Photo by Melody

Vegetable Gardening: Garlic question

Communities > Forums > Vegetable Gardening
bookmark
Forum: Vegetable GardeningReplies: 81, Views: 875
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 4, 2012
4:38 PM

Post #9070047

I have had limited success with garlic. I believe I may have a good crop this year. I am not sure when is the right time to pick. Last year I waited until the leaves fell over, and picked it. This year I planted elephant garlic along with regular garlic. They both seem happy...when is the perfect time to harvest?...thanks in advance.

Thumbnail by hornstrider   Thumbnail by hornstrider
Click an image for an enlarged view.

tommyr2006
Poughkeepsie, NY

April 4, 2012
5:20 PM

Post #9070081

When the leaves brown and droop down. Like onions.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 4, 2012
6:56 PM

Post #9070230

I normally wait for the six bottom leaves to turn brown.
I usually harvest my garlic in May ... maybe this year will be earlier ... I cannot wait !

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 5, 2012
6:25 AM

Post #9070549

Really nice looking garlic Hornstrider. Last year my garlic was ready about the same time as my onions (late May). I pulled when the tops were pretty well brown. I didn't get any garlic planted this year... I still have bulbs for cooking from last year's crop. I'm guessing that planting about every two years will keep me in garlic, since I don't use a huge amount. As nice as those plants look, you should have good-sized bulbs.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 5, 2012
6:38 AM

Post #9070562

dreaves...thank you neighbor. The bigger leafed plants are elephant garlic. I don't believe it is really garlic... but it has a sweetness to it. Really good. One of these days we are going to have to walk across the street, and meet each other.
texasrockgarden
Canyon Lake, TX
(Zone 8b)

April 5, 2012
7:36 AM

Post #9070615

Yep, what the others said.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 5, 2012
7:45 AM

Post #9070621

Those pictures were taken last May 24, 2011.
I had enough garlic for six months ... I love to use garlic in my cooking.

Thumbnail by drthor   Thumbnail by drthor
Click an image for an enlarged view.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2012
8:21 AM

Post #9070663

My garlic is usually ready around the end of June beginning of July. I pull them after the leaves die and flop over.

Because of our mild winter, the garlic has grown very tall. It is already thigh-high, so I'm looking forward to a really good crop this year.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 5, 2012
8:52 AM

Post #9070694

Thanks everyone...I kinda' knew that, and that is what I have done in the past. But this years crop is really special looking, and I don't want to mess it up. What about when scapes start to appear? I have read I need to cut them...is that correct?
kmom246
Murfreesboro, TN
(Zone 7a)

April 5, 2012
11:49 AM

Post #9070869

Yes, cut the scapes - and eat them. They should add a really nice spicy (hot?!) touch to many dishes. I add them to anything that calls for garlic and hot peppers, reducing the amount of hot peppers. Yummy. Your garlic sure looks good.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 5, 2012
1:52 PM

Post #9070948

kmom246...Thank you...That is what I love about this forum...ask, and you shall receive.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

April 5, 2012
2:33 PM

Post #9070983

Somewhere I read about the scapes- either softneck or hardneck is the only type that makes scapes- I can't remember which-

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #9071660

Hardneck makes scapes. Pickled scapes are wonderful.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2012
6:13 AM

Post #9071687

[quote]Hardneck makes scapes[/quote]

Mine must be softnecks, 'cause they never make scapes.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2012
6:29 AM

Post #9071704

Softnecks do better in the South anyway.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2012
6:34 AM

Post #9071711

Thanks, darius, I didn't know that.

I save my own garlic from year-to-year and choose the largest cloves for replanting. I've noticed that they grow better every year, so I guess I'm getting them to adapt to my climate/growing conditions by doing this.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2012
6:50 AM

Post #9071728

Indeed they do. I wrote several articles on garlic for DG several years back, you can find them near the bottom of my member page.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 6, 2012
7:06 AM

Post #9071744

HoneybeeNC wrote "I save my own garlic from year-to-year and choose the largest cloves for replanting. I've noticed that they grow better every year, so I guess I'm getting them to adapt to my climate/growing conditions by doing this."

