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Vegetable Gardening: What Peppers and Tomatoes are you Starting for 2012?

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 2, 2012
4:17 AM

Post #8991714

This conversation was started in the Tomato forum but the thread is getting long so let's continue here.

For peppers, I've started:
chiltepins
Aji Limon
Orange Habenero
Big Jim
Kung Pao
Vaquero (a jalapeno)
Costeno Amarillo

Two new tomatoes, for me this year are:
Riesentraube - a cherry
Momotaro - getting great reviews here on DG

What's growing in your garden this season? Ranging beyond tomatoes and peppers is okay with the topic starter, OT rules are suspended. ;-)

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cornish2175
Charleston, SC
(Zone 8b)

February 2, 2012
5:44 AM

Post #8991794

Tomatoes -my favorite- purple cherokee, a plum called principe borghese- new for me but had roasted plum tomatoes last fall that were fantastic with goat cheese. A costoluto genovese, another heirloom, this one red and wavy edged, and finally a brownish tomato called kumato- we have been buying them all winter so I thought I'd try to grow the seeds. I can plant fairly early here so all will go out to harden off in the next few weeks.
Peppers are a banana called godfather- had good sucess last year and an heirloom called quadrato d' asti russo- a red bell

I no longer have the huge garden space nor the people to eat that much, but am always interested in other varieties.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2012
6:19 AM

Post #8991821

Here is the list of what we are growing. Most of it is from seeds with a few plants thrown in. We also have a number of perennial herbs in the yard already. We should start planting seeds the next couple of weekends. Although we've just got told that we've moved from Zone 5 to Zone 6 so I guess I better at what impact that might have on the planting dates.

Basil: Genovese - Organic
Boxwood

Beets: Red Ace - Organic
Beet greens: Early Wonder Tall Top

Begonia: White Baby Wing
Dragon Wing

Bok Choy: Toy Choi
Violetta Pac Choi

Broccoli Raab: Sessantina Grossa
Spring Raab

Calendula: Orange Zinger (Hardy Annual)

Carrots: Caracas

Chamomile: German

Coleus: Versa Burgundy to Green

Collards: Georgia Southern

Cover Crop: Soil Builder Peas/oats

Dill: Mammoth -Organic

Eggplant: Orient Express

Garlic: TBD

Impatients: Accent Mystic Mix

Kale: Winterbor

Kohlrabi: Eder

Leeks: Lancelot

Lemon Grass: West Indian

Lettuce: Black Seeded Simpson
Flashy Troutback Romain
Wildfire Lettuce Mix (oakleaf)
Provençal Winter Mix

Mache: Big Seeded

Melon: Bit o' Honey

Nasturtium: Jewel mix

Parsley: Giant From Italy

Peas: Dwarf Grey Sugar Pea (snow)
Tom Thumb (Shell)
Sugar Bon (snap)

Peppers: Roumanian Rainbow

Radish: Easter Egg
Ping Pong
Rat-Tailed

Sage: Pineapple Sage (Salvia elegans)
Mexican Sage (Salvia leucantha 'Santa Barbara PP12949' )

Spinach: Space
Tyee

Tomatoes: Brandywine (Sudduth's)
Black Cherry
Box Car Willie
Juliet
Kellog's Breakfast
Opalka

Watermelons: Sunshine
Sugar Baby
Crimson Sweet - organic

Zinnia: Zahara Double Fire
Zahara Double Cherry
Zahara Starlight Rose











This message was edited Feb 2, 2012 8:21 AM
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #8991824

I am not crazy about Hot peppers. I only need a few for a little spice.
Trying out the hot Peter Pepper.
Love Fooled You jalapeno.
Growing Big Bertha Bell, Super Heavyweight Bell.
I like growing big veggies.
(even giant pumpkins)

As for the whole garden...the list is a mile long and i would be here all day.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #8991835

We've put ours into a spread sheet. Makes it easy copy the list or to track orders are filled and what gets planted next.

What is your favorite hot and non-hot pepper?

A former boss was into growing giant pumpkins and entering them in competitions. The competition part explains his personnality alot.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #8991858

Mary, thanks for starting this thread-
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2012
7:33 AM

Post #8991929

Same Here. Thanks for starting the thread.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 2, 2012
8:37 AM

Post #8992025

You are both (all) very welcome...I look forward to seeing lots of new idea...like I need those. Susan, you're amazing. And I though *I* needed a 12-step program for a mere 'home gardener'.

My favorite hot pepper, at least so far, is the little tiny round chiltepins. They dry quickly and easily then I grind and put them in a shaker. Unfortunatly, the birds REALLY like these too so it's a battle to get to them first.

It seems there is more than one variety of chilteping because I keep telling the folks I order from "Do not substiute." but I get other plants than what I really wanted. For a long time I thought they were sending my Birds Eye peppers because they grow straight up, but the packing list calls them a certain chiltepin - don't have the details handy.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 2, 2012
10:02 AM

Post #8992104

I copied and pasted this from my seed order from Johnny's:

Monica (F1) (OG)-Packet
Vegetables > Tomatoes > Saladette and Sauce > Determinate

Royal Burgundy (OG)-Packet
Vegetables > Beans > Beans, Bush > Purple, Round Pod

Arcadia (F1)-Packet
Vegetables > Broccoli > Hybrid

Green Magic (F1)-Packet
Vegetables > Broccoli > Hybrid

Tasty Bites (F1)-Packet
Vegetables > Melons > Cantaloupe > Hybrid

Sugar Sprint-Packet
Vegetables > Peas > Snap

Ace (F1)-Packet
Vegetables > Peppers > Sweet Bell > Green-to-Red Bells > Hybrid

Sweet Bite (F1)-Packet
Vegetables > Watermelon > Triploid/Seedless

Genovese-Packet
Herbs > Basil > Pesto

Giant of Italy-Packet
Herbs > Parsley

I have also purchased/ordered Vardeman sweet potatoes, Candy onions, Alaska peas, Australian brown onion.

Seeds have been exchanged with DG members

And then there's seeds left over from years past...

I NEED A LARGER GARDEN!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2012
10:30 AM

Post #8992141

I don't have the right soil to grow competition giant pumpkins. It would take me years to build it up. I just like watching them grow. The prettiest giant leaves. And, I eat the culls(6 to 10 days old) and prepare them like you do crookneck squash. So Yummy Big round sliced circles of young pumpkin, battered and fried.


Spring is around the corner.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2012
12:41 PM

Post #8992294

LOL I've seen another avid gardener's list recently and it was 8-10 items. Since then I've been wondering if I maybe need to cut back a bit. It seems like there is always some plant/veggie out there that we ran across at a local market or restaurant and want to try growing ourselves. It does have to produce or it gets skipped/replaced the next season.

It's a garden for two so think smaller quantities. We plant smaller rows and only 8-12 tomato plants. Any extras we give out to the neighborhood or food pantry. We set up as much as we can so the garden running and seed starting is easy. Flowers on the other hand are in much larger quantities. I'm also thinking I need to start putting in more perennials and less annuals grown from seed.

I haven’t heard of chiltepin peppers before. Is that a warm climate pepper and how hot is it?

Honeybee- The Tasty Bites looks interesting. What do you like about it and how well does it grow for you?

CricketGarden - Sounds interesting on the pumpkin culls. I didn't know you could eat those. So tell me more about them. Are they green or orange? How big is a pumpkin cull on a giant pumpkin? How big do your giant pumpkins get?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 2, 2012
12:50 PM

Post #8992304

Chiltepin is very hot. If you can grow other peppers you should be able to grow that one. Want some seeds to try? Be happy to enable!!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 2, 2012
12:55 PM

Post #8992313

LOL. So your thinking my list is not long enough and happy to help resolve that issue?
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2012
1:25 PM

Post #8992350

My pumpkins have never gotten giant. The squash vine borers make sure that I don't. The biggest was 310 lbs. An actual joke compared to world record. The culls are about the size of a cantaloupe up to a basketball. Their color is pale orange, pale yellow. Pumpkins get darker as they get older. I want to grow a green one...squash, real bad. I have the seed. I know the key to protecting the pumpkin vines from SVB is by covering the vine but I always manage to miss an area and also not suppose to cover a certain amount of the vine near the trunk. I seriously thought about covering the plant with 30 percent shade cloth this year and see what happens...the giant pumpkins are a huge subject all by itself.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 2, 2012
1:42 PM

Post #8992382

Susan - you betcha!!

Re: SVB - I have successfully battled these buggers by feeding the new vines through empty toilet paper rolls, then push the carboard roll into the [wet] soil for at least half an inch. Really. It works. Before that I was running the new vine through a piece of panty hose but the cardboard rolls are easier. It's my understanding that the SVB lies its eggs within a couple of inches of where the stem emerges from the soil. So if you can stop them there, they are stopped. Here's the Wiki link.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_vine_borer

another interesting link with a YouTube video that I don't have time to watch right now.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Squash_vine_borer
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2012
6:26 PM

Post #8992691

That was a good info link
I currently have 4 Giant Pumpkin DVDs from Holland Giants, One DVD by Joe, and all three Giant Pumpkin books by Marvin.
I went all out. Even as to pay $100 for a pack of seed. I have not tried growing anything in two years. Been building a home after the fire.
I want to grow this year but not sure If I should. I have the shade cloth. I have the seed. I have the books and DVDs. I even have a hoist.
I don't have the right soil for a giant but I do have soil. I have whole fish too. That 310 pound I grew actually aborted on day 35 after pollination.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 2, 2012
6:33 PM

Post #8992696

maybe I should start a Pumpkin/Squash topic??? or leave it here???

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 3, 2012
9:44 AM

Post #8993279

MaryMcp
"I have successfully battled these buggers by feeding the new vines through empty toilet paper rolls"
when do you do that?
when the vine is small ?

I had to start squash/cuke seeds indoorr because pill bugs will eat them ...
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2012
11:01 AM

Post #8993345

i don't understand the concept of the toilet paper rolls down a long vine.
I better make sure I cover every inch with soil this year and with the shade cloth draped over the plant too. (screen)
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2012
11:04 AM

Post #8993349

I do like the stocking idea wrapped around the vine where I cannot cover the vines with soil.


2 years ago.



This message was edited Feb 3, 2012 1:04 PM

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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 3, 2012
12:42 PM

Post #8993456

drthor - yes, when the vine is young. The Wiki article says the SVB lays its eggs in on the first 2" out of the soil but they [apparently] don't go any further than that so if you can keep the SVB from laying the eggs when the vine first emerges, you're good. At least in theory!!

crickets...same thing as above. You don't have to do the entire vine, just the first couple of inches.

Stockings work really well too, they are just not as easy to place around the vine, at least for me.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 3, 2012
1:52 PM

Post #8993553

Mary. The SVB does lay its eggs all along the Vines. Bush is different.

