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Shady Gardens: Your Woodland Shade Favorites 3

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KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 3, 2012
5:51 PM

Post #9028808

Here's a new thread as we anxiously await the coming of spring! We came from here:
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1198921/#new
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 3, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9028867

Thank you. It's a perfect time for the new thread.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 3, 2012
8:31 PM

Post #9028985

You're welcome!
Today I noticed I have some daffodils blooming that didn't bloom last year. Do they not always bloom their first year?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 4, 2012
5:21 AM

Post #9029140

I thought that they did. How odd. But what a nice surprise.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 4, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9029220

I hope they do, I've got several of them planted this year, first time for me, and I'm looking forward to seeing their pretty little faces this year. They're in containers, and so far all I see are loads of sprouts. That's ok, it's the right start! :)
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 4, 2012
7:31 AM

Post #9029338

The daffs here are just showing leaf tips at this point. They'll probably be a little more exposed by the end of this week. Still getting a few snowflakes but nothing sticks (Yeah!).
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 4, 2012
8:00 AM

Post #9029364

Just a few snow flurries here, and it's about 40 degrees.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 9, 2012
4:20 PM

Post #9036220

Since this forum is about shady favorites , I need your best advice. What is your favorite long-blooming plant? I mean, I get lots of impatiens but I need something else that is prolific, whether perennial or annual. Of course, a perennial would be nice so I don't have to replant every year.
Again, I need this for our little museum gardens which I want plants to bloom as much as possible to impress the public.
Suggestions?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 9, 2012
6:35 PM

Post #9036338

Caladium are grand in shade. They'll bloom until frost.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 9, 2012
7:08 PM

Post #9036378

Those are so beautiful and really brighten up a dark spot. I can't grow them at my house, but at the museum, it's 1,000 feet lower and about 8 degrees warmer on any given summer day. They should be perfect.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 9, 2012
7:11 PM

Post #9036380

Also coleus, it can take some sun, but it is grate in shade. Has meny different hight, so you can layer them.

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 9, 2012
8:36 PM

Post #9036441

Beautiful gardens!

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2012
3:42 AM

Post #9036553

Isn't there a little blue flower called Torenia or wishbone flower? I can't find it in the Plants Files?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2012
4:37 AM

Post #9036574

Here it is: http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/68533/
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 10, 2012
5:29 AM

Post #9036619

I just find the wishbone flower seeds at the Swalowtail Garden seeds webs. and they have about 4-5 different colors. I wish I have seen them before I ordered my seeds, they are coming today. Seems easy to grow and they are good in containers.

Pirl, have you grown some babies breath, I have ordered some seed from the ST seeds, never grown them before. Etelka
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 10, 2012
6:04 AM

Post #9036673

Yes, Etelka, we have grown baby's breath from seed. They don't do much the first year but the second year they go insane so place them exactly where you want them. The billows of baby's breath take up a lot of room and I'll be trying to move some this spring though I know they develop a deep tap root and probably won't transplant well.

In just one spot in the rose garden the baby's breath completely blocked a slate path. I had to cut it back as shown here:

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 10, 2012
11:37 AM

Post #9037049

Golly - I thought baby's breath was an annual. Duh. Or maybe it's too cold here?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 10, 2012
4:19 PM

Post #9037307

Spring is definitely waking up my woods.
Early spring is my best season, since woodland perennials are my niche.
Most of them bloom early spring and are gone by midsummer.
The show is starting a little early this year.
Each week, I have to wait patiently for the weekend to see what's new.
Here's what I found on today's yard tour.
#1. Anemone blanda. Brilliant blue really stands out against dried leaves of winter.
#2. Corydalis solida George Baker. Foliage is emerging and the blooms along with it.
#3. My NOID hellebore has been blooming non-stop for over a month.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 10, 2012
4:24 PM

Post #9037317

#1. Cardamine heptaphylla. A beautiful lavender carpet of color.
#2. Claytonia. Earliest of spring ephemerals.
#3. Anemone hortensis. This bloom probably got a little frost injury.
But fortunately, looks like more blooms to come.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 10, 2012
4:28 PM

Post #9037321

#1. Veronica 'Georgia Blue'. Needs some sun, but thrives at the edge of woodland.
#2. Jeffersonia dubia. One of my favorite woodland flowers.

I can't wait to see what's going on next weekend!

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 10, 2012
5:32 PM

Post #9037405

Weerobin, what beautiful plants! I love your colors!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 10, 2012
7:29 PM

Post #9037531

I agree with Donna - the colors are gorgeous.
Hellebores here are just starting to open up but my fave Hepaticas are just emerging from the ground.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2012
12:58 AM

Post #9037678

Now if I can just find some yellow impatiens, or if I have to, the seeds. I got some seeds in a trade once, only one of them germinated and I enjoyed that plant.

I guess I should have taken cuttings because I haven't seen any since, at least not locally.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9037763

Maybe this is the yellow one you meant. It's "Fusion Glow Exotic Impatiens".

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2012
8:04 AM

Post #9037899

Where'd you find it, pirl?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2012
8:31 AM

Post #9037932

At a local nursery. You might want to check Proven Winners to see if they were the ones who offer it.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2012
8:51 AM

Post #9037956

Good idea, thanks!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 11, 2012
9:10 AM

Post #9037988

Couldn't get provenwinners.com search to work, but I googled it, and found it right here! http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/161359/
And the vendor that is listed as having it available is Avant Gardens.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 11, 2012
2:10 PM

Post #9038329

When I brought in the basket of begonias, where I finally put that impatiens, it bloomed all winter and into the next summer. Glad you found it.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2012
11:47 AM

Post #9046147

Just found the impatiens again (online) at a local nursery and the description said it grows to 2' in the garden. I'll have to buy it again. They showed a few cultivars in the Fusion series.

Impatiens ‘Fusion’ (1 qt)
Large cup shaped flower. Grows to 2' in the garden.

I. ‘Fusion Glow’
Yellow to pale yellow with a salmon throat.
I. ‘Fusion Heat Coral’
Bright coral pink with a yellow throat.
I. ‘Fusion Infrared Apricot’
Coral with a rust center.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 18, 2012
2:23 PM

Post #9047600

wow, wish I could find them here.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 18, 2012
3:16 PM

Post #9047670

When they are available for sale I will check for the distributor's name in the hopes in will be helpful.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 18, 2012
6:34 PM

Post #9047921

I'd also like to find the Blue Diamond impatiens.
http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/158917/

Annie's Annuals is said to carry them, but it's not available now--maybe too soon in the season?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 18, 2012
7:15 PM

Post #9047984

Try going to Annie's Annuals site and see if they have a locator, which would give you retailers in your area.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 19, 2012
1:37 AM

Post #9048188

pirl does that nursery sell online? What is the name of it?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 19, 2012
4:56 AM

Post #9048268

The nursery I mentioned that has it is local and they don't sell online, sorry!

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 19, 2012
4:34 PM

Post #9049281

Annie's Annuals sells them for $9.95 each. Again, too expensive for me for an annual. However, do these plants root well from cuttings?
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
3:38 AM

Post #9049749

Here are some more woodland early spring wildflowers.
Each weekend in March is a different show.
They bloom early and are often low to the ground,
so you have to be vigilant to find them among the dead leaves!
#1. Corydalis solida George Baker.
#2. A volunteer viola which has reseeded throughout the woodland.
#3. Hepatica.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
3:40 AM

Post #9049752

#1. Phlox divarica London Grove.
#2. Anemone hortensis.
#3. Anemonella thalictroides Cameo.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
3:43 AM

Post #9049755

#1. Dutchman's breeches (dicentra cucullaria).
#2. Mukdenia rossii.
#3. Ranunculus ficaria Brazen Hussy.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
3:46 AM

Post #9049760

#1. Pachysandra procumbens. Strange spring blooms with beautiful mottled foliage in the background.
#2. Phlox stolinifera Sherwood Purple.
#3. Pachyphragma macrophyllum. Forms a nice spreading colony with time.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
3:50 AM

Post #9049764

Finally (though I could go on, trust me...)
#1. Arisaema mirabae.
#2. Epimedium brachyrrhizum.
#3. Epimedium x versicolor Cherry Tart.

Looking forward to next weekend's display!

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 20, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9049798

Oh Weerobin, how inspirational. I am establishing a new garden with more shade and you have so many wonderful things I have never grown - in fact, never seen or heard of! I particularly love your members of the anemone family. I have fall blooming anemones and anemone blanda, but now I see the possibilities. Thank you so much for taking the time.

