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Article: Jequirity Beans: Those Poisonous Pretties: Excellent information

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Forum: Article: Jequirity Beans: Those Poisonous PrettiesReplies: 17, Views: 97
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Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Middle TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

February 16, 2012
5:11 AM

Post #9008513

Another case of pretty but poisonous. A good lesson to keep in mind ... always.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 16, 2012
10:34 AM

Post #9008827

Wow--just as toxic as they are beautiful! I'm glad they won't grow here!
Thanks for the interesting article.
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 16, 2012
11:41 AM

Post #9008895

Those are beautiful!! And, just like in everything else, the prettier they are, the further away you need to stay from them!!
tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

February 16, 2012
3:31 PM

Post #9009175

These are native to here but they aren't invasive. As with many plants, in habitat there are controlling agents which keep them in balance. Outside their habitat there often aren't any controlling agents so they get out of control and become "weeds". They're called Crab's Eye Vine here and were used by indigenous people to make necklaces/bracelets. I've never heard of people being poisoned by handling the seeds. But normally they were drilled when still green (soft). People I knew who used them always said it was too tedious and difficult to drill them once they dried out. With children they were a danger so they're not popular these days as jewelry, especially with all the inert artificial alternatives available.
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 16, 2012
4:46 PM

Post #9009231

Oh yes these were the ammunition we kids used in south Florida. We all had pea shooters.
We did swallow some now and then. and my brother inhaled on into his nose. I think he coughed it up when he got home.
We also used Caster Beans to throw at each other.
I can and do grow the caster bean here but the 'red eye bean', (that's what we called them) I haven't had any to grow.

Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 16, 2012
7:50 PM

Post #9009439

I didn't realize they grew in Australia as well. I suppose the climate would be similar enough, it shouldn't surprise me. Most of the drilling incidents I read about involved the dried beans, and the powdered abrin.

tropicbreeze
noonamah
Australia

February 17, 2012
4:15 AM

Post #9009573

They're quite widespread across the north of Australia. Often see them when out bushwalkin/trekking. I've some in my garden. The flowers here are more blue in colour. I also like the ferny leaves. The seeds persist in the pods, even when the pods are far gone.

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Bookerc1

Bookerc1
Mackinaw, IL
(Zone 5a)

February 17, 2012
4:34 AM

Post #9009577

Great pictures! Have you submitted them to Plant Files? Good, clear shots like that are so helpful when someone is trying to identify a plant! If you have not, there is a link at the bottom of the Plant Files entry to Add a Picture. I hope you'll consider adding them!
hikerpat
Knoxville, TN

February 20, 2012
5:08 AM

Post #9012878

@rentman: What part of South Florida? Wilton Manors, for me. I, too, remember playing with them. I just don't remember any tree looking like this one. And, I probably swallowed at least one.
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
7:54 AM

Post #9013136

Pat, I was bored and raised in West Palm Beach, and spent 80% of my life within 120 miles of the birth hospital...
Up the road from me was an abandon orange grove which had the vines growing the trees.
Don't get me started...brings back lots of great memories.

Dwight
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
10:35 AM

Post #9013400

Aawwww, cum-mon, Dwight, elaborate! I'd like to hear your story (please?).
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
11:31 AM

Post #9013472

Across the street from the orange grove were 4 huge mango trees, we would climb up and as cars passed by would drop mangos on the cars...I was a bad boy...now I'm so wonderful. ^^_^^
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 20, 2012
2:41 PM

Post #9013735

ROFL Boys!!
orangegrovegirl
Port Saint Lucie, FL

February 21, 2012
5:06 AM

Post #9014337

Hi Folks (esp. rentman), I was born in Fort Pierce, 60 or so miles north of West Palm Beach, FL. Having grown up in orange groves, I used to see these pods all the time; my cousins and I used to play with them, mainly just throw or sling-shot them at each other. Kids being kids and all that, I tried biting one but it was so tough, I couldn't bite it. Thank God I didn't succeed! I knew them by the name "rosary beads", but no one in my family seemed to know they were poisonous. I didn't find that out until I was grown (after I'd seen a movie, "The Blue Lagoon" with Brooke Shields). Rentman, we didn't drop mangos on cars but we ate many of what we called "turpentine" mangos - gosh, what a rash I would get! My cousins and I used to climb the bamboos (the really big ones) until they would bend over and we'd jump off when we got close to the ground. Again, thank God I didn't break any bones! Thanks for the memories...
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2012
5:37 AM

Post #9014361

Oh the sling shots...I for got about them...OH what memories those bring back.
I guess they would be a deadly weapon and I wouldn't be aloud to bring one into a court room
FlowrLady
-South Central-, IL
(Zone 6a)

February 21, 2012
10:27 AM

Post #9014710

More...More!!!
orangegrovegirl
Port Saint Lucie, FL

February 22, 2012
10:10 PM

Post #9016691

OK FlowrLady, this is to rentman: a eucalyptus seed is about the same size as a rosary bean, and goes up the nose equally as well. Don't ask... I haven't the slightest clue why I stuffed one up my nose when I was in the third grade unless I was bored out of my mind. Boredom quickly became panic until the teacher gave me a tissue and I was able to blow the thing out; otherwise, it would have been a trip to the nurse's station and tweezers! Rentman, did you ever get into a sandspur fight, with the really big ones that have long stickers that sting when you step on them? (Gives me chill bumps right now just thinking of the pain.) There's nothing like launching a full stalk at the bent over butt of someone who is picking them for their next salvage at you! Then... whammo! OW! (Sigh) Kids were so innocent back in the day; nowadays they don't use seeds and sandspurs... it's guns!
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

February 23, 2012
4:15 AM

Post #9016772

Yes OrangeGirl we had sand spurs, not the large one you speak of.
But sand spurs do bring back another memory.
The field, at school, where we played football (no one knew what soccer was back then), well one corner had a lot of spurs growing there. We would take off our shoes (yes we all wore shoes to school) to play. My feet were like leather, so when I got the ball I would run to that corner and no one would follow, TouchDown.
I would kind'a slide my feet along and few stickers stuck me.
Oh ain't it wonderful ?

P.S. my rabbit had babies yesterday

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Other Article: Jequirity Beans: Those Poisonous Pretties Threads you might be interested in:

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