They even say it in the Link you posted.
"""Prevention includes pesticides to kill the adult moth (such use must not contaminate the flowers, as pollinators would be killed by poisoned nectar or pollen). Organic controls include wrapping the lower stem with nylon stockings or aluminum foil to prevent egg laying, which generally occurs within a couple inches from the point where the stem emerges from the soil. Row covers can be used up until bloom. An old gardener trick for vining squash and pumpkin cultivars is to cover the vine with earth at various points along its length, inducing rooting at several points, thereby continuing to feed the developing fruit despite the loss of the original stem. It may be noted that after the vine has taken root at multiple points, the infected portion of the plant can be cut off, along with another inch where the larvae is eating into healthy tissue, without significant damage to the plant."""

I guess the part that is misunderstood is... on """ Vining plants""" there are leaf stalks all down the long vine. The SVB is laying eggs at the junction of every leaf joint stem and along the vine itself which means the whole vine has to be buried or covered
This is not an issue with the Bush plants which only need little protection.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 3, 2012
3:18 PM

Post #8993688

Thanks for the clarification...I had not understood it that way. I love the zucc plants but did get completely wiped out one year by that bugger.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 4, 2012
3:58 AM

Post #8994160

Cricketgarden - That blossum looks huge. How big do they get?

CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 4, 2012
5:18 AM

Post #8994199

it was huge. I never measured them but i would say the blooms are as wide or wider than a cereal bowl.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 5, 2012
7:22 AM

Post #8995362

SusanKC -
Quoting: Tasty Bites looks interesting. What do you like about it and how well does it grow for you?


Here's what Johnny's site says about Tasty Bites:

Quoting:Personal-size melon.

Tasty Bites is an innovative new type of melon bred by crossing an ananas and a charantais. The result is a very sweet, rich, aromatic, cantaloupe-like melon with an above-average shelf life. Fruits are round to oval with an attractive netting and avg 1 3/4-2 1/2 lbs. Harvest when skin is yellowish orange and the fruits slip from the vines. Fruits ripen over an extended harvest period making this a good choice for market growers. Avg. 17,400 seeds/lb. Packet: 20 seeds.


I produced so many of these last summer that I gave many away to neighbors. I also cut off the rind and froze the flesh. They are unbelievably sweet!

It is easy to tell when they are ripe, they turn a yellowish orange and slip from the vine - just like Johnny's description.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 5, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #8995662

HoneybeeNC - Hum. We may have to try those next year. They sound wonderful. We had a good couple of years with the bit a honey but the seeds are harder to find.

Cricket - are you eating the blooms also?


rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2012
7:43 PM

Post #8996111

...and the thread drifts away like oak pollen on a spring breeze...kachoo! ;o)

Seriously, you gotta be quick. I just found this thread on starting tomatoes and peppers, and that conversation apparently stopped a while back. Why don't we just start a dozen threads and call them all "Random thoughts about stuff"?

Yeah, just kidding...

-Rich
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 5, 2012
8:12 PM

Post #8996147

Yep. We went south pretty early on. As the topic starter, I'll just say I'm okay with rambling conversations. That's usually how it goes face-to-face. We may come back around to tomatoes and peppers at some point, but it's certainly not mandatory. Carry on...
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2012
8:54 PM

Post #8996191

MaryMcP wrote:Yep. We went south pretty early on. As the topic starter, I'll just say I'm okay with rambling conversations. That's usually how it goes face-to-face. We may come back around to tomatoes and peppers at some point, but it's certainly not mandatory. Carry on...

I guess my bigger gripe - it's a stretch to call it that - is not really about discussing things not included in the topic header. I love hearing about other gardeners' experiences growing just about anything edible. It's even been hard for me to refrain from talking about my fruit trees - it all seems related. But there may be some poor soul looking for information about controlling squash vine borers, and they'd never think to look for it here...

-Rich
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

February 5, 2012
9:12 PM

Post #8996199

New tomatoes for me: Black Prince, Tiffen Minnonite, Coir de Bue and trying one more time Silvery Fir Tree, Copia, Black Krim (these are yummy, I've already picked a few) plus others
Peppers: King Arthur, Muscato, Quadrato d'asti Russo, Red Ruffled and Chichimeca.

Squash/pumpkin blossoms are delicious. I need to find some giant pumpkin seeds to grow for blossoms!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 5, 2012
10:57 PM

Post #8996220

To help "reboot" the thread...

I have five more pepper varieties up since yesterday. That makes a total of 18 out of 24 that were planted on 1/27. I believe the bottom heat is making a difference, even though my seed-starting area isn't what you'd consider cold. At least some of these are species I've always considered difficult to start in the past. In fact, 8 days after planting the seeds I now have representatives of all five of the species I planted: Frutescens, Pubescens, Annuum, Baccatum, and Chinense. All but one of the seeds came from Semillas La Palma.

The next batch, started 2/1, should produce more data, as they are from a larger number of suppliers (but almost all are Annuums). If they follow the pattern of the first set, some should be up tomorrow or Tuesday (days 5 and 6).

-Rich
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
4:22 AM

Post #8996293

Hadn't thought of that point Rich...squash vine borer control info is buried without a proper heading.

Most of my peppers have sprouted but they have a long way to go before I can plant them out. They got a late start due to timing (as in enough hours in the day) and space requirements (as in not sufficient indoor grow lighting). Hopefully they will take off now that they have been potted up from the foam cells to potting mix.

The tomatoes are going well. Nearly all are potted up to 1 quart size, I've had trouble getting enough containers. The hydro store had some cool grow bags for 12 cents each and I bought what they had but the only size available was 1/2 gallon which take too much soil. I found some cardboard 'popcorn' cups that are 32 oz but they are not wax coated and I'm not sure how long the cardboard will hold up.

http://www.greenfireshop.com/cart/index.php?productID=1212

Smart and Final had some 32 oz clear Solo-type cups but I'm not sure the roots will like the clear plastic. What do you folks think? Can I use clear plastic cups for the final pot-up before going in the ground? One quart is the size when I'm finally ready to sell the plants and these cups are the most affordable solution.
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
4:32 AM

Post #8996300

A few years ago I re-potted tomato starts in some 32 oz clear plastic cups and promptly developed an alge problem. I would go with something else if it's available.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2012
7:03 AM

Post #8996464

The thread went south is because I trucated the title somehow and thought it said What Are You Starting.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
7:12 AM

Post #8996473

No no Susan, that wasn't it. It was the squash vine borers where we took the turn. It's all good though.

Dan, thanks for the feedback. Right after I posted that question I went and bumped around on a thread by flyboy in Florida and he has pics of his tomato starts in clear cups. Then Honeybee_NC says she always starts in these cups...

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/p.php?pid=8640978

I may give them a try for the peppers I'll be potting up next.

This message was edited Feb 6, 2012 8:17 AM

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 6, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #8996549

Mary -
Quoting: Honeybee_NC says she always starts in these cups


Your link takes you to flyboy's photo. I sometimes use those in the photo to pot-up seedlings, but I start all my seeds in 3oz plastic Solo cups. They used to be called (or maybe still are called) bathroom cups. Walmart sells them.

The cups in the photo are 7oz cups (I think.)
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
8:28 AM

Post #8996592

I was referring to the fact that you say you've used clear cups, not so much their size. I always thought plants did not want to grow roots in a clear container...maybe that was misinformation. It's been in my head for years so there's no telling where I got the idea.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 6, 2012
9:42 AM

Post #8996685

Mary, I use clear cups nearly all the time, and have great success with them. You can watch the root development which is fun-if you feel that the roots shouldn't see light, just wrap a paper around the pots or the whole flat and peek at them when you want to. I have some fig cuttings rooting in 20oz clear cups that Horseshoe sent me- Thet are very happy-I just don't know where I will find the spece to plant them- probably in containers since they would probably freeze back every winter here.
I hope we don't get too caught up with this wandering off topic subject- I don't think it is a problem at all. I enjoy the exchange, and I don't think anyone should be jumped on for chatting-we all can learn a little every day, otherwise it ain't worth gettin up !
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
9:49 AM

Post #8996694

Quoting:I hope we don't get too caught up with this wandering off topic subject- I don't think it is a problem at all.


I agree. It's all good. Rich did make a good point that the information we collect off-topic is not searchable when someone might benefit from the discussion. Can't have it all. ;-))

Good to know I can grow in the clear containers. Dan may have had some other issue that coincided with the plants in clear plastic.

How do you put drainage holes in the bottom? Best part of the cardboard popcorn cups is how easy it was to punch holes in 5 cups at a time.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 6, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #8996801

I have an old woodburning tool that works great -I punch 3 holes about 1/4 " above the bottom - I buy packages and get them all ready- I have 4 pkgs of 5oz ready- they are great to start with, then move to about 8oz later. I beg empty cactus flats at WalMart that hold the small cactus- they hold the little cups perfectly. While I have your attention I just went and took this photo to show you what I do- (I don't know what the cups with the lips were for- I got a big bunch at the Thrift Shop!)

This message was edited Feb 6, 2012 11:46 AM

Thumbnail by JoParrott
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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #8996869

AH HAH! A wood burning tool...that stays hot because it's plugged in. You should picture me out on the patio with the propane camp stove and an icepick. Scheesch! I'll bet DH has one of those tools in his workshop. Thanks...DUH! - sound of Mary slapping herself across the forehead.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 6, 2012
12:53 PM

Post #8996887

Good idea. I noticed it from the photo that the tool puts a nice size hole in the bottom.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 6, 2012
2:05 PM

Post #8996986

Yes, I just don't put any of the tips on- just use the base, which makes about a 3/8" hole. To me it's the perfect way-but the stink is bad- don't breathe it in! You can find the woodburning tools real cheap- less tha $10, or less at a thrift store. And the cactus flats keep them from tipping over which is great! I Love repurposing!!!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
4:09 PM

Post #8997130

Here's a link to an article I found very interesting...I've sent out email blasts looking for fresh horse manure to heat the raised beds. I've had the black plastic and glass top on for several days, it's not 'bounding' up in temps. I like the idea of burying the manure, repacking the soil on top, and the manure heats the soil above. Someone here directed me to this same idea a while back, sorry, I don't remember who to give the credit to, but I was then focused on getting the black plastic and glass top going. Time for Plan B.

http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/publications/guides/carver_tomato.html

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
5:14 PM

Post #8997210

So when are you going to plant your tomatoes outside?
I have just checked your weather and it is perfect to plant out.
Have you harden off your tomatoes plants? also under the sun?