And there are never too many! The stuff in my yard is bland by comparison.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2012
5:58 AM

Post #9049896

woodspirit - I didn't try cuttings. I also know for sure I didn't pay that price for them. More likely it was around $5.00.

What fantastic photos! Weerobin - you're an inspiration for all of us.

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
6:08 AM

Post #9049908

One of these days I'm going to drive to St Louis just to peruse that beautiful garden!!!
rouge21

(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #9049950

[quote="Weerobin"]#1. Anemone blanda. Brilliant blue really stands out against dried leaves of winter.
[/quote]

I am really late getting into the game ie having 'Anemone Blanda' in my garden. But last fall I planted tons of them and so I am hoping I see these beautiful flowers this spring...only green tips thus far in my zone 5b.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 20, 2012
7:50 AM

Post #9050007

Weerobin - keep those photos coming! That 'George Baker' Corydalis is amazing. I think my current favs here are the Hepatica and Epimedium. Always keeping an eye on them for the first flowers. The former has been blooming for the past week and the Epimedium buds should be opening today with all of the warm weather up here. I think the various phlox might be blooming by the end of the week.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2012
8:57 AM

Post #9050107

woodspirit - I found this page on seeds for the Fusion impatiens. Lots of good photos! I would guess they can be rooted easily since they're grown from seed but I may be wrong.

http://www.google.com/search?tbm=isch&hl=en&source=hp&biw=1003&bih=486&q=fusion+impatiens+seeds&gbv=2&oq=fusion+impatiens&aq=1S&aqi=g1g-S1&aql=&gs_sm=1&gs_upl=2422l7281l0l14906l16l10l0l0l0l0l1531l3204l4-1.7-1.1l3l0&gs_l=img.1.1.0j0i24.2422l7281l0l14906l16l10l0l0l0l0l1531l3204l4-1j7-1j1l3l0.frgbld.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 20, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9050159

I loooove wildflowers, and yours are wonderful, Weerobin! Thanks for sharing them. I am so excited every spring when our woods come alive with the wildflowers. I hate that some don't stick around long, though.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2012
10:09 AM

Post #9050192

These aren't wild, but seem to like shade. They grow in a little rock garden close to my pond. Can anyone I.D. them?
pirl, thank you so much.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 20, 2012
10:10 AM

Post #9050196

i guess you need the picture...

Thumbnail by woodspirit1   Thumbnail by woodspirit1
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rouge21

(Zone 5b)

March 20, 2012
10:18 AM

Post #9050203

[quote="pirl"]Just found the impatiens again (online) at a local nursery and the description said it grows to 2' in the garden. I'll have to buy it again.
[/quote]

Last summer was the first time for me growing Fusion Gold Yellow Exotic Impatiens. I so hope I can find it again as it looked so cool in my garden...a very unique impatiens and not easily found in nurseries (at least not in my neck of the woods) and so not often seen in residential gardens .


This message was edited Mar 20, 2012 9:44 PM
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 20, 2012
1:22 PM

Post #9050374

wood - Hmm - could that be Veronica 'Waterperry'? I can't get close enough to the flowers but those are cute!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 21, 2012
3:11 AM

Post #9051040

Woodspirit, the 1st pix is veronica georgia blue, which looks like your plant?
Georgia Blue hugs the ground and spills out nicely between rocks, as in your picture.
But it needs at least half sun, at least around here.

Thanks for the comments guys, but you've definitely got me wrong!
You'll notice you never see a full 'garden' picture of my yard, just individual plants.
From the street, my yard looks like the woods everywhere else.
I have to get vicarious enjoyment of the real gardens of other DG'ers.
They're the real gardeners. (You know who you are...)
As for me, I have 2 acres of wooded property here in suburbia.
So naturally I focus on woodland plants which of course aren't as well known.
In the spring, they're often ephemerals which as KyWoods notes don't hang around long.
Which is why this time of year, you'll find me crawling around on hands & knees with a camera.
Here's a few more from last weekend.
#1 is the veronica peduncularis Georgia Blue, mentioned above. Full bloom right now!
#2 is a spring flowering bulb which looks great in the woods, chionodoxa.
#3 is an ephemeral corydalis, corydalis stenantha. It's really little (few inches).

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 21, 2012
3:16 AM

Post #9051041

#1 is another woodland anemone, anemone x seemannii. It spreads nicely for form a woodland ground cover.
#2 is epimedium omeiense. Big purple spiders hovering over the low foliage.
#3 are my virginia bluebells just getting ready - should be in full throttle next weekend!

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 21, 2012
3:24 AM

Post #9051042

#1 is one of my cutest little trilliums. It's called trillium pusillum. Its only about 2 inches tall. It's supposed to spread to form a colony, but this is only his second year, so no significant spread yet. I think he's adorable!
#2 anemonella thalictroides. There are lots of named cultivars with spectacular blooms, but this is the straight species - a volunteer. I think it's pretty in it's own right.
#3 is leucojum which also does nicely in the woods in a damp spot, as opposed to other bulbs which can be fussy about drainage.
That's all for this past weekend.
I hope to have more pix of what's happening in my woods next weekend,
unless it's a rainout!

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 21, 2012
3:50 AM

Post #9051052

What gorgeous pictures Wee!! Have you been outside crawling around in the dirt already this morning!? =)
I love the Anemones and Corydalis (I love Anemones anyway), I bet they look really great together! =)
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 21, 2012
5:06 AM

Post #9051086

You are an early bird. And the pictures are beautiful!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 21, 2012
5:40 AM

Post #9051120

Love your plants and photos, Wee.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 21, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9051248

Wee. you definitely tend toward cool colors. My absolute favorites - the blues and mauves, but you throw in yellow and I go with pink - but there are exceptions.

I just replanted the Deutzia Chardonnay Pearls from my house. Pic 1 is how it looks now.

Pic 2 shows how it will look in a few weeks.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack
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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 21, 2012
7:16 AM

Post #9051256

Gorgeous plants! The Epimedium is impressive. Were you flat on the ground for that shot? I'm a big fan of Anemonella as well. My little colony is rebuilding itself after having been dug up to get to the house foundation a while back. Have it planted near Jeffersonia diphylla which has the neatest seed pods but the flowers only lasted about a week with all of the warmth here. I think maybe the Leucojum is a little more forgiving in terms of siting. Most of mine are in dry spots just above a slope and bloom reliably. I was surprised to see them out so early here.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 21, 2012
7:18 AM

Post #9051261

Donna - 'Chardonnay Pearls' is one of my favorites. I'm seeing flower buds already. Hmmm - what's going to be left to bloom in May???
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 21, 2012
7:22 AM

Post #9051265

True, most of the May blooms are sun loving plants - peonies, tulips, roses.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 21, 2012
7:36 AM

Post #9051278

Crumbs - one of my roses - I think 'Lavender Lassie' - already has a few small buds. I just cut it back two weeks ago. DH was asking me what I'm going to do when we get a frost (since it's only March). He suggested going down to the dollar store to stock up on cheap sheets. I don't even want to think about that.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 21, 2012
8:23 AM

Post #9051326

If it's in the ground it may be fine. I learned years ago that if I take my container roses out and they leaf out, I can kiss them goodbye if there is a frost.

My roses in the ground are leafing out, not budding, and I don't dare prune them. The day after I do the temperature will fall to 20.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 21, 2012
12:29 PM

Post #9051570

Same here, mine are badly in need of pruning, and it's been in the 80's here lately. It's soooo tempting, but scary.
I love those wildflowers--I absolutely have to get some of that last one in WeeRobin's photos! We have the red trillium, and the anemone in our woods.

woodspirit1

woodspirit1
Lake Toxaway, NC
(Zone 7a)

March 21, 2012
4:34 PM

Post #9051890

I'm sure it is Veronica Georgia Blue. I remember the name now. It is getting leggy and has longish stolons. Should I cut them off, or replant the whole thing. They are in a very narrow pocket in a rock garden.
This is my trollius, bloom early. It is not as tall as the information I've found and this is its first good year. I do not know what ph it prefers although I'd guess acidic, nor if it should be fertilized. I do know it doesn't like it dry and grow well above creeks and ponds.

Thumbnail by woodspirit1
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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 21, 2012
5:40 PM

Post #9051979

wood - I've always been tempted by Trollius. Yours are beautiful!
I clean up my roses at leaf break since I don't cut them back for winter.
mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2012
9:26 AM

Post #9052722

[quote="DonnaMack"] I just replanted the Deutzia Chardonnay Pearls from my house.[/quote]

I got two a Deutzias 4 years on the clearence rack at lowes. I didn't and don't know much about these plants but the tag read part shade so in my woodland garden they went. They are great now should I do anything to them in the way of pruning? In passed years I cut them back to the ground when they went dormant but last fall I left them be. I see that they are leafing out on old wood now.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2012
10:41 AM

Post #9052815

I have never cut them to the ground. They are fully hardy in my rather cold zone. I just let them start leafing out and then cut the old wood. Here is what the deal wood looks like - you can see it at the tips. I'm glad you wrote this now because I was just about to prune it.

