom on my columbine for four years now cuz my deer (I'm sorry, they aren't mine), eat the flower buds. I have a fragrant columbine...Sweet Rainbows (fragrant), and have yet to see a bloom. The deer have eaten all my columbine blooms!!!!! I have atleast 4 or 5 varieties. Lately, when I wanna see columbine I go to my daughter's garden. The first year in this garden they didn't find them so I had bloom, but none since. (GRRRRRR!!!!) The solid yellow pix is Aquilegia Chrysantha or Chrysantha hybrid "Denver's Gold", both are fragrant, (most columbine don't have any fragrance).

This message was edited Mar 27, 2012 8:48 PM

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weedyseedy
Warners, NY

March 27, 2012
8:09 PM

Post #9059853

I think I found some Stylophorum seedlings in the pine needles today; I don't know if they will bloom this year and there is a weed with similar leaves and a small yellow flower that was infesting my woods last year. So I will have to wait and see. Saw early yellow alyssum at Home Depot. Also they had promix veg and herb mix for sale over the weekend and were totally sold out two dollars and thirty cents a cubic foot bale--and I thought I had time to wait and buy some----hesitation is fatal sometimes. After a long stretch of above normal temperatures there was a freeze last night and I felt bad for the orchards although they are still evaluating the damage so one can hope it is not too bad. They had their smudge pots lit. At least my living will not be effected if I lose a few daylilies. Some of them did look a little frosted this morning and there is more cold weather to come. Wondering if this will bring on a lot of Spring Sickness. Had one short row of two year seedlings that bloomed early two years ago and the year befor last, all have Spring Sickness last year, only five plants from a tricky cross between an early and a later plant. First photo the pod parent, third the seedling in it's first bloom that almost withered away from sickness last year.-----------Weedy

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weedyseedy
Warners, NY

March 28, 2012
8:59 AM

Post #9060366

Googled the yellow weed and it's Chelidonium majus, apparently called celandine also which adds to my confusion as there are apparently other celandines including the little tuber one that spreads like mad. Unfortunately, so does Chelidonium. But there are numerous seedlings around where the Stylophorum was planted---I wonder how soon they will bloom? Then I may be more certain what I am growing, or maybe what's growing by itself. Now all I need is bluebells or blue phlox and possibly bleeding heart and my woods spot under the pinnes will look the way I want it.----------------------Weedy
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2012
4:10 AM

Post #9061454

Stylophorum blooms in early spring. Mine has been blooming already for a couple weeks. So if yours is just coming up in your climate, if it's stylophorum it should bloom soon.

And I definitely agree on the beautiful mix of stylophorum and bluebells.
I didn't plant either one; both show up in wonderfully accidental combinations throughout the woods. This is from last weekend.

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weedyseedy
Warners, NY

March 29, 2012
9:23 AM

Post #9061833

I planted Virginia Bluebells thirty years ago but they died out. Now some white pine seedlings and a whitch hazel have matured and the ground is semi shaded and I think wild flowers will grow back in there,; the Stylophorum seems content and ferns are showing up. I grew a bunch of Hosta ventricosa from seed in the area too, so it is shaping up. I leave the hostas and ferns where they grow next to or apart and if I get the blasted garlic mustard under control it should be a pleasant spot--a little bit wild. I'm also hoping the morel mushrooms will come back this year in that area because we had a frying pan full of them last year.-----------------------------------Weedy
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2012
1:11 PM

Post #9062138

Kathy, pretty columbines! I am growing from seed Aquilegia caerulea and Aquilegia caerulea 'McKana Giants'
Here's Aquilegia caerulea:
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.anniesannuals.com/signs/a/images/aquilegia_caerulea_rocky_mountain.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.anniesannuals.com/plt_lst/lists/general/lst.gen.asp%3Fprodid%3D73&h=396&w=338&sz=155&tbnid=8tr55RGy4bT6OM:&tbnh=90&tbnw=77&zoom=1&docid=lvgsAOQkZ-o4NM&hl=en&sa=X&ei=b710T6W5F8bYgQfjhK1Y&ved=0CF0Q9QEwBg&dur=1079
And, here's Aquilegia caerulea 'McKenna Giants':
http://streambankgardens.com/Aquilegia_McKanas_Giants.html

It is a real shame the deer eat off the flower blooms. They did that to my Oriental Lilies last year. I was planning on putting some of my columbine under three dogwood trees that are at the edge of our forest. It sound like I better re-think that plan. I have bluebells, heucheras, and painted ferns there now. I was going to add Columbines and Helleborus.

