Plant starts from cuttings

Orange Beach, AL(Zone 9a)

I am curious which vegetables can be started by cuttings. I have put my green onions in dirt and they have continued to grow. I also put my celery root bottom in a cup of water and have started it growing. Carrots sprout greenery from their ends, but I am not sure if they produce a viable root for eating. I got my mint that I bought in the store to grow roots and it is now planted in dirt. Are there other vegetables/herbs that you can use your "throw away" parts or left over pieces to make new plants?

Poughkeepsie, NY(Zone 6a)

I believe Tomatoes can be done by cuttings. I've never tried it but maybe this year I will!



This message was edited Feb 11, 2012 1:42 PM

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Definitely you can make tomato cuttings, I'm currently doing this with success!

Orange Beach, AL(Zone 9a)

At this point I have rooted celery, carrot, onion, chive, mint, and mango. We will see what/how it will all grow!

Brighton, MI(Zone 5b)

I'd like to try some cuttings. Should you put them in a dark place or in a dark container where the foliage gets light, or doesn't it matter? I've heard conflicting theories on this so I thought I'd ask someone that had already gone through the process. I know that some cuttings do well in water where others need soil but I'm just experimenting right now. "Practice propagation".

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

>At this point I have rooted celery, carrot, onion, chive, mint, and mango. We will see what/how it will all grow!"

Albeachrealtor, your celery..was it a stalk? The root? A stalk won't create another stalk; a celery root won't grow another plant but will put up new growth, usually leaves and/or a couple of tiny thin stalks. The carrot will tend to grow foliage and sometimes an elongated root but what happens is the root will have a very hard core (inedible) and the top will begin flowering and go to seed. Can you tell I've done this one? :>)

Your onion, if it was a bulb it will rot but will give you some green top to cut off and use in a nice stir fry!

Mint will definitely root and give you a whole new plant, or plants.

Mango? Do you mean you planted a seed? If so, prepare to wait 10 to 20 years for a harvest. Mango trees take a long time to produce but it could be fun to have a beautiful tree/plant in a container as a house plant for a while, similar to what some folks do with avocados, another pretty plant to root and grow.

Ironworker, you'll have to be more specific which type of cuttings you are interested in so we can give a more precise answer.

Shoe



This message was edited Feb 23, 2012 10:54 AM

Brighton, MI(Zone 5b)

Hello Horseshoe.
Guess I should have said more but you actually answered a couple questions in your post.
One question I do have is about what to do with a cutting from a hardy hibiscus (don't know name of plant, only know it survives MI winter so it is of the hardy variety). Just curious what your or anyone's thought might be on the best method of rooting it when I do get a chance to acquire it?
Also, I was given a potted miniature rose bush with little info but I know it's fine outside in my zone. I'd like to start another one from it to have ready to plant this year if anyone has any thoughts as the best way to go about that one too.
Thanks for any help or tips you may have.

Orange Beach, AL(Zone 9a)

Thanks for the info Horseshoe! My green onions have all but died at this point. I got about a month of "chives" from them. You are right, great for stir fry. Then the roots (bulbs) shriveled up and died. Oh well, it did save me about 2 bucks a week buying them at the store, so it was worth it. I may just keep them in h2o next go round.
My mint is doing great. I am pinching new growth off the top to encourage root growth and bushing.
My onion is putting up foliage, I don't know how it will taste compared to my green onions, so that will be interesting.
The carrot I am growing for the seeds more than anything else. I am going to try to plant those, knowing full well that they may be an f2 or hybrid and not sprout. However, even if this is the case, I can still use the seed to cook.
The celery is much the same way. It was a root and I cut the stalks off at about 3 inches above the base. Lots of foliage at this point, and I am okay with it flowering or just using the leaves for cooking.
My husband and I have a 6 month old son and this is as much fun for us to figure out what experiments we are going to do as it will be for him some day.

Thanks and keep us all posted!