I was moving, so I actually put the whole plant in a pot and kept it in my garage over the winter.

The second picture is from last May of 2010. You'll see a bit of dead wood on the left.

Unless they are so overgrown that they are scraggly and need renewal pruning, you probably can just prune them rather than cutting them to the ground. They will bloom earlier.

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack
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mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2012
11:01 AM

Post #9052839

Not a great picture but here are my blooms from last year. Any idea what variety? Should I prune after they bloom or as they're leafing out?

Thumbnail by mccaine
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nutsaboutnature
Algonquin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2012
1:16 PM

Post #9053008

Hi everybody!

Before I go any farther I have to say WOW. . . I mean WOW!! Weerobin your blooms are just absolutely beautiful. To repeat DonnaMack, your photos are truly inspirational.

And the rest of you that have posted pics as well, Thank You! I have sooo much shade and many of those plants never crossed my mind. Some I've not even heard of.

The Yellow Impatiens sounded interesting so I searched a bit. There's a nursery that sells the JUNGLE GOLD seeds (they're listed in Garden Watchdog) called SWALLOWTAIL GARDEN SEEDS. I looked them up and they do have a few negatives here & there so you'll have to read the feedback & make your own decision, but most seems to be positive.

This link doesn't hit in exactly the right place. You'll have to click on the Jungle Gold link then scroll back up to the picture or you can forget about the link and just scroll down. They're near the bottom of the page.

http://www.swallowtailgardenseeds.com/annuals/impatiens.html#
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2012
1:56 PM

Post #9053050

Wow, that's beautiful. MUCH more so than mine. It looks like a deutzia scabra. Very much like their Cosall Pink. Here is an image at White Flower Farm:

http://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/61601-product.html?utm_source=rkgkeywords&utm_medium=ppc&utm_campaign=2011%2B11%2B01&utm_term=

The advise an annual light pruning, which is what I do once I spot dead wood. As you can see from my pic, I didn't catch all of it.

The Missouri Botanical Garden advises pruning after blooming. That way you don't lose the blooms.

http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plant-details/kc/v570/deutzia-scabra-codsall-pink.aspx

You have a very special plant!
rouge21

(Zone 5b)

March 22, 2012
2:34 PM

Post #9053099

Here is one of my "King's Ransom" Brunnera that has come up this past week. It is so cool to see that the leaves are exact miniatures of what is to come in a month or so. I have put a penny coin nearby to better see how small but perfectly formed is each leaf.

(I actually like the design and colour of "Jack Frost" better)

Thumbnail by rouge21
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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 22, 2012
3:30 PM

Post #9053161

OOO - like the 'King's Ransom'. Might have to add that to my "want" list.
I killed 'Jack Frost' last year. Brought it home from the nursery and it went downhill from there. Same with a pricey Heuchera, same nursery. I like an old white-edged variety - exact name unknown, maybe 'Dawson's White'. It shows up more in my shade.
I generally prune Deutzia after blooming (unless its obviously dead wood) since they bloom so early.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 22, 2012
5:00 PM

Post #9053240

Cindy, we treat our Deutzias the same way.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 22, 2012
6:49 PM

Post #9053391

That 'Codsall Pink' sure is pretty. I have D.x. 'Magician' as well as D. gracilis (?) 'Nikko' (I think). The 'Magician' is much taller and grows fast - up to 6' if I let it.
mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2012
7:14 PM

Post #9053434

Thanks to Donna and Cindy who helped me with the deutzias. I keep my tags and the Lowes tag says it's a "Pink Minor." It's happy but leggy because I didn't know what to do with it. Now that I know how to tend to it, my little $5 clearance orphans should be quite happy.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 22, 2012
7:25 PM

Post #9053446

CindyMzone5, are deutzias blooming now for you? Hmmm, way too early for yours? Mine too, and they both blooming at the same time?. The weather has lots to do with all these early blooms, doesn't it?

One of my fav. woodland blooms this time of year. Native decidous Azaleas. I finally have a few in the garden, yeah! The blue blooms in front is some sort of squills I think.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
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mccaine
Wilmington, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 22, 2012
7:34 PM

Post #9053455

No, mine aren't blooming, just leafing out. It wouldn't surprise me if they bloom soon, though.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2012
1:53 AM

Post #9053582

Mcccaine, you are welcome. And nutsabout nature, thanks for the kind words.

Lilylove, that native azalea is really lovely. It never occurred to me that there was such a thing. It has a really refreshing, delicate beauty.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2012
2:43 AM

Post #9053588

Lilylove, OH what a wonderful Azalea!! DonnaMack described it perfectly, "refreshing, delicate beauty", AMEN to that! What are the little blue blooms in the background to the left? Those are really pretty as well! =)
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 23, 2012
4:06 AM

Post #9053621

Mccaine, I have what I think is deutzia Codsall Pink, but I don't remember for sure.
Mine is in a wooded setting so mostly shade, but still blooms pretty nicely.
I'm sure not as much as in more sun.
But I think the shady situation blanched the pink out of the flowers.
You can see a little pink on the outside of the buds only.
It grows rambunctiously, as you can see from the picture.
I have hacked at it from the front to keep it from swallowing up the path.
But maybe I'll prune it more aggressively this year.
It's getting out of control!
I also have deutzias Nikko and Magicien, both of which bloom fine in shady situations.

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speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2012
4:07 AM

Post #9053624

WOW Wee, how spectacular!!!! Now I want some!!!! =)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2012
4:59 AM

Post #9053659

Whoa! Weerobin, I had no idea deutzias are so varied, and diversified! Some beauty. When I moved here, the previous owner had those in the front yard, I promptly moved them in the backyard for I wanted a more colorful front of the border. Mine, are diminutive in forms and has tiny white blooms.

Speediebean, the blue bell-like flowers are some sort of seberian squill I do think. I planted them in my small shade garden to the sideyard, and I've found them scattered in various places, which I love for those unlikely place where they pop up has poor soil condition. I think but not sure; squirrels may have stolen the bulbs and hid them where the plant germinated and flourished. I love those kind of "invasiveness" lol

Donna, here is an example of the native Azaleas. http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/136324/ They're extensively hybridized and available in the market. I felt in love with this type of flowers years ago. Has a neighbor that has a hedge of them in the backyard. Only she "whacked" them off in wrong time of the year, and some spring I wanted to cry for all the flowers were inadvertently sheered off.

Another neighbor has this lovely pink blooming one;

I'd be so tickled that I personally introduce these lovely Azaleas to some of you. ~grin.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 23, 2012
5:34 AM

Post #9053703

Wee, now you're talking! I do think you have Codsall Pink. I had never HEARD of it. My Chardonnay was a gift but I think I love yours even more.

Speedie, we have to get together and do a raid of Lilylove's and Weerobins gardens. We can split the native azaleas and deutzias, and see what else we can pick up!

Changed because I wrote hydrangeas when I meant azaleas! Still want to swipe them!

This message was edited Apr 3, 2012 7:57 AM

postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 23, 2012
6:18 AM

Post #9053748

[quote="DonnaMack"]Wee, now you're talking! I do think you have Codsall Pink. I had never HEARD of it. My Chardonnay was a gift but I think I love yours even more.

Speedie, we have to get together and do a raid of Lilylove's and Weerobins gardens. We can split the native hydrangeas and deutzias, and see what else we can pick up![/quote]

Pick me up on the way!!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2012
6:36 AM

Post #9053767

Y'all common down. lol

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2012
6:48 AM

Post #9053782

Here is the mentioned shady garden. It's small, but it's like hidden Gems. Here the Seberian squills that are waxing and wanning. Giving rooms to other shady blooms such as False Solomon Seals and Tricirtas (?sp) and hostas and such. I planned on adding some more colorful impatiens (annuals) to this area, let's hear/see some thought about this? Columbines will do well here too. I've a double blooming columbine awaiting bloom soon in the bed.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 23, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #9053790

Close up view;

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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 23, 2012
7:09 AM

Post #9053813

Alright all you shade nuts, take a look at this and tell me what it is.

http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1248296/


Doug
dawnsharon2001
New York, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 24, 2012
11:40 AM

Post #9055300

Weerobin, that white viola with birdsfoot-like leaves is a volunteer?

| #2. A volunteer viola which has reseeded throughout the woodland.