The deer ate my heucheras down to to the ground last year. They are suppose to be deer resistant! They are coming back nicely. I don't think the deer would want to eat the Hellebors, but I am sure if they get desperate, they will eat them. I wonder if it would deter the deer if I put fishing line all the way around the three dogwoods as a barrier?

Man, if it isn't the deer,... it's the voles,... or the rabbits,... or the ground hogs. And then, there's my husb. who used R. Up on my new Alliums I planted this fall! :(

Pretty Daylilies, Weedy.



pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2012
2:40 PM

Post #9062242

Try the fishing line and let us know how it works. I've heard it works well since deer halt if confronted by any barrier.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 29, 2012
7:28 PM

Post #9062603

weer...love the pix. I have a feild of bluebells, 4 acres worth, along with about 3 acres of the wild rose,(I just love the smell in the spring, and most of my neighbors that have horses hate them, gosh what a pity, in fact most people mow their feilds around here). I love that yellow one and have never heard of them. Are they a shade plant? Love the combo of the two, hmmmm, might have to see about getting some if they can handle full sun.

>>>>> HEY...I just wanted to invite you ALL, we have a great group of people over in "Group Trades, Swaps & Round Robins" There all sorts of things going on; new plants (starting April, I say new but it's from your garden), birdhouses (we just finished), Froggies is just now signing up and so much more. Take a look and I hope to see some new faces there, lol. Truely it's sooo much fun!!!

Bird... I started a flat of my state flower (A. caerulea, the blue one, altho the other colors grow wild too), last spring and will get them planted where I want them this spring. My plan is a tunnel (ya, I know, it's gonna be made out of rebar, but I can afford that, lol), with vines and outside the tunnel (5-7ft each side) will be planted with the blue columbines. I also have flat of straight white that I'm thinking of mixing in but just not sure yet. (Still deciding). And on both sides there is a row of Prunus cistena (purpleleaf sand cherry), with their beautiful redishgreen leaves, but best thing about them is their early spring fragrance. Absolutely fabulous !!!!!!!

Another deterrant for the deer with your fishing line fence idea is to tie on some mylar strips. They hate shinny stuff that blows about in the breezes. You can get some pretty cheap at Micheal's, (on spools of ribbon less than $3 or 4, probably). It is also visible so no one, including the deer get caught up in that fishing line. But yes, I'm all for keeping those four legged critters out of the garden this year. I have four more acres they can eat from, leave my smelly stuff alone...lol.

pix: 4 birdhouses, 2 bat and 2 bluebird, I just got in my most recent trade
pix: my new windchimes in a trade in Feb.
pix: one of my plant trades I recieved last season
pix: Christmas goodies 2011, SEEEE, so come over and join us this year, there are many different ones all year.
pix: a j.j. it's my smiley face, lol.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2012
8:18 PM

Post #9062683

Okay! I am going to plant the columbines etc in my little Dogwood area and put up the fishing line--good idea with the mylar. I did not know where to get it. Thanks! I will let you know how it works. We don't have a Michale's, but we do have a Hobby Lobby. I will check there--if not, I will be going to St Louis to the Fox Theater soon.

Kathy--design sounds great. I wish I were more creative. I have all these flowers I started from seed and now, wonder where I am going to put sooo many plants.

I am going over to the Group Trades--tomorrow because it's getting late tonight.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 30, 2012
4:44 AM

Post #9062846

Just don't forget the fishing line (30 lb. monofilament) is there so you don't get ensnared! You only need three lines of it at 2, 4, and 6' and some people just use it at 2' - enough for contact with their legs.

Back in '93 and '94 my husband grew over 3,000 plants from seed each year. Believe me, getting them all in the ground, and finding spots for them, was a job and a headache...but we did it.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 30, 2012
6:07 PM

Post #9063704

Yes, it's a job and a headache--but so rewarding once you get it in the ground and planned. It someone would just tell me--ok plant this here and here and here.
30# monofilament----I will get that.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 30, 2012
6:57 PM

Post #9063779

Even Walmart or any store with a sporting section should have it.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 31, 2012
4:12 PM

Post #9064682

Yes, I was talking about the milar strips! :)
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

April 18, 2012
6:30 PM

Post #9088183

Well it appears that plants where I had my one plant of Stylphorum are seedlings thereof as at least two are developing larger poppy-like buds, but, the Chelidonium is also spreading thru the woods. When both are in full bloom maybe I can get rid of the Chelidonium as it is a pernicious weed----found it growing out along walking trails around here. Not as bad as garlic mustard, but not desirable either. What about Golden Star, Chrysogonum Virginianum for a low perennial ground cover, native from Pa to I don't know where south?? Low, perennial, spreading but not invasive. I am thinking of planting it in front of yellow foxglove although I'd really like a nice orange-red geum in front of the foxglove. (My wife is working on the census forms tonight and I am keeping out of her way--I think I'll stay on the computer and blather for a while then I'll talk to our new cat who just purrs sweetly, unlike the old lady--calling her that would get me half killed!)---------------------------Weedy
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 19, 2012
6:12 AM

