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Voting Booth: The biggest challenge in my garden is...

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Forum: Voting BoothReplies: 69, Views: 604
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Schenectady, NY


March 12, 2012
9:50 AM

Post #9039516

There are a total of 155 votes:


Too much sun.
(13 votes, 8%)
Red dot


Too much shade.
(19 votes, 12%)
Red dot


Too many weeds.
(38 votes, 24%)
Red dot


Too much water.
(1 votes, 0%)
Red dot


Not enough water.
(6 votes, 3%)
Red dot


Not enough time.
(30 votes, 19%)
Red dot


Poor soil.
(22 votes, 14%)
Red dot


Other...tell us!
(26 votes, 16%)
Red dot


Previous Polls

DitchLily206
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

March 12, 2012
10:13 AM

Post #9039550

I try to keep up, but by summer's end I always have a geat crop of weeds!

After that I would have to say that not enough time>too much water>

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 12, 2012
10:17 AM

Post #9039556

Too much Bermuda grass. The bane of my gardening existence here. Ugh! :(

cececoogan

cececoogan
Waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 12, 2012
11:03 AM

Post #9039620

I f the plants I plant on purpose would grow as well as the weeds and as quickly too, I would be the world's best gardener.
nifty413
Garland, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 12, 2012
11:06 AM

Post #9039629

Mind, body, and spirit — I don't function efficiently/effectively when all three are not synchronized. But, who does?

trackinsand

trackinsand
mid central, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2012
12:21 PM

Post #9039721

i could vote for all of them but shade. never enough shade...and way too many weevils.
tlm1
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2012
12:31 PM

Post #9039732

WEEDS!!! UGH! In the beds, it's the Florida betony! In the lawn, it's Bermuda grass! Both are completely impossible to get rid of!
After that, my vote would be poor soil….Or should I say sand! All the compost in the world doesn't seem to improve it. It's almost like the sand devours it...

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 12, 2012
1:30 PM

Post #9039810

I said "Other".
Too much sun. -- It can get very hot out in the field in August.
Too much shade. -- Mostly no problem, except in some small areas. Pick the right things for those places.
Too many weeds. -- Not a great problem except we have yellow nut sedge in one area. It's terrible!
Too much water. -- A low area along the creek can flood in a heavy rain. Just keep fingers crossed.
Not enough water. -- We have the whole 5 acres covered with drip tape.
Not enough time. -- Only if hired help doesn't work out. We have had good help last few years.
Poor soil. -- Mostly we have beautiful soil. Couple areas on the hillside not so nice. One will be seeded to alfalfa.

Looks like early spring here, so we will get a head start on these things.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 12, 2012
1:37 PM

Post #9039824

CG,
What do you plant in your shade areas?
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 12, 2012
3:59 PM

Post #9040022

Other: uncooperative body. Which results in too many weeds, and too little actual time in the garden. Nevertheless, I keep adding new beds and expanding what I have. Hope springs eternal...
pepper23
KC Metro area, MO
(Zone 6a)

March 12, 2012
6:43 PM

Post #9040238

Poor soil mostly. Black Walnut trees sometimes give me trouble but mainly with veggies. My soil is mostly clay and super dry in some spots and pretty moist in others. I'm on a hill and we had major erosion when we moved in so we hauled in dirt. That dirt burned my marigolds and Dusty Millers for years. Now I can grow stuff but it's a challenge.

palmbob

palmbob
Acton, CA
(Zone 8b)


March 12, 2012
7:37 PM

Post #9040346

really the biggest challenge in my garden is me... too lazy and too many plants in too small a space. When I started, everything looked perfect and there was plenty of sun for all (too much for some)... but then these darn plants grew, and all the ones left in the dust rotted or learned to live in shade. Garden still looks as full as ever despite there being about 1000 less plants in it.
marti001
Somerset, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 12, 2012
8:06 PM

Post #9040399

I voted "Other". I'm now living in a moblehome park where no one grows anything bush large out of control bushes to block the trailer next door. It was so closed in and made me feel claustraphobic. Have removed bushes down the sides of the trailer now just have to finish up in back and than I can container garden with my OGR's and some veggies. The soil here is also bad, so I figure container gardening is best.
sqwashbuckler
Yucaipa, CA

March 12, 2012
8:52 PM

Post #9040473

I live in an area where there is clay soil and sand. I recently went to a soil dealer, where they gave a potting mix that was WAY too sandy mixed with a tiny amount of 'black gold'.

