Photo by Melody

Perennials: Euphorbia Ascot Rainbow

Communities > Forums > Perennials
bookmark
Forum: PerennialsReplies: 11, Views: 144
Add to Bookmarks
-
AuthorContent
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

April 15, 2012
4:06 PM

Post #9083791

I bought a gorgeous Euphorbia Ascot Rainbow last fall knowing full well that it will be too hot for this one during the summer months here. I know from experience if I leave it outside it will melt. Rather than treating it like a winter annual, I am considering bringing it inside to the air conditioning for the next 6 months. It is just an experiment and it will be interesting to see what happens. Since I have never had one last more than one season, what do you do with these plants when they finish blooming? Mine is finished, should I be cutting it back now?

Thanks!


kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

April 16, 2012
3:38 AM

Post #9084244

I tend to avoid cutting back because the sap can cause a rash on the skin (all euphorbia can do that). I have this same variety, and will post some pics when I return from vacation. Mine looks good, going on year 2. It hasn't bloomed yet this year.
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

April 16, 2012
4:30 AM

Post #9084266

Good point, I forgot about the sap. You are fortunate to have cool nights in Oregon, it is our steamy hot nights that some plants like Euphorbias can't take.
kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2012
8:44 PM

Post #9120526

Here are the pics I promised.

Thumbnail by kosk0025   Thumbnail by kosk0025
Click an image for an enlarged view.

kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 11, 2012
8:45 PM

Post #9120527

One more

Thumbnail by kosk0025
Click the image for an enlarged view.

ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

May 12, 2012
2:55 AM

Post #9120636

Just beautiful, I love this plant. I did bring mine inside where it is air conditioned and,so far, it is holding on. There are three new shoots from the base. It gets dry quickly in the house though and a lot of leaves have fallen off, I am having to water it every day. Maybe I just need to put it in a larger container. Will the flower heads eventually just fall off?
kosk0025
Salem, OR
(Zone 8b)

May 12, 2012
4:41 AM

Post #9120672

You eventually have to deadhead down to the tops of the leaves (just for looks). (leave foliage intact). Careful for the sap though!
txaggiegal
Belton, TX

May 18, 2012
4:00 AM

Post #9128032

I've raised this plant...and other hybrid phorbs...for several years now. I have it placed in the landscape to receive pm shade, but it gets lots of full hot morning and non sun...even in Texas summer...this year has been particularly humid, which is not characteristic. The Ascot Rainbow is shining. I trimmed away blooms to redirect the plant's growth in April and time to do it again. I have not found that any of the hybrids naturally remove their own blooms...so I do it for them.

I did lose several when I brought them into the greenhouse for the summer...they sustained the greenhouse, but dwindled when I put them back outside...

This is a Beautiful addition to the Texas garden...takes the heat, drought-tolerant, and glows in and among darker green foliage...sounds like it would do well in SC landscape as well...
Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2012
4:05 AM

Post #9128037

I planted Ascot Rainbow for the first time this year.
I put it in one of the few places which gets sun in my yard, right next to the highway frontage.
You guys are making me nervous that it will get cooked in the sun.
I figured it would be nice tough plant for that situation. I may regret it.
We'll see...
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

May 18, 2012
5:15 AM

Post #9128105

It is my understanding that is is not the sun as much as the humidity that will get it. They melt during the summer around here, hence my experiment with it indoors. So far it has lost a lot of leaves but new growth is starting from the base. We had a nice rainstorm yesterday so I put it outside for a drink. There are parts of SC where this plant would thrive in the ground, just not along the muggy coast.

Weerobin
Saint Louis, MO
(Zone 6a)

May 18, 2012
9:33 AM

Post #9128484

Hmm, that's not what I wanted to hear...
My non-variegated euphorbias have done fine w/ our humidity in past,
but I don't have tons of experience with them (since I have so little sun).
I just have a couple plants, but they looked great last year.
Is it a problem specifically with the heavily variegated cultivars, or with the entire species?
ardesia
Saint Helena Island, SC
(Zone 9a)

May 18, 2012
1:29 PM

Post #9128715

In addition to excessive humidity, we have a problem because our nights stay in the 80's during the summer, the poor plants never get a rest. A lot of plants, like some euphorbias, just turn to mush and disappear. There are Zone 9 spots where these plants thrive but they are on the west coast - places where the nights are cool. I am hoping my air conditioning mimics these conditions.

This message was edited May 18, 2012 3:34 PM

You cannot post until you register, login and subscribe.


Other Perennials Threads you might be interested in:

SubjectThread StarterRepliesLast Post
Campanula Wonder Bells Blue Gloriaglolms 37 Apr 11, 2009 4:28 PM
Oriental Poppy Pops! Weezingreens 34 Jun 27, 2010 6:36 AM
BLUE FLOWERS Lori_Illinois 62 May 4, 2010 4:09 PM
Triple Roadside/Ditch lily OhioBreezy 21 Jul 9, 2011 6:56 PM
what are you sorry you planted.. thehumblebumble 279 Aug 12, 2012 4:28 AM


We recommend Firefox
Overwhelmed? There's a lot to see here. Try starting at our homepage.

[ Home | About | Advertise | Media Kit | Mission | Featured Companies | Submit an Article | Terms of Use | Tour | Rules | Privacy Policy | Contact Us ]

Back to the top

Copyright © 2000-2014 Dave's Garden, an Internet Brands company. All Rights Reserved.
 

Hope for America