And its progeny look the same? What can I offer you in return for some seeds when they form?

The Cradle of Aviation museum here on Long Island makes a point of including the V. pedata of the Hempstead Plains, which throve in the same miniature prairie landscape that nurtured airplane development. I have a link to a recent picture: http://nyfablog.org/2010/04/23/birds-foot-violet-on-long-island/ I don't know if this white violet is the same species (there are other violets with that kind of foliage, aren't there?) but it's sumptuous.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2012
4:14 PM

Post #9055599

Donna, I'm donning my black garb and cat-burglar face mask as we speak, will be ready to raid in just a second. =)

Lily, my opinion on your lovely shady garden area is a "no" to the brightly coloured impatiens. The whole setting is serene and peaceful and hushed; it veritably whispers to one, so calming and peaceful. Adding anything too brightly coloured would be like
HIIIIII!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Ya don't really wanna get YELLED AT when you stroll through there, do ya? ;) Just my opinion. Maybe some gentle subdued pastel yellows and pinks and blues? Again, just one little Pollack's opinion. =)

Ok, so y'all know that I've had this plan to buy/make some stair-step thingies for my soon-to-be backyard shady garden area, right? So, I get home from work yesterday and I immediately smell the Heavenly aroma of LUMBER(!!) wafting up from downstairs. "Huh??", I say to myself. I hear DH (emphasis on the "D") holler up to me from the basement, "Hey Dear!"... down I ran. What greeted me was him just finishing putting this together! The first of two, he surprised me by stopping at Home Despot to buy the lumber and nails and get started on it since I worked late yesterday. Is he a DARLING or what!?!?!? < =D Gonna start on the sanding tomorrow, then it's gonna get a natural stain (to match the deck) coating, then a clear weather-proof/UV protection coating. Then it'll be ready for the great outdoors! =)

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 24, 2012
5:37 PM

Post #9055682

speediebean, I sincerely appreciate your input on my little garden. Whoa! Now what should I do with a flat of bright red, double blooming inpatiens that I just purchased yesterday? Just kidding. I'll manage, for I am 100% with your wonderful thought. I'll need to give the place a little manicure work, tweak it a bit, and sit back and enjoy the small hidden garden. And about the bench! Bravo! [quote] DARLING or what!??? [/quote] That is a DDD (Definitely Darling on the Double). Just wait until it's sanded, then a natural stain, and then a clear weather-proof/UV protection coating. Man, oh man that's going to be fabulous!

Doug, I have no clue as to what's the plant in question. But, am open to learn new info.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 24, 2012
5:39 PM

Post #9055684

Lily - My Deutzias all have buds but they haven't opened yet. It did turn cooler today so I hope that slows things down a bit. Your garden setting reminds me a bit of my own from the photos. Azaleas here haven't bloomed yet but that's okay.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 24, 2012
7:57 PM

Post #9055839

Ooo, lucky you, speedie!! Congrats!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 25, 2012
5:31 AM

Post #9056051

Thank you thank you, yes, he truly is a double-triple Darling. :) Need to get outta here very shortly to get downstairs and get to work... errr, get to FUN on that. :) Got a few things down there to get to, some new seeds to pot up and my attempts at lettuces from store-bought ends need to be tossed, they never did root. =/ Oh well, it was fun to try. :)

I've GOT to remember to wander the beds and check out the Deutzias at work, to see if they're budding yet. I bet they are! =)
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 25, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9056083

Oh, Speedie, what a lovely man! He's a keeper.

And Lily, dear, speedie has forthrightly said what I am thinking. Impatiens would perhaps not go well with the quiet beauty of your yard.

OK, I'll admit it - I hate them. Lots of people in my old neighborhood had them. Red and hot pink. And in your beautifully natralized setting, they look comparatively artificial.

Always listen to speedie - great instincts there.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 25, 2012
6:47 AM

Post #9056136

^_^ Thanks Donna.

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speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 26, 2012
2:12 AM

Post #9057111

Aaaaaw shucks Donna, gee thanks! ^_^ Please, don't **always** listen to me, I have PLENTY of Polish moments where it's better to just ignore me, trust me! =) But I agree, the Impatiens would not look quite right in Lily's beautiful peaceful setting there. While I rather like them (a lot), and they'll certainly look right at home in lots of places, Lily's naturalized woodland setting is not one of those places.

Lily, we'll just talk about you, hope you don't mind, heehee. When I saw that last pic you posted, "Aaaaaw how SWEET!!" was my first instinctive response. What a LOVELY picture!!! Your whole "secret garden" setting makes me want to show up with a blankie and a book and spend the afternoon reading and napping, aaaaah! =)

Oh, and yes, I agree, my little Triple-DH certainly is a keeper! =) He's got this habit... see, I LOVE tea, the iced variety. Every Friday, he stops off on the way home from work and scours the shelves of the 7-11's or whatever grocery store that catches his eye, to find me a new and exciting tea flavour, or sometimes it's just my favourite old faithful Peach flavour. There's always some sort of treat waiting for me every Friday afternoon when I come home from work. Well, this time he decided to up the ante on my "Friday Treat"! (along with the Snapple Peach tea that was waiting in the fridge!) ^_^

... heh heh, my 6' 81/2"-tall 250-pound "little" DH. HAHAHAHAAA!!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 26, 2012
7:13 AM

Post #9057364

Having purchased hundreds of flats of impatiens over the years with different color schemes in mind, I have to admit that when it comes to the second half of summer when most of my shade-lovers are done blooming, the bright colors of the reds, hot pinks, orange and fuchsia really pop out from all of the greens. Normally, I don't "do" such bright colors but it can be a nice change from the lighter pastel colors.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 26, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9057399

I tend to use impatiens balsamina, mirabilis jalapa, verbena bonariensis and nicotiana alata for the same effect. Effortless color.

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Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 26, 2012
8:27 AM

Post #9057439

[quote] Lily, we'll just talk about you...your "secret garden" setting makes me want to show up with a blankie and a book ...[/quote] . Tehehehe speediebean, here is a test...just a test. When you come with a book, will that be a hard-cover book or a kindle?

CindyM, I was inspired to lighten up some shaded area. Some of the annual impatiens just reseeded and brightened some shaded area in the garden where after Azaleas and Camellias finished blooming in the spring, there are not many thing else would thrive. I'm just now beginning to learn more about how to adapt to the shady garden, instead of up root and move to a sunnier locale. lol

Donna, that is very nice a setting. I like, I like.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 26, 2012
10:04 AM

Post #9057617

I should be getting a little more sun back into the shaded area this year after having two big oaks removed at the front of the house (dropping acorns on vehicles like crazy). I've used lots of impatiens in the past (they do reseed a bit but don't flower until late in the season), different coleus and Browallia (which I have to start from seed since they're hard to find). I do tend to have a lot of yellow foliage for brightening but, by July, it's just too much all-green for me. Some years I will go with more of a pastel look but I think it depends on my mood when I'm purchasing the annuals.
Donna - you must have a bit more sun than I do. I did start some nicotiana last year but they just sat there once I planted them out and didn't grow. Maybe too hot last summer. Had them in half-day sun with supplemental watering.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 26, 2012
10:43 AM

Post #9057701

Spot on Cindy, I think you think correctly that Donna may have more sun although in the termed shaded. For impatiens balsamina is known to be the sun-patiens. :) Though her combo is attractive. I like it all the same. It's difficult to define "shade" This seemingly shade area? Well, it's dappled sun. One of the most challenging area to plant. I have several woody hydrangeas that I thought they required shade planted here. As it turned out, after years of waiting, and waiting. I'm changing my way of thinking. lol

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 26, 2012
11:28 AM

Post #9057775

I showed a pic of impatiens balsamina in sun but I also have it in part shade. I just don't take as many pictures of it in shady locations because it doesn't "pop". I had a section of the yard that started all sun and transitions to mostly shade. I was amazed at some of the results. The alchemilla mollis was much happier with less light. Heuchera Firefly seemed pretty happy in either. So was polemonium, much to my surprise. But I was most surprised by alchemilla mollis and the peony Burma Joy. Burma Joy, early and single, blooms quite well in shade. I have moved it to the shady side of my yard and it is budding up very well.

I have sections that are quite shady with sunny sections only feet away. I may be (and probably am) underestimating the reflected light.