Post #9088627

Those 'poppy-like' buds sound for sure like stylophorum, so I think you're right.
Chrysogonum spreads with runners, so it fills in more reliably as a groundcover.
I use it on a hillside as erosion control, works pretty well.
I find it's foliage rather coarse and the flowers aren't super spectacular,
but it's serviceable in certain situations.

I'm happy to offer opinions on plants...,
but as for your wife and the cat, frankly I'm staying out of it...
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

April 30, 2012
12:42 PM

Post #9104128

the "old lady" : Funny! I chuckled out loud! Hope she got the census done.

The Penstemon cobea that I started from seed two years ago turned out to be white!! What's the chances?? It's usually some sort of purple. Now, I have it planted around some yellow stuff: a pale yellow rose, Calendulas and Orange poppies! I "may" try to move it. I don't know how well they like to be transplanted. I believe they have a long tap root. Growing penstemons is new to me, so I have no experience.

Another yellow plant that I started from seed last year is: Aurinia saxatillis also known as Allysum saxatillis. The common name is Basket of Gold. It has been long blooming and has been quite striking in the spring garden. It gets about 12" X 12". I am hoping it won't get out of hand. I am letting it go to seed this year as I would like more of it.
Pippi21
Silver Spring, MD
(Zone 6b)

April 30, 2012
4:13 PM

Post #9104457

Did you all see the size of that one Hosta in the photo on the far right? That thing is hugh! Dax, do you know what variety that one is? Blue angel, perhaps?

Birder17... I started myself a small rock garden in the flowerbed behind my sunroom. Even thought I have amended the soil, I am plagued with fiberous roots from Azaleas and a 40 yr. old plus root from a hugh maple tree that is there. I've been thinking of planting Basket of Gold, because I've always heard it is showy and reseeds itself. Have you found it "invasive?" I don't have any yellow flowers in that bed, some may be blooming later that I wintersowed last year. At my former home, I had yellow sedum, purple petunias and red geraniums and everybody complimented me on it. I also had Ajuga,as a border in another flowerbed and they usually are the first to bloom in the early Spring and their purple blooms were always so pretty.

I've kind of fell in love with columbines because they are so easy to grow and reseed themselves. Want to divide my coreopsis this Fall too. My daughter gave it to me and she can't remember the name of it and never keeps her plant ID tags..I think it is Zagreb because of its color.

Last year I divided my pink creeping phlox and put some in the sunroom flowerbed and this year I bought some Emerald blue and planted them in nearby beds..The pink in the garage flower bed will need to be divided this Fall too.

I find the columbine so easy to get the seeds; sometimes works better that way than transplanting them. They kind of go into transplant shock for about a week or so then start adjusting to their new home.

I'm going to be very busy in Sept. dividing a lot of my perennials and plan to plant some more bulbs, especially on the side of the house where all the hydrangeas are located. The original owner of this house was a lover of hydrangeas. There were about 8 or 9 very mature bushes when we moved here 7 yrs. ago. Gradually I've had some of them removed but have a landscaper that does my prunning and feeding of them and they were so beautiful for past two years. They got hit about 6 weeks ago by a hard freeze and the outer leaves look like they were in a bad fire, but I'm just leaving them alone and letting Mother Nature do her thing. I haven't had the prunning man this Spring but will have him in the Fall, after I'm finished dividing and planting out and have him mulch for me.

dax080
Cedar Rapids, IA
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9105402

Hi -- just a follow-up on the blue hosta -- yep, you called it, Blue Angel. Here is a pic in early June when they are fully spread -- there are actually 2 there -- Dax

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 1, 2012
8:33 PM

Post #9106544

Here's the Alyssum Basket of Gold, and no, it's not a reseeder. Love it and it's also fragrant, too bad it's only a spring bloomer. I started mine from seed also, as were most of my plants.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 1, 2012
9:02 PM