I am hardening off mine. Not yet at night ... it is still cold.
My plants are just loving being outside ... I can tell the leaf color turning from indoor green to bright outdoor green (which is more green instead than on a blue tone green)
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 6, 2012
5:58 PM

Post #8997265

There's an 'Arctic Express' coming through late this week or next, can't remember now, but we often get one final hurrah before spring truly breaks. I'll wait for that to pass, although had planned to plant out Feb 15+...so a little of a set back. Overnight low's in the high 30's/low 40's with what we call and Arctic Express here in the SW desert. The plants have been outside during the day for the last 2 or 3 weeks. Hump everything back in at night...ready for a bit warmer temps so that task is over. :-|
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
6:10 PM

Post #8997282

Mary-You may already know about this but some fresh animal manure contains a systemic broad leaf herbicide that will kill veggie plants. I only use "old manure" or manure from our donkey that only eats off our untreated pasture.

great Article but it too says not to use fresh (hot) manure. This is only true of herbivore manure
































This message was edited Feb 6, 2012 8:16 PM

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 6, 2012
6:11 PM

Post #8997285

huumm
in DFW we also have always some cold spell at the end of March/beginning of April.
But my tomatoes always survive that.
Plus the very high winds.

I keep my plants under a hoop house with a perforated plastic cover.
If the temperature drops below 40F I cover the all hoop house with blankets.

Good luck to you

This message was edited Feb 6, 2012 8:12 PM
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
3:41 AM

Post #8997567

Thanks for pointing that out Lisa, I'll check with the person I'm picking up the manure from. drthor, have not got the hoop house idea put together yet, it's on my bucket list of projects...long list. ;-)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
3:58 AM

Post #8997574

Mary -Did you seal the edges aroound the plastic or sliding class door so you are not getting any air leaks?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
4:45 AM

Post #8997599

Susan, a thick mil black plastic sheet is draped over the entire bed, then a door on top, it does not quite fit completely and I have not gone the extra step to make it airtight. It's a good idea though. The soil has come up to 60° (from 50) and according to a chart honeybee posted last week, 60° is okay for planting out tomatoes. Someone here (Shoe I think but am not certain) suggested 75° and that's what I'm really shooting for...nice warm soil for those roots.

Tomato starts on Feb 5th. Anybody else notice we can now post up to 5 images at a time? Whooo Hoooo.

Thumbnail by MaryMcP   Thumbnail by MaryMcP   Thumbnail by MaryMcP
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JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 7, 2012
5:51 AM

Post #8997666

Wow! The multiple image upload is super. Thenks to whoever implemented it!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2012
6:04 AM

Post #8997695

MaryMcP wrote:
What's growing in your garden this season? Ranging beyond tomatoes and peppers is okay with the topic starter, OT rules are suspended. ;-)


getting off the topic of tomatoes and peppers was my fault. I am posting this quote in the beginning topic so yall could see why i thought it was ok


I have plans to make my own pepper powders and dried peppers this year.

Have sown the seed for
Paprika= powder
Pimento = dried
Peter Pepper for the chili powder
Cayenne Long Slim= dried and powder
Fooled You Jalapeno(love it)
Early Jalapeno(for hubby) dry
Big Bertha Bell= dry
Super Heavyweight Bell= dry
Purple Beauty Bell= dry
Sweet Banana= dry
Hot Cow Horn(for hubby)= dry

I don't make sauces with vinegar. I hate vinegar. I dodge it when I can. Nasty stuff!!!






CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #8997698

Mary, I have not noticed the 5 pic upload.
that is neat
And your plants look so pretty.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
6:14 AM

Post #8997707

Thanks Cricket, I'm very happy with this season's tomato starts...now if I could just get their parents to come and pick them up!! If our night time temps ever sneak past 50, I won't care so much but humping these trays in and out of the house overnight is a hassle, especially now that they are all in larger containers.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2012
6:21 AM

Post #8997715

your tomatoes are wonderful.
Seriously you are ready to plant out.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
7:08 AM

Post #8997776

I'll not be too hasty with a storm scheduled to come through in a few days. Low's in the high 30's next week. I'll wait a bit. I lost 3 beautiful Black Plum tomato plants to an early frost in December and it was heartbreaking. As the bumper sticker on the car ahead of me in Hawaii often says: "Try wait." hahahah
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
7:40 AM

Post #8997827

Mary - Try getting the edges sealed down by soil. Another suggestion would be to put a sheet of black plastic under the sliding glass door Glass converts sunlight to heat and black colors store heat.

Cricket - Nice list of peppers. BTW - I enjoyed the discussion about pumpkins and squash bugs. Let me know if you start one on the subject.

This message was edited Feb 7, 2012 1:13 PM
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2012
10:19 AM

Post #8997980

I have to agree with Mary, there is no way I would plant out if the temps were predicted to be in the 30s. IF you look at the chart I posted (on the soil temp thread) it says the recommended soil and air temp. We all have our methods but Ive been gardening for 25+ years and there is just no way. I doupt if Mary has time to cover and uncover them every day, I know I dont. I wait until the weather stablizes every year, and every year I get tons of tomatoes and other veggies all summer long. Last summer was the ONE exception. But the heat was extreme and then there were the deer...

Mary's plants look great I sure would hate to lose them to a freeze.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
11:30 AM

Post #8998050

Mary - Agree dirthur that your tomato plants look wonderful. I've not heard of the black plum tomatoes. What are they like? On the manure, I vaguely remember reading that it had to be composted a year before the volunteer seeds and nitrogen burn on plants was not an issue. It might be something you want to discuss with your freind.

Cricket - It had not occured to me to make our own pepper spices. I'm looking for a couple of new peppers to try. Have you grown any of the peppers before and which do you like best?

Nice to be able to have multiple picture uploads.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 7, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #8998064

I posted my tomatoes over on the other message in the tomato forum. The peppers I plan to grow are mostly sweet. I will be growing one hot pepper, for drying and making into flakes (if I can actually harvest enough to be useful).

The list:

Aleppo -- hot, medium size pepper from Syria/southern Turkey
Yummy -- small, orange sweet Hungarian type
Gypsy Hybrid -- medium to large, sweet, orange-red "frying" pepper
Whitney Hybrid -- medium to large, sweet, red Hungarian type
Zsa Zsa Hybrid -- medium, sweet, red Hungarian type
Chablis Hybrid -- medium to large, sweet, red bell (supposed to be resistant to Tobacco Mosaic Virus)

I have soil contaminated with Pepper Mild Mottle Virus, which has pretty well destroyed my ability to grow bell peppers. Hot peppers seem to resist it and I've had okay luck with the non-bell sweet peppers. I'm still looking for one that is the best in my circumstance. That's why I have four different peppers that are very similar... hopefully one of them will do well in resisting the virus and produce a decent quantity of peppers.

David
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2012
12:19 PM

Post #8998105

SusanKC, I have grown all the peppers in my list before Except for that Peter Pepper.
I don't know how the hot peppers taste raw cause ...lol...i just cant handle the heat but I can handle a piece thrown into dishes.
I love the Fooled You Jalapeno cause there is no heat but sometimes there might be a tiny touch of it. I like the flavor of Jalapenos but can't handle the full force heat. And if I do eat something hot spicy, I am a big big baby and have to have my chocolate milk to go with it.
I love the Super Heavyweight Bells. They ripen yellow and its has the mild sweetness level of a banana and it doesn't have a strong bell pepper after math flavor. lol Great snack . And I love how huge they get. The Big Bertha is great too and ripens red.
I have only dried peppers once in my life and I did that with bell peppers and stored the long slices in a canning jar and used it all winter.
My sister said she dried some hot peppers this past year and just ran the dry peppers through her food processor and stored the powder/semi flakes in a canning jar. I never thought about the food processor which makes the idea of drying and storing peppers so much better and I am following her foot steps this year.
I will start a Squash/Pumpkin ( Big Family) topic one day soon cause I will be growing some in the greenhouse to get an early crop...impatient.

I am growing my peppers in 5 gallon buckets / pots this year. Using my garden beds and raised beds for other veggies that either take up a lot of space or need deep root space (carrots, potatoes , etc...pumpkin)

This was last years peppers that the Bull ate...I been waiting a year to do it again...(bull gone bye bye)





This message was edited Feb 7, 2012 2:46 PM

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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 7, 2012
12:24 PM

Post #8998111

oh and this hydroponic place gave some info on other ways to dry peppers.

http://www.hydroponic-growing-systems.com/drying-peppers.html
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
12:32 PM

Post #8998124

Thanks Cricket. Nice looking pepper plants. We have grown our peppers in containers for a while. The soil warms up faster in the containers and the peppers like it that way, so it works well for us.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
2:22 PM

Post #8998218

Cricket, That's a great link on drying peppers, I just read through it quickly but have bookmarked it for later. I'll post a pic of my home sun drying setup. Works great here in the summer. When dry I like to grind them with a spice grinder, then put in jar with shaker top. Lasts months.

Susan, the hot manure idea is simply to heat up the soil in the beds. It's been used for centuries in other countries, like Germany and the UK to get the soil warmed up for spring planting. It's not that you mix the manure into the bed, but bury the manure 2' to 3' deep. The heat comes up to warm the bed, and by the time the roots get to the manure, it's no longer hot. At least that's the way I understand it.

But I still need to ask my source about the broadleaf herbicide issued raised by 1lisac. The jury's still out on that but I may be better safe than sorry. Probably the only way I would know is if I contacted the company they buy their hay from for the horses. but if the horses are eating alfalfa, which is a broad leafed plant, it's doubtful that a broadleafed herbicide would be used on it. I dunno...too deep for me.

Cricket, your pepper plants look just great. Poor bull...my Cav spaniels like to graze on green leafy things so I have to be careful where I place the young'uns.

Susan, I read about the Black Plum tomatoes on the TomatoVille site when I was browsing tomato recipes. Folks over there claim it's the best salsa tomato around.

Here's my leafy greens eater...the main culprit anyway, and the solar pepper drier. Can't find the pic of the beautiful Black Plum plants before they were frosted...I saw it this morning when looking for something else but it's hiding now.

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1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 7, 2012
3:13 PM

Post #8998273

Mary 2' to 3' deep? I couldnt dig that deep here with a bobcat. You can test the manure/hay by starting a pea or bean in a small container make "tea" with the hay or manure. After the seed has sprouted water it with a little tea if it has the herbicide it wont live very long. Legumes are very sensitive to this herbicide. Im not sure of the time frame you may want to google

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #8998302

Cricket - Thanks for the input. I'll be looking at those peppers.

Mary - Interesting concept. I've seen the manure piles in ND steam in the middle of the winter so that may work. It seems like a lot of work to dig it in 2-3 feet down. Do the articles say if they typically dig the manure into the garden in the fall or in the spring?

Our leafy green eaters. The first is helping with the compost in our compost pile. The second photos is two of the babies when we first started gardening. The fence kept them out until one of them fell through the 2x3in grid in the fencing. All five then proceeded to eat through everything except the mustard greens.

Thumbnail by SusanKC   Thumbnail by SusanKC
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MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #8998324

Lisa, thanks for the sprouting tip. My raised bed is not that deep. I was not planning on mountains of manure. Just a small amount should heat the soil I need. It just needs a little bitty boost and the concept intrigues me...or it did yesterday. I dunno now.