Wow that is good information...thanks for posting.

darius wrote "Indeed they do. I wrote several articles on garlic for DG several years back, you can find them near the bottom of my member page."

darius...can you tell me more about growing garlic. What exactly is elephant garlic? I grew it last year w/ limited success, and it is really is tasty. The bulbs are huge.

drthor

drthor
Irving, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 6, 2012
7:53 AM

Post #9071788

Is the "SCAPE" a flower?
If so, I normally have a few buds forming on my garlic and I remove them right away.
I grow only softneck garlic

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2012
8:20 AM

Post #9071810

Yes, the scape is the flower/seed head. There are a few softnecks that flower, but not many... out of several hundred garlic varieties.

Elephant garlic is not a true garlic, but actually a kind of leek that produces mild garlic-like cloves. It doesn't grow well for me, unlike garlic and shallots.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 6, 2012
9:15 AM

Post #9071879

Make sure you cut the scapes off soon enough as they get woody otherwise. We grill them or saute them like asparagus.

We also pick green garlic to cook with like green onions and use the young tips of the garlic "leaves" in soups as a flavoring.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 6, 2012
9:21 AM

Post #9071886

darius - thanks for mentioning your Member Page - I did not know such a thing existed!

Great read about the different garlics. I knew there were a lot, but I'm happy with mine.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 6, 2012
11:25 AM

Post #9071998

Honeybee, the garlic that seems to do best in my 3-county area is "Music" and I've noticed over time (just as with your own garlic) that it changes and improves growth a bit as it adapts to the soil. It's not my favorite garlic, but it grows well so I plant it. I haven't yet determined which one garlic I want to keep and propagate, too many to trial!
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2012
4:39 AM

Post #9072777

[quote] There are a few softnecks that flower, but not many... out of several hundred garlic varieties [/quote]
Thanks for that clarification Darius. I was wondering as I had a friend share an heirloom start of garlic years ago. It grows well and does produce beautiful scapes early in summer. Is your pickled scape recipe in your articles? I will have to go search.

I leave my garlic in a permanent bed. If I relocate the bed, I find it keeps popping volunteers in the old bed for years to come. One of these days I'll have it where I want it I guess... Kristi

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 7, 2012
4:49 AM

Post #9072788

No Kristie, the recipe is on my blog but should be easy to find. I'm not allowed to post the link here.

I have some garlic left in the root cellar and I plan to encircle my new fruit trees and shrubs with it, densely planted in hopes of deterring the voles from eating the roots. That garlic will stay in the ground. Should be interesting to see what it does in a couple of years without harvesting!

This message was edited Apr 7, 2012 6:51 AM

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 7, 2012
6:37 AM

Post #9072877

I found your blog, darius ^_^
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 7, 2012
6:24 PM

Post #9073513

Not to worry... I go to your blog on a regular basis. Some of your blog posts are favorites that I reread occasionally. I easily found the garlic scape recipe, thank you. Do you eat them as pickles only or use them in cooking also?

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2012
3:56 AM

Post #9073755

I do cook with some fresh scapes; they have a mild garlic flavor.
TX_gardener
Brady, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2012
5:14 AM

Post #9073792

how do u find the blog? just skimmed over the list of articles you've done here on DG -- too many sound interesting (and the sun's coming up so I can garden) so I'll have to come back...

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2012
5:39 AM

Post #9073826

TX, look down at the bottom of my DG Member page. Most of us who have blogs list them there as a favorite website...
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 8, 2012
5:47 AM

Post #9073838

I just sent her links to both your blog and the garlic scapes post. 8 ) If anyone else wants, just say the word...

Silly that you can't link it when you can member page it... IMO

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 8, 2012
5:55 AM

Post #9073845

Thanks for sending her the links. I fight with Admin over that all the time, but the policy is "no advertising". Since I don't sell anything, I don't see it as advertising, but rather as an information source. If YOU had a blog, even a blog selling something, I could post a link to it... but just cannot post a link to my own blog.