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CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 26, 2012
3:43 PM

Post #9058100

I never envisioned A.m. liking the shade. I think I remember always seeing it planted with roses and so thought "sun". I know after they bloom and into August, the leaves start browning up quite a bit to the point that I trim them off and there's not much left. Is the shade kinder to them?
Gorgeous peony! What a popper!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 26, 2012
5:31 PM

Post #9058269

In spring my ac was always very happy, but by mid-summer it was pretty dry, needed water, and seemed stressed. I plant it with heuchera and ferns, and it likes that much better. And they did much better as the shade in that area increased.

Burma Joy was a gift. It's so cool! All my other peonies were in bright sun on the south side of my house. This one was the only one on the north side, and it gets shaded out by smokebushes and crabapples. The fact that it is early, and a single, allows it to thrive in the shade.

This message was edited Mar 27, 2012 7:04 AM

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 26, 2012
5:59 PM

Post #9058318

Two of Donna's inspirational plants for me were Lilies and Baptisias. Here is my 'Purple smoke' that are coming up in my shady corner. Donna, how are yours coming along this time of year?

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
2:35 AM

Post #9058706

Donna, your peony is beautiful! I love the singles.
I have been growing species peonies because they tolerate shade better.
In fact, some require partial shade or woodland conditions.
But I didn't know you could grow some of the cultivars in partial shade.
It looks very happy!

This is one of my peonies species blooming this past weekend.
This is paeonia wittmanniana.

I've got a couple other species all budded up ready to pop.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
2:43 AM

Post #9058708

Here are a few other flowers blooming in the woods this past weekend.

#1. Take a look at these wild asarum flowers! I'm embarrassed to admit I've never noticed them before. They're huge! I lost the tag, but pictures on line look like asarum maximum. But it's not supposed to be quite hardy for me, so I'm not really sure. But the flowers are wild.

#2. My double bloodroot. Always spectacular.
#3. The nearly black hood on arisaema mayebarae looks eerie when backlit by the sun.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
2:50 AM

Post #9058709

#1. This is an odd-looking hepatica. My first year with it, so I didn't know what to expect. I think it's cute.
#2. Chloranthus japonica. A small woodland perennial with cute white flowers in spring.
#3. Pasque flower. This isn't in the woods - it's in one of the few patches of sun I have.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
2:55 AM

Post #9058710

Finally, a few more common shade-loving plants.
#1. A pretty hellebore. Seems like it blooms forever.
#2. Epimedium x rubrum Sweetheart. The back of the flowers is prettier than the fronts.
#3. Pulmonaria.

That's it for this weekend.

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Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
2:57 AM

Post #9058712

Cindy, is this the brunnera you mentioned? This is Dawson White.
Just started blooming.

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DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 27, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9058825

Lilly,

I was forced to give up my huge baps because I could not get any of the 5 I have out of the ground - they were too mature. BUT - I was trading heuchera Firefly with someone who had baps in pots and gave me two. One is now in the ground, happily sprouted. The second is still in its pot, but I will find a place for it. Will baps grow in shade?! The first one is in a sunny location on the south side of my house. I have given it company with Rose Heritage, which I purchased last year from Pickering, put in a self watering pot, moved to the ground a few days ago (all five feet of it!) plus a japanese variegated Kerria, Mt. Hood daffodils, and two peonies. If I can grow the second bap in some shade, my problem will be solved.

Weerobin,
The peony was a gift from Steve/FortWorth now Steve/Indy. I had never grown singles, but I fell in love. It has gone from shade at the old house to shade at the new. It is budded out and will perform better than ever. It taught me about the level of abuse a peony can take. I dug it up in April of 2011 and put it in a pot. It bloomed. Then, in December (a mild one) I put the contents of the pot into the ground. No, you are not supposed to move peonies in the spring or plant hem in December, but I actually did that with about half a dozen of them and they are all leafing out.

And double bloodroot. It's been on my wish list for years!

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 27, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #9058839

Donna, by experience. I've seen Baps. perform excellent in full sun. In my dappled shade garden. They are somewhat, okay, with the exception of the cultivar 'Purple Smoke'. These outshine my species babs anyday in my small, shady garden.

Weerobin, those woodlands you listed are gorgeous!!!! I tried a several brunneras in the garden, none have survived!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 27, 2012
6:28 AM

Post #9058852

Lily - That photo of yours shows such a sweet spot to lounge anytime of day!
Donna - I'll have to try a piece of my Alchemilla in a shadier spot here.
Weerobin - As always, your photos are inspirational. Checking photos, I think I killed 'Dawson's White' but instead have 'Variegata'. My variegation isn't quite so pronounced. Those Asarum flowers are huge! Love the Hepatica but then I'm partial to them. And darn it - meant to order some Pasque flowers this year. Still can't bring myself to buy the double bloodroot as I'm afraid I'll kill it. Wow - are those the hellebores that you posted a month ago???
My Munchkin order is enroute and I'm excited to get the Spigella marilandica. Do I have a spot picked out for it? Heck, no. Also coming is Corydalis 'Berry Exciting' and Phlox 'Manita'.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 27, 2012
6:38 AM

Post #9058876

Thanks, Cindy. Here is my mentioned cultivar baps. last spring, Donna.
Kim

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postmandug

postmandug
Bardstown, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 27, 2012
6:40 AM

Post #9058879

Donna, have you tried Munchkin for Double Bloodroot? I know Gene carries them some years.
rouge21

(Zone 5b)

March 27, 2012
7:02 AM

Post #9058901

[quote="DonnaMack"]Lilly,

I was forced to give up my huge baps because I could not get any of the 5 I have out of the ground - they were too mature.[/quote]

I know this it getting off topic as I dont believe Baptisia thrive in shade but have people seen these newer Baptisia cultivars? They are advertised as being more compact and more floriferous than other Baps

http://www.pwcertified.com/pwcommon/files/pdf/baptisia-dutch-chocolate.pdf

http://www.pwcertified.com/pwcommon/files/pdf/baptisia-blueberry-sundae.pdf

http://www.pwcertified.com/pwcommon/files/pdf/baptisia-lemon-meringue.pdf
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 27, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9058916

I planted my first (common) Baptisia next to a small tree that proceeded to grow 50' tall so the plant was in almost total shade, receiving only morning sun and it thrived. Last year's hurricane eliminated the tree so we'll see how it does in sun now. The easiest way to get young plants is to dig from the outside edges of the mother plant.I've done that successfully. Baptisias tend to develop large tap roots rendering them difficult to impossible to remove. I do have another, Twilight Prairieblues, that has been planted in mostly sun but hasn't yet flowered.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 27, 2012
8:08 AM

Post #9058980

Lily, Cindy, and Rouge, thank you all so much for the bap info and suggestions. I do think that I will put the second in a sunny location.

To give you an idea of size, here are two of the five last year.

And a third three years ago, against the house, slowly being shaded out by a lilac.

One of my favorite uses for baps is hiding thick lily stems, like those of Silk Road.

Now you see them (not pretty!)

Now you don't!

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click an image for an enlarged view.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 28, 2012
3:22 AM

Post #9060028

WOW you guys, you have GOT to stop sharing all these GORGEOUS photos 'cause I'm NEVER gonna be able to bring home a paycheck!!!! < =D (adding Baptistia to my shopping list now...) (... Oooooh DH is gonna disown me sooo bad!!...)
rouge21

(Zone 5b)

March 28, 2012
5:05 AM

Post #9060069

I have wanted to add a Bap to my garden but space is at a bit of a premium and is it not the case that their period of bloom in relatively short?
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 28, 2012
5:51 AM

Post #9060124

Yes, it is short but the seed heads are quite nice. They turn black and are interesting.

Thumbnail by pirl
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2012
5:57 AM

Post #9060131

Rogue, you have a good point. In many ways baps are like small shrubs that bloom, like lilacs and viburnum carlesis, for a relatively short time. But the foliage is really quite lovely, and they require absolutely no care. They are exceptionally drought tolerant - I never water mine - and they fix their own nitrogen, so they require no fertilizer. In fact, you should never fertilize them.

I use them to fill in spaces. Actually, I loved them so much that I looked for areas that needed coverage. I would not recommend them as foundation plants. There are people in my community who use them that way and it doesn't work. During the winter they fall apart and in spring you cut them back. Rather like ornamental grasses. Sunny spaces are at a premium in my new yard so I had to choose just two from the palette of miscanthus that I used to grow and chose Adagio, which is relatively short.

But they are spectacular!!!!! No care, nice structure, lovely flowers, attractive structure. And I'm not always practical.