Susan, In order to serve the purpose, the manure is planted in spring. If planted in fall, it would cool down before spring. ;-) My leafy green eater is cuter than yours...good thing they don't like mustard greens, at least something was left for you.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 7, 2012
4:19 PM

Post #8998342

Your's is cuter. Mine adds to the usable compost. :-)

Try sealing the edges of the glass door and plastic. See what that gets you.

BTW the tomato festival is a favorite site. I came across their cookbook in our library. I like the cookbook very much also.
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 7, 2012
8:49 PM

Post #8998613

Dave...would mind sharing your source for the Aleppo seeds? I looked for several years and never found a reliable source for them. There was a thread here devoted to finding such a source a few years back. I finally gave up the search but if you have found a source I'd be interested in checking it out.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 8, 2012
4:11 AM

Post #8998773

Ditto what Dan said. That Aleppo pepper is pricey - when I can find it.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 8, 2012
5:45 AM

Post #8998853

I got a few seeds from a Dave's Garden member a couple years ago. I didn't get them planted until last year. Unfortunately, we had a horrible drought and a heat wave (all summer was 100-degrees plus) so I didn't get a good crop. I did get enough to save the seeds, though.

I would be willing to share from the 100 or seeds I have for a stamped, self-addressed envelope. D-mail me for my mailing address if you are interested. (Dan & Mary, I sent my address to your d-mail).

David
Dann_L
San Tan Valley, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 8, 2012
7:25 AM

Post #8998987

Thanks David!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 8, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #8999097

Mary - unfortunately, alfalfa is sprayed with Round Up!

[HYPERLINK@www.genuity.com]
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 8, 2012
10:00 AM

Post #8999200

ALL ag crops are sprayed with Round Up. No horse owner is going to pay for hay that has weeds in it, me included. Not only is it a waste of money but some of the weeds are poisonous. Please dont make assumptions, it makes people panic and things get very confusing. The Systemic Broadleaf Herbicide is not ROUND UP and it is only avalible to people in the AG industry. By the time hay and grain are digusted by an animal Round Up is no longer a problem.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
12:24 PM

Post #8999359

Dave - Nice of you to offer the seeds. What do you use the aleppo peppers in and what do they taste like? Can you grow the peppers in pots to get away from the virus or is it too highly transmittable for that to work?

Cricket - I don't know if this will help with the vinegar issue. I can't have vinegar so we use something called Verjus. It's juice crushed from immature grapes. The basic type is white but you can get a rouge colored verjus which is the basic plus some red grape juice. There are several types on Amazon.com

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

February 8, 2012
1:14 PM

Post #8999443

Susan

The Aleppo pepper tastes like spicy paprika to me. It is a little smoky and a little sweet. I use it anywhere you would use red pepper flakes.

David
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 8, 2012
1:15 PM

Post #8999447

Thats very helpful Susan. I'll will surely check out the Verjus. Wondering how it taste. Assuming tart grapish.

Critters====oh my! Lunch!

yep---I hear good things about Round Up and I use it. Love it. That's a whole deep subject all by its little lonesome.

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 8, 2012
2:06 PM

Post #8999490

Crickets - Not grapey. Think acidic with a sweet clean taste to it.

We've used both the Fusion and the Terra Sonoma brands. Current favorite is the Rouge Fusion. Greenhouse gal makes her own with a grape or cider press. She's more up on the process than I am right now. I think we had a thread on it a while back. Usually the first cull (or whatever the word is) of immature grapes gets used.

A caution on the Roundup. There is some kind of residual issue that they are discovering with it. I don;t remember exactly what the issue is and I'm sick enough today to not feeling like looking for it. Whatever it is was bad enough that we quite using Roundup in our yard.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 9, 2012
7:28 AM

Post #9000228

Glyphosate: A review of its health and environmental effects

http://www.ofa.org.au/papers/glyphosatereview.htm
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 9, 2012
7:40 AM

Post #9000245

HoneybeeNC - Would you post that same link under a seperate thread for Glyphosate? Thanks!

Dave - that pepper sounds nice. Let me know how it grows this summer.
frogymon
Mesa, AZ
(Zone 9a)

February 13, 2012
1:53 PM

Post #9005433

Hot peppers already producing:

Hungarian Yellow
Big Jim
Poblano
Orange Habanero
Takanotsume

hot peppers from seed:

Cubanelle
Uba Tuba
Cajamarca
Aji Limon
Datil
Mulato
Chiltepin
Takanotsume
Costeno Amarillo

Sweet peppers from seed:

Green Bell
Sweet Banana
Pimente de Espelette
Mixed Bells
Shishito

Tomatoes:

Black Krim
Aunt Ruby's German Green
Mortgage Lifter
Sweet 100
Roma
Cherokee Purple

For all you chile heads, New Mexico State University's Chile Institute sells packets of seeds, most @ $4 and has lots of different varieties available, including most of the ones I listed above.
rwaterspf1
Durham, NC
(Zone 7b)

February 13, 2012
4:42 PM

Post #9005623

planted all my seeds this past weekend 1 flat of 72 and 1 flat of 38. My first time starting the spring garden from seed so if all of these survive I will have to give away lots! lol

Tomatoes:
Celebrity
Juliet
Brandywine
Roma
San Marzano

Peppers:
Jalapeno
Scotch Bonnet
Chocolate Habanero
Big Bertha Bell
Tabasco
Cubanelle
California Wonder Bell
Mexibell
Orange Bell
Yellow Bell
NuMex Big Jim
Ancho
Serrano

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 13, 2012
10:23 PM

Post #9005916

Here are the peppers I've got up from seed so far this spring:

Aji Dulce Amarillo
Anaheim, Sahuaro Hybrid
Ancho, Giganta
Ancho, Ranchero F1
Ancho, Tiburon F1
Bhut (Bih) Jolokia Improved Strain II
Blushing Beauty Hybrid
Cacho Negro
Canario
Cantina
Chimayo
Chocolate Bhut Jolokia
Corno di Toro Giallo
Criolla Sella
Cubanelle, Key West X3R Hybrid
Dulce Italiano
Early Sunsation Hybrid
Fish Heirloom
Goccia d'Oro
Guyana PI 199506
Italian Gourmet
Jalapeño Ixtapa Hybrid
Lemon Drop
Manabi Sweet
Marconi Rosso
Mirasol
Mucho Nacho Hybrid (Jalapeño)
Naga Morich
NuMex Suave Orange
Orange Bhut (Bih) Jolokia
Orion Hybrid
Pasilla Bajio
Pasilla, Holy Mole Hybrid
PI 439416
Pinocchio Hybrid (Cayenne)
Purrira
Red Knight X3R Hybrid
Revolution Hybrid
Robertos Coban Seasoning
Rocoto Manzano Amarillo
Rocoto Red
Rosso Dolce Appendere
Short Yellow Tabasco
Socrates X3R
Tabasco
Tepin (Bird Pepper)
Tobago Seasoning
Trinidad Scorpion
Vicentes Sweet Habanero
Wilde Grove

All seeds were started in flats over a heating pad set to 80F
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 14, 2012
5:51 AM

Post #9006098

Of the peppers you all have listed. What is your favorite hot & mild peppers? What makes them your favorite?

frogymon - Thanks for the info on the NMU Chili Institute. They have an interesting assortment of peppers, cookbooks, and accessories. Esp like the chili pepper shaped flash drive.

In case anyone else is interested, here's the link for the New Mexico State University's Chile Institute http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/files/tiny_mce/file_manager/2012Catalog.pdf
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 14, 2012
3:19 PM

Post #9006819

rjogden ~ What do you use for a starting medium for your peppers? I read on a website that orchid mix is a good one.

Evelyn
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 14, 2012
4:57 PM

Post #9006938

I guess I should never say never, 'cause look what I got 3 of today from BigLots! After my TopsyTurvyTomato fiasco last year, I swore off- but these were just $1 each! I don't plan to put peppers in them, but probably strawberries. Each has 7 openings for plants.

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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 15, 2012
12:11 PM

Post #9007811

evelyn_inthegarden wrote:rjogden ~ What do you use for a starting medium for your peppers? I read on a website that orchid mix is a good one.

IIRC, it was Miracle Grow Organic. Not a seeding mix - I just picked out the big pieces so they wouldn't interfere with the seeds. I'll probably stop using it when I've run out - I really prefer one of the professional starting mixtures by Fafard or Metro, but they are harder to find here (and more expensive).

-Rich
.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

February 15, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9007988

I'm waaaaaaaaaaay late with this reply, but, regarding using the clear plastic cups, I made an interesting observation last January when I potted up over 200 tomato seedlings. I usually pot up to 16 oz. RED Plastic Solo cups, which I did, until I ran out of my supply. But, I had a whole package of CLEAR Plastic 12 oz. cups, so, hey, it is what it is. Then I noticed something interesting...

All the plants on my fluorescent light stand that were planted in the CLEAR plastic cups were greening up, and growing at a much faster rate than those in the RED plastic cups. And, I could see a much more developed root system in the clear plastic cups. All the growing conditions were the same for the entire group. Only variable was the cups.

Then, I began to wonder if it was because there was actually more LIGHT available to the seedlings in the clear plastic cups, on all sides of the cup. The seedlings in the RED cups only received the light that was shining down directly from overhead. No light could penetrate from the sides.

I don't know if the light made the difference, but there was definitely a difference...

Linda

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rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 15, 2012
2:32 PM

Post #9008000

Gymgirl wrote:All the plants on my fluorescent light stand that were planted in the CLEAR plastic cups were greening up, and growing at a much faster rate than those in the RED plastic cups. And, I could see a much more developed root system in the clear plastic cups. All the growing conditions were the same for the entire group. Only variable was the cups.

Then, I began to wonder if it was because there was actually more LIGHT available to the seedlings in the clear plastic cups, on all sides of the cup. The seedlings in the RED cups only received the light that was shining down directly from overhead. No light could penetrate from the sides.

Some seeds need light to germinate. It stands to reason there may be an effect of more light reaching the crown or even the roots having an effect. OR could be something leaching from the different plastics...

-Rich
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2012
5:53 AM

Post #9015586

wow rjo. that is a lot of different peppers. You must really love Peppers.

No one sells Fafard around here except for the Co-Op. It is hard to find. I use my colander to sift the big stuff out for seedling soil and add a little vermiculite which is also hard to find except at the Co-Op

My turvys arrived and my strawberries arrived. I potted up 27 strawberry turvys. Crossing my fingers.

The snow peas are always in my way when spring arrives so this year I put the snow peas in the top side of the tomato topsy turvys. When they are done, I will put cucumbers in the turvys. I don't know how it will work out but it always worked out in 4 gallon pots that needed hangers. Crossing my fingers on these too.

