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Beginner Vegetables: Snow Peas in the south?

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GreeneLady
Oak Island, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 18, 2012
9:44 AM

Post #9047295

I planted snow peas in my garden this year. I don't really know what to expect, being that I'm in zone 7b/8a, but thought I'd give it a shot. I've amended my soil perfectly, planted the seeds according to directions, with the exception that I am probably a little late planting them. Our last frost date in March 24th here. Peas have only been in the ground for a week now, but they are popping through the soil.

Do you think they will be able to produce pods in time before the heat comes on? Right now we have temps in the low to mid 50s at night, and high 70s-low 80s during the day. Any thoughts would be appreciated. Thanks folks!
behillman
Plantersville, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 18, 2012
10:49 AM

Post #9047373

Are snow peas & sugar peas the same thing? Mine are starting to bloom here in Texas, but they are called sugar peas.
Farmerdill
Augusta, GA
(Zone 8a)


March 18, 2012
12:49 PM

Post #9047472

Snow peas do best here overwintered. Planted in mid November. Spring plantings are iffy as they 1. are not really early maturing ( 60-70 days) and 2. tolerate heat even less than English or Sugar Snaps.

behillman, the term "sugar" is often applied to the the flat podded oriental "snow" pea and to the round fleshy edible podded sugar snap pea. It is up to you to determine which you have.
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 18, 2012
12:58 PM

Post #9047479

Ive had great crops of snow peas using the cultivar, "Melting Sugar" but they are a fall/winter crop for me, like farmerdill says, plant in November.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 18, 2012
1:41 PM

Post #9047527

I sowed a row of "Sugar Sprint" snap peas on March 8th and a second row on March 16th.

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-6722-sugar-sprint.aspx

I would like to sow them in February, but if I do, the birds eat them!
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 18, 2012
1:49 PM

Post #9047536

Honey, cover with wire mesh until they become plants vs seeds. I have to do that with lots of things I plant.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 18, 2012
7:49 PM

Post #9048019

I am able to grow sugar snap peas in the spring in central Texas. They do eventually burn up in the heat, but I get what I consider to be decent production.

David

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2012
6:52 AM

Post #9048443

dreaves
which variety do you plant?
I never had luck with peas ...
When they are grown could you post a picture, please?
I want to know how you train them ...

aaaoooohhh ... I cannot grow peas ...
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 19, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9048447

I plant both sugar snap and snow in January. I've had decent yields, but every year I mean to plant in the fall...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 19, 2012
8:27 AM

Post #9048579

Steadycam,
You have any pictures of your bean trellis you could post?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

March 19, 2012
8:44 AM

Post #9048602

steadycam3 - thanks for the tip. Would poultry wire (chicken wire) work? I have some of that.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 19, 2012
10:28 AM

Post #9048776

I plant which-ever sugar snap pea that the display rack has in stock...I don't use any particular cultivar. For a trellis, I use sections of cattle panel wire cut in 3-foot lengths (makes a 3' vertical x 4' long section). One 16' panel makes 5 sections of trellis. I trim the bottom cross-bars off, so that there are 6" vertical spikes on the bottom of the wire section. I press those into the ground, then tie sections together with plastic cable ties. I sometimes add a short (4-foot) U-post at the joints and cable-tie the post to the wire for extra support if the vines are extra heavy or if there is a very windy spell.

In this photo, you can't see the section of wire in the ground, or the top row of the wire panel.

David

Thumbnail by dreaves
Click the image for an enlarged view.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2012
10:51 AM

Post #9048807

Is this picture right now dreaves?

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 19, 2012
11:55 AM

Post #9048886

So, David,
Your panels are 4' high... Removing just one horizontal will give you enough anchorage in the ground that the wind won't topple it over (a sure pea disaster!!!)?

We're having might gusty winds here. Plus the fact that my yard sits on a crosswind, anyways!

That looks like galvanized wire panels. Is it? More seasons before rust sets in?

Thanks for the pic!

Steadycam, where's your picture??? ^^_^^ Jumping up and down, waiting...

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

March 19, 2012
1:34 PM

Post #9049001

Dthor--yes, the picture is today. The peas are 60 DTM and were planted Feb 28th.

Linda--the panels are only 3' high (I turned them sideways.) The 6 inches in the ground is a decent support. If they start to look iffy, then I add the metal U-shaped fence posts with 1 foot in the ground, and the other 3 feet tied to the cattle panel. As far as I know, all cattle panels are galvanized. The "wire" is really about 1/4" metal rod. I have to cut with a bolt cutter.

David

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2012
1:41 PM

Post #9049018

dreaves you rock!
I cannot grow PEAS ...