I resort to making my own mixes where out of necessity ($) I have to use some clay. AGGGGGHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2012
12:15 AM

Post #9040569

I think the problem here in Houston is that the weather is too inconsistent. The heat and humidity we have is extreme and then we get used to 75* in Nov and Dec and along comes a week of 22* that kills everything. We have some lovely days but then there are those "surprises". Last year we had the hottest summer since they've been keeping records. Prior to that, we had the two coldest winters we've had in 20 yrs. We have too much or too little of something and very few periods of just temperate weather. Oh, and when we do have some nice days, the mosquitos get the best of us. I grew up in North Louisiana and there was more predictable weather there. I guess it just makes us appreciate those "fine" days even more. Because of the weather extremes, my garden flora changes each year. Some things make it and some die so I try another plant so there are always some oldies and some newbies. I think in about 20 more years, I will have worked out who are the real survivors.

growin

growin
Vancouver, BC
(Zone 8b)


March 13, 2012
12:43 AM

Post #9040577

Although I answered shade, the biggest challenge is vandalism. Most of the front garden has been repeatedly sprayed with herbicide so nothing alive there.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 13, 2012
3:00 AM

Post #9040614

That's terrible. :(
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2012
4:01 AM

Post #9040636

Bermuda grass!...we should start a form on how to kill bermuda grass.
I had a piece of carpet all winter on one section, looked at it the other day and the grass under the carpet is yellow but just waiting to take over again.

speediebean

speediebean
Somewhere in, MD
(Zone 7b)

March 13, 2012
4:40 AM

Post #9040655

I voted "Other" too: Not enough space, and DH won't let me turn the entire front lawn into nothing but garden beds!! < =( Whaaaaaaaahhhh!!!
I trick him though, I have been slowly and sneakily "expanding" the beds just a couple feet each year! Maybe by the time I'm 80 we'll have no more lawn! < =D

Sqwashbuckler, to you I would suggest straight compost in your beds. Nothing but compost, and add it in copious amounts each year. Forgo the fancy "mixes", and just add compost. In just a couple years you'll be amazed how much nicer they are. Lots and lots of compost. =)

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 13, 2012
5:07 AM

Post #9040677

rentman wrote:Bermuda grass!...we should start a form on how to kill bermuda grass.
I had a piece of carpet all winter on one section, looked at it the other day and the grass under the carpet is yellow but just waiting to take over again.


I agree ... it's very sneaky. It lays low for awhile and hops up seemingly out of nowhere. It's on top of the ground, under the ground, seeds. It hangs on even in the shade. Very tough to eradicate. Phooey. :(
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2012
5:38 AM

Post #9040707

My soil is loose, years of compost, so it's easy to pull out but who likes to get down and pull weeds.
frogymon
Mesa, AZ
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9040792

Cville, I have Bermudas grass and have had a lot of success against it by screening the soil when digging new beds, then lining the bed with weed blocker fabric before refilling it with native soil and compost. I get much better results than in the older beds that I didn't line with weed blocker. I'll probably wind up re-doing the old beds to the new "standard". For more info on the process, check out my blog, http://www.mrbsgarden.blogspot.com and search for "screen".

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 13, 2012
6:56 AM

Post #9040813

Thank you, frogymon. That is very good info. I have not tried screening or sifting the soil and I can see where that would be very helpful. It only takes a little "sprig" of Bermuda to root and take off again. :)
mamasita
Southern Dutchess Co, NY
(Zone 5b)

March 13, 2012
6:59 AM

Post #9040816

I could have selected time as my biggest issue, but the truth is deer present the greatest challenge. Certainly limits what to plant and where to plant it.
rentman
Frankfort, KY
(Zone 6a)

March 13, 2012
8:06 AM

Post #9040907

Thanks frogymon
frogymon
Mesa, AZ
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2012
9:20 AM

