Hollyhock germination

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

Does hollyhock seed need to be soaked before planting or are they just slow to germinate.........it's been 3 weeks now.
I also have the same problem with dwarf zinnias.

Florissant, MO

Hi woodspirit,

I've never grown hollyhock from seed but, according to Thompson & Morgan seed company, the seed should take between about 12 and 21 days to germinate. They also say that light is beneficial to germination, so I guess they should be sown on the surface or covered very lightly with something like vermiculite.

Soaking prior to sowing probably would have helped, but failure to do that would only mean that the seeds would take a little longer to germinate. I wouldn't give up on them just yet. Give them a few more days, especially if you feel they may have been planted a little too deep.

Art

Ottawa, KS(Zone 5b)

Hi Woodspirit,

The Thompson & Morgan germination times tend to run very much on the long side. Perhaps their cooler climate in England has something to do with that. For example, the Thompson & Morgan catalog gives a germination time for zinnias as 10 - 24 days at 60 to 85 F. For indoor planting I get zinnias up in 2 - 4 days at 80 F. Several books list 5 to 7 days at 70 to 75 F for zinnias. Those same books list 10 to 14 days at 70 F for Hollyhocks. I haven't been growing hollyhocks, so I don't have my own numbers for them.

You must have some problem with your germination conditions, because 3 weeks is much too long not to have seedlings of hollyhocks and zinnias up. Can you describe or picture your germination set-up?

ZM

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I have them in my little greenhouse. Other seeds are up but not these two. They were given to me so may be too old.

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(Pam) Warren, CT(Zone 5b)

I soaked mine, 3 types, in hand- hot water mixed 9:1 with peroxide and 1 drop of Superthrive overnight, then put them in damp paper towels in a baggy on a heat mat. Two types germinated over a period of 4-9 days, at which point I had enough for my garden and tossed the rest. The third did nothing so after a couple of weeks I tossed it. All were from trades. The one that didn't germinate was a commercial packet from Japan so I couldnt tell how old they were.
I planted the germinated seeds as they sprouted in 2" pots and put them in a propagator over heat until they 'took,' and now they're all on self-watering trays under lights growing their 2nd set of true leaves. This system has been very successful with the plants that don't need cold stratification. Those I've kept in baggies in the frig for a while first.

Pam

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

As you can see, my little greenhouse has a roof so all the sun it gets are from the side walls. Strategically placed, I can get most things to germinate. However, during this week, I got tired of waiting for the basil to germinate so put them on my deck as it has been so unnaturally warm here. They germinated in 3 days so now I am moving ther hollyhocks and dwarf zinnias out there. Wish me luck!

Duxbury, MA(Zone 7a)

My hollyhocks have been coming back as volunteers, so I can't help you on the germination time, but light might have something to do with it, because obviously the seeds drop on the ground and probably don't get covered with dirt.

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

Well, since these didn't germinate, I'm going to try again with the hollyhocks but without covering them and I'm going to put them in a warmer place.

Rancho Santa Rita, TX(Zone 8a)

How are the hollyhocks coming along ?

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

not. i had to have shoulder surgery - 3 different procedures. My hosband has bees weeding and fertiluzing, but i doubt i will plant anyting more. some things look really, though.
i think one of my probkems is using too large containergs

Batesville, AR

I put my hollyhock seeds in a mixture of 1/2 cup 3% peroxide to 1 gallon of distilled water. After about 3 days in a glass in my windowsill they began germinating. About half of them grew to good-sized seedlings, which I'm about to plant (I think I'm planting them late though!!). About 2 weeks later I used the same technique and I have about 10 little ones growing well so far. I've been spraying all of my seedlings with the same water combination and I've had better germination and growing with all of my seeds and seedling than ever before.

My husband just had shoulder surgery as well, and it's been so tough on him. I hope you feel better soon!!

Good luck!!

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

1/2 cup peroxide per 1 gallon of water sounds simple and may work. I really like to have some of these growing. They won't, of course bloom this year but the french hollyhocks which are a bit small but with beautiful blooms, will start blooming the first year. They they will get taller and bigger the secon year and reseed so you will always have them. They are not invasive.
this is the newest project I am tackling at the museum......Betty

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McMinnville, TN


What is wrong with my Columbine? This is its 3rd year to produce big beautiful yello blooms and I don't know what is causing its leaves to look like this. I have other plants in the same area and their leaves look like this also.
I hope someone can tell me what is wrong so maybe I can help my plants.

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McMinnville, TN

What is wrong with my Columbine? This is its 3rd year to produce big beautiful yellow blooms and I don't know what is causing its leaves to look like this. I have other plants in the same area and their leaves look like this also.
I hope someone can tell me what is wrong so maybe I can help my plants.

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Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

I've seen this before. It is definitely an insect. Take a look under the leaves. They need spraying with a generalized insect control but first you might try a mix of a little liquid dish-washing soap and water.
i find the healthier plants are, the less susceptible to insects and disease. If you don't use natural fertilizers, they will help. I use Black Kow liberally, compost, and some bone meal.

Sidney, OH(Zone 6a)

What you're seeing are leaf miners, the larvae of small beetles, sawflies, or moths. Since they tunnel inside the leaves, spraying usually doesn't kill them. Try cutting off all the affected leaves and destroying them so the larvae can't develop into adults and lay more eggs. Do not compost them. Use Neem oil on new growth before eggs can be laid. Systemics containing imidacloprid can also be used after cutting off affected leaves. Leaf miners on columbine are quite common. While they won't kill the plant, they "uglify" the foliage.

McMinnville, TN

Thanks so much I will take care of it today. I was think of cutting the plant back to get all the ugly leaves and already have cut the dead ones off.
Thanks a bunch! I love columbines and think their blooms are out of this world!

Lake Toxaway, NC(Zone 7a)

uglify. Great word.

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