I think of them as being like amsonia or dictamnus. I was looking at all three and frankly thought there was no comparison. They will take your breath away!
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2012
6:06 AM

Post #9060138

Oh, and postman - Munchkin! I love that place. I ordered bloodroot from them years ago and it thrived. It's at my old house. I had ordered some from another company two years before. When I dug them up to add his, Gene's plants were bigger than the ones that had been in for two years. And athyrium nipponicum 'Ursula' s Red'. And Baneberry. I actually get his newsletter. If he shipped shrubs I would order them from him. FYI, if you want incredible shrubs look at Plant and Gnome. 35 reviews on Dave's Garden - 34 positive and one neutral. I just got 3 three foot hydrangea querquefolia Snow Queens for $70, and that includes shipping via FX. Forest Farm quality plants at bargain basement prices:

http://davesgarden.com/products/gwd/c/2494/

The multiplexes were just so expensive. I was concerned about that particular plant taking a hike!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 28, 2012
7:11 AM

Post #9060217

Oh gosh - another website to drool over. Donna, have you noticed any issues with their plants coming out of the winter? Just wondering because of having been grown in a warmer climate and then the shock of a midwestern winter.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2012
7:23 AM

Post #9060232

Cindy,

Surprisingly, no. Chris (the Chief Executive Gnome) takes this into consideration. He asked if he could ship the plants in Mid March, and I said yes. He tends to ship in March or April (and will negotiate this) so that the plants I have had in the past had several months to acclimate. And the plants have been hardy in our zone. The previous plants have done very well - I have NEVER lost one of his.

It's like Antique Rose Emporium. Their plants are raised in Texas. I would ask for shipping in April, they would bloom in June, and have been rocking out for years.

He is incredible - you can actually get him on the phone. He actually responds quickly to emails. It's a very small operation. High quality small companies, like Plant and Gnome and Munchkin, have become some of my favorites.

I forgot to mention that the box with the hydrangeas weighed a ton. How he arranged $10 shipping via Fedex is a mystery to me. And the plants were very securely wrapped. My biggest problem was getting a VERY HEAVY box to the back yard. I gasped at the size of the plants.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 28, 2012
2:30 PM

Post #9060800

I loved shopping at ForestFarm but the shipping just got too prohibitive. Finding good nurseries east of the Miss is always a good thing.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 28, 2012
2:41 PM

Post #9060817

Bluestones new prices and sizes actually drove me back to Forest Farm, where I placed an order for perennials. They do something very interesting now. As you are placing an order, they give you feedback on how many more plants you can get into a container. I was placing an order and they noted that I could get x number of tubes or x number of size 1 plants into a container for no higher shipping cost. Of course I was encouraged to put more plants into the box, but I know they will be super, and many of them cost less than Bluestone, which has tripled its prices, and since there are no more shipping peanuts, there is also no free shipping.

I always like to drive to Milaegers in Racine, but I have moved further away, and gas is $4.00 plus dollars a gallon.

By the way, I have purchases oakleaf hydrangeas at Forest Farm, and Chris' at Plant and Gnome are just as big, if not bigger!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
3:58 AM

Post #9061446

[quote="Lily_love"] . Tehehehe speediebean, here is a test...just a test. When you come with a book, will that be a hard-cover book or a kindle?

[/quote]

Oooops, I forgot that I wanted to reply to this! I'll have a real-live hard copy of a good Stephen King thriller, of course! A beautiful setting like yours **demands** only the BEST of reading material.
< =D

CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 29, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #9061603

I've noticed that Bluestone is more often not offering plants in 3's the way they used to. Now it's becoming more single plants that are higher-priced. Always thought in the past that BS was a great place to get a new garden planted at a reasonable price.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
7:07 AM

Post #9061622

speediebean, you're in. lol Thanks for the response.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
7:15 AM

Post #9061631

On my way with my pic-i-nic basket full of goodies to share, thank you. =)

Cindy, I have never done any by-mail ordering for plants (or seeds, for that matter), but I've been seriously thinking about it. Thank you for the note about Bluestone, I'll be sure to remember to *not* order from there when the time comes. My budget thanks you, too. :)
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2012
7:21 AM

Post #9061644

Always check Garden Watchdog before you order so you can see the experience of others.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9061650

Oh, I'd forgotten about that, thank you Pirl! =)
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #9061656

Some companies that had good reputations years ago have fallen in stature, satisfaction and their attitude towards customers.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
7:34 AM

Post #9061668

I haven't had many good experience with mail order when it comes to gardening. I once ordered some seeds, the seeds arrived damaged, I wrote to the company and they asked that I send the damaged seeds back in order to get my refund. For the price and trouble of mailing the damaged junk? I've banded mail order from my existence.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2012
7:36 AM

Post #9061672

I've had more good experiences than bad, thankfully.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 29, 2012
7:52 AM

Post #9061693

Well, when the time comes that I finally decide to take the plunge, I'll be sure to check the watchdog and I'll ask y'all in here, too.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

March 29, 2012
7:56 AM

Post #9061696

Good idea!
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 29, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #9061831

I get most of my plants mail order. Frankly, I'm usually pleased.
In fact, the next couple weeks will be a frenzy of UPS/USPS trucks trundling up my driveway.
Opening the boxes is right up there with finding what Santa brought Christmas morning!
cathy166
Stamford, CT
(Zone 6b)

March 29, 2012
9:54 AM

Post #9061909

Just a note on the Baptisia. I treat mine horribly. It comes up reliably, and even sends a friend sometimes. Once it has bloomed and made its pods, it starts to get very bushy and wants to take over and steal the sunlight from my lilies. All in all, destroying the other blooming plants. The past 2 years I've been cutting it down once it wants to take over. Really cutting down and ignoring it, and it comes up again no matter what. Amsonia is more of a woody bush, and I try to cut that down also even with its sticky white sap. Not quite as pretty a Baptisia, but it has its benefits.

Thumbnail by cathy166
Click the image for an enlarged view.

DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 30, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9062951

I find that baps really need to be spaced pretty far from other plants from the time of planting, and another step I take is to scratch out the seedlings in spring.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 30, 2012
6:45 AM

Post #9062965

Received my Munchkin order the other day. The Corydalis 'Berry Exciting' is quite large and has flowers intact. The Phlox 'Manita' is on the small side but some of my named varieties aren't very full in the early spring either. I finally got my coveted Spigelia which is small but healthy. Now I just have to figure out where to plant the latter since I'm totally new to this plant.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2012
2:14 AM

Post #9063956

I received my Raulston Arboretum plants yesterday (I am a contributor). I am only entitled to 2 but they always give me extras because I am so far away that I don't get a lot of the benefits of belonging. I received a hydrangea angustipetala that was listed on a U.K. site for 1,995 pounds. And it's not available. It's very rare and grown from seed.The hydrangea scandens was 30 pounds, and they boast about growing both from seed. I was also given a variegated St. John's Wort and a pasque flower. The plants often have a twist, like the japanese vareigated kerria I received last year. It was a sport. A lot of the plants are sports that they then replicate. I just love nature's little twists. 3 of the four are shade plants. Very cool.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

March 31, 2012
2:40 AM

Post #9063960

I just realized that I have three sweet autumn clematis trained on the fence between me and my neighbors. I say these three plants and started pruning them. I realized that they were clematis. It is a sun partial shade spot. The ones in my old community were allowed to bunch up and look quite awful, but these have actually bee trained quite skillfully - vertically instead of randomly, so they don't bunch up - which is why I didn't recognize it.. I wouldn't have chosen it but it's nice to have. There is a sweet much older couple next door, and we chat over the clematis. They are clearly thrilled to have a neighbor who is a serious gardener and who is friendly.

It's funny. I moved here in December and I know most of my neighbors, but some people around me don't even know the names of people they have lived across the street from for 15 years. Excuse the phrase, but, what's up with that? I just said hello and introduced myself to everyone. The only person who won't speak to me is the wife of a very handsome Battalion Commander for the fire department. H's joined me on runs a couple of times, was kind enough to move a mountain of snow, and we always chat. But then, if my husband was the neighborhood stud muffin I would probably be wary of new females too!
rouge21

(Zone 5b)

March 31, 2012
5:09 AM

Post #9064016

[quote="CindyMzone5"]I finally got my coveted Spigelia which is small but healthy. Now I just have to figure out where to plant the latter since I'm totally new to this plant.[/quote]

Cindy take a look at this video to see what your small Spigelia will become...lucky you.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x7tzrkGN6ZM
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 31, 2012
7:27 AM

Post #9064173

Thanks for that link to the video. I've been roaming the backyard for the past couple days trying to figure out where to put the poor thing. The Corydalis and Phlox are easy to place but the Spigelia will take some thought (and moving of other plants).