Post #9106577

Pippi: This is the first year for my Aurinia saxatilis or Allysum saxatilis 'Basket of Gold' to bloom. So, I don't know if it is "pushy" or not. Thank you, Kathy, for the information. I "believe" I had asked on DG regarding it being invasive before I purchased the seeds and recall someone saying it was not invasive. I have enjoyed it this spring.
I have done some research and one of the people on the Plant Files says to cut it back after bloom to keep it compact and for re-bloom. Another on the Plant Files says it re-seeds readily. So, it may depend on where it is planted. I am going to keep a watch on it.
I do like it. The yellow is just, well, bright! It's showy but not over powering as it only gets about 12 inches tall.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 1, 2012
9:20 PM

Post #9106595

Oooooooh, wow, I'll cut it back and see if it reblooms also. Personally I've yet to ever have it reseed, almost wish it would, lol. Mine just started blooming this week.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 2, 2012
6:19 PM

Post #9107792

Kathy, I hope we're talking about the same flower. I think we are as your picture looks like what I have. It seems strange, however, that yours does not re-seed and someone on plant files says it's a real re-seeder.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/64/

Here's a pic of my Basket of Gold. It has been blooming throughout the month of April and is about finished. There's a picture of the bloom and the leaves.

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weedyseedy
Warners, NY

May 5, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9111426

My memory has gone with the Spring breezes but in about 1972 I grew two kinds of yellow, spring blooming "allysum" one with small narrower leaves and lighter yellow flowers the other with wider gray green leaves probably Basket of Gold. As usual I got attention deficit and I have no idea what happened to them---I think I started concentrating on daylilies when we moved and I had unlimited space. I have seen them in rock gardens around here and if you team them with iberis, creeping phlox, and maybe aguga or another very purple thing I can't remember you can have a brief explosion of color that will look like a mess of weeds for the rest of the year.Well it is not easy to have bloom all the time. ON another note, my Stylophorum definitely is and is seeding itself over a twenty by ten space and you can't walk in the area to weed because the Hosta ventriculosa has also seeded itself all over. I now have dozens or hundreds of both. Lowes looks as if they have hundreds of blue wood phlox that have bloomed and faded and if they put them on sale I will try to grab some although I would rather have bluebells. Well, the bulb English blue bells are blooming, maybe they would work with the woods poppies???--------------Weedy (Am I ever--I have acres of garlic mustard and Dames Rocket)
weedyseedy
Warners, NY

May 6, 2012
9:12 AM

Post #9112593

I can't spell either----and I Majored in English Lit!!!!!!----------------------------------------------------Weedy!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 6, 2012
12:22 PM

Post #9112769

Birder...yup that's the one I have. Gosh, I've grown this one in three different gardens and have never had it rebloom or reseed, what am I doing wrong? LOL.

pix 4 a newly aquired annual OSTEOSPURMUM , nifty huh?

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 6, 2012
5:47 PM

Post #9113110

Very, very cool!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 10, 2012
7:17 PM

Post #9119248

Kathy, this is the first year my Aurinia saxatilis has bloomed. I will let you know if it re-seeds. I would like to have some more of it.
Thanks for sharing your pictures. You are so good to do so. I looked for white Osteospurmum seed this year and could not find any, nor did the garden centers here have the white ones or blue ones for that matter. They are gorgeous.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #9121331

birder, the blue are Senettis, which is also an annual, new for me this year. If you want some seed checkout : tmseeds.com. You are also in a zone for the perennial type, now there are 3 that will come back year after year and grow to8-16", all season if deadheaded. I picked up a new one yesterday that is white, the other two are a lavender and a purple, pix below. They are only hardy in z5-6.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 12, 2012
6:49 PM

Post #9121443

Kathy, that last picture looks like a Pasque flower?? It's pretty. I checked out TM and put senettis in the search box, and it did not show up. I had trouble with TM on line catalog this late winter when I was trying to order Digitalis purpurea 'Candy Mountain'. Then, about a month later it showed up.
I was doing a little research on the Senettis. One website says it gets powdery mildew easily. We have high humidity here, so it would probably get mildew. However, I have zinnias and phlox that get mildew, but I still enjoy them. I believe it also said it likes cool spring weather? I would appreciate an up-date.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 12, 2012
7:28 PM

Post #9121494

Looking at the fine print on the tag...(lol, is very tiny) plant is Pericallis, annual, hardy to 45-55*, likes cool weather, can bloom indoors for several weeks, then move outside for rebloom, spring patio container and as a bedding plant.
OOOOh, I ordered candy mountain last week, can't remember if it was one of their sale items tho, got that and another digi. another new varietyof Foxy, where blooms are more upfacing. I'm going to try direct seeding into the garden, hope it works, lol...
Gosh, ya, sorta looks like a pasque flower, but not at all fuzzy like pasque tho. It's actually half open as it was cloudy, they are one of those that close up at night. Try going to Highcountrygardens.com, they should have several of the osteos and maybe better pix.
Just so ya know TM is having a sale up to 60 or was it 70% off n selected items. Also when they get ready to do inventory, everything is on sale, (june maybe, or july).
pix; somemore Pericallis