I had one cherry tomato plant that was tall enough to transplant into the TOP of a topsy turvy. I cut that center section out of the lid of the topsy turvy so the plant would have plenty of room to expand its stalk as it grows.
I planted ONE big beef tomato upside down in a turvy. I need my own opinion of how it turns out. I did it by myself. I tried placing the tomato plant as deep inside the turvy as I could and it was difficult. I had to lay the turvy on its side to stuff the soil around the stalk. Then I sat the tuvry up right in a spot so the tomato tip was straddled between two objects so it wouldn't break as i filled the turvy and packed the soil.

I am transplanting peppers and eggplants today. They will later be grown in 5 gallon pots. Today they get transplanted from 3 inch pot into 6 inch pots.

I will also be sowing squash, cucumbers and more tomato seeds today.

Happy Gardening

SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 22, 2012
6:17 AM

Post #9015608

Peppers and eggplants were started two weeks ago. Tomatoes were started last weekend.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9015673

CRicket, can you post photos of your planted Turvys? I found some for $1 at BigLots- the box says they are for Hot Peppers- each has 7 openings. I plan to put strawberries in them.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 22, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9016021

On February 17th I sowed the following seeds:

Pepper Ancho (trade) Hazzards seeds 2010
Pepper Anaheim trade 2010
Pepper Golden Bell Pinetree Seeds 2003
Pepper Gypsy hybrid Pinetree Seeds 2003
Pepper Sweet Banana Trade 2011

Eggplant Rosa Bianca Trade 2011
Eggplant Fairytale Gurneys 2011
Egglplant Long Purple Trade 2011

Tomatillo Giant Yellow Trade 2011
Tomatillo Purple Pinetree Seeds 2010
Tomatillo ? Trade 2010

And the following tomatoes:

Caro Rich Totally Tomatoes 2010
4th of July Burpee 2009
Early Wonder Tomato Garden Supply 2009
Mortgage Lifter Tomato Garden Supply 2010
Pink Ponderosa trade 2010
Fireball Bentley Seed 1999
Kellogg's Breakfast Park Seed 2010
Yellow Brandywine Platfoot trade 2010
Bull's Heart Trade 2010
Marianna's Peace Trade 2010
Golden Jubilee Ferry Morse 2010
Principe Borghese Pinetree Seeds 2010
San Marzano Lampadina 2010



CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2012
4:03 PM

Post #9016315

I have a pepper turvy too. The strawberry and tomato turvys are twice that size.
I have no plans of putting peppers in the pepper turvy. It was a gift and I have no idea what to grow in it.
It only holds about 3 gallons of soil which is a gallon more than a regular 10 inch hanging basket.
undecided what to plant in it.

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JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 22, 2012
4:10 PM

Post #9016326

Those are some awesome planters- I hope they produce well for you. Will you sell the planters when they get filled out, or will you just sell the berries?
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 22, 2012
6:05 PM

Post #9016460

Just the berries. I will move them out of the greenhouse before the customers show up.
I have strawberry plants that will be for sale in 4 inch cups.
I am excited about these strawberry plants. They are Quinault , day neutral everbearing and self pollinating that produce up the 2 inch wide berries as they get older and more established. I hope the turvys work too. Meanwhile, I will be building some table top gardens for the runners that I get off the plants. I have not figured out how I am going to root hanging runners yet.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2012
5:28 AM

Post #9016823

Try baggies or cling wrap with soil tied on by either rubber bands or twist ties.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2012
5:57 AM

Post #9016853

Thank you Susan. Of all the ideas I have seen on the net, I haven't seen cling wrap and I like that idea more than others. Plus, I can see when it has rooted and safe to cut from the mother plant.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #9016901

I've used baggies to start cuttings on shrubs. Seems like it or cling wrap should work on strawberries. You might want to think about the type of soil or mix would work best inside the cling wrap.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

February 23, 2012
7:18 AM

Post #9016960

"...You might want to think about the type of soil or mix would work best inside the cling wrap."

Two words: Roots Organics... ;-)
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2012
8:07 AM

Post #9017017

Here is my airplane/spider plant with about a dozen babies rooting- I used plastic sandwich bags with a little potting mix and a rubber band. They are rooting nicely.

Thumbnail by JoParrott
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 23, 2012
9:55 AM

Post #9017137

so cool !
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

February 23, 2012
10:41 AM

Post #9017173

About half of the babies have rooted and are ready to have the umbilical cords cut and get potted up.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #9017741

I use to raise those airplane plants. I waited til they got a little root nub and potted them up. I use to sell them on Ebay.
They were so easy .
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 23, 2012
7:40 PM

Post #9017753

By the time my strawberry plants have runners big enough to root, they will be hanging in a greenhouse structure covered with 30 % shade cloth for the summer.( no plastic) I will most likely use a mixture of rabbit manure compost and promix to root them.


The darn mice are eating my pepper seeds. I had to hunt down my tray Domes and cover them up tonight. I don't know how many seed they ate. Will lhave to resow a few varieties. California Wonder bell and Cayenne and my Sage too.
stinking little varmints. I covered my tomato seedlings too. I have seen mice eat the tops of my tomatoes before too.
Makes me think about the movie- The Green Mile. dunno why. has nothing to do with each other , Other than a darn mouse.
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

February 23, 2012
10:01 PM

Post #9017870

SusanKC wrote:Peppers and eggplants were started two weeks ago. Tomatoes were started last weekend.


Hi, Susan!

I just sowed mine on the 17th. What varieties have you sown? It's way too early for me to put them out yet.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 24, 2012
2:59 PM

Post #9018648

The domes over my pepper seed trays did not work...stinking mouse got in anyway and helped itself to dinner.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 24, 2012
4:32 PM

Post #9018777

Tomatoes up are Black Truffle, Abraham Lincoln, Caspian Pink, Tumbling Tom yellow (for HB), Tomatoberry Hyb, Agro Hyb, Caro Rich, Roma
Peppers: Carnival Mix Bells, Giant Jalapenos, Tabasco, Bhut Jolkia, Cayenne, Pimento

This is just a start, a few of my tomatoes will phase out and I am doing a second planting if some other types just haven't deciede what they will be yet :O)
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 25, 2012
6:04 AM

Post #9019257

What we're starting from seeds:
Peppers: Roumanian Rainbow

Tomatoes: Brandywine (Sudduth's)
Black Cherry
Box Car Willie
Juliet
Kellog's Breakfast
Opalka

We'll also pick up a couple different types of pepper plants from a local organic place to try out. We do that sometime when we want something new but are not sure what.

Cricket - Sounds like you need a couple of cats. Are your plants on tables or on the ground?
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2012
5:34 PM

Post #9020016

my seed trays are on Pallet tables.
Put out some mouse traps. Got one.
I have one cat. She does a good job but she sleeps in the house during the night and that is when my seeds get eaten.
Seedling Greenhouse

Thumbnail by CricketsGarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

MyRee
Brigham City, UT
(Zone 5b)

February 25, 2012
6:40 PM

Post #9020069

Cricket, You made me and my sweetheart smile. Our Savana got ill and no matter what we did, could not help her. She got feline peritinitis. She left us last October. She was my husbands guardian and he still tears up when he thinks about her. I had an 8x10 picture made of her and put it with our family photos.
Thanks, Marie

Sorry, didn't mean to steel the thread, but had to post this

This message was edited Feb 25, 2012 7:41 PM

Thumbnail by MyRee
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CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 25, 2012
7:21 PM

Post #9020100

AWw. I am sorry to hear that Marie. So sad when our dear beloved pets pass away.
I had a cat for 12 years. Sadly, the one thing that killed her was my granddaughter chased her until she had a heart attack. Cats build up blood clots in their hind legs. It gets worse as they age. Continuous activity will give them a heart attack. No, I did not let her chase the cat but her mother did. She is resting under the Magnolia Tree.
I got BB just before Sheba died. BB is my Greenhouse Cat. She goes where ever I go. Sometimes while I am sitting there transplanting seedlings, she brings me a dead mouse and lays it at my feet...startles me. ekkk. Today, she brought me a squirrel.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2012
10:46 PM

Post #9020228

All my maters are up except the Agro Hybrid from Parks
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2012
11:09 PM

Post #9020234

MyRee wrote:Savana


What a beautiful cat. Out of the dozens who have graced my life by their very presence, there have been a few who genuinely stole my heart by inviting me to be such a big part of their lives. I wish they weren't such fragile creatures, but maybe that's part of the price of living life so intensely.

-Rich
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 25, 2012
11:13 PM

Post #9020237

CricketsGarden wrote:The domes over my pepper seed trays did not work...stinking mouse got in anyway and helped itself to dinner.


I finally had to resort to bait to get rid of my uninvited guests. There's a type that just delivers a very high dose of vitamin D. I understand it is even approved for use in organic food processing areas. It works much better than the types sold at the home improvement centers (which did not work at all for me).

-Rich
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 25, 2012
11:27 PM

Post #9020241

at our nursery in our greenhouses we had to resort to putting 2 X 4 pieces in between our trays on the benches, as well as weighting down the tops. Kept them out long enough for us to get them planted and moved out of our greenhouses. As for doing trays of cukes and squashes, we just had to stack em until they germinated, and then put baited mouse traps all over, they finally were under control with little loss.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

February 27, 2012
5:51 AM

Post #9021607

If you are on tables then one other option might be to put tin around the legs of the tables so they can't climb up them.
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2012
1:29 PM

Post #9022221

tin is a good idea. I guess they would slip and slide. Wonder how far a mouse can jump.


I transplanted my Big Bertha Bells, Super Heavyweight Bells, and Black Beauty Eggplants today into 10 inch pots.
I hope they don't get root bound before I can transplant into the raised beds which will be sometime during the first two weeks of April. They are about 8 weeks old now. They were slow to get growing because they didn't have very many heat hours. The electric heated wasn't working for about 5 days - guessing- when i noticed they weren't growing much... Was lucky we didn't have a freeze during those days. It's warming up now and this greenhouse will stay at 55 at night or above.