It would drive me crazy trying to write (and uphold) rules for half a million gardeners who visit here!
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 8, 2012
6:07 AM

Post #9073863

You do have some interesting article titles.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 8, 2012
6:54 AM

Post #9073937

darius...that is an awesome blog. So far I have red the snail article, and the leek article. Very, very nice..thank you for the effort.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

April 22, 2012
2:32 PM

Post #9093135

Pod, would you please send it to me? Thanks Jeanette
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 22, 2012
3:06 PM

Post #9093173

You got it... give me just a minute.
Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 27, 2012
3:26 AM

Post #9099604

Darius, I found your blog, and enjoyed reading it and several of the articles. But I couldn't find the post on Pickled Garlic Scapes. Can you help?

Thanks!

Pam
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 27, 2012
3:48 AM

Post #9099614

Here, I can get away with it... http://2footalligator.blogspot.com/2010/06/pickled-garlic-scapes.html
and last nite I noticed mine are starting to bloom.

Pfg
(Pam) Warren, CT
(Zone 5b)

April 27, 2012
3:37 PM

Post #9100393

Thank you, podster! It looks great, I can't wait to try it. Unfortunately I will have to wait a while. After an un-naturally warm February and March, we're having freezing temps in April. Brrrrr...

Pam
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 29, 2012
6:53 PM

Post #9103099

My onions are starting to lay over...I think its almost time to harvest...but my garlic is still standing tall...no scapes, no flowers...I guess I should still water the garlic?
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 30, 2012
4:31 AM

Post #9103487

hornstrider, I have the opposite. The garlic stalks are browning but my onions are still strong and green. Found this on Goumet Garlic Gardens website:

Once any given variety of garlic starts losing its leaves and there are still eight leaves left (a week to 10 days from harvest), discontinue watering and let the soil begin to dry out some so as to make harvesting easier - it's easier to pull garlic out of loose soil than mud.

HTH.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

April 30, 2012
8:39 AM

Post #9103806

Mary, I wonder why they keep stating to "pull" the garlic. I thought they said NOT to ever pull the garlic but to dig it because, especially when the soil was dry, that the tops break off.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 30, 2012
9:03 AM

Post #9103853

I don't know Jnette, it may just be semantics.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

April 30, 2012
9:57 AM

Post #9103942

I dig my garlic, wouldn't dare try pulling in my soil.
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

April 30, 2012
10:02 AM

Post #9103956

I think it's just wording-pull= taking out of the soil. And maybe they figure that digging carelessly could cut into the bulbs? Anyway, I do it the easiest way! Sometimes the *experts* don't give us credit for possessing any common sense!

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

April 30, 2012
10:21 AM

Post #9103978

I gently lift out mine with my hands. That way I can feel where the bulb is and get each one out of the ground without damage.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

April 30, 2012
12:02 PM

Post #9104085

We harvest our garlic by pulling and we have clay soil. It has never been an issue.

Only the hard neck garlic have scapes. We usually harvest the mature garlic in July. The scapes are sometime in the May/June time frame. If you cut the scapes to early then they keep growing and if you cut them too late then they are tough.

We also only harvest when most of the bottom rows of leaves are turning brown from being ripe (as opposed to not getting watered enough). The bulbs get washed off and then hung to dry for a couple of weeks.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 30, 2012
3:55 PM

Post #9104425

Wow things change in a hurry...soil is moist, and I have brown bottom leaves...elephant garlic looks tired...scapes appearing...should I quit watering?...then what?

Thumbnail by hornstrider   Thumbnail by hornstrider
Click an image for an enlarged view.

Ray_Der_Phan

Ray_Der_Phan
Oceanside, CA
(Zone 10a)

April 30, 2012
4:29 PM

Post #9104483

Horn, My EGs look exactly like yours. A few of the larger stalks are near wrist thickness. I removed the scapes a few weeks ago. Only a few lower leaves have turned brown. The main/larger leaves still green.

