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Tomato leaves yellowing

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

This started about 2 weeks ago. The vines were vigorous and healthy, now they slowly turn yellow one leave at a time. More around the middle, not at the very top. Some edges turn brown. i fertilize with organic 5-3-3, and plant leave tea. What could this be?

Thumbnail by birke
Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

More pics.

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Hornell, NY(Zone 5a)

It's not uncommon for a few bottom leaves to yellow up a bit after transplanting, usually the upper stem will survive quite well. I would just trim off the yellow leaves and wait, your plant is probably okay

Al

Clover, SC

Sometimes yellowing occurs with transplant shock. Also, double check 3 things: room temperature (70-75 F consistently), watering -- too much can drain nutrients from potting mix or choke new roots, and your fertilizing schedule. Here's a link that may help: http://www.tomatodirt.com/tomato-seedlings.html

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

The plant has been in the ground since December and I'm harvesting since mid January. And other tomato plants are starting with yellowing leaves,too.

Greenfield, OH(Zone 6a)

I'm not a master gardener but I am well experienced with tomatoes and what I'm seeing in the pics is common in my own garden. I've pinched off the yellowing leaves and applied fish emulsion or compost tea.
Both will give a mild shot of nutrients but they will also help with fungal prevention. I wouldn't be too concerned at this time.
Are the plants in a well ventilated area?

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Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Yes, very ventilated and not too crowded. But I have a lot of stinging insects, so I'm always concerned about viral diseases.

Tonto Basin, AZ

Some of my large seedlings in the greenhouse (still too much chance of frost to plant out), started looking likt that and I realized that I was over watering them. Just a thought . . . .

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

It could be, not so sure though. I had a large plant in a large pot, which got planted in the ground about 1 1/2 weeks ago, and that one has 1 leave yellowing now, too. My soil is very sandy and doesn't keep the water very good, that's why I water almost everyday here, since there is no rain and temps in the 80's with full sun and medium humidity(low for FL standards). I made some coffee grounds and black tea tea today, so we'll see if that'll help. Also I started a chicken manure fertilizer tea today.

Tonto Basin, AZ

You're probably right. That sand is almost miraculous the way it will drain water.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

birke - I used to live and garden in Palm Beach County so know what you mean about the soil being so sandy. I used to call it "grey dirt!"
I had aged horse manure dumped every August to turn it into "real soil"

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

How much, and how often are you applying that fertilizer?

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Yes, Bee, you just have to add add add to that pure sand if you want anything to grow.
Gymgirl, they get food every 2/3 weeks, epsom salt every 4/5 weeks. Maybe I need to give a little more though each time, or more frequently. That's why I started right away on it.

SE Houston (Hobby), TX(Zone 9a)

Birke,
I feed my tomatoes once each week. MG Water Soluble plant food for veggies. Why are you giving them Epsom Salts on a regular basis?

Arlington, TX

maybe he needs to invest in some potting soils that will hold the moister in.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

How about foliar feeding. So the nutrients can be taken in by the leaves.

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Thanks for all the advice. I had used MG, but didn't have a good experience with it and turned to organic fertilizer anyway. The epsom salt I read in a lot of articles that tomatoes grow better with it. And I noticed it on the Super Fantastic, which was just "hanging around", after the epsom salt made a big "jump" with new green, also on the Better Boys in my root knot infested other patch.
So let's see if the additional nutrients/fertilizer will help.

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

It was/is root knot nematodes. The plant died after fish emulsion and various herbal green teas. Pulled it out today and so sad, now my new patch is completely infested with them beasts,too. I hate the FL sandy soil. Now I know why the other tomatoes aren't doing good in this patch anymore either. I'll plant Crotalaria juncea L. over summer and make lots of Crotalaria juncea L. tea for both veggie patches.

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Plantersville, TX(Zone 9a)

Birke, you need to plant something that is not bothered by those pests.

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Yes, I know, that's why I will plant Crotalaria juncea L. over the summer and they will hopefully die of hunger. Then for the rest of the pest I'll dig under the plants. They have an alkaloid which kills the root knot nematode, so they say. And is not a host plant.

Charlotte, NC(Zone 7b)

There are some beneficial nematodes that eat bad nematodes. They can be purchased online, but I've never tried them.

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

I did buy nematodes online and didn't have any success with them. I did so much research online towards the issue with the root knot nematodes and how to get rid of them. Last year I did the soil solarization, but they turned back very quickly. Tried the tagetes tea, but only to find out that this helps only for another kind of nematodes, tried various other things, neem cake and added lots of organic matter. But I found the studies from the sunn hemp and hopefully this will help with the problem after all the other unsuccessful trials.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Starving them out is probably your best bet. You obviously know what you are doing, and have studied them good luck. Please let us know how it works out.

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Thanks, will do. Since it's too hot here for veggies in the summer, I hope the sunn hemp will grow and I'll turn it into the soil after summer.

Liberty Hill, TX(Zone 8a)

Oh that's right this isn't your gardening season, so that makes this even easier. Have you checked with your ag agency or anybody in your area that has experience with them. My ex put construction sand in my garden 1 time and the nematodes came with it. But because they don't normally live here they only lasted for a season of so but I really added the organic material. Yes, they can ruin a garden. Well, they can make it impossible to garden.

I don't know if your a paying member or if you need to be but you may try posting on the soil and compost forum. There are some very experienced folks over there and I know they will help if they can. Good luck!

Broward County, FL(Zone 10b)

Thanks for all!

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