Emily

Brighton, MI(Zone 5b)

Hello Emily.
If you wouldn't mind telling me how you got your mint to root, I'd appreciate it. I plan on getting some myself and would like to make some new plants from it. The same method should work for my herbs as well.
I'd like to try to root some tomato plant cuttings too when those are big enough. I've got plenty of things to grow from seed but haven't tried this yet. Figure I better learn how when I want to rather than hurriedly when I need to.
Thanks for any advice.

Rick

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Ironworker...
regarding your hardy hibiscus, if it has gone dormant for the winter it will send up new growth at the crown (base) of the plant. You can let the new growth multiply (many stems) and gently slice one off leaving a piece of the parent and root it in moist soil, OR you can allow the new growth to increase in length then take tip cuttings. I'll see if I have any pics in my files for doing that; I root quite a few plants each year so may have it already documented.

Your rose bush can be rooted with cuttings as well. I'd wait til around June (or July in your area) so there is ample active growth and take tip cuttings where the new growth (green wood) meets the old growth (darker/brown wood). It would be best to use a rooting hormone for roses then stick the cuttings in a pot in a shady area, keeping it moist but yet well-drained. I'd suggest taking several cuttings as they don't all tend to take (root).

Emily, congrats on your "grow-outs"! Isn't it nice to have a little "summer" greenery during the winter? Just think of all the cool stuff your young'n will be involved in as he/she grows older and playing with plants, experimenting, learning from Day One to eat good foods! Congrats!

Shoe

Brighton, MI(Zone 5b)

Thanks Horseshoe, that is helpful. I already have some rooting hormone that I picked up in prep for this new adventure. The extra info on the hibiscus would be great if you come across it.
What is your opinion on tomato cuttings? Water or soil rooting? It'll be a while before I get to that stage but, I'd like to have an idea beforehand.
Thanks for the help so far. As I've said already, this type of propagation is all new to me. Us newbies appreciate the guidance.
Rick

Orange Beach, AL(Zone 9a)

Ironworker, for the mint, (this is pathetic) I took the mint I bought in the produce section of the grocery store and just cut the end off. I then placed it in a mason jar of water with my green onions (hubby didn't want too much clutter in the kitchen window sil). Once it had some roots, I put it in dirt in a cup on the window sill. My onions are now dead, but the mint is doing well. I bought basil today to make chicken parm and I went ahead and put it in the h2o also. I don't have any rooting hormone. Just letting good old fashioned nature do its work.

Shoe,
My son, Attison, is already learning to enjoy plants and veggies. Every morning we look at my seed starts and I rub each one with my fingers and then let him smell. We also walk around the house and touch the cypress trees, palm fronds, gardenia, camelia, lillys etc. We live across the street from the beach here in Alabama and it was nearly 70 today and will be in the mid 70's by next week. I already have most of my garden in. I am straw bale gardening this year.

Later!

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

"Attison". What a great name, Albeach. And a six month old...just think, this time next year he'll be bopping all over the house, exploring this and that. What a treasure. Ya'll are off on a great adventure. And oh how I long for the smell of the beach, the sand, the saltwater.... Enjoy it for me!

Rick/Ironworker....
"What is your opinion on tomato cuttings? Water or soil rooting? It'll be a while before I get to that stage but, I'd like to have an idea beforehand."

Definitely soil rooting. Even outside in the ground, no need for pots/soil, etc. For years that is how I got plants for a late season grow-out. If you take suckers from your plants (the stems that grow off the main stem/trunk which are nestled next to a side-stem) and stick them in a shaded area of ground will do you justice.

I like to take a hoe, shovel, whatever, and make a trench as long as you like (depending on how many cuttings you are doing), water it down to make a slurry, then stick your tomato cuttings in it. This should be done in a shady area or if it gets sun it should be minimal. Keep the soil moist and in ten days to two weeks those cuttings will be rooted. At that time fork them out and either move them into the garden or you can pot them up to transport them elsewhere. You can get lots of "free plants" this way!

And no, for tomato cuttings/rootings, no need for a rooting hormone so save it for your hibiscus and other cuttings.

