Some beauties just for fun

Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Over on the Tropical Plants forum, we had a gal post yesterday that she had a brom given to her as a gift, and it didn't bloom again until just this week. She made the comment that she "didn't really like" bromeliads. I was really amazed, and bombarded that thread with pictures of some favorites from my garden.

Today I was at a garden center that had a really nice display of different kinds and colors so took a bunch of pictures. I'm going to send her over here to take a look at the stunning array from just one store.

Elaine

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Nice red, white floret.

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

These dark reds are very dramatic.

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Bright accent even without a flower.

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Better than celosias, and bloom more often, too!

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Love the frosty blue leaves on this one, and the pink plume will get much bigger before it's done.

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Just amazing, bright and pretty.

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Please everybody, post pics of your favorites with jazzy leaves or any that are in bloom. We need to show Sherri that there's a bromeliad for everyone. Plus they're such easy plants, what's not to like?

Best possible plant for dry shady areas under oak trees down here, that's for sure.

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(Zone 9a)

I know where you have been.... (and I am green with envy) :-)

Some of them are striking even when they are not in bloom. This is one I found on the sale table at Selby last May.

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(Zone 9a)

The flowers on a bilbergia are almost unreal.

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(Zone 9a)

Found this one in the grocery store. In retrospect, it should not have been mounted in the crotch of the oak, that can cause rot in the tree. It is better to mount them along the branches or the trunk.

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(Zone 9a)

Neophytum 'Burgundy Hill' from tropiflora years ago. It lived outside for me for about 6 years then last winter did it in.

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(Zone 9a)

Neo 'Zoe' - also from tropiflora - also bit the dust last winter, :-(

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Alice, those are all lovely. I have a Bilbergia like yours only the bracts are red instead of pink. So pretty!

Actually, I didn't go to Tropiflora for the pictures. If I go there, I come home with a full car and an empty wallet. Broms and orchids, Phew! both expensive habits.

Those above were all at the local Lowe's store!

(Zone 9a)

Well shoot, even your Lowe's are better.

(Debra) Derby, KS(Zone 6a)

what do they sit on when they are on branches or in the Y of a tree?

Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Nuttin but their little bottoms, Deb. They put roots out into the grooves of the bark to hold themselves in place, like orchids do.

If you place them you have to secure them somehow until they get their roots attached to the bark. Liquid Nails works pretty well, and hot glue is not bad either. Once they attach, they really hold on, I had to use a big screwdriver to pry that pink one out of the Y of my oak tree.

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Well, maybe I won't get Bromeliad shunned when I post a photo of another related Bromeliad... this is Cryptanthus Pink Zebra



This message was edited Feb 5, 2012 6:54 AM

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Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Beginning to bloom on the Cryptbergia Red Burst

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(Debra) Derby, KS(Zone 6a)

pretty!

Huntersville, NC(Zone 7b)

I 'm with you Deb!

(Zone 9a)

Beautiful - and all in the family.

Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

wow such gorgeous pictures! i agree bromeliads are care free just be careful spreading granular fertilizer do not let them go down in the well. i always spread them on the ground around them. also for the ones in the trees i used those nice tea bags that have stitching make a cut put slow release pellets in them and wrap in spagnum moss and put near the roots. i do it with the orchid in the trees too.

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(Zone 9a)

Agreed, and that is an excellent idea about the tea bags. I do drop a few grains of mosquito bits in the throats of the broms. This is the same stuff as mosquito dunks but in a granular form. It has not harmed my plants at all.

Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

these have grassy looking leaves

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Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

this color almost doesnt look real.

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Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

another

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Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

fairchild always has a great bromeliad show every year.

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Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

this is how my husband attached them to the queen palms. he cut off the end of the palm frond and turned it upside down and wrapped fishing wire around the frond then added spagnum moss/ bromeliads.

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Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Elaine, you said the brom given as a gift didn't bloom again until just this week. I didn't realize they rebloomed. I thought when done blooming, the plant put out pups and died. Are there some that continue to live?

I love all those glorious showy blooms!

The ones I have are less than flashy, just pretty foliage. Kristi
Cryptanthus ~ Pink Starlite

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Miami, FL(Zone 10a)

i put my cryptanthus in an old coconut.