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 12, 2012
8:33 PM

Post #9121631

Kathy, I grow D. 'Candy Mountain' every year. So pretty. The flowers face outward not down. I also have D. 'alba' blooming right now. It's about 4 feet tall and has been blooming for at least three weeks.
This year along with Candy Mountain, I am growing Digitalis grandiflora.http://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/27895-product.html# For some reason, White Flower Farm won't "copy". Anyway, it's a pale yellow. It is perennial instead of biennial.
Digitalis purpurea 'Apricot Beauty' and http://www.bluestoneperennials.com/DIAB.html
Digitalis purpurea 'Glittering Prizes'. . http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/106200/
I grow Digitalis from seed every year via winter sow. It also comes up volunteer-but not very well. I believe every seed germinates via WS.
I hope the 'copy/paste worked. I am having trouble getting pictures posted on the website and also the copy/paste isn't working for me for some reason.
This is Digitalis 'alba'. I have enjoyed it this year.

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2012
7:35 PM

Post #9122664

birder..just stunning, love foxglove. I have one that is perenn. and should bloom in a few weeks, think it's pinkish but short at 12-18", grown from seed a few years back.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 14, 2012
9:48 AM

Post #9123347

Very good system. We had such a warm winter - I didn't have to put stuff under lights.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 14, 2012
7:52 PM

Post #9124131

birder...those are new seedlings...most of my garden was started from seed grown on the above system, potted on and then into the garden.
Pix1:east side of border
Pix2:west side of border, 45feet x100 feet, like I say, mostly from seed.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 17, 2012
7:00 PM

Post #9127790

That is one big garden! It will look so pretty when in bloom.
I grow a lot of my stuff from seed as well. It's a big savings. I WS my seeds and have the best success that way. When temps warm up, I am so busy getting the gardens in shape I don't seem to find time to start seeds.
I am seriously thinking about starting some perennials in August to plant in September or October. The perennials suffer from high humidity and heat while trying to establish a root system through the summer. The perennials that I started from WS do much better if I wait and plant them in the fall.
I get so many seeds to germinate. Then, I don't have room for all of the seedlings, and I hate to let them die. That's my conundrum! I am thinking of taking the extras to a farmer's market to sell, as I hate to let them die. Neighbors and friends don't garden, so they don't want my seedlings. I have given a few to my Dr. and about 50 plants to my brother. I just potted up 100 Antirrhinum majus 'Black Prince' (snapdragon that acts as a perennial for me.

My WS seedlings:
1. Snaps & Poppies V. L.
2. Digitalis purpurea 'Apricot Beauty' & Maltese Cross
3. Several different ones: Penstemon (2 kinds), Columbine, A. braun-blanquittii, Nepeta
4. Aubrieta, Digitalis floribunda
5. Heirloom tomatoes (all extras), Delphiniums, & Poppies red

4.

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 17, 2012
7:44 PM

Post #9127840

Two more:

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2012
4:02 AM

Post #9128033

Wow. You guys are amazing.
Looks like Kathy's got room for all your extras, with garden space stretching to the horizen.
I'm exhausted just looking at that much garden space!
I can't keep up with my little plot.
And neither of you apparently have figured out yet that winter is for resting!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 18, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9128479

Wow! I thought I was an avid seedstarter. I have NOTHING on you two!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 18, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9128631

Yes, for me, it's TOO much! I didn't "want" that many plants. I have a regular city lot for Pete's sake. Too, too many seeds fell into my milk jug when winter sowing. Then, I think every last seed germinated. I had perfect weather this year for winter sowing. I have a really hard time throwing perfectly good, pretty flowers away. I have a huge deck-(especially when we have to re-stain it)! There's a lot of little seedlings all over my deck. I tried "not" to plant so many seeds, but I ended up with way too many.
I hate to buy plants at $5.00 a pop when I can buy a pkg. of seed for $2.00 to $3.00. Hence, too many plants.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 18, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #9128650

Birder, I'm with you. I ended up filling a lot of pots simply because I over germinated. But there was a blowout of gorgeous blue and green ceramic pots when Frank's Nursery and Crafts closed a few years ago. I must have bought 25. Which I then filled with my extra seedlings and put them on my front steps, back steps, garden walls, retaining walls, the front deck, the back deck. And I only had a quarter acre - and that includes the house.