Curious, I dug down...and was disappointed, no bulb. Looks like they are widening a bit, but as it looks now...I still have a long way to go and they sprouted 150 days ago. Is that normal? Regardless, I'm in for the long haul. Gonna wait until they really start dying before I dig'em. Hope they start forming bulbs soon.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

April 30, 2012
4:33 PM

Post #9104489

Similar here. VERY small bulb but they the stalks are dying back. Maybe I'm under-watering - at the point I saw some brown stalks, and thinking I would be harvesting soon, I cut back a bit on the water.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

April 30, 2012
7:02 PM

Post #9104711

Well dang...I just stuck my finger down, and I felt a bulb...I mean its much bigger than the stalk from what I can tell...my stalks are probably your wrist size, not mine...but it has bulbed I am sure...I guess I will leave them...I planted in oct...help
podster
Deep East Texas, TX
(Zone 8a)

April 30, 2012
7:32 PM

Post #9104758

You mentioned earlier that you planted elephant garlic along with regular garlic. Which one had the bulb?
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

May 1, 2012
5:10 AM

Post #9105137

Elephant garlic...I did.not try my reg garlic. Reg garlic is still standing tall.

This message was edited May 1, 2012 6:23 AM
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 1, 2012
10:00 AM

Post #9105598

Horn, I planted mine, regular garlic, in October, but I don't expect to harvest until maybe July. But then I am not in Texas either.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 5, 2012
5:10 PM

Post #9111884

We had such a mild winter and it's already been warm, so the garlic is probably going to need to be harvested earlier than normal. I planted mine in late October and it's almost ready to harvest. Many of the lowest leaves are dying, which is an indication that it's getting close to harvest time!

Thumbnail by stephanietx
Click the image for an enlarged view.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 5, 2012
10:12 PM

Post #9112196

Looks really cool Stephanie. Good for you.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

May 8, 2012
6:58 AM

Post #9115388

stephanietx...wow mine looks like yours. When are you going to pick?...I am a bit warmer down here in Central Texas. I picked most of my onions over the weekend. My onion crop was nothing to brag about. It's OK, but not like years past. I saw Dreaves crop on another thread, and his onion crop was impressive.

Also what is the best way to cure the garlic? I asked a similar question on the onion thread about onions. Please give a step by step method to follow.

This message was edited May 8, 2012 8:15 AM

Thumbnail by hornstrider
Click the image for an enlarged view.

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 8, 2012
11:36 AM

Post #9115898

Mine is still in the ground. I will wait another couple of weeks. More of the bottom leaves need to be dried up. I usually just use a pitchfork to dig up the dirt around the garlic, far enough away from the bulb to do any damage to the bulbs, though. You don't want to pull it by the stalk and you don't want to cut or bruise the bulb. In the past because I've not had much, I've just laid them out on my compost sifter (wooden frame with hardware cloth) for a few weeks until the rest of the stalk dries up. We have a large area that has a carport covering that doesn't get any sun and that's where I've left them to dry. This year, though, I might have to bunch them up and hang them from the ceiling in my laundry room because I have so many. You want them to cure in a dry place with little to no direct sunlight.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 8, 2012
11:46 AM

Post #9115904

...and DON'T WASH the dirt off, just shake off what you can. When they are fully dry they can be wiped with a dry rag before bringing into the kitchen.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 8, 2012
7:20 PM

Post #9116499

Sounds wonderful. Mine are just skinny stalks about a foot tall right now. This was the nicest and warmest day we have had. 72 degrees. You guys can't comprehend that can you?
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2012
4:23 PM

Post #9121286

We just started harvesting the garlic scapes. Cooked some for dinner tonight.
urbanveggies412
Pittsburgh, PA
(Zone 6a)

May 12, 2012
6:01 PM

Post #9121381

My garlic is also doing awesome this year. I have about 25-30 bulbs growing.

I planted some tomatoes in between the garlic since I will harvest the garlic in another month or two. I am hoping that this experiment works out well. Any thoughts on this?

Thumbnail by urbanveggies412
Click the image for an enlarged view.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
6:43 AM

Post #9121892

urbanveggies412 - interplanting crops is a great idea. I have onions interplanted with sweet potatoes. Sweet peppers interplanted with onions in another raised bed. Peas interplanted with onions in yet another raised bed.