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 31, 2012
3:19 PM

Post #9064587

Thank you Rouge for that video. I'd never heard of Spigelia before, so at first I was thinking it was a new hybrid combo of a Wigelia and Spirea, LOL!! < =D
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

March 31, 2012
5:16 PM

Post #9064758

I did some checking on it this afternoon and, while a native in IN, it's on the endangered list. I've never seen it before around here so maybe it's a good thing I purchased one.

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

April 3, 2012
10:50 PM

Post #9069035

Hi, I'm new to this thread.
I live in a California live oak forest. I have foxglove, rose campion, and brugmansias growing at the forest edge. You all have such great suggestions for shade plants but I have deer, gophers, and bunnies feasting nightly. Any suggestions for wildlife resistant plants? The shade natives here are mostly ferns.
This brings to mind the day my daughter brought my 2 year old grand-daughter out into my garden, she asked "is there anything poisonous out here?", I replyed if it's alive it's poisonous.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 4, 2012
11:57 AM

Post #9069736

LOL Good thinking, Dee. Welcome to the thread!
I have the same problems here, and have just discovered a new repellant product that actually works, and that you don't have to remember to reapply every time it rains. It's called "Deer Scram", and I bought it at our local nursery. I used it on pansies a couple of weeks ago, and so far, nobody's touched them! I never used to be able to keep pansies more than a couple of days or so, and gave up until this one last-ditch effort.
Heucheras are supposed to be deer resistant, but I caught a deer nibbling one the other day; I'll have to sprinkle some of the repellant on it. It even kept the kitties from digging in a freshly seeded container that they had previously dug in!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2012
12:38 PM

Post #9069783

To deer, and maybe other critters, it's supposed to smell like a dead deer and supposedly deer won't go where they sense a deer has been killed. Good luck.

This year our guy will be spraying with Deer Off. He has a different one he uses for winter. I'll report on how well it works (I hope and pray).
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 4, 2012
2:13 PM

Post #9069878

Ah, deer. We finished putting up the last bit of hopefully deer-deterring fencing this past week which now covers the 150 ft of back property line which borders on a wooded wetlands. It's 6 ft tall and yes, I know deer can manage an 8 ft fence but the only time I've seen them jump that high is when a crazy woman (me) is trying to chase them out of the garden. I think it will work to keep the casual browsers out. With plantings all along the back of the property, it's just too much to use deer-repelling products. I wish dead racoons would deter the live ones but it doesn't work that way with them.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 4, 2012
3:41 PM

Post #9069989

LOL Nope, they're a whole different story. In the past couple years, I have put river rocks (and larger!) in my beds and containers to keep the squirrels (and cats) from digging in them, but the racoons like to take out the rocks as they look under them for tasty tidbits. Grrrr...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 4, 2012
6:37 PM

Post #9070198

My neighbor has cats that she allows to roam free. I told her how tired I am of picking up after them but she still lets them out so I did the kind thing - I threw all seven mounds back on her property. Between the deer and the cats I'm quite peeved but this is a problem she is capable of doing something about, but she won't.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2012
3:12 AM

Post #9070419

Pirl, I've got a neighbor (or 2? or 3?), who do the same thing. I have found a couple o' few different cats wandering and nosing around in my beds out front, and have found their "leavings" on more than several occasions and can't for the life of me figure out HOW to deter them. Grrrr. I have no idea whom these cats belong to, or else I'd go have a friendly chat with them, so I'm left with just trying to figure out what to put out there that they don't like. We do sell "Deer Scram" at work, and while I don't have deer problems, I may just give it a try for the cats. This is an ongoing "yarden maintenance" issue for me. Any other suggestions I can try? Maybe some plants that they don't like? I'd GLADLY install new plants for this purpose! =)
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 5, 2012
4:08 AM

Post #9070440

Cindy, I'm going to do the same thing with deer fencing around the perimeter of my woods. I'm not going to attempt to fence the whole yard, because I don't think it's practical. But I figure if I can at least interrupt the deer highways, maybe they'll learn a different route.

I was out of town last weekend; I very much missed my yard survey.
Things change so quickly during the spring, I hate to miss anything.
But I did catch a picture of another woodland peony blooming at the edge of the woods by my driveway. This is paeonia rockii.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2012
4:57 AM

Post #9070471

Rockii Rocks! What a beauty.

How I wish I had a good answer about the cats. I do run after them and yell at them. That's the best I can do. I'm at the point of setting a Hav-A-Heart trap. Here's the best I could find for a cat repellent: http://www.havahart.com/advice/animal-repelling/repellent-guide Scroll down to see it as the top of the page looks blank when it appears. It still irks me that I should have to pay to either trap or repel cats because someone else is not responsible.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 5, 2012
5:59 AM

Post #9070521

In my former community the people who lived across the alley would let their cat out for hours. Because my yard had ornamental grasses, the cat would come and hide at the base of the grasses and attack and kill birds. It was heartbreaking seeing their remains. I spoke to my neighbors but they are idiots. Happily, in my former community there were ordinances about unleashed dogs and roaming cats. So I called the police. Who went to their door. And who told them that there was a $25 fine for every occurrence. It stopped.

Another time I was wandering around with a two gallon watering can and I come across a cat. I turned the entire can upside down on it. Never saw it again.

Mind you, I love cats. I grew up with them. I have two. One is sitting in my lap as I type. None of them was ever allowed outdoors, which is why several of them lived past the age of 20. Here is Sophie, who has taken over my seeding mat, but she also shares. How could you endanger such lovely creatures by leaving them outside to the mercy of the elements, while also allowing them to reel such havoc?

Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack   Thumbnail by DonnaMack
Click an image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #9070545

How sweet.

In the link I gave above it mentioned cats kill hundreds of thousands of birds each year. I feed birds so it's a dual issue for me.

My other point is that we don't walk our dog on her property so the responsible thing to do would be to keep it inside, as she does with her other cats and did for the first year with the problem cat. She also feeds a feral.

Another issue is that I'm afraid of slipping on the excrement, which the one cat does cover. A broken hip would not be fun for a gardener.

We've bought 52 bags of my favorite mulch, pine needles, in the past 10 days at $9.00 each. The cats seem to enjoy it tremendously but as the one scratches (to cover what it leaves) it is also digging through my lilies, seedlings, young plants and those newly emerging. I am tempted to give her my B & D Lily bill and ask her to pay me for what the cat has done. She incurs no expense allowing the cat to roam while we're left to pick up the bills. Furthermore, she and her husband are well equipped to handle the expense.

Sorry we got so off topic here.
cathy166
Stamford, CT
(Zone 6b)

April 5, 2012
6:39 AM

Post #9070563

And if her cat has not been altered, it is doing some other irrersponsible things.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2012
7:20 AM

Post #9070599

Her cat has been neutered but the feral cat certainly isn't.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 5, 2012
10:59 AM

Post #9070826

Ach! Idiot next door has started feeding the raccoons again this year. Found my poor new Spigelia dug up this morning. Must be too close to their path through my garden to climb the fence into neighbor's yard. For the past few years, I have to patrol all of my new plantings to replant them a couple of times before the raccoons leave them alone. What's worse is that the neighbors know DH has invested (and used) a pellet gun and they still continue to feed them. A very sore spot for me. I sympathize with having to clean up after straying animals. The 'coons get into neighbor's garbage and it gets strewn in my front yard. I do pick it up and put it into their fenced back yard. You'd think they'd get the hint by now.
It's going to be frosty here the next couple of nights and I hope the newly-emerged plants can take the cold.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2012
12:10 PM

Post #9070883

People who think they are doing a good thing by feeding wild animals are simply wrong. It makes the animals dependent on people for food instead of allowing the creatures to follow their natural instincts and hunt for the food they require.

Sorry about the raccoons and the mess they leave with the garbage. I'm especially sorry about the Spigelia since I know how much you wanted it.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 5, 2012
12:44 PM

Post #9070904

Cindy, you can protect your vulnerable newly planted pots by putting heavier flower pots (like terra cotta) upside down on them. I'm going to do that with my sprouted lilies.

I am very sorry about your Spigela.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2012
5:07 AM

Post #9071603

Oh Cindy, I'm so sorry to hear about your Spigelia!! Yes, these animal issues are a real nuisance, and the people who encourage their wayward behaviours should be ashamed of themselves. The sad part is, it's not the innocent animals' fault, it's the people who should know better, and a lot of the time, the innocent animals are the ones to pay for the human's ignorance. Tsk tsk!

Donna, what lovely pictures of your little feline babies!!

Pirl, thank you for that link to Hav-a-hart. I have tried Critter Ridder in the past with so-so results, but didn't realize that sometimes it can take more than one (or two) applications, so I will buy more and keep up the usage. We sell it at work, along with the Defence for rabbits, so I'll try that as well... since I have had rabbit nesting problems as well. I thought we carried the Deer Scram at work, but I was wrong, we just have the "Scram" for moles and voles. That's ok though, I'll just use the other 2.