But wow, I loved it.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 18, 2012
2:49 PM

Post #9128800

Donna, that sounds gorgeous--all blue pots. I have several "blue" pots but others as well. I believe blue pots look good with all flowers. I started out buying blue pots but started buying green, white and beige as well. I should have stuck to just blue! We have a place in town that is called Ceramo. They sell to garden centers all over. They used to offer one day to the public to purchase their pots. Now, I believe they open to gardeners all of the time. I need to get out there---that is, when I can get these blasted seedlings under control!!! :)

How in the world did you keep all of the pots watered throughout the summer? That is what discourages me from putting too much in containers.

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 18, 2012
11:57 PM

Post #9129188

Oh my...tose dark red snaps are my favorite, just love them. What is digitalis floribunda? Hey birder, let me know if you'ld like to get rid of some of those seedling, maybe we could do a trade, I have scads of things.

Donna...you're tooooo funny. Ya seeds are cheap, and I also hate to throw away seedlings, lol, I had to overwinter some from last year. Mant didn't make it but many did, lol.

pix: hesperis matronalis, (false phlox),, I started these from seed 3 or 4 years ago and now let them reseed at willl in the garden, I just love em, oh soo fragrant, yummmm!!! These are one of the first to bloom in the garden each spring, my patch has grown to about 20-30 feet by 5-10feet wide. Gosh I guess it's time for some editing, lol.

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2012
12:01 AM

Post #9129191

this years pix and 2 is last years pix. I just wanted to do a comparison to see how it had grown, lol. Wow.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 19, 2012
5:42 AM

Post #9129356

Ah, terrasorb. I put terrasorb in all my pots. I finally realized that the way to use it is to mix it with water, let it solidify, and then put it in. No more daily watering!

It did let a little out of hand!

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birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 19, 2012
8:36 AM

Post #9129474

Kathy, nice pics. I love the stuff-but my little yard wouldn't be able to handle the re-seeding. I like it so well, I have even thought about putting it in pots-but still afraid it would get away from me.
Yes, Kathy, I would be happy to trade with you. My little seedlings will be ready in a couple of weeks or close to it.

Donna, I don't think you got carried away. I think it is pretty.

Is terrasorb the same thing as the white, hard, almost clear crystals one shakes into the soil to help with moisture?? I have that stuff. I would like more information regarding "mix it with water let it soldify, then put it in".???
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 19, 2012
10:11 AM

Post #9129537

You put a coffee scoop's worth of crystals in a large, leak proof, jug, then fill almost to the top with water. That's reconstituted water crystals. Wait two hours and they'll turn into what appears to be little blobs of clear jello. Then, as you're planting, you put some at the bottom of each hole so the plant roots have access to water.

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warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2012
10:42 AM

Post #9129567

Donna...oooooooooh Heliotrope, absolutly YUMMMMM!!!!!! And Donna those pots are just lovely!!!!, oh ya, and the flowers look great too!!!, lol..

Yup, I just picked up 21/2 lbs of those crystals, will be planting trees and shrubs in a few weeks, think I'll also add some to the sib and japanese iris while I'm thinking about it.

Some newbies I got this year.

This message was edited May 19, 2012 10:52 AM

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 19, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #9129614

That's a perfect description for the use of terrasorb, or whatever name is used for them. I didn't realize how little is needed!

Thank you, Birder. A kindred spirit!

I LOVE heliotrope! I started with seeds on top of the fridge for warmth, and seeded lots of them because I heard it was hard to germinate. I then produced about ten plants and had the fun of putting them everywhere! I had the best luck with Marine. I haven't been able to find a seed for white heliotrope, so I purchased it.It's one of the few things that are tempting enough to buy.

Warrier - gorgeous irises!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 19, 2012
1:03 PM

Post #9129697

Donna, try Selectseeds.com. They have 3 or 4 varieties of Heliotrope, and some are taller. Great catalog and many unusual annuals, mostly seeds but they do have a few plant varieties available. I got a Dicentra scandens, a yellow Bleeding Heart Vine from them this spring. Hmmm, maybe I should figure out where I'm going to plant that now that it's warm enough to get it in, tho not today, it's 38* at 2pm. Yuckkkkkk!

tree peony blooming the first time

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 19, 2012
2:27 PM

Post #9129780

Great minds - that's where I got them! And the Geranium Gardeners Joy in the 4th pic - that from them too.

My favorite Select Seeds plant is Feverfew Tetra Strain - it's a double feverfew.. I thought it was an annual, but some of the individual plants survive the winter AND they seed. One you grow it you always have it - but it's easy to pull out. Blooms and reblooms if you cut it back. A phenomenal plant that goes with everything. I love it.

