Providing Heat?

Silver Spring, MD(Zone 7a)

Greetings WS Friends,

Last year's winter sowing was great. So here I am back again, seeds in hand anxious to begin again. This year though, Greenhouse envy has gotten the best of me. I have a tiny greenhouse/plant stand with plastic covering. I've been thinking about providing a low level of heat to ward off freezing temperatures. Last year, during the coldest nights, I stuck a couple of candles lodged in cat litter on the bottom row. This year, I've been thinking that that was probably not such a great idea. I've been thinking of purchasing a couple of those battery opperated lights (I think I've seen them on "as shown on tv" or some such) during very cold nights. The only other alternative I can think of, digging a hole and placing manure in it, is not practical for a couple of reasons. Can any one help me brainstorm providing a source of heat without using electricity (or candles:)
Thanks Very Much,
Marlene

Silver Spring, MD(Zone 7a)

Hi Marlene! It looks like we're neighbors :-)

I've heard of people using Christmas lights around trees to protect them from frost. Would that work?

Those battery operated lights are often LED, which do not give off any heat at all.

Silver Spring, MD(Zone 7a)

Hello SSgardener,
Thanks for the help with brainstorming.The problem here is that I will not be able to use electricity, so..... don't think that christmas tree lights would work in this case.
:)Marlene

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

Someone mentioned filling water jugs with really hot water. sounds like a bit of a pain but I guess in fairly mild weather it might work. Course you would be refilling fairly frequently so might not be very practical

Arlington, MA(Zone 6a)

stick some bricks or stones in your oven (low temp) & take those to your green house.

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

6aseeder, that is a great idea. I also have my WS containers in one of those upright mini-greenhouses on wheels. I won't be worried about warming for at least two months but it's a great idea for future reference.

Arlington, MA(Zone 6a)

mary (oberan46) -- anchorage is zone 5b ?? i'da never thought it. even if our zone was changed to 6b (but i am not changing my screen name to 6bseeder)

(Mary) Anchorage, AK(Zone 4b)

Oh! that is what your name means. :) I live in a small micro climate here. Anchorage ranges from 5b (or a or whatever) to a zone 1 up in the hills. I can grow many things and/or leave them in the ground where other areas here cannot. Judging by the zone 5 stuff I can grow, that was how I picked my zone. then there are other zone 5 things that I just cannot get going. Part of that is my ignorance on the soil, moisture, etc that they need. I tend to plant first and read later. Getting better though.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Sometimes sticking too closely to your zone can be limiting, I find. If you're familiar with your micro-climates (like Mary is), you'll find that there's ooooodles of things that you can grow that you might otherwise shy away from, thinking it's "outside of your zone". Are you higher up on a hillside? Down in a valley with lots of sun? Those things make a big difference, so it's good to experiment with different sorts of things that might not otherwise do well... say, for your neighbors or the guy at the hardware store! Step outside your (comfort) "ZONE" and have fun! =)

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