This message was edited Feb 27, 2012 3:31 PM

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Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

February 27, 2012
2:15 PM

Post #9022288

This is what I planted today and yesterday.
Pepper Seeds Planted
Albino 18
Aji Dulce 4
Aji Lemon Drop 13
Anaheim Chili 20
Ancho/Poblano 22
Big Bertha Hybrid have one that has been growing since last year
Big Jim 14
Black Hungarian 18
Bolivian Rainbow 11
California Wonder 20
Chinese Giant 14
Chocolate Sweet 15
College 64L 9
Condor's Beak Pepper 5
Corno di Toro 16
Colossal Hybrid 12
Corno Di Toro Giallo 20
Cubanelle 22
Czech Black Hot Pepper 11
Early Jalapeno 20
Fresno 20
Golden Calwonder 23
Goliath 7
Habanero Chocolate 11
Habanero Orange 17
Habanero Red 14
Habanero White 12
Hot Red Cherry 17
Hungarian Wax 20
Ivory Hybrid 5
Jamaican Hot Red 15
Jamaican Hot Yellow 14
Jupiter 9
Klari Baby Cheese 22
Long Red Cayenne 20
Maui Purple 11
Mulato Island 13
Pasilla Bajio 13
Pepperoncini Italian 12
Purple Beauty 23
Red Marconi 15
Sante Fe Grande 14
Serrano 20
Sweet Banana 24
Tabasco 15
Thai Hot 26
Tricolor Variegata 12
Yellow Nocera 14

happytail

happytail
St. Simon's Island, GA
(Zone 9a)

February 27, 2012
7:52 PM

Post #9022700

Trying a Yellow Pear tomato, "Nugget" tomato, Thai pepper, a Jalapeno, and a couple of Calif. Wonder green peppers. Still thinking about the other tomatoes I'll do. Have several seeds to choose from, but just trying to decide how much space to take up with which plants. We're making a new garden this year, since we've only been in this house for about a year. Last year was spent doing landscaping and house stuff, so the veggie garden had to be put on the back burner. But, I'm trying the Square Foot Garden method, since it's just the two of us, and we just don't have the stamina to work a large area anymore. I have my posts up for the deer fence, and I've been working the soil into a nice flat space, to accommodate the raised beds. If it would just stop raining, maybe I could get the fence up. Several seeds are started already, and I have more to get going after these are up large enough to put outside for hardening off. Wish me luck!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 27, 2012
8:17 PM

Post #9022729



Wow Doug...what do you do with all those peppers? Sell produce?

BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 27, 2012
9:44 PM

Post #9022795

WOW is right, I have lots of different seed just no where to plant all of then indoors right now.

Pimentos are up
searched out a few more varieties to work up today
Charleston Hot Peppers
Alma Paprika
and some sweet Yellow Bells (so beautiful when stuffed with Quinoa)

I am sure I will find some space for a few more things, I am anxious to get out of doors and get my early beans and peas in the ground.
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2012
8:11 AM

Post #9023190

I need some bell pepper expertise :0)
Can I start them in 170ct trays and hold them there for at least 8 weeks after germination? Or would they have to be potted up?
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

February 28, 2012
5:54 PM

Post #9023904

I think the 170 count might last 5 weeks.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

February 28, 2012
8:07 PM

Post #9024042

I don't grow bells because I don't get good yields but I do grow other sweets. I use a 72 ct tray and pot them up at about 4 weeks. In that small a tray they won't have enough root development IMO.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 28, 2012
8:43 PM

Post #9024085

I normally use 32 count trays so I do not have to repot, they can grow out and go straight into the garden.
This year I am running two plantings so I am only working with 18 ct trays (3") pots
I am expecting my plants to be stocky before they go into the prepared area :O)

I am working my tomatoes the same way, even using a scant bit of soil to start them in the bottom of their pots, then when they have gotten to size with their first set of true leaves, I am filling the pots up with soil, giving them a sturdier planting and a deeper root system. We get really dry here so when my plants are about 8-10" tall and ready to plant, they will be going deeper into the ground to try and keep a more stable amount of moisture to the plants. (I plant in mounds)
Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

February 29, 2012
5:55 PM

Post #9025197

I will sell if I get enough. Mostly I have a field to fill, I like the looks of peppers among other things and I want to figure out what works and what doesn't. I want to get a greenhouse up in the next year or so to sell plants from and also to have a small commercial garden to ad to my income.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 29, 2012
7:30 PM

Post #9025302

Doug9345 wrote:I want to get a greenhouse up in the next year or so to sell plants from and also to have a small commercial garden to ad to my income.

Rule #1 of starting a business: identify a market for your product. If there is no market, and you don't have the resources or know-how to create a market for a product, then you are just a hobbyist.

Not that there is anything wrong with being a hobbyist.

-Rich
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

February 29, 2012
9:52 PM

Post #9025393

I am getting together with a gardening friend and taking my over plantedness (plants and harvests turnips/kales) to our local Farmers Market close to the time of the Midlands Plant Show...with a pile of handouts and business cards with my business' mission
It'll be a 2-fer cool plants cheap veggies and advertisement. If I pull 1 job off the handouts It'll be worth it :O)
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

February 29, 2012
10:31 PM

Post #9025404

I admit I'm tempted to look further into market gardening. It would take a LOT of work in this soil, and a bit of start-up money because I'd have to buy in mulch and other supplies. But the local farmers' market (open 1 day/week) typically sells out of their better vegetables within an hour (I've heard but haven't witnessed that there are some scrambles over who gets to the freshest stuff first). I love growing greens like kale in the cooler time of year (also my favorite time to garden) and they are always one of the first veggies to disappear - and expensive, even the locally-grown stuff. I can only imagine what something like local artichokes or broccoli raab would bring in.

-Rich
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

March 1, 2012
4:07 AM

Post #9025463

Another idea that I just happened to stumble into: selling plant starts, like tomatoes and peppers. I have the lights, heat mats, and two spare bedrooms for starting indoors. A friend who is unsuccessful starting tomatoes from seed asked me to start some for her, I started 'a few' extra (188 plants germinated). A different friend mentioned me at her church, who are attempting to start a community garden but were unsuccessful with their seedlings (no lights or heat mats). They took all I had left and now they will buy 100 tomato plants each time I have them. They want to feed the needy in Phoenix. Another gardener who has no time for seed starting will purchase 50 at a time.

I've been selling good, strong plants in one quart containers for $2.50. Last Sunday I saw a tiny little tomato someone wanted $8 for - price adjustment is in order here. I think $5 is fair.

I'll post a follow-up to the picture that started this thread.

Thumbnail by MaryMcP
Click the image for an enlarged view.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2012
8:10 AM

Post #9025747

That's how I started out. Mary, your prices are WAYYYY to low, I realize that you were just trying to pay for your addiction. There are state and federal regulations in most states that you may want to check into. Sometimes they depend on how much you sell a year. I get out about 350 - 400 plants every 2-3 weeks. It's a lot of work and timing is key. I love it tho.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 1, 2012
10:53 AM

Post #9025918

Ok. Ya'll KNOW how much I love to start tomato seedlings. I want in.

MaryMcP,
Where're you getting those 6" grow bags?

1Lisac,
I just wanna do the Farmer's Market/parking lot thing. Come to think of it, there are enough backyard gardeners in just my NEIGHBORHOOD who would gladly pay $2.50 for a seedling that looks like MaryMcP's. We have a whole strip I could set up tables on not a 1/2 mile from my house, and, with more in and out weekend traffic than you can imagine.

I could post flyers right in the neighborhood for the sale date!

Oh, my, goodness!

Wow!
cocoa_lulu
Grand Saline, TX
(Zone 7b)

March 1, 2012
12:26 PM

Post #9026004

Thank you so much for the pepper potting info, looks like I've got to pot up tomatoes soon, so that will free some 72ct size trays.


I so happy to see everyone is venturing into selling their produce, hobby or bigger. Can't wait to see how the ventures go, and wise the best! Same discussions going on here. My oldest wants his own egg biz. He's thirteen and convince he's going to be a gazillionair by the time he's 18.lol I've been wondering if I can produce enough good veggies to tag along with him :0)
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 1, 2012
1:06 PM

Post #9026055

The Farmer Markets here require a nursery licence certification. Can't remember how it's classified and you may need a vendors permit to set up on the side of the road. Depends on what your city/county requires. I would check into it before I set up in public. The fines are pretty hefty. In Texas it goes by how many acres your on.

I'd be really careful about selling in public without all my ducks in a row. If Mary is filling orders for people that's one thing, but there are a lot of regulations around plants and I'd be cautious.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 1, 2012
1:14 PM

Post #9026068

Lisa, that's just the kind of info and feedback I need to hear!

I've already reviewed our local Farmer's Market regs, and it's a piece of cake, here. The one I have in mind will only allow seedlings less than 12" tall, so the timing is critical. Would 'a recouped almost 2 years of expenses with my 2011 tomato seedlings if I hadn't poisoned 1/3 of them with OVER-fertilizing...I got zealous...up to that point, was the best crop of seedlings I ever grew!

Hugs!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

March 1, 2012
1:59 PM

Post #9026116

Linda, the half gallon grow bags are from my local hydro store, Sea of Green. I'm looking for quart instead because the half gallon size takes WAY too much soil and it will break the bank. SOG does not stock/cannot purchase wholesale the 1 quart bags so I will look at other local hydro stores. I can find them on-line but the shipping is $28 whereas 100 bags is only $12.

Lisa, that's interesting it's how you started with your mega growing. I have a full-time business and if I switched to growing any more veggies than this I would need to find a new bookkeeper for my clients and I'm not ready for that step yet. But in 5 years I'll be 67 and ready to retire. By then I should have most of my mistakes out of the way and plan to hold onto a few good clients and grow grow grow instead of crunching numbers.

Thanks for the encouragement y'all!
CricketsGarden
Nauvoo, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 1, 2012
8:09 PM

Post #9026566

I am having a hard time keeping up with all the threads and working too.

I just want to say this about pricing plants for sale.

food and money for thought:
First of all, Walmart and Home Depot prices, which is nearly road side robbery, and other similar places are charging high prices cause they have high expense cost. Employees being the highest on the list... etc... The small business owner does not have to charge that much to make a great profit. You want to make "at least" a 50 percent profit for your time of doing all the hard work. Also, Folks up north including Canada companies can't see how I make a profit charging low prices...the simple fact that is not thought of is...I don't have the heating bill that they have.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 1, 2012
10:08 PM

Post #9026629

Where we are timing is everything, You cannot believe the excersize you get everyday when the weather is nice out of doors and then the nights are questionable...Veggie plants in and out every A.m. & p.m. just to make sure we have the best, acclimitized plants ready at the correct planting time for these folks around here.
I love late winter Early Spring, you can loose 5 pound a week on our "wild and crazy winter I wanna Be spring wonderland days"...LOL...We moved 100 flats every day for a month in and out...Now I wonder how many reps that would've been in the GYM...LOL

mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2012
12:06 PM

Post #9027149

I've overwintered my peppers. I've got cowhorn, thin cayenne, red hot chiles, big Jim, 4-6L chiles, and cubanelle. I went to NM and brought back a couple of plants and seeds for Hatch chiles

Thumbnail by mccaine   Thumbnail by mccaine
Click an image for an enlarged view.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

March 2, 2012
1:03 PM

Post #9027245

L-o-o-k-i-n-g good! What's that soup? Finally, another person who like cheese as much as me!!
mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 2, 2012
1:24 PM

Post #9027278

Cheen chile chicken stew. Slow heat...
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 2, 2012
8:44 PM

Post #9027790

Well I had an issue with some of my Tomato plants getting a little leggy (Caspian Pinks). My recycling option instead of purchasing new pots...
finished Toilet paper roll pots, they are just tall enough to plant the long legged things all the way up to their sweet little necks. They're bottomless cardboard and wick the water right out of my bottom watering tray. And they fit neatly right in between the other recycled yogurt containers perfectly. There was not but one variety that got leggy so there are not enough to blocke light and make the ones planted in the less deep pots leggy reaching for 'The Light'.
My first planting are also getting to spend their first night our of doors(temps down to~ 53degreesF) , hopefully they will get to continue out there until about this coming Tuesday(Temps predicted ~38degreesF) when I will probaby have to bring them in for at least one night due to temps :O)
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 3, 2012
5:31 AM

Post #9027960

mccaine wrote:Cheen chile chicken stew. Slow heat...


