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Beginner Vegetables: can I plant multiple heirloom seed varieties?

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Forum: Beginner VegetablesReplies: 7, Views: 101
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srtink2000

March 11, 2012
1:40 PM

Post #9038286

I am new to gardening but I'm starting off with heirlom seeds. I wanted to plant multiple varieties of tomatoes and peppers. Can I do this or would it affect the plants by cross-pollination? If it is an issue, could I just plant them on opposite sides of the garden? It's not a terribly large garden, 20x10 or so. Or does it really matter?

Thank you!
Doug9345
Durhamville, NY
(Zone 5b)

March 18, 2012
1:23 PM

Post #9047507

Unless you are saving the seed then it doesn't matter. Tomatoes are self fertile for the most part, so while you may get some crossing many people are saving seeds from unbagged tomatoes with out a problem. Peppers tend to cross more, but not badly.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 19, 2012
12:55 PM

Post #9048954

I agree with Doug. Go for it! I'll have at least 8 different varieties of heirlooms growing in the same bed by this weekend. And, I do save the seeds. We shall see!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 20, 2012
7:31 PM

Post #9050793

Yes. That's what we do.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 20, 2012
7:49 PM

Post #9050815

According to Carolyn Male, the tomato expert who graces our Tomato forum, has said that tomatoes normally self-pollinate and that the risk of cross-pollination that would affect home gardeners is low.

David
ParmaJon
Portland, OR

March 28, 2012
5:57 PM

Post #9061106

As to peppers, you will want to separate your hot peppers from your sweet ones.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 28, 2012
8:23 PM

Post #9061284

Or you'll end up with hot sweet peppers or sweet hot peppers.
synsfun
Lake Charles, LA
(Zone 9a)

April 11, 2012
8:43 AM

Post #9078346

If you're not collecting seeds, then I wouldn't worry about it. just remember to keep them spaced properly when their seedlings are about three inches. Most tomatoes are fairly big plants and take up a lot of room, and if you plan using that same little plot next year, be sure to rotate your crops. Tomatoes are heavy feeders and drain the soil of vital nutrients and protiens most plants need. Any type of beans or peas would be a good plant to use in its stead.

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