Shoe (getting a bit bleary-eyed here...off to watch The Walton's and relax)...:>)
Best to All.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

My oh my, Horseshoe, you are a treasure!! Thank you a ton on the info on the celery and carrot, I've just recently done the same thing as Albeach (Emily) has done, along with the 'butt' of a head of green leaf lettuce, and I, of course, have had no idea what to expect, but it's been fun watching the foliage burst forth. Like Emily, I don't mind not getting a viable carrot, the seeds will be wonderful and I'll just let that puppy go to seed and spread the joy!

Efland, NC(Zone 7a)

Sounds good to me, speedie. I think it is great just to have any kind of new life showing up in any form or fashion. It was quite common as my DD was growing up to have carrot tops sitting in shallow bowls of water, various plant stems rooting in glasses of water, and since we have a big greenhouse there was all kinds of "experiments" going on in there she loved. And of course, in our garden as well she learned much, and taught much...

...one day while walking that little 5 or 6 yr old around the garden, just hanging out, I mentioned "we're gonna have to hill those taters up soon". She looked up at me and asked if they were sick. Then corrected me! Apparently with my Southern accent she thought I said, "heal those taters", even to the point of making me practice saying "HiLL" vs "HEAL". Heheheh, out of the mouths of babes, eh? :>)

In other words, enjoy growing the carrots, the celery roots, the lettuce roots, etc. Great fun regardless!

Happy Gardening, Folks, in all the Gardens of Life!
Shoe

Brighton, MI(Zone 5b)

Thanks Shoe.
Appreciate the advice. I'm looking forward to trying all this new knowledge!

Thanks to you too Albeach.
I figured there wasn't much to it but, I still wanted to ask someone who had already gotten plants to root that way.

Thanks again for your help folks.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Aaawwww, those precious times with our little ones ... nothing can compare, huh? =)
My "little one" is going on 24 now, and in college to "Learn how to play in the dirt, like his Little Mamma". < =D I'm so proud!!!

Danville, IN(Zone 5b)

So which can and cannot be started from cuttings?

Brighton, MI(Zone 5b)

Hello Julia.
Seems as though no one has gotten to your post yet so I'll get the ball rolling for you. If you've read this entire thread, you will already have some answers there. Do you have anything in particular in mind? There are just too many ways of reproduction from cuttings to give you a generalized answer. As I was told earlier in this thread, you kind of need to be more specific and then someone will surely be glad to help.

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Thank you Ironworker, I had read Julia's question, but wasn't sure how to answer. Shame on me for just not saying anything. =( I *do* know that tomatoes and basil can grow from cuttings (based on my own fun at work), but that's all I know.

Danville, IN(Zone 5b)

Looks like I already got my answer....thanks anyways :)

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Oh good, I really didn't mean to ignore or neglect you, honest! =) Soooo, what'cha gonna grow from cuttings? What have you started already? < =D

Danville, IN(Zone 5b)

My grandaughters....ages 4, 5 and 5 and I have started the celery for fun:) Baleigh decided to just plop a carrot in the dirt lol....this is great fun with kids....even more fun with grand kids!

Orange Beach, AL(Zone 9a)

Julia- Green onions are very easy to grow for a short time and provide a quick reward and fast growth. I have also used a little root hormone and started mint, basil, and cilantro and currently have an avocado and a mango seed growing!

Danville, IN(Zone 5b)

Oh how fun...bet they would love that!

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Albeach, the green onions.... can you use the ones that you buy in bunches at the store? I've still got a few in the fridge, they have little baby root bits still on the bottoms, wonder if I should plop a couple into water over-night and then into some soil tomorrow .... oh what the heck, it was only 50 cents for the whole bunch, may as well try to grow a couple instead of letting them all go to waste. I'll give it a try this evening, when I get home! =)

Danville, IN(Zone 5b)

Speed...just plop the bulb in the dirt and it will keep growing:)

Somewhere in, MD(Zone 7b)

Oh cool, thank you! I was so tired when I got home from work yesterday that I'd forgotten all about it! I *really* need to write down everything "to do" or else I forget. OK, that will get potted up today along with my Chaste tree seeds. =)

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