What is cheen chile?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

March 3, 2012
6:01 AM

Post #9028013

I think it's Green Chile Chicken Stew. ;-)) Simmered slowly.
mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2012
5:15 AM

Post #9030377

Yes, green chile stew. Typo
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9030612

1lisac wrote:I don't grow bells because I don't get good yields but I do grow other sweets.


What holds your yields back? Are they just not blooming? Are the blooms falling without being fertilized? Or are diseases causing plant stunting or fruit loss?

Just curious because I used to feel that way about Bells, then found a few that thrive in our summer heat and shrug off the diseases we have here.

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2012
12:40 PM

Post #9031009

I know a lot of gardeners that don't feel the yields are as good with bells and since I grow mostly O/Ps I've found other non bells that taste just as good but produce better.


All the reasons you gave for why I might not grow them would affect non bells too, it would seem. I like Marconis and they get so loaded with fruit I have to stake them.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 5, 2012
3:30 PM

Post #9031278

1lisac wrote:I know a lot of gardeners that don't feel the yields are as good with bells and since I grow mostly O/Ps I've found other non bells that taste just as good but produce better.

All the reasons you gave for why I might not grow them would affect non bells too, it would seem. I like Marconis and they get so loaded with fruit I have to stake them.


I actually prefer the long Italian-style peppers and southwestern Anchos for most of the purposes I used to reserve for Bells. But I wouldn't say I've ever run into any that taste exactly the same. I mostly gave up on bells because I lost so many to fungal and bacterial diseases, which usually seemed to hit just as the fruit was ripening. But then I found a few hybrids that are actually worth growing here because of fantastic disease resistance. My best last year was "Blushing Beauty", an odd bell pepper whose fruit starts out a very pale yellow (not green at all) but ripens to a beautiful deep red. One I grew last year - and ate from all summer and fall - is still producing peppers in a Gardener's Supply self-watering container that I rolled it inside when freezes threatened. The peppers that formed during the winter didn't elongate properly (no pollinators, I suppose) but now the plant is back outside and producing full-sized peppers again.

As for the non-bells - I would agree with reservations. The vast majority of older varieties (especially those passed along from family seed collections) were never properly tested under controlled conditions, so there aren't any specific claims made for them. That doesn't mean they are not disease resistant. One of the reasons I favor the Italian long sweet types in general is because they have performed well for me growing right next to other varieties (including Bells) that succumbed to leaf or fruit disorders or just didn't thrive under identical conditions (mostly hot & humid, but really more a matter of extremes).

I have to admit I still grow Anchos mostly out of stubbornness. I still haven't found a variety that tolerates our climate conditions well, but I also haven't found any other peppers that have the same combination of rich pepper flavor, size and shape for stuffing, and that little bit of heat. I have started seed of five varieties I haven't tried before, hoping to find one that won't give up early.

-Rich
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 5, 2012
7:24 PM

Post #9031605

Peppers, like tomatoes and Eggplant are self pollinating they don't need pollinators, only a breeze. The strange shape was probably do to the cooler temps.

I don't grow many, if any hybrids. Yes, they have disease resistance, but since I grow O/Ps all my peppers are pretty much open to the same diseases bell or not.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 5, 2012
8:03 PM

Post #9031647

We have put our first bit of calcium on our plantlings, this week.
We use whatever is left in our milk carton mixed with water about halfway. Since we started using eggshells in the growing space and starting a calcium watering very early, we do not have much in the way of blossom end rot any more. Now if we could only find a cure for the no rain...LOL...Luckily the soil has been organically worked for a while now that it is just like cake about 12 inches down all the time.
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 6, 2012
2:59 PM

Post #9032474

1lisac wrote:Peppers, like tomatoes and Eggplant are self pollinating they don't need pollinators, only a breeze. The strange shape was probably do to the cooler temps.


Bell peppers are "self pollinating", but these peppers were not pollinated. If the pollen doesn't ripen, or the pollen tubes don't grow, or the stigma isn't receptive (e.g.: because it's too dry), then you won't get pollination even if the species is known to be self-pollinating.

The abnormal fruit on this plant is parthenocarpic. There is no seed. In fact there is none of the normal placenta to feed the seeds. If you look at the interior where the peduncle is attached, you can see there is no indication of any development.

The images show the fruit on the plant; the abnormal whole fruit; and a cross section of the fruit showing NO seed or placental development.

BTW, the pale green color is normal for the unripe fruit of Blushing Beauty (the yellow in the second two shots only appears under my under-counter LED lights, and only on the camera). They stay this pale green color until they start to ripen, when they get their characteristic "blush" before turning deep red.

-Rich

Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden   Thumbnail by rjogden
Click an image for an enlarged view.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 6, 2012
7:29 PM

Post #9032768

Cool looking pepper but now I'm confused. How would having pollinators have helped if the pollen wasn't viable, anyway? I must be missing something. I kind of like that shape.

This message was edited Mar 7, 2012 8:57 AM
mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #9033138

BUFFY690 wrote:We have put our first bit of calcium on our plantlings, this week.
We use whatever is left in our milk carton mixed with water about halfway. Since we started using eggshells in the growing space and starting a calcium watering very early, we do not have much in the way of blossom end rot any more. Now if we could only find a cure for the no rain...LOL...Luckily the soil has been organically worked for a while now that it is just like cake about 12 inches down all the time.


What does calcium do for peppers? I'm hoping the answer is that it gives them that waxy sheen or makes them bigger. Last season my big Jims were dull and not so big.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9034100

I was told it had something to do with lessening the scalding of the skin of the peppers.
Hey I grew the Blushing Beauty Peppers last year and only had a few in the beginning of the growing season to have ANY seed whatsoever. Although my fruit were small because of the extreme dryness of the summer, mine never changed shape.

But my Big Bertha peppers, were twisted, and small, and looked more like large jalapenos than Big Bertha Bells. they were a waste to plant.

We did put down a few yellow bell pepper seeds from a pepper from the grocery store the other day (Sunday) and they are up and I am going to have to transplant them to their new single celled pots this weekend.


I am letting my tomatoes and broccoli, spinach, agastache and another something we potted out today get some air tonight since our low temps are supposed to be around 56Degrees F
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

March 7, 2012
8:40 PM

Post #9034115

BUFFY690 wrote:I
We did put down a few yellow bell pepper seeds from a pepper from the grocery store the other day (Sunday) and they are up and I am going to have to transplant them to their new single celled pots this weekend.



Most likely the bell that you got at the supermarket was a hybrid, so you may get a variety of different plants. Save the seeds from the best one and pull the rest.

BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 7, 2012
8:59 PM

Post #9034129

As long as it is bell pepper my little one will not care...LOL

How may 3 year olds favorite foods are tomatoes, Bell Peppers, lettuce, asparagus and broccoli...

Thank goodness they are all pretty easy to grow here
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

March 9, 2012
12:58 PM

Post #9035984

1lisac wrote:Cool looking pepper but now I'm confused. How would having pollinators have helped if the pollen wasn't viable, anyway? I must be missing something. I kind of like that shape.

I think there was no pollination because the stigma was not receptive - one of the options I named. There were other peppers present that could have acted as pollinators. Not many insects stirring either, though.

The flattened shape is OK, but the production was way down. The normal shape/size of the peppers is a medium-large bell pepper, so you get a lot more food for the same effort.

I didn't notice a drop-off in the flavor/aroma like I had with the over-wintered tomatoes, though. Just a lot more fruit to pick and clean and a lot more knife-work for a little flavor-and-crunch addition to my salads. The winter fruit are not really big enough to stuff. Once the "top" is removed, all you have left is a nearly-flat bottom.

The new fruit that has begun forming since the weather has warmed (in the middle of the photo below) are completely different: nearing "bell" shape and already showing the intermediate color before some of the "winter" peppers that were actually initiated earlier. That may also be an effect of the parthenocarpy - presence of seeds induces production of hormones involved in ripening. The surprise to me was that the fruits stayed on the plant and didn't just drop.

-Rich

Thumbnail by rjogden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

March 18, 2012
5:05 AM

Post #9046997

Someone wanted me to report on Silvery Fir Tree. The plants are 18-24 inches tall and except for the initial fruit set have not set any more fruit nor have they flowered again. The plants do not like the wind and now look dry and crispy. I can't find any insects on them. The oxheart, mountain pride, black prince and copia tomatoes near them are all beautiful and loaded with fruit. Fruit on SFT was not very tasty, small and unimpressive. So disappointing, they were such beautiful plants in the beginning.

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

March 18, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9047038

Calalily, that might have been me. I have one of those SFT tomato plants that I received as part of a tomato growing class I took. Mine was potted up two weeks ago and has no flower set as yet. Thanks for the update, I'll let you know the results I get.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

March 18, 2012
8:43 AM

Post #9047239

I had the same sad results last year- pretty foliage, but disappointing fruit, and very few. If I want pretty leaves I'll grow ferns! I want tomatoes!
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

March 18, 2012
8:45 AM

Post #9047244

Hah! no kidding Jo.
idealpeggy
Lexington, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 22, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9052729

Yellow Pear & Red Grape Cherries, Brandywine Pink and Rose Heirlooms and Big Dipper and Snapper Sweet Bell Peppers
irishmist
Rochester, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 23, 2012
9:16 PM

Post #9054742

A friend grew 'Momotaro' in her Pennsylvania garden last summer and got a large crop of good looking tomatoes. She reported flavor was very good but a little sweeter than her usual choices. Other family members raved about the flavor. Here in Zone 6a I like 'Matina' (indeterminate) for my early crop for its good flavor and depend on 'Big Beef', 'Mexico', 'Viva Italia' and 'Wild Cherry' for flavor, disease resistance and producivity. Trying the cherry 'Sweet Treats' as a new variety this year.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 25, 2012
5:24 AM

Post #9056042

I can attest to the Momotaro being the SWEETEST tomato I've grown so far. It has subtle undertones that give it just enough zing to make it the kind of balance I like in a tomato. But, definitely more sweet than tang.