Nice looking in bud. Gorgeous in bloom.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click an image for an enlarged view.

birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 19, 2012
9:22 PM

Post #9130124

Thanks, Pirl, for the instructions for the water crystals.
What size jug? pint? quart? I am thinking the amount of water would make a difference.
Do the water crystal blobs "float" in the water or does all of the water get jelly like?
Sorry, so many questions, but I am not quite following this yet. So, what's the difference between sprinkling the "dry" water crystals in the soil vs. putting them in water first then putting them in the flower container?

Very pretty iris. Iris, in general, are so beautiful. I just dead headed mine today. I am going to dig some of my La. Iris as they have spread, and I would like to put some of the Antirrhinum braun-blanquitii (pale yellow perennial snap) in front of them along with the dianthis that is lilac in the morning and lavender in the evening--so cool! Anyway, if anyone wants some La. Iris, let me know, cause I have to get rid of them.



I start heliotrope from seed every year. This year, I planted the seed w. my daughter's heirloom tomato seeds. The tomatoes developed much earlier than the heliotrope, and my heliotrope ended up dying. Live and Learn! I bought my heliotrope this year at $4.99 a pot. Terrible. I always put it in my garden by the front door. It smells sooo good. I actually had some re-seed last year. I may have had some this year-but pulled them up as weeds.

I planted a Martha Washington geranium in that same garden bed last summer. Well, low and behold it came back this spring from the roots!!

Donna, I got feverfew from Select Seeds about four years ago. It comes back and re-seeds every year-but not aggressively. When I saw your picture, I went to Select Seeds to see your cuter feverfew. I did not find the Tetra Strain, but when I looked at her selection of feverfew, I realized I had ordered the Virgo (I recognized the name) with no yellow centers, but mine look like regular feverfew. I knew the feverfew I grew was dissapointing, but I did not remember the virgo was quite different from all of the other feverfews. I think I will order the Virgo again and hopefully, I will get the right seed this year.

I ordered something from her last year also and did not get the seed I ordered. I have no idea what kind of seed I got. I have a picture of it somewhere-maybe I can find it and post it. Perhaps someone can tell me what it is. I may have a picture of my feverfew also.

Kathy: just wanted to tell you our temps today were 89 to 90 degrees!


This message was edited May 19, 2012 10:46 PM
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2012
4:36 AM

Post #9130242

Start by using a Pyrex measuring cup, 4 cup size (1 quart), to one TBSP of crystals and see what it looks like two hours later. They won't float. If you have too much water the mixture will be too runny so just add more crystals. The reason for not using them dry is that gardeners typically use more (of anything) than is needed and, if you put the dry crystals in the bottom of a planting hole when you water the plant the volume of crystals will lift any annual or small sized perennial out of the ground.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2012
5:57 AM

Post #9130324

Birder, the double feverfew I grew, called Tetra Strain, actually came from Johnny's Selected Seeds, which no longer carries it, or at least not this year. Not realizing that this is in fact a perennial plant in my zone, I ordered Virgo from Select Seeds because it appeared to be the same flower. Some of the plants I love disappear, because I think my taste is a little off kilter. That's why I love these forums, because I see plants that I never see in the yards around me. I've noticed that many want to grow things that are reliable, so they look at the yards around them and duplicate the successful plants. It's understandable. Everyone isn't a plant fanatic like me. I have a tendency to reject the familiar (I think I'm just perverse) and end up with some curious plants.

And Pirl is absolutely right about plants being pushed out. Like a dummy, I didn't really read the instruction, would put it in dry and near the top, and then have volcanos of crystals at the top! So I then started mixing it with water. I'm glad this topic was raised, because I potted up a trade gallon Glamis Castle yesterday and put the moistened crystals near the roots, not the stems. I've been using this for years, and only now, because of Pirl, am I doing it correctly.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9130336

Thanks, Donna. I read it years ago, here on DG first. So it wasn't my invention but it is a great idea. When the jug gets low you can just add more crystals and more water - no need to finish a jug first.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 20, 2012
7:19 AM

Post #9130441

Pirl, my first experience with Terrasorb crystals was sort of like that old episode of I Love Lucy where she puts too much laundry detergent in the washer. The next morning, I woke up to a terrified plant perched precariously about 2ft above the rim of the pot balancing on a bunch of jiggling clear jell-o. We live, we learn...

This message was edited May 20, 2012 8:20 AM
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

May 20, 2012
8:19 AM

Post #9130500

Sounds like the new product I used for the dishwasher, eons ago, dishwashing liquid. There I thought it meant a liquid you used for the dishwasher. What a Lucy event. Suds were spewing out and my floor was the cleanest in town. I tried using vinegar to stop the suds and had sudsy vinegar all over.