The onions don't seem to mind other veggies growing all over them. I got this idea last year when I ran out of room to set some onions - so I stuck them in the same bed as the melons. They grew and made large bulbs despite being almost smothered by the melon vines.

I suspect you could do something similar with garlic, although I haven't tried this, YET!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

May 13, 2012
7:40 AM

Post #9121976

Roses like garlic. So if you have some roses, plant garlic around them. It deters lots of pests and disease.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2012
8:26 AM

Post #9122034

I have just interplanted Witloof Belgian Endive between my rows of garlic. The garlic will get dug about the time the endive plants need more room. Last year I interplanted veggies all over my flower beds, with great success and fewer pest problems.

I have a huge mole/vole problem, and I've been adding powdered garlic to the planting holes for everything this year. So far I've only lost 1 seedling and it probably wasn't due to a tunnel rat.

HoneybeeNC

HoneybeeNC
Charlotte, NC
(Zone 7b)

May 13, 2012
8:39 AM

Post #9122048

Maybe I should beg/borrow/rent/adopt a "Jack Russel" terrior - although I doubt I'd have much garden left after she dug up the last vole!

I almost purchased a Jack Russel before I purchased my Maltipoo, but someone pointed out what great "diggers" JR's are - so I changed my mind.

darius

darius
So.App.Mtns.
United States
(Zone 5b)

May 13, 2012
8:55 AM

Post #9122074

Same thoughts here on "diggers" LOL.
MaryMcP
Phoenix, AZ
(Zone 9b)

May 13, 2012
9:19 AM

Post #9122090

Si - me too. My cavaliers don't dig but they love to roll in fresh compost - or anything else stinky. For the digging issue, see my thread about cats! grrrrr...she's a sweet kitty but when she's gone, no more cats.
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 13, 2012
9:25 AM

Post #9122100

Yes, my Siberian made a bigger hole (mess) than the moles did. She dug up the whole garden going after the mole.
hornstrider
Hutto, TX

May 21, 2012
10:58 AM

Post #9132042

Help garlic experts. I dug up one clove of Elephant Garlic, and it looks like an onion. The cloves have not formed. I have quit watering them. How long before the cloves form? Or will my garlic form cloves?

Thumbnail by hornstrider
Click the image for an enlarged view.

dreaves

dreaves
Hutto, TX
(Zone 8b)

May 21, 2012
11:22 AM

Post #9132062

Horn,

From what I've read, all you can do with the single clove elephant garlic is replant it next year for a full head. It is my understanding that if you plant the small, hard, cloves that form with the elephant garlic that the first year they will form a single bulb. If that bulb is replanted then it will grow a larger bulb, of cloves. If you plant the large cloves from a head, then they will normally form multi-clove heads and some of the smaller, hard cloves. I've only planted one year, and I had a few small cloves that grew into single bulbs, The larger cloves I planted grew into heads, but they also formed some extra, very small, hard, cloves.

Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 23, 2012
6:16 PM

Post #9135831

.My garlic looks kind of scrawny. Is there a fertilizer or something I can put on it to make it bulk up? I haven't dug any, just going by what the foliage looks like.
SusanKC
Shawnee Mission, KS
(Zone 6a)

May 24, 2012
5:03 AM

Post #9136265

We don't harvest ours until sometime in July. It takes that long for a fall planted garlic crop to mature for us. In the meantime, you can either use the green leaf tips for cooking with or pull an inmature garlic bulb to use like a green onion.

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 24, 2012
6:07 AM

Post #9136317

I'm going to harvest today and tomorrow, which is definitely early for us. It's a bumper crop this year. I don't know if it was the mild winter or the new varieties or what, but I'm going to have a LOT of garlic!
Jnette
Northeast, WA
(Zone 5a)

May 24, 2012
5:53 PM

Post #9137224

What variety did you plant Nicole?

NicoleC

NicoleC
Madison, AL
(Zone 7b)

May 25, 2012
6:23 AM

Post #9137803

Lorz Italian and Broadleaf Czech. I dug up half the Lorz Italian this morning and this was the "small" stretch of plants. Nice full heads, a couple of little ones and a couple of big ones.