Speaking of such things, I think I hear plants calling me! =) Hope y'all have a wonderful day today!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 6, 2012
6:33 AM

Post #9071709

Sorry - I did go off on a rant yesterday. I'll go check on the Spigelia and get a clay pot over it. Hope it will be okay for two days like that while I'm away.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2012
7:38 AM

Post #9071774

You were completely justified. And you are amongst friends here.

I put my lilies that are in the ground under pots yesterday. It's quite a bit warmer so I took them off and the babies look great.
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 6, 2012
9:09 AM

Post #9071871

The varmints dug up the Spigelia again last night. Grrrr. I replanted it and put a heavy terracotta pot over it and then sprinkled cayenne pepper all over it. Needless to say, the poor plant does not look too happy. If it pulls through this time, I'll be surprised. Time to start hunting.
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2012
9:11 AM

Post #9071873

Yes!!!!!!!!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 6, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #9071884

Oh pirl! You are an enabler. And just when I'm feeling guilty about thinking such things. :) I've never minded the occasional raccoon wandering through the yard but when the idiots continue to feed them and try to socialize them (by whistling - I call him the raccoon whisperer) and knowing that it's creating a problem for us that leads to hunting them, I get very angry over their selfishness. Oh - I could go on...
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 6, 2012
9:22 AM

Post #9071888

It's a shame people drive us to such lengths by their own actions.

How nice if he were the bird whistler instead. I love watching them feed and their antics of who goes first and who has to wait, who is the bully and those that prefer eating from the ground.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 6, 2012
10:56 AM

Post #9071975

Try freshly ground black pepper from a pepper grinder. Cayenne never worked for me (I'll never forget the squirrel sneezing, its face covered with cayenne, while it continued to eat my lily in a pot between sneezes!) But fresh black pepper repulses them, both in pots and in the ground. It really works for me.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 6, 2012
6:03 PM

Post #9072488

LOL, that must've been a very hungry squirrel!

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

April 6, 2012
6:54 PM

Post #9072548

I had a cat that kept "going" in my flower bed. I read somewhere that if you put in sticks every foot or so, inbetween the plants etc. that the cats didn't like having to negotiate the sticks to dig a hole and "go". Well it worked but I got tired of people asking me "what are all the sticks for?" It's kind of like in Summer when it gets dry here the deer get bold and come in the yard and eat my bushes and plants, so I put fencing circles around their favorites, my husband calls it my plant zoo. Guests ask about the cages too, I tell them it keeps the plants from running away. There is a sprinkler called the "Scarecrow" that does a pretty good job at frightening animals off, it is motion activated. I caught my daughter luring a neighbor child into the area the "Scarecrow" protected one day. LOL, that thing caught me in the head more than once!
pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 7, 2012
5:08 AM

Post #9072804

Love "keeps the plants from running away"! I do lay down some of that green vinyl wire fencing over hostas to keep the deer away. Yesterday I put a circle of it around their favorite azalea. It looks terrible after their feasting on it over the winter.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2012
6:16 AM

Post #9072854

I always wondered if the Scarecrow device worked. I always thought it would be fun to spray the idiot dogwalkers who would let their dogs come into my yard and do their business on my lilacs and hydrangeas.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 7, 2012
7:05 AM

Post #9072900

LOL Maybe that's what it was really invented for, but they just market it as a deer deterrent?
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2012
7:14 AM

Post #9072909

I love it!

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

April 7, 2012
8:48 AM

Post #9073027

It's also a pretty good husband deterrent LOL. he knows it's out there . . . somewhere.
I have four of them in various stages of repair. They work pretty good, no one wants to be hit with a high powered stream of water.
Maybe you could get some money with the pictures of the dog walkers being hit from "funniest home videos".

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

April 7, 2012
8:53 AM

Post #9073033

Check this out: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A5D3GKlTkpY
They have videos on You Tube.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 7, 2012
9:37 AM

Post #9073064

This is really cool!
CindyMzone5
Hobart, IN

April 9, 2012
6:31 AM

Post #9075176

Re: Deer Scram - over the weekend I listened to a podcast of the Dirt Doctor out of TX. Did you know that they make Armadillo Scram as well? Thought that was very interesting.
The "scarecrow" sounds promising and hilarious. Wonder if it'd work on raccoons?
Hmm - black pepper instead of cayenne - I'll have to try that.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2012
3:11 PM

Post #9075972

Donna, you crack me up!!! You sound JUST like me re: 'those idiot dog walkers', LOL!!!
Dee, thank you for sharing that youtube clip, now I'm thinking I may REALLY have to get one or two of those. I did get some goodies at work yesterday, so we'll see how it goes. I got Critter Ridder, VoleScram, and a bag of Espoma Soil Perfector. I figure I should be covered pretty well from several critters with all the junk I bought. =)

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2012
6:20 PM

Post #9076272

Here is to share my 'Purple Smoke' a baptisia in bloom.

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 9, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9076279

Another view;

Thumbnail by Lily_love
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

April 9, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9076337

Lily - how pretty!
I've been out in the garden taking bloom shots today too.
Then my husband went for a garden walk and located something or rather someone just a few feet from our back door, frightened and precarisely perched on the side of the house.

Thumbnail by Domehomedee   Thumbnail by Domehomedee   Thumbnail by Domehomedee
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Lily_love

Lily_love
Central, AL
(Zone 7b)

April 10, 2012
4:17 AM

Post #9076611

Dee, the un-invited guest does look frightened. Just hope it decided to go elsewhere very soon. lol. Your Lenten Roses are very nice.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2012
5:26 AM

Post #9076664

Domehomedee, have you seen the "cute little vole" posted recetly?

Mine were never so cute. And they never stood around waiting to be photographed!

Domehomedee

Domehomedee
Arroyo Grande, CA
(Zone 9a)

April 10, 2012
10:06 AM

Post #9077058

I must have missed the vole. I think this little guy is a wood rat, they are native here.
He's at least 9" head to tail, maybe more. We tried a rescue with a large branch but it just freaked him out and he fell.
That was probably for the best as he was obviously feeling trapped and he did scurry off.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2012
10:16 AM

Post #9077067

Oh wow! Definitely not a vole! 9 inches.

What is it about DG that you guys are producung the cutest little rodents I've ever seen!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 10, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9077204

I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks they're cute. I used to have domesticated rats as pets, and loved them! But yep, the wild ones can carry disease, so they need to stay in the wild. I'm glad he got away safely.
DonnaMack
Elgin, IL
(Zone 5a)

April 10, 2012
2:27 PM

Post #9077339

My mother taught elementary education, and they had gerbils in the classroom. She brought them home over the summer. We had them in a big cage with their toys, and I loved feeding them wheat bread. Cutest little things you've ever seen.
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2012
4:19 AM

Post #9085691

I wanted to share picture of my lady slippers.
Just starting to bloom.
They're expensive, so I was worried if they'd survive.
But each year they have expanded a little, this year 3 blooming stalks.
Hopefully they're settling in.

Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2012
4:23 AM

Post #9085695

#1 glaucidium palmatum. Just it's 2nd year. Blooming happily.
#2 arisaema ringens.
#3 paris, I think quadrifolia, but not sure. There are 4 leaves anyway...
I love the strangeness of the 'flower'.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2012
4:28 AM

Post #9085700

#1 a non-invasive buttercup, ranunculus Miss Austria
#2 a tiny (compare the size of the geraneum leaf next to it) hypoxis hirsuta
#3 a gentian blooming in my new half sun/half shade 'rock garden'.
It's a cement planter with 1/2 sand/potting soil. My new experiment.
I've never been able to grow these types of gentians before,
so we'll see if they overwinter in my new container.
But it's at least blooming beautifully now.

Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin   Thumbnail by Weerobin
Click an image for an enlarged view.

pirl
(Arlene) Southold, NY
(Zone 7a)

April 17, 2012
4:31 AM

Post #9085704

All lovely, as usual, but that gentian is so wonderful.
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 17, 2012
6:35 AM

Post #9085862

I agree, I'll have to look for some of those around here. Thanks for sharing the pictures!

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

April 18, 2012
2:40 AM

Post #9087107

Absolutely lovely pics, Robin! Those Lady Slippers are beautiful, so darned cute!
KyWoods
Melbourne, KY
(Zone 6a)

April 18, 2012
8:02 AM

Post #9087413

They are! I'll bet those would grow here, too.
I started a new thread, 'cause my dialup was complaining, lol.

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