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(Zone 9a)

What a great idea using the palm fronds. I throw away dozens of palmetto boots every week., Now some of them wil be re-purposed and I like that idea much better than using old panti hose. LOL

Winter Springs, FL(Zone 9b)

Absoulutely wonderful photos. I didn't know they could grow in a tree...I have trees...lots of trees. I would love to try that.

So many different kinds. Ardesa that bilbergia is so pretty, I've never seen anything like that. Candela the Fairchild is really pretty, I have seen something similar to that before. The flowers are all so beautiful.

Ok dizzy you are getting me hooked now...all my DH needs is me buying more plants...lol.

-Sherri

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

Check out this bromeliad tree photo that Wendy posted on the Australian brom thread... http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/fp.php?pid=8995236

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

No need to buy them, Sherri. The exotic ones can be expensive. Get starts Free! from your neighbors and friends. They are the easiest plants to raise from divisions. Growing in/on trees is fun, but their best use is in the shade under the trees, where nothing else likes to grow.

Kristi, each separate rosette of leaves only ever has one flower. Then they make pups and the pups bloom. That is how they 're-bloom'. Some of mine bloom twice a year. So don't throw away any brom after it has bloomed, let it make babies, then if the mother plant gets scruffy, cut it out and let the small ones grow. See candela's cryptanthus (above) in the coconut? Looks like she could make about 20 separate plants out of that one!

Your Pink Zebra is just lovely! The leaves look like feathers with those intricate markings. I'm going to hunt for one of those.

Here's a small one - leaves are about 8in. - called Matchstick, that I got as a start from a DG friend. She says it spreads like mad and blooms really well, too. This flower is long since spent, but still pretty. I think the florets on the ends were purple.

This message was edited Feb 5, 2012 11:05 AM

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brainerd, MN(Zone 4a)

jealous!! I would have to grow them inside. Who wants to share? ;) :D

I love tropicals..Im just not in the right zone. :(

Huntersville, NC(Zone 7b)

We have a person who regularly reports in who lives in Colorado (Zone5 I believe) who grows Colocasias Alocasias Musa(banana) and such! It just depends on how much you want to work at it. You can grow Musa Bajoo inMinnesota and leave in the ground over the winter if you do a little research!

You can do it Minnesippi!!!!

Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

As far as the cold weather issue goes, Kristi, I think if I lived where you do, I'd grow my broms outside from March through October, then take a few pups of each kind indoors for the winter, once the cold threatens. They're such easy transplants. Throw some extra mulch around the ones left outdoors, and they might survive, too. But you have the indoor ones as insurance if they don't.

I'll bet you'd be amazed how easy and prolific they are when grown outdoors. Mine all survived two record cold winters here with no frost protection whatsoever. Our record cold winter might be about equal to one of your normal winters, I'd think?

Elaine

Deep East Texas, TX(Zone 8a)

You know, I've got a friend that leaves a large pot of Bilbergia outdoors. When the days grow short and the temps dip, it begins to bloom like mad. I suspect in an attempt to reproduce to survive but it is very pretty. I intend to snag a start of that one. It is a pink Bil.

Elaine, if/when I acquire enough broms to plant outside I will indeed try what you suggest, thanks for that idea.

Minnesippi ~ you should indeed give it a go. You won't believe how it warms those freezing winter days to gaze upon the lush foliage of tropicals.

I did like the coconut shell planter full of Candelas' crypts. I suspect that one is C. cascade ~ very pretty. Mine is currently in a hanging basket. It should eventually drape down like a spider plant.

Cryptantus cascade...

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Sarasota, FL(Zone 9b)

Also tropicalnut777 ( I think) who lives in Provo UT (also Zone 5) and loves banana plants - they have the added challenge of no humidity! When I lived in Salt Lake, the only place any tropicals would grow was in my master bathroom. Luckily it had a south-facing floor to ceiling frosted window. Perfect light for them. We cooled the house in summer with a swamp cooler, which added some humidity, too.

Minnisippi, I'd love to share but sent off all my starts a couple of months ago. I'll have more to share by the summer, though.

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