Post #9041020

Cville/rentman: You're welcome. Note that this takes longer than simply digging a new bed, but the time saved over the life of the bed is well worth it. I spend 95% less time weeding beds done this way than those done quick and easy. It also loosens the soil so the new plantings can establish a better root zone and gets all the rocks and trash out of the bed. You'd be amazed at the stuff I've found 6"-8" inches down; everything from spark plugs to broken glass/dishes to coins. My neighbor found a ruby and diamond ring in one of her beds.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 13, 2012
9:28 AM

Post #9041028

A ruby and diamond ring!!! :-)

I have a bit of that deer issue going on here as well, mamasita. With gardening, it's always something.

flowAjen

flowAjen
central, NJ
(Zone 6b)

March 13, 2012
9:42 AM

Post #9041049

I voted other also, because it's a variety of things
Too much sun in the backyard and not enough shade
Too many weeds, but just certain ones...chickweed one of the worst!
The water is all dependant on the crazy weather the past couple years so I have to deal with it as it comes, last year was too much water, year before not enough
Too many ants, I've never seen so many!
Not enough $ to do all things I want to do
IlovemyTiger
Irving, TX

March 13, 2012
10:07 AM

Post #9041072

Too much sun in the summer,
Too many weeds,
Not enough water (yay new rain barrel)

-Amanda

DreamOfSpring

DreamOfSpring
Charleston, SC
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2012
11:34 AM

Post #9041214

The biggest challenge in my garden is...ME.

The weeds are a bit problematic, too, and there is never enough time, but ultimately it all comes back to me, the person who plants too much, plants the wrong things in the wrong places, plants things too close together, does more planting than maintenance, loves all of the things that don't belong in my area (and tries to grow them), and so on and so on.
MargaretK
PERTH
Australia

March 13, 2012
5:34 PM

Post #9041661

Too much sun, poor soil and too little water.
McCool
Millbury, MA
(Zone 5a)

March 13, 2012
7:37 PM

Post #9041866

I voted "other" because we have too much shade, soil that is about 40% clay and 60% rocks -- where it isn't solid ledge about 8" down. On top of that, add in some deer and other critters, plus lots of Creeping Charlie, violets, and other assorted invasives (not even counting the poison ivy, Oriental bittersweet, barberry, dog roses, and other goodies that the birds plant for me all over the yard).

Actually, since my overall aim in this yard is to make it as wildlife friendly as I can, and since I have finally come to the conclusion that it's much cheaper to buy organic veggies than to try to grow them, I'm not really that upset about the state of my gardening efforts.
jmc1987
Cascade, VA
(Zone 7a)

March 13, 2012
8:30 PM

Post #9041917

i Picked "Other" because of both too much shade, AND poor soil (red clay)
vlygrl
Country Club, CA
(Zone 9a)

March 13, 2012
9:23 PM

Post #9041953

Anybody know what to do about oxalis? Someone said you have to dig down a foot or so and replace all soil. No way I could do that! Someone needs to invent a systemic spray that will take out the roots, which go everywhere, and go dormant in midwinter and summer, then pop up as soon as they get a little water and sun in Spring. Something like Round-Up tends to take out anything nearby.


Click the image for an enlarged view.

SolMan
Croydon
Australia
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2012
2:23 AM

Post #9042047

Hard time trying to control the soil it is hard clay and i have beed doing every thing to make it lighter,
some times i just wanna give up, but i put almost every thing in post and the allow it to root to the earth
Oberon46
(Mary) Anchorage, AK
(Zone 5b)

March 14, 2012
7:24 AM

Post #9042274

vlygrl, to get an idea of what you are fighting -- I had a pot with oxalis in it up in Fairbanks (winters down to -55). come fall I just dumped the pot into my greenhouse which was not heated though was built against the south side of the house. Come spring I had oxylis throughout the bed. I planted it outside that year thinking it would be a good ground cover. It didn't return. It surely didn't take much warmth, what little was in that greenhouse to allow it to live through our winters. Good luck.