Live and learn is what it's all about.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2012
8:51 AM

Post #9130528

Wee, that image of your plant is absolutely hilarious!
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 20, 2012
1:18 PM

Post #9130772

"Aint" it the truth!! Live and Learn.
The water crystal mixture won't spoil?

Donna, don't you think the Virgo looks like your Tetra Strain? I am going to order some of it.

It's hot and humid today--but we have a nice west breeze which makes working outside more tolerable especially if you can do something in the shade. So much to do...so little time!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 20, 2012
1:30 PM

Post #9130787

The water crystal stuff never spoils. I have actually carried mine over from year to year. It just dries out. You wet it and - voila!

And yes, I think the two are the same.

It's incredible how much I, and I'll bet you, are cramming into these days. We had a chilly spell, and now it's close to 80. It's weird.

Ack! Donna! Learn to spell!


This message was edited May 21, 2012 8:14 AM

This message was edited May 22, 2012 4:46 AM
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 20, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9130804

Yes, I am going non stop trying to get most of the garden nestleld in for the summer before June. June gets pretty hot and sticky here.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

May 21, 2012
7:04 AM

Post #9131683

I've done the dishwasher thing... In a summer rental, the regular and dishwasher types were in identical containers and I mixed them up. Hilarious- Suds like a tidal wave, coming at me down the corridor outside the kitchen! I cleaned it up, tried again... And it happened again from the residue inside the machine. I finally had to swab inside with q-tips to get rid of it all.

I've also 'elevated' plants with the water crystals. Good tip, Pirl. You really have it all down!

Pam
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

May 21, 2012
7:56 PM

Post #9132807

What a mess with q-tips! This is way off topic, but it makes me think of the time I made a cheese cake. I tripped and out flew the cheesecake batter all over my kitchen floor! The floor was so greasy, I mopped it three times on my hands and knees, and it was still greasy. I think I finally used a vinegar wash to get it up. What a mess.

Eleven

Eleven
Royal Oak, MI
(Zone 6a)

May 22, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9133546

[quote="birder17"]
Sorry, so many questions, but I am not quite following this yet. So, what's the difference between sprinkling the "dry" water crystals in the soil vs. putting them in water first then putting them in the flower container?
This message was edited May 19, 2012 10:46 PM[/quote]
Birder, what happens when you use the dry is that all the crystals expand and then burst out of the pot after you water the plant. This happened to my neighbor last year =)
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 22, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #9133733

Here's my water crystal story, quite off topic. My husband and I went out of town for a week this past winter, leaving my somewhat learning disabled 20-year-old in the care of a family friend in her late 20's. It snowed and got icy. My daughter went into the garage to find sand or snow melter (which we don't use for environmental reasons). She found some unlabeled bags of, you guessed it, water crystals. I had rather a lot of it from a bulk purchase, that had been repackaged in one-pound bags. (They had been inside a plastic tub -- she really had to hunt to find them.) She figured they were appropriate for the snow. Of course, no one called us to ask if it was ok to sprinkle unlabeled chemicals around and about. The two of them sprinkled the water crystals all over our yard and driveway. When we came hold, the snow had melted but it still looked like Christmas at our house.

Now back to "shorter yellow perennial for part sun/part shade garden!"
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

May 22, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9133820

This is the most fun I have ever had off-topic!

warriorswisdomkathy

warriorswisdomkathy
Kiowa, CO
(Zone 5b)

May 24, 2012
3:24 PM

Post #9137037

Yup, love that hydrogels stuff too. I knew that it was suppose to be soaked first, but was lazy one day, yup, put in the bottom of the hole and mixed with the backfill. Ended up with all these little lumps coming out of the soil, looks like clear jello.

OMG...happy..too funny but then again not!!!!! I know what a large bag costs, sure hope you scrapped them up and put back in a bucket til dry...I know I'm paying $7.50 lbs. LOL
happy_macomb
Chevy Chase, MD
(Zone 7a)

May 24, 2012
3:30 PM

Post #9137041

Kathy: I have a large garbage pail filled with the stuff, which is still wet and now smells slightly mildewy. But I grab a bit here and a bit there, and eventually will have used it up. I don't even want to think about what I paid for it -- it was a lot!
1alh1
Sidney, OH
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2012
9:16 PM

Post #9137509

Yellow flowering perennial: how about one of the euphorbias? Myrsinites and Cushion spurge (polychroma), are 2 that might fit the bill. They stay short and have a milky substance when cut or chewed that animals avoid. Other euphorbias would work well, too

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