Be forewarned.
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

March 26, 2012
5:54 AM

Post #9057241

Sweet Treats is a fantastic tomato that is very hardy, I have some plants that are over a year old. It reseeds all over the place from birds dropping fruit/seeds and comes fairly true from seed.
I bought Momotaro seeds but havenf't planted them yet. Copia set fruit and then the plants started dying (horrible tomato year in the Valley so far), I pulled out yellow and red pears, Legend, most of the Black Prince and Tiffen Minnonite, Black Krim, German Green, Cosmonaut Volkov because they look terrible. Mountain Pride, Coure de Bue Box Car Willie and Abe Lincoln still look good along with Chocolate Cherry, Juliette and Sweet Treats.

King Arthur, Big Dipper and Chichimeca peppers are producing.
BUFFY690
Prosperity, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 28, 2012
1:21 AM

Post #9060004

Searching for a space for our Tomatoberry Garden and 12 Roma Tomato plants...
The main garden is full we got in the black truffles, rutgers, big beef, celebrity, pink caspian, caro rich, & Abe Lincolns. Cabbages pacific giant, ruby red, apollo, kale. Beans, Yellow Squash, ZXucchini, and patty pan. Carrots thumbellinas and danver's half long. Waiting for the peppers, okra, watermelons, cukes, and pumpkins until after Easter. Now comes the work
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 30, 2012
12:39 PM

Post #9063365

Cala-Do the tomato plants show signs of disease?
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 1, 2012
7:17 PM

Post #9066085

I sure hope that y'all are enjoying your tomatoes. I won't be able to put any out yet, as it snowed again yesterday, and there is still snow on the ground, though most of it has melted, most likely a hard frost tonight.

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

desert_witch
Lucerne Valley, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 1, 2012
11:10 PM

Post #9066283

I've started 5 peppers: Heirloom white Habanero, Jalapeno, Anaheim, and Hungarian Banana and Casca Mini Bells. For tomatoes I'm trying doing Heirloom varieties: Beefsteak 2 new (to me) Heirlooms; Tasmanian Chocolate and Mexican Midget.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 2, 2012
5:26 AM

Post #9066423

Nice picure evelyn, just the way I prefer to see snow - from a distance. ;-)

My peppers, all hot peppers, no sweets, sure are slow to start. The Aleppo's have progressed the most and the best. Chiltepins are lagging. Not dead but certainly not going anywhere. I think they are waiting for higher temps. Same for the jalepeno's and a couple of others.
frogymon
Mesa, AZ
(Zone 9a)

April 2, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #9066585

Mary, I'm having the same issue, even with the seedling greenhouse.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 2, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9066597

Pepper disaster! My peppers were outside, hardening-off, while I was away over the weekend. Apparently, we had some large gusts of wind at some point. The pepper tray blew off the table on my covered porch, landing pepper-side down. All the plants were crushed, and appear to be killed. Looks like I'll be buying sweet pepper plants at an Austin nursery this year...

MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 2, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9066616

Oh David, what a shame. All that work. We had a very windy weekend as well.

Frogy, at least I'm in good company! Thanks for the input.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 2, 2012
8:06 PM

Post #9067621

Mary-have you grown tepins before? They are always slow and they can have the same amount of true leaves and still look much smaller then other peppers. I started some on Feb 23rd for this Market order. They are just slow to grow if the conditions aren't perfect (hot with shade) last year they grew really fast due to the heat.

They ask for the plants just before I sowed them but the plants will lag until the conditions are right.

David-feel free to dmail me I might be able to help. How many plants were there. They may not be dead, if the tops got cut off they'll still grow and produce they'll just look different. I couldn't even leave mine outside without being home, they need to be watered daily. Please dmail me if you would like.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 2, 2012
9:04 PM

Post #9067662

I lucked out! The peppers were wilted enough that they bent rather than broke, so after a good soaking most of the plants have pretty well recovered. There are a few scuffed leaves, but I think the plants will survive. I am planting tomorrow, regardless of the weather. Wish me luck!

David
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 3, 2012
4:00 AM

Post #9067769

Tough little peppers!

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 3, 2012
9:09 AM

Post #9068122

GREAT news, D!

RickCorey_WA

RickCorey_WA
Everett, WA
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2012
6:43 PM

Post #9071242

Mary said:
>> according to a chart honeybee posted last week, 60° is okay for planting out tomatoes. Someone here (Shoe I think but am not certain) suggested 75° and that's what I'm really shooting for...nice warm soil for those roots.

Just a guess, but maybe Shoe was suggesting that 75° is good for germinating tomato seeds, but honeybee was saying that an outdoor soil temperature of 60° is good for transplants above a certain size.

i have seen advice in several places that say many seeds germinate better quite warm, but then the seedlings prefer considerably cooler soil and air in order to become stocky.

1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2012
7:56 PM

Post #9071343

The seeds need the heat to germinate. The seedlings grow slower and stockier if they are kept cooler. I think 60 is good as long as the soil is warm, Bee doesnt pot hers up. She does have a method that Ive never tried but she has great results. I dont think Shoe meant the air temps need to be 75*(?) to plant out but it helps if the soil is warm. I believe he was referring to germination temps.

I have to add that when I plant out early (before the soil has warmed up) my plants grow much slower and I really dont get ripe fruit much earlier. Last yea,r the plants that I put out first grew really slow for some reason I didnt get out there for another 10-14 days. The plants that I put in later grew really fast so I yanked the first ones. I noticed that they had very little root development, I replaced them with more plants that were the same kind. I was amazed how quickly they caught up and produced.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 6, 2012
9:08 AM

Post #9071870

There's not much developement if you put them out before the temps are high enough. I do cheat the temp some what on the plants that go into containers. The soil in them warms up faster and I use a row cover on them to keep the air temps higher also.

You can also warm up the in-the-ground soil temp using row covers and an overall plastic cover.

Milestone hit this week: Tomatoes and peppers have been going outside to start the hardening off process.

This message was edited Apr 6, 2012 10:10 AM
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

April 12, 2012
5:47 AM

Post #9079376

No disease that I could identify. They just stopped growing and producing. Cuore de bue is another one that is not doing well. Large beautiful plants, very little fruit. I was going to rip them out and noticed more buds coming on so I left them in the ground. Horrible tomato year for all the growers in the valley. No rain last year so salt is high in soil, crazy fluctuating temps, lots of wind. The greenhouses aren't finished yet, so no help there. I did get my shade cloth finally after ordering from a supplier in TN.

Mountain Pride and some of the cherry tomatoes are doing super well, loaded with fruit. I think I need to retest the soil in some beds, possible potassium and phosphrus deficiency judging from the symptoms.

Bell peppers are loaded with fruit, as are the jalapenos and the plants are beautiful.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 12, 2012
10:57 AM

Post #9079757

Cala-this is a crazy year, especially weather wise. We are lucky up here because we have gotten alot of rain over the last few months so it leached out a lot of the salt, and the amendments : ( so Im adding stuff to each hole, but this is on tiny scale. Nothing compared to your's. We have had minimal wind this spring but much higher humidity then I'm used to. Yuck!

Ill be thinking about you, please keep us updated. Good Luck
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2012
3:10 PM

Post #9081327

It snowed again today, so I will wait to put out the tomatoes. We should have had this weather in winter, not spring!!! At least we are getting snow and water for the state, as it was set to be in a drought.

I think that all farmers and gardeners are many times upset at what weather we have...too hot, too cold, too wet, too dry...LOL!!!
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 13, 2012
7:46 PM

Post #9081640

Do you have your tomatoes started? I cant believe the crazy weather you are having.

This message was edited Apr 13, 2012 9:43 PM
evelyn_inthegarden
Sierra Foothills, CA
(Zone 8a)

April 14, 2012
11:32 AM

Post #9082223

Lisa ~ Yes, I have some started, but not yet planted outside. I have started the rest of them last night. I will keep them in until they germinate and then go from there. I have them under lights and on heat for now. The others are under lights with no heat, doing well. Some were started in February. I never know when I will get a chance to put them out. It looked really good in January and February! LOL!! (Ugh!)

The sun is shining and most of the snow is melted, though not quite warm yet, 40° right now. I think it will be warmer later in the day, well at least I surely hope so!

Thumbnail by evelyn_inthegarden
Click the image for an enlarged view.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

April 14, 2012
11:42 AM

Post #9082244

WOW! That weather really does sound "grizzly".
Calalily
Deep South Coastal, TX
(Zone 10a)

April 15, 2012
4:53 AM

Post #9083010

This is the 3rd day of 30 mph wind. We might get a little rain tomorrow when the front finally gets here. I started going around pulling any tomatoes that aren't doing well. I am going to try direct seeding Arkansas Traveler, Top Gun and a few other heat tolerant varieties. I had a few bell pepper starting to wilt, so pulled those out also.
I am trying Red Ruffles this year, peppers are nice size but I want these to get red before picking. I did pick the first fruits that set (we do this with all peppers) and they had nice thick walls.
I have most of the peppers, tomatoes and eggplant in the greenhouse (shade house in summer). Not sure how I'm going to work the rotation of crops since the only other things in there are cucumbers and squash!
rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

April 17, 2012
2:08 PM

Post #9086472

BUFFY690 wrote:Searching for a space for our Tomatoberry Garden

I'd appreciate a report on the Tomatoberry if you do plant them and get fruit. That was one seed packet I bought but held off planting because I am out of room.

-Rich


Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 18, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9087978

All you Texans give me major zone envy! LOL...

I'm not doing beefsteaks this year, our season is just too short. Last year I only got a couple of good Brandywine, not worth the effort. But I am growing tried and true Sweet Million and Sungold cherries, and trying an early Roma type, Pompeii. Funny, Sweet Million is an old favorite, and I've always considered it to be early, but of the three it was the last to germinate. So I have high hopes for good yields this year from all.

Last year I really pushed to get them in nearly three weeks early. I had them hardened off in a cold frame while it was still quite cool and they were nice and sturdy. Then I poured hot water on the 3x6' raised beds to raise the soil temps, planted, laid down plastic on the soil and mulched with wood chips, and covered the whole business with frost blanket fabric over hoops... And they loved it, I got the first red Sweet Million in early July.

Pam

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

April 18, 2012
4:07 PM

Post #9088019

Well, out went my black cherry seeds, 8 weeks and not one germinated. OH WELL, I'll try again later.Planted some yellow cherries (tomato) they dwarfed and didn't grow earlier.So I replanted them today.

I'll get to the peppers.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 18, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9088244

How old were the seeds and where did you get them? I can't imagine NONE germinating.

juhur7

juhur7
Anderson, IN
(Zone 6b)

April 18, 2012
7:19 PM

Post #9088259

1lisac ;Those were half the seeds I had gotten from wintersown. Half the seeds in the package I still have. The others I've gotten from there are all doing pretty well At least those i've grown so far.
1lisac
Liberty Hill, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 19, 2012
12:36 PM

Post #9089081

Hopefully you can try again. Those are some tasty tomatoes, IMHO.

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