My biggest limitation is me. If I may plagerize Dream of Spring . . . "the person who plants too much, plants the wrong things in the wrong places, plants things too close together, does more planting than maintenance, loves all of the things that don't belong in my area (and tries to grow them), and so on and so on."
roseycats
Dayton, OH

March 14, 2012
7:58 AM

Post #9042313

I have a lot of probelms with weeds and don't have the energy and or time to keep up with everything. I'm just about ready to give it all up.
OutsidePlaying
Laceys Spring, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 14, 2012
8:53 AM

Post #9042388

I voted too many weeds, but I could have and should have voted other as I never have enough time to do what I want & need to do. No matter how much mulch, Preen, soil conditioning and other stuff I do, weeds are there, but that's country living for you. I have a lot of beds, sun and shade, and keep adding and tweaking. And then spring and summer comes and it's time to work the veggie garden. Then it's on to the next battle with the deer, possums and other unknown critters that rob the garden (fending to be improved this year I hope). Maybe I need to stop - ;~) Not happening by the way. Bermuda (wild or other) is another story. I've dug enough of this stuff to sod a city yard somewhere. Happy gardening.

NancySLAZ

NancySLAZ
Sun Lakes, AZ
(Zone 9a)

March 14, 2012
10:55 AM

Post #9042555

Too much sun (one word, Phoenix!), not enough water and not enough time. It's a wonder I can grow anything!

meezersfive

meezersfive
waukesha, WI
(Zone 5a)

March 14, 2012
11:27 AM

Post #9042596

I hesitate to say these, but ...too much garden. We've got a full acre and beds everywhere, which are over whelming when I am less and less capable of bending, and getting up and down easily. We've laid weed block and planted lots of perrenials but it's still a lot of work. I'm looking out now and see all the spring clean-up and am getting tired even contemplating what needs doing.

It will get done.
Cearbhaill
Russell, KY
(Zone 6b)

March 15, 2012
5:22 AM

Post #9043341

Weeds.
I have all the time in the world but am not getting any younger and I have a very large yard with many large ornamental beds.
During the spring gardening season I try and spend at least four hours a day weeding.
By summer I am tired and will likely use herbicides.

It is a young garden as we only moved here in '07 and as I had so much space I was forced to buy small plants.
So I hope that as things continue to fill in my weeding chores will diminish.
birder17
Jackson, MO
(Zone 6b)

March 15, 2012
7:03 AM

Post #9043479

Weeds are a problem for me. This year, I am pulling the weeds once, then putting down Preen in most beds. Some, I am leaving as I want re-seeding. I almost think it's easier to pull weeds, preen, and start annuals in containers, and then plant out--or buy a few six packs. Although, six packs have become four packs and keep increasing in price.
frogymon
Mesa, AZ
(Zone 9a)

March 15, 2012
7:04 AM

Post #9043483

Between lining my beds with weed blocker fabric and using at least 2" of bark mulch, weeding my beds isn't an issue, it's the lawn that has the problem.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 15, 2012
8:56 AM

Post #9043625

Burmuda grass It took us a few years, but we did get rid of it by digging out every single tiny piece of root!

As to my vote: Poor Soil! We have hard red Carolina clay.

After ridding ourselves of the Burmuda grass we put in raised beds. Now we enjoy a grass-free existance and lovely fresh, organically grown vegetables.

As to weeds - we smother the walkways with fall leaves to a depth of 6" or more. No more weeds!

Thumbnail by HoneybeeNC
Click the image for an enlarged view.

OutsidePlaying
Laceys Spring, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2012
2:12 PM

Post #9043956

I love your beds, Honeybee. In part of my garden, I've mulched the paths with weed barrier cloth and pine straw and kept the raised beds for cutting garden and perennials. I'm thinking I may do the same with the veggie part one of these days and hopefully minimize the weeding there too. DH thinks he needs to till every year and I keep telling him 'no'.
greentoo
Carpinteria, CA

March 15, 2012
2:28 PM

Post #9044000

N.E. exposure in most of my garden means no sun or little reflected light in winter. I plant Clivias, Geranium 'Biokovo', almost any Bromeliad, Tasmanian Tree Fern, Leucojum aestivum, black mondo grass, maidenhair fern. These plants compete with one or another predominating as the light levels change with the seasons. I am in coastal So. California.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 15, 2012
3:17 PM

Post #9044050

meezersfive wrote:I hesitate to say these, but ...too much garden. We've got a full acre and beds everywhere, which are over whelming when I am less and less capable of bending, and getting up and down easily. We've laid weed block and planted lots of perrenials but it's still a lot of work. I'm looking out now and see all the spring clean-up and am getting tired even contemplating what needs doing.

It will get done.


Only a half an acre here but I definitely hear what you are saying. No way to get all the weedy invasive grasses out any time soon. And then it just comes back from the neighbors on both sides via runners and seeds blowing in the wind. But a lot of cardboard and weed cloth is going down so that will help. And I think a lot of gravel areas as well. I guess where there is a will, there is a way. But sometimes I wonder.
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 15, 2012
5:04 PM

Post #9044182

I picked time, but need to add weeds and mosquito's...as one is buzzing in my ear as I sit here on the couch...
Lots of beds, (killed him :) ) adding more to include veggies as well. I want to do more but just dont have the time.
strange2u
Hinsdale, IL

March 15, 2012
6:51 PM

Post #9044335

I said not enough time. But I bet, If I ever put some money into a irrigation system, I'ld have plenty of time for weeding and pruneing.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 15, 2012
8:09 PM

Post #9044436

I have a problem with a Lobber Grasshopper, they are destroying my favorite flowers and they do like the hydrengeas. You can't spray them or prevent them, so every morning I spend time with my scisors and cut them down as they are sunning them self on the top of the bushess. It is a terrible way to start the day, but it helps to prevent them from eating all my garden. If anybody knows some solution, I will be thankful. Etelka
luciee
Hanceville, AL
(Zone 7a)

March 16, 2012
8:17 AM

Post #9044815

Weeds, gnats, fire ants, heat, lack of time, age creeping up on me, no help, etc. What's the use of gardening this year? Luciee {;^(
tlm1
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 16, 2012
11:33 AM

Post #9045023

kiseta wrote:I have a problem with a Lobber Grasshopper, they are destroying my favorite flowers and they do like the hydrengeas. You can't spray them or prevent them, so every morning I spend time with my scisors and cut them down as they are sunning them self on the top of the bushess. It is a terrible way to start the day, but it helps to prevent them from eating all my garden. If anybody knows some solution, I will be thankful. Etelka


Etelka, Early in the season when they are just coming out they are small, black, with a red stripe….Smack 'um with flip flops! My neighbors laugh at us stomping around on these things, but it does cut the population before they can get to that big yucky size! :-)))

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 16, 2012
11:45 AM

Post #9045032

kiseta - There is something called NOLO BAIT that supposed to kill grasshoppers. Do a Google search
Katlian
Carson City, NV
(Zone 6b)

March 16, 2012
1:07 PM

Post #9045106

Too windy, not enough water, poor soil, not enough space, not enough time, too hot, too cold, too many weevils. I daydream about having enough money to buy a nice place in a more temperate climate and quit my job during the summer so I could spend all of my time in the garden.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2012
3:49 PM

Post #9045289

Katlian, I guess I am living your dream, I have a job 9 months of the year and June, July and August I have a unpaid leave from cooking. I cook for a churches Wedn. night program and in the Summer we rest. Plus I only work 3 days a week. My garden keeps me busy, but the trouble is that since I don't have a sprinkle system, I can not leave home for more then 3 days, everything would be dead from heat. But sometime to go away just for the weekend is just right for me, glad to be back to sit in my little garden and drink coffee on the porch where I can hear the birds. Life is good.

Thumbnail by kiseta   Thumbnail by kiseta
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kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2012
5:33 PM

Post #9045388

HonneybeeNC , thank you for your advice, I have found the NOLO Bait on the internet, it is very highly priced, I will check my local garden center if they have it, least I would save on shipping. It would be nice to have a garden without those ugly grasshoppers. I also have slug problem, but I have been mixing some ammonia , water and Murphies soap in a spray bottle and in the morning I get the slugs. Thanks again. Etelka
bonehead
Cedarhome, WA
(Zone 8b)

March 16, 2012
5:59 PM

Post #9045435

Kiseta, what a nice homey looking place you have - love the curb garden in front. Much friendlier than the usual mown grass and small trees.
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2012
6:22 PM

Post #9045465

Thank you, I have a electric lawnmower and got tired of cutting the grass in front dancing around my electric cord. So I dug the whole grass up and planted flowers, the city didn't complain. This year I have some new flowers, yarrow , salvia and some annuals will be in between. I have seen some people slow down while driving, and it makes me feel like the hard work was worth it.

Thumbnail by kiseta
Click the image for an enlarged view.

tlm1
Jacksonville, FL
(Zone 9a)

March 16, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9045538

Beautiful work! I would slow down to admire this as well!!!!
kiseta
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)

March 16, 2012
7:01 PM

Post #9045548

Everybody is planting a formal, or a cottage garden, I just plant what I like, mostly flowers that I remember from my home town in Europe. Next on my list to sow some Night sented stock, it is sure smelling good in the evening. First picture of the city of Novi Sad, Serbia (but I am a Hungarian) the second is the stock that I just ordered the seeds. Etelka

Thumbnail by kiseta   Thumbnail by kiseta
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g_whizz
rosetta TASMANIA
Australia

March 16, 2012
7:46 PM

Post #9045619

Not enough room!
frogymon
Mesa, AZ
(Zone 9a)

March 16, 2012
9:13 PM

Post #9045675

Kiseta, I planted some stock in baskets on an old tricycle and the fragrance is wonderful.

Thumbnail by frogymon
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Cville_Gardener

Cville_Gardener
Highland Rim of TN
United States
(Zone 7a)

March 17, 2012
2:27 AM

Post #9045744

Honeybee, thanks for the info on the NOLO bait for 'hoppers. I've been searching for something organic and will definitely check into this.

revclaus
(Judith) Denver, CO
(Zone 5b)

March 17, 2012
8:40 AM

Post #9045984

Not big enough. I went from a large balcony with lots of plants to a small retirement community with room for four large pots. Getting used to making the most of the pots I have. One other thing, all the perennials I planted last year got killed by very dry gale force winds. And Bluestone Perennials decided to change their pot size so I can't by them inexpensively any more, and on my budget, it looks like marigolds and morning glories. :-(

themoonhowl

themoonhowl
Prairieville, LA
(Zone 9a)

March 17, 2012
11:33 AM

Post #9046130

WEEDS...since Hurricane Gustav blew through here we have seen weeds that were never a problem before...

Kiseta, aside from smooshing lubbers as they hatch, we have found that wasp spray seems to work very quickly at killing them. One thing I did discover is that the population is determined by how wet winter and spring are. The more rain, the fewer Lubbers...seems they lay their eggs in the ground and lots of rain destroys the eggs. Starting now, March, keep an eye on your flower beds...young Lubbers start hatching in March/April..last year we put a bounty on them...promised my Grandson a dime for each dead one...he earned a little over $30...
n2dyt
Wheatfield, NY
(Zone 6a)

March 17, 2012
3:12 PM

Post #9046349

Bad Back - Considering Earthboxes!

CountryGardens

CountryGardens
Lewisville, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 17, 2012
3:25 PM

Post #9046361

Here's a way to save your back.
http://davesgarden.com/community/forums/t/1175007/

greenbrain

greenbrain
Madison, IL
(Zone 6b)

March 18, 2012
9:27 PM

Post #9048132

Definitely time shortage since I work full-time away from home & run a household. Gardening is my escape!
minnesippi
Oakdale, MN
(Zone 4a)

March 19, 2012
5:52 PM

Post #9049390

It is totally an escape, isnt it? It's my sanctuary and there is never enough time..
1234dottie
Morgantown, WV

March 22, 2012
9:04 AM

Post #9052702

My energy level is bad when it gets warm. Trying to get work done outside gets hard for me when it gets in 80's. Only march and already feeling the heat! I have so much planting to do. I have plants ordered and they won't even send them for another month. I am moving some roses to a new bed and replanting miniature roses in old bed. I also am feeding my perennial plants that I have all over the place. I have an acre of land. In the last few years I have been planting and planting. My heart condition makes all this very challenging. But it keeps me active. My husband gets dragged into a lot of work for me. My honey to do lost is huge in spring. But he is so good to me. He is wonderful I. Coming up with new ideas around here.

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