Considering I dropped the cloves into unamended clay loam, top dressed with some semi-finished leaf-compost and a little cottonseed meal, and the beds were full of weed, I'm impressed they've performed this well.. The Lorz Italian will scorch your tongue off right now so I hope it mellows a bit while drying!

Ray_Der_Phan

Ray_Der_Phan
Oceanside, CA
(Zone 10a)

May 28, 2012
3:08 PM

Post #9142203

I have a few questions, growing garlic is pretty new to me. I pulled a few today for a test. I got about 6-7 with large formed bulbs and 2-3 that didn't form cloves(like hornstrider showed above). They were all planted from the same sized cloves. Did I pull the ones that didn't form too early? Or does that just happen from time to time with Elephant Garlic?

I'm more than happy with the first ones I pulled, but now I have to wait 3-4 week for them to dry? Could I speed up the process by sticking a few bulbs in the dehydrator a couple hours a day until dry?

Thumbnail by Ray_Der_Phan   Thumbnail by Ray_Der_Phan
Click an image for an enlarged view.

rjogden
Gainesville, FL
(Zone 8b)

May 31, 2012
10:36 PM

Post #9147156

[quote="Ray_Der_Phan"]I have a few questions, growing garlic is pretty new to me. I pulled a few today for a test. I got about 6-7 with large formed bulbs and 2-3 that didn't form cloves(like hornstrider showed above). They were all planted from the same sized cloves. Did I pull the ones that didn't form too early? Or does that just happen from time to time with Elephant Garlic?

I'm more than happy with the first ones I pulled, but now I have to wait 3-4 week for them to dry? Could I speed up the process by sticking a few bulbs in the dehydrator a couple hours a day until dry? [/quote]
Remember "Elephant Garlic" isn't really garlic. It's only called that because of the form of the bulb and because of a vague resemblance of the aroma to a very weak garlic. These days it has become just a term to help market the stuff. It is really a form of leek, so it may not behave like garlic.

AFAIK there is no reason to wait. The drying and curing process is only to help bring them to a point where they can be more successfully stored (though the flavor may change a bit). I don't know what the effect of forced air drying would be. Personally I would be concerned that forced-air drying (without heat, of course) would cause the outer portions of the bulbs to appear dry while the moisture content of the inner portions was still quite high.

What's the hurry?

-Rich
JoParrott
Richland, WA
(Zone 7b)

June 1, 2012
7:46 AM

Post #9147515

RayDer, you do not have to dry garlic before using. My garlic fresh from the garden is one of the delicacies we wait for all year! Roasted with some olive oil- yummm!

Ray_Der_Phan

Ray_Der_Phan
Oceanside, CA
(Zone 10a)

June 1, 2012
9:31 AM

Post #9147646

Ahhh! Thank you both...sounds like I should start using them whenever I need :) Then I'll let the next harvest cure for later use. I was always told you had to let Garlic/Elephant Garlic cure, glad I asked.

Jo, that's exactly what I've been wanting to do with a few bulbs. Yum indeed!

stephanietx

stephanietx
Fort Worth, TX
(Zone 8a)

June 1, 2012
10:39 AM

Post #9147728

I use it fresh from the garden and let the rest cure. Otherwise you end up with a big mess of garlic you can't use.

kittriana

kittriana
Magnolia, TX
(Zone 8b)

June 1, 2012
2:31 PM

Post #9148029

Or, we have permanent garlic beds that spread and thrive for years, inground, off the side of a tree, and use year round, they do like a rich well drained area, they like water but want their feet to stay dry my mom used to say

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Vegetable Gardening Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
very important question farmgirl21 31 Jan 8, 2008 12:31 AM
Need Source For Chinese Vegetable Seed berrygirl 18 Jun 15, 2008 7:21 PM
An accidental lesson Farmerdill 26 Feb 24, 2013 12:10 PM
Planting the "Three sisters" HilltopDaisy 94 Jul 6, 2011 3:38 AM
Rhubarb emilyrasmus 19 Apr 25, 2013 4:55 PM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America