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 19, 2012
2:18 PM

Post #9049091

Thanks, David! Got it!

I thought peas grew very tall? I have KY Wonder Pole Beans growing now, and need a support. From what I've seen, these get way tall.

I think I'm probably comparing two different peas here, huh?
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

March 19, 2012
2:45 PM

Post #9049131

This year I've found mostly "bush" style sugar snap and snow peas available as seeds. I personally like them taller, as I'm too lazy (and creaky) to bend over too far for harvest. My "trellis" is 2"x4" 5ft fencing between Tbars, But raised up about 6" off the ground. Seems tall enough, at least has been before.
GreeneLady
Oak Island, NC
(Zone 8a)

March 19, 2012
7:47 PM

Post #9049559

I am growing Dwarf White Sugar Snow Peas. http://parkseed.com/snow-pea-dwarf-white-sugar/p/05235/

I have some aluminet shade cloth, does anyone think would that help cool them a little since I planted them so late?

Thanks everyone for your help. FarmerDill! You practically live in my backyard. Nice to meet you! I primarily like to do flowers, but for the past few years I have been obsessed with heirloom tomatoes. This is my first year that I've done a veggie garden since I've been down here, and it's very different from my previous zone 6 gardening.

This message was edited Mar 19, 2012 9:55 PM
steadycam3
Houston Heights, TX
(Zone 9a)

March 19, 2012
11:14 PM

Post #9049683

Honey, the chicken wire will work but it has to be up off the seeds about 4" or so. I place the wire on top of my square foot beds so it's up off the seeds by about 4". If you lay it flat on the seeds, the birds can still get to the seeds.

G Girl, My snow pea trellis is strings suspended by a pipe shaped like an up-side-down U. This is illustrated in Square Foot Garden by Bartholomew. My pole bean trellis is a teepee made of poles about 7-8 ft tall tied together at the top with wire.

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

March 20, 2012
7:59 AM

Post #9050023

Uh, I'm a visual learner...you got a picture of the bean pole trellis?
synsfun
Lake Charles, LA
(Zone 9a)

April 11, 2012
2:14 PM

Post #9078774

i as well am growing Dwarf sugar peas. gets pretty down here now (80 F). but so far the peas are doing fine

Gymgirl

Gymgirl
SE Houston (Hobby), TX
(Zone 9a)

April 11, 2012
2:32 PM

Post #9078802

Thanks, Steadycam3!
GreeneLady
Oak Island, NC
(Zone 8a)

May 15, 2012
7:04 PM

Post #9125362

Update on snowpeas in the south: Since this is my first time growing snowpeas, I don't know what the average harvest is, but out of 30 snowpea plants we had about 20-25 pods per plant so far. They are still producing, some more than others.

Since my pecan tree leafed out, one half of the snowpea row is now in the shade from about 1:00pm until the next morning. The ones that are in the shade are still producing as robustly as they did when they started. The shaded plants are also the tallest-one of them is over 5ft.

So I think the trick for growing them in the south is part shade. I know they really aren't suited for this climate, but I do love me some snowpeas!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 16, 2012
10:14 AM

Post #9126044

GreeneLady - [quote]I know they really aren't suited for this climate[/quote]

Shhhhh...don't tell them that.

My sugar snap peas have been producing for a week.
behillman
Plantersville, TX
(Zone 9a)

May 17, 2012
8:52 AM

Post #9127169

We need someone to remind us to plant Snow Peas in the Fall. I nominate Honeybee. Is that o.k. with you, Honeybee.?

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2012
6:03 AM

Post #9128157

behillman - depends where you live as to when to sow pea seeds.

I've purchased "Thomas Laxton" for this fall. I plan to sow seeds mid-August. I've never grown peas in the fall - will keep y'all posted as to how they do.

The spring sown sugar snaps are in full production now. They were sown March 8th and 16th.
catmad
Pelzer, SC
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2012
7:08 AM

Post #9128250

HoneyB, what kind of sugar snaps did you use? My snow peas did well, but the sugar snaps (cascadia) never really grew. The biggest problem I run into when looking for seeds in either snow or sugar snap is that I don't care for the bush varieties. I'm too old to bend over so much *G*.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 18, 2012
12:51 PM

Post #9128663

catmad - I'm growing "Sugar Sprint"

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/p-6722-sugar-sprint.aspx

They don't grow very tall, but I don't mind bending over. LOL

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 18, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #9128771

I grow regular English peas and start them very early (like Feb/March). Wando variety is supposed to be able to handle cold and heat better. This year, I grew Wando and Alaska. They are growing like